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Sample records for dynamics underlying neurite

  1. Neurite-specific Ca2+ dynamics underlying sound processing in an auditory interneurone.

    PubMed

    Baden, T; Hedwig, B

    2007-01-01

    Concepts on neuronal signal processing and integration at a cellular and subcellular level are driven by recording techniques and model systems available. The cricket CNS with the omega-1-neurone (ON1) provides a model system for auditory pattern recognition and directional processing. Exploiting ON1's planar structure we simultaneously imaged free intracellular Ca(2+) at both input and output neurites and recorded the membrane potential in vivo during acoustic stimulation. In response to a single sound pulse the rate of Ca(2+) rise followed the onset spike rate of ON1, while the final Ca(2+) level depended on the mean spike rate. Ca(2+) rapidly increased in both dendritic and axonal arborizations and only gradually in the axon and the cell body. Ca(2+) levels were particularly high at the spike-generating zone. Through the activation of a Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) current this may exhibit a specific control over the cell's electrical response properties. In all cellular compartments presentation of species-specific calling song caused distinct oscillations of the Ca(2+) level in the chirp rhythm, but not the faster syllable rhythm. The Ca(2+)-mediated hyperpolarization of ON1 suppressed background spike activity between chirps, acting as a noise filter. During directional auditory processing, the functional interaction of Ca(2+)-mediated inhibition and contralateral synaptic inhibition was demonstrated. Upon stimulation with different sound frequencies, the dendrites, but not the axonal arborizations, demonstrated a tonotopic response profile. This mirrored the dominance of the species-specific carrier frequency and resulted in spatial filtering of high frequency auditory inputs. PMID:17443773

  2. Neurite-specific Ca2+ dynamics underlying sound processing in an auditory interneurone.

    PubMed

    Baden, T; Hedwig, B

    2007-01-01

    Concepts on neuronal signal processing and integration at a cellular and subcellular level are driven by recording techniques and model systems available. The cricket CNS with the omega-1-neurone (ON1) provides a model system for auditory pattern recognition and directional processing. Exploiting ON1's planar structure we simultaneously imaged free intracellular Ca(2+) at both input and output neurites and recorded the membrane potential in vivo during acoustic stimulation. In response to a single sound pulse the rate of Ca(2+) rise followed the onset spike rate of ON1, while the final Ca(2+) level depended on the mean spike rate. Ca(2+) rapidly increased in both dendritic and axonal arborizations and only gradually in the axon and the cell body. Ca(2+) levels were particularly high at the spike-generating zone. Through the activation of a Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) current this may exhibit a specific control over the cell's electrical response properties. In all cellular compartments presentation of species-specific calling song caused distinct oscillations of the Ca(2+) level in the chirp rhythm, but not the faster syllable rhythm. The Ca(2+)-mediated hyperpolarization of ON1 suppressed background spike activity between chirps, acting as a noise filter. During directional auditory processing, the functional interaction of Ca(2+)-mediated inhibition and contralateral synaptic inhibition was demonstrated. Upon stimulation with different sound frequencies, the dendrites, but not the axonal arborizations, demonstrated a tonotopic response profile. This mirrored the dominance of the species-specific carrier frequency and resulted in spatial filtering of high frequency auditory inputs.

  3. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    García-Grajales, Julián A; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  4. Neurite, a Finite Difference Large Scale Parallel Program for the Simulation of Electrical Signal Propagation in Neurites under Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    García-Grajales, Julián A.; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite—explicit and implicit—were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  5. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  6. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M. Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C.; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development. PMID:25814944

  7. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development.

  8. Mathematical Relationships between Neuron Morphology and Neurite Growth Dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster Larva Class IV Sensory Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Liang, Xin; Grace, Michael; Lee, Daniel; Howard, Jonathon

    The morphology of neurons is diverse and reflects the diversity of neuronal functions, yet the principles that govern neuronal morphogenesis are unclear. In an effort to better understand neuronal morphogenesis we will be focusing on the development of the dendrites of class IV sensory neuron in Drosophila melanogaster. In particular we attempt to determine how the the total length, and the number of branches of dendrites are mathematically related to the dynamics of neurite growth and branching. By imaging class IV neurons during early embryogenesis we are able to measure the change in neurite length l (t) as a function of time v (t) = dl / dt . We found that the distribution of v (t) is well characterized by a hyperbolic secant distribution, and that the addition of new branches per unit time is well described by a Poisson process. Combining these measurements with the assumption that branching occurs with equal probability anywhere along the dendrite we were able to construct a mathematical model that provides reasonable agreement with the observed number of branches, and total length of the dendrites of the class IV sensory neuron.

  9. PAK–PIX interactions regulate adhesion dynamics and membrane protrusion to control neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, Miguel; Gregus, Kelly A.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The roles of P21-activated kinase (PAK) in the regulation of axon outgrowth downstream of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are poorly understood. Here we show that PAK1–3 and PIX are expressed in the developing spinal cord and differentially localize to point contacts and filopodial tips within motile growth cones. Using a specific interfering peptide called PAK18, we found that axon outgrowth is robustly stimulated on laminin by partial inhibition of PAK–PIX interactions and PAK function, whereas complete inhibition of PAK function stalls axon outgrowth. Furthermore, modest inhibition of PAK–PIX stimulates the assembly and turnover of growth cone point contacts, whereas strong inhibition over-stabilizes adhesions. Point mutations within PAK confirm the importance of PIX binding. Together our data suggest that regulation of PAK–PIX interactions in growth cones controls neurite outgrowth by influencing the activity of several important mediators of actin filament polymerization and retrograde flow, as well as integrin-dependent adhesion to laminin. PMID:23321640

  10. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks. PMID:26568288

  11. The cytoskeleton and neurite initiation

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Neurons begin their life as simple spheres, but can ultimately assume an elaborate morphology with numerous, highly arborized dendrites, and long axons. This is achieved via an astounding developmental progression which is dependent upon regulated assembly and dynamics of the cellular cytoskeleton. As neurites emerge out of the soma, neurons break their spherical symmetry and begin to acquire the morphological features that define their structure and function. Neurons regulate their cytoskeleton to achieve changes in cell shape, velocity, and direction as they migrate, extend neurites, and polarize. Of particular importance, the organization and dynamics of actin and microtubules directs the migration and morphogenesis of neurons. This review focuses on the regulation of intrinsic properties of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and how specific cytoskeletal structures and dynamics are associated with the earliest phase of neuronal morphogenesis—neuritogenesis. PMID:24002528

  12. Novel inhibitory action of tunicamycin homologues suggests a role for dynamic protein fatty acylation in growth cone-mediated neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In neuronal growth cones, the advancing tips of elongating axons and dendrites, specific protein substrates appear to undergo cycles of posttranslational modification by covalent attachment and removal of long-chain fatty acids. We show here that ongoing fatty acylation can be inhibited selectively by long-chain homologues of the antibiotic tunicamycin, a known inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. Tunicamycin directly inhibits transfer of palmitate to protein in a cell-free system, indicating that tunicamycin inhibition of protein palmitoylation reflects an action of the drug separate from its previously established effects on glycosylation. Tunicamycin treatment of differentiated PC12 cells or dissociated rat sensory neurons, under conditions in which protein palmitoylation is inhibited, produces a prompt cessation of neurite elongation and induces a collapse of neuronal growth cones. These growth cone responses are rapidly reversed by washout of the antibiotic, even in the absence of protein synthesis, or by addition of serum. Two additional lines of evidence suggest that the effects of tunicamycin on growth cones arise from its ability to inhibit protein long-chain acylation, rather than its previously established effects on protein glycosylation and synthesis. (a) The abilities of different tunicamycin homologues to induce growth cone collapse very systematically with the length of the fatty acyl side- chain of tunicamycin, in a manner predicted and observed for the inhibition of protein palmitoylation. Homologues with fatty acyl moieties shorter than palmitic acid (16 hydrocarbons), including potent inhibitors of glycosylation, are poor inhibitors of growth cone function. (b) The tunicamycin-induced impairment of growth cone function can be reversed by the addition of excess exogenous fatty acid, which reverses the inhibition of protein palmitoylation but has no effect on the inhibition of protein glycosylation. These results suggest an important role for

  13. Bioluminescence imaging of mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics in soma and neurites of individual adult mouse sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Lucía; Senovilla, Laura; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Chamero, Pablo; Alonso, María T; Villalobos, Carlos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) are essential for triggering neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals. Calcium-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may amplify the [Ca2+]c signals and facilitate neurotransmitter release in sympathetic neurons. In adrenal chromaffin cells, functional triads are formed by voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCCs), CICR sites and mitochondria. In fact, mitochondria take up most of the Ca2+ load entering the cells and are essential for shaping [Ca2+]c signals and exocytosis. Here we have investigated the existence of such functional triads in sympathetic neurons. The mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) in soma and neurites of individual mouse superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was monitored by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorins. In soma, Ca2+ entry through VOCCs evoked rapid, near millimolar [Ca2+]m increases in a subpopulation of mitochondria containing about 40% of the aequorin. Caffeine evoked a similar [Ca2+]m increase in a mitochondrial pool containing about 30% of the aequorin and overlapping with the VOCC-sensitive pool. These observations suggest the existence of functional triads similar to the ones described in chromaffin cells. In neurites, mitochondria were able to buffer [Ca2+]c increases resulting from activation of VOCCs but not those mediated by caffeine-induced Ca2+ release from the ER. The weaker Ca2+ buffering by mitochondria in neurites could contribute to facilitate Ca2+-induced exocytosis at the presynaptic sites. PMID:17234693

  14. Synergistic Effects of 3D ECM and Chemogradients on Neurite Outgrowth and Guidance: A Simple Modeling and Microfluidic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2014-01-01

    During nervous system development, numerous cues within the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) guide the growing neurites along specific pathways to reach their intended targets. Neurite motility is controlled by extracellular signal sensing through the growth cone at the neurite tip, including chemoattractive and repulsive cues. However, it is difficult to regenerate and restore neurite tracts, lost or degraded due to an injury or disease, in the adult central nervous system. Thus, it is important to evaluate the dynamic interplay between ECM and the concentration gradients of these cues, which would elicit robust neuritogenesis. Such information is critical in understanding the processes involved in developmental biology, and in developing high-fidelity neurite regenerative strategies post-injury, and in drug discovery and targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we quantitatively investigated this relationship using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, and determined the synergistic role of guidance cues and ECM on neurite outgrowth and turning. Using a biomimetic microfluidic system, we have shown that cortical neurite outgrowth and turning under chemogradients (IGF-1 or BDNF) within 3D scaffolds is highly regulated by the source concentration of the guidance cue and the physical characteristics of the scaffold. A mechanistic-driven partial differential equation model of neurite outgrowth has been proposed, which could also be used prospectively as a predictive tool. The parameters for the chemotaxis term in the model are determined from the experimental data using our microfluidic assay. Resulting model simulations demonstrate how neurite outgrowth was critically influenced by the experimental variables, which was further supported by experimental data on cell-surface-receptor expressions. The model results are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This integrated approach represents a

  15. Dendrite and Axon Specific Geometrical Transformation in Neurite Development

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Vasily I.; Semyanov, Alexey V.; Kazantsev, Victor B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model of neurite growth to explain the differences in dendrite and axon specific neurite development. The model implements basic molecular kinetics, e.g., building protein synthesis and transport to the growth cone, and includes explicit dependence of the building kinetics on the geometry of the neurite. The basic assumption was that the radius of the neurite decreases with length. We found that the neurite dynamics crucially depended on the relationship between the rate of active transport and the rate of morphological changes. If these rates were in the balance, then the neurite displayed axon specific development with a constant elongation speed. For dendrite specific growth, the maximal length was rapidly saturated by degradation of building protein structures or limited by proximal part expansion reaching the characteristic cell size. PMID:26858635

  16. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  17. Solo/Trio8, a membrane-associated short isoform of Trio, modulates endosome dynamics and neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Jie; Nishikawa, Kaori; Yuda, Hideki; Wang, Yu-Lai; Osaka, Hitoshi; Fukazawa, Nobuna; Naito, Akira; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Wada, Keiji; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2006-09-01

    With DNA microarrays, we identified a gene, termed Solo, that is downregulated in the cerebellum of Purkinje cell degeneration mutant mice. Solo is a mouse homologue of rat Trio8-one of multiple Trio isoforms recently identified in rat brain. Solo/Trio8 contains N-terminal sec14-like and spectrin-like repeat domains followed by a single guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) domain, but it lacks the C-terminal GEF2, immunoglobulin-like, and kinase domains that are typical of Trio. Solo/Trio8 is predominantly expressed in Purkinje neurons of the mouse brain, and expression begins following birth and increases during Purkinje neuron maturation. We identified a novel C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain in Solo/Trio8 that is required for enhanced green fluorescent protein-Solo/Trio8 localization to early endosomes (positive for both early-endosome antigen 1 [EEA1] and Rab5) in COS-7 cells and primary cultured neurons. Solo/Trio8 overexpression in COS-7 cells augmented the EEA1-positive early-endosome pool, and this effect was abolished via mutation and inactivation of the GEF domain or deletion of the C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain. Moreover, primary cultured neurons transfected with Solo/Trio8 showed increased neurite elongation that was dependent on these domains. These results suggest that Solo/Trio8 acts as an early-endosome-specific upstream activator of Rho family GTPases for neurite elongation of developing Purkinje neurons.

  18. Drag force as a tool to test the active mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Roberto; Melo, Francisco; Pullarkat, Pramod A

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the mechanical response of PC12 neurites subjected to a drag force imposed by a laminar flow perpendicular to the neurite axis. The curvature of the catenary shape acquired by an initially straight neurite under the action of the drag force provides information on both elongation and tension of the neurite. This method allows us to measure the rest tension and viscoelastic parameters of PC12 neurites and active behavior of neurites. Measurement of oscillations in the strain rate of neurites at constant flow rate provides insight on the response of molecular motors and additional support for the presence of a negative strain-rate sensitivity region in the global mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

  19. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  20. Laminin receptors for neurite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, H.K.; Ogle, R.C.; Cannon, F.B.; Little, C.D.; Sweeney, T.M.; Luckenbill-Edds, L.

    1988-02-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein promotes both cell attachment and neurite outgrowth. Separate domains on laminin elicit these responses, suggesting that distinct receptors occur on the surface of cells. NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma cells rapidly extend long processes in the presence of laminin. The authors report here that /sup 125/I-labeled laminin specifically binds to these cells and to three membrane proteins of 67, 110, and 180 kDa. These proteins were isolated by affinity chromatography on laminin-Sepharose. The 67-kDa protein reacted with antibody to the previously characterized receptor for cell attachment to laminin. Antibodies to the 110-kDa and 180-kDa bands demonstrated that the 110-kDa protein was found in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in brain, whereas the 180-kDa protein was neural specific. Antibodies prepared against the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins inhibited neurite outgrowth induced by the neurite-promoting domain of laminin, whereas antibodies to the 67-kDa laminin receptor had no effect on neurite outgrowth. They conclude that neuronal cells have multiple cell-surface laminin receptors and that the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins are involved in neurite formation.

  1. VAMP-2 promotes neurite elongation and SNAP-25A increases neurite sprouting in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, M; Kimura, K; Kataoka, M; Takahashi, M; Okajima, S; Kawaguchi, S; Hirasawa, Y; Ide, C; Mizoguchi, A

    2000-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attached protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE)-mediated membrane fusion system is involved in vesicle fusion in the plasma membrane that allows expansion for neurite elongation. There have been several reports analyzing the effects of neurite outgrowth by inhibition of SNAREs. In this study, we took the opposite approach by overexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion SNAREs, including VAMP-2, SNAP-25A, and syntaxin1A, in PC12 cells to investigate the role of SNAREs in the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Neurite outgrowth analysis demonstrated that: (1) GFP-VAMP-2 increased the length of individual neurites, without changing the number of neurites per cell; (2) GFP-SNAP-25A increased the number of neurites per cell, with no change in the length of the individual neurites. In both cases, the total length of neurites per cell was increased; (3) GFP-syntaxin1A resulted in no significant change, either in neurite length, or in the number of neurites per cell. These findings suggest that when overexpressed in PC12 cells, VAMP-2 can promote neurite elongation, while SNAP-25A can stimulate neurite sprouting. On the other hand, overexpression of syntaxin1A neither promotes nor inhibits neurite outgrowth. Thus VAMP-2 and SNAP-25A play different roles in neurite elongation and sprouting.

  2. Outgrowth of neurites is a dual process.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Racchetti, Gabriella; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2010-11-01

    In neurons and neurosecretory (nerve) cells, neurite outgrowth requires the enlargement of the plasma membrane sustained by the exocytosis of specific vesicles. The well known, slow canonical form of outgrowth induced in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells by NGF, as well as the outgrowth taking place in neurons, involve vesicles positive for the vSNARE Ti-VAMP. Working in defective PC12 clones expressing high levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, we have identified now a new, rapid form of outgrowth, triggered by activation of a small GTPase, Rac1. This form is sustained by the exocytosis of another type of vesicles, taking place locally at the tip of neurite growth cones, the enlargeosomes (vSNARE: VAMP4). This new form, which is positively controlled by REST, requires the dynamics of microtubules, but not of microfilaments. Its signaling remains undefined because established second messengers, (Ca(2+), DAG, cAMP) seem not involved. Using a high REST/enlargeosome-rich PC12 clone transfected with TrkA we have found that the NGF-induced outgrowth is not always slow, but can be fast in cells expressing high levels of the receptor involved, TrkA; that PC12 can express together the two distinct forms of outgrowth, canonical and new, activated independently from each other. Their comparative characterization in terms of changes in the cytoskeleton has now been initiated. The two forms are present also in neurons where the new one seems to predominate in the initial phases of development, the canonical one later on. Our results identify a new aspect of the REST impact in nerve cell specificity/function. The existence of two distinct forms of neurite outgrowth may cope better than a single form with the variable needs of nerve cells in the subsequent stages of their development. PMID:21331244

  3. Brownian motion under annihilation dynamics.

    PubMed

    García de Soria, María Isabel; Maynar, Pablo; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2008-12-01

    The behavior of a heavy tagged intruder immersed in a bath of particles evolving under ballistic annihilation dynamics is investigated. The Fokker-Planck equation for this system is derived and the peculiarities of the corresponding diffusive behavior are worked out. In the long time limit, the intruder velocity distribution function approaches a Gaussian form, but with a different temperature from its bath counterpart. As a consequence of the continuous decay of particles in the bath, the mean-squared displacement increases exponentially in the collision per particle time scale. Analytical results are finally successfully tested against Monte Carlo numerical simulations. PMID:19256805

  4. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  5. Consequences of Neurite Transection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Nurettin; Erdoğan, Ender; Him, Aydın; Oğuz, Elif Kaval

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In order to quantify degenerative and regenerative changes and analyze the contribution of multiple factors to the outcome after neurite transection, we cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, and with a precise laser beam, we transected the nerve fibers they extended. Cell preparations were continuously visualized for 24 h with time-lapse microscopy. More distal cuts caused a more elongated field of degeneration, while thicker neurites degenerated faster than thinner ones. Transected neurites degenerated more if the uncut neurites of the same neuron simultaneously degenerated. If any of these uncut processes regenerated, the transected neurites underwent less degeneration. Regeneration of neurites was limited to distal cuts. Unipolar neurons had shorter regeneration than multipolar ones. Branching slowed the regenerative process, while simultaneous degeneration of uncut neurites increased it. Proximal lesions, small neuronal size, and extensive and rapid neurite degeneration were predictive of death of an injured neuron, which typically displayed necrotic rather than apoptotic form. In conclusion, this in vitro model proved useful in unmasking many new aspects and correlates of mechanically-induced neurite injury. PMID:20121423

  6. Neurite Outgrowth on Nanofiber Scaffolds with Different Orders, Structures, and Surface Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingwei; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Li, Xiaoran; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.; Xia, Younan

    2009-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers can be readily assembled into various types of scaffolds for applications in neural tissue engineering. The objective of this study is to examine and understand the unique patterns of neurite outgrowth from primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultured on scaffolds of electrospun nanofibers having different orders, structures, and surface properties. We found that the neurites extended radially outward from the DRG main body without specific directionality when cultured on a nonwoven mat of randomly oriented nanofibers. In contrast, the neurites preferentially extended along the long axis of fiber when cultured on a parallel array of aligned nanofibers. When seeded at the border between regions of aligned and random nanofibers, the same DRG simultaneously expressed aligned and random neurite fields in response to the underlying nanofibers. When cultured on a double-layered scaffold where the nanofibers in each layer were aligned along a different direction, the neurites were found to be dependent on the fiber density in both layers. This bi-axial pattern clearly demonstrates that neurite outgrowth can be influenced by nanofibers in different layers of a scaffold, rather than the topmost layer only. Taken together, these results will provide valuable information pertaining to the design of nanofiber scaffolds for neuroregenerative applications, as well as the effects of topology on neurite outgrowth, growth cone guidance, and axonal regeneration. PMID:19397333

  7. Neurite Tracing With Object Process.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreetama; Ooi, Wei Tsang; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a pipeline for automatic analysis of neuronal morphology: from detection, modeling to digital reconstruction. First, we present an automatic, unsupervised object detection framework using stochastic marked point process. It extracts connected neuronal networks by fitting special configuration of marked objects to the centreline of the neurite branches in the image volume giving us position, local width and orientation information. Semantic modeling of neuronal morphology in terms of critical nodes like bifurcations and terminals, generates various geometric and morphology descriptors such as branching index, branching angles, total neurite length, internodal lengths for statistical inference on characteristic neuronal features. From the detected branches we reconstruct neuronal tree morphology using robust and efficient numerical fast marching methods. We capture a mathematical model abstracting out the relevant position, shape and connectivity information about neuronal branches from the microscopy data into connected minimum spanning trees. Such digital reconstruction is represented in standard SWC format, prevalent for archiving, sharing, and further analysis in the neuroimaging community. Our proposed pipeline outperforms state of the art methods in tracing accuracy and minimizes the subjective variability in reconstruction, inherent to semi-automatic methods. PMID:26742129

  8. Matrix RGD ligand density and L1CAM-mediated Schwann cell interactions synergistically enhance neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Romano, Nicole H; Madl, Christopher M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    The innate biological response to peripheral nerve injury involves a complex interplay of multiple molecular cues to guide neurites across the injury gap. Many current strategies to stimulate regeneration take inspiration from this biological response. However, little is known about the balance of cell-matrix and Schwann cell-neurite dynamics required for regeneration of neural architectures. We present an engineered extracellular matrix (eECM) microenvironment with tailored cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions to study their individual and combined effects on neurite outgrowth. This eECM regulates cell-matrix interactions by presenting integrin-binding RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) ligands at specified densities. Simultaneously, the addition or exclusion of nerve growth factor (NGF) is used to modulate L1CAM-mediated Schwann cell-neurite interactions. Individually, increasing the RGD ligand density from 0.16 to 3.2mM resulted in increasing neurite lengths. In matrices presenting higher RGD ligand densities, neurite outgrowth was synergistically enhanced in the presence of soluble NGF. Analysis of Schwann cell migration and co-localization with neurites revealed that NGF enhanced cooperative outgrowth between the two cell types. Interestingly, neurites in NGF-supplemented conditions were unable to extend on the surrounding eECM without the assistance of Schwann cells. Blocking studies revealed that L1CAM is primarily responsible for these Schwann cell-neurite interactions. Without NGF supplementation, neurite outgrowth was unaffected by L1CAM blocking or the depletion of Schwann cells. These results underscore the synergistic interplay between cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions in enhancing neurite outgrowth for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25308870

  9. Semi-automatic quantification of neurite fasciculation in high-density neurite images by the Neurite Directional Distribution Analysis (NDDA)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Amy M; Wheeler, Brandon; Staii, Cristian; Kaplan, David L.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bundling of neurite extensions occur during nerve development and regeneration. Understanding the factors that drive neurite bundling is important for designing biomaterials for nerve regeneration toward the innervation target and preventing nociceptive collateral sprouting. High-density neuron cultures including dorsal root ganglia explants are employed for in vitro screening of biomaterials designed to control directional outgrowth. Although some semiautomated image processing methods exist for quantification of neurite outgrowth, methods to quantify axonal fasciculation in terms of direction of neurite outgrowth are lacking. New Method This work presents a semi-automated program to analyze micrographs of high-density neurites; the program aims to quantify axonal fasciculation by determining the orientational distribution function of the tangent vectors of the neurites and calculating its Fourier series coefficients (‘c’ values). Results We found that neurite directional distribution analysis (NDDA) of fasciculated neurites yielded ‘c’ values of ≥ ~0.25 whereas branched outgrowth led to statistically significant lesser values of <~0.2. The ‘c’ values correlated directly to the width of neurite bundles and indirectly to the number of branching points. Comparison with Existing Methods Information about the directional distribution of outgrowth is lost in simple counting methods or achieved laboriously through manual analysis. The NDDA supplements previous quantitative analyses of axonal bundling using a vector-based approach that captures new information about the directionality of outgrowth. Conclusion The NDDA is a valuable addition to open source image processing tools available to biomedical researchers offering a robust, precise approach to quantification of imaged features important in tissue development, disease, and repair. PMID:24680908

  10. Immobilized laminin concentration gradients on electrospun fiber scaffolds for controlled neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Beebe, Thomas P

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal process growth is guided by extrinsic environmental cues such as extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent reports have described that the growth cone extension is superior across gradients of the ECM protein laminin compared to growth across uniformly distributed laminin. In this work, the authors have prepared gradients of laminin on aligned electrospun nanofibers for use as substrates for neuronal growth. The substrates therefore presented both topographical and chemical guidance cues. Step gradients were prepared by the controlled robotic immersion of plasma-treated polycaprolactone fibers reacted with N-hydroxysuccinimide into the protein solution. The gradients were analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Gradients with a dynamic range of protein concentrations were successfully generated and neurite outgrowth was evaluated using neuronlike pheochromocytoma cell line 12 (PC12) cells. After 10 days of culture, PC12 neurite lengths varied from 32.7 ± 14.2 μm to 76.3 ± 9.1 μm across the protein concentration gradient. Neurite lengths at the highest concentration end of the gradient were significantly longer than neurite lengths observed for cells cultured on samples with uniform protein coverage. Gradients were prepared both in the fiber direction and transverse to the fiber direction. Neurites preferentially aligned with the fiber direction in both cases indicating that fiber alignment has a more dominant role in controlling neurite orientation, compared to the chemical gradient. PMID:24739010

  11. Analysis of the action of euxanthone, a plant-derived compound that stimulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Naidu, M; Kuan, C-Y K; Lo, W-L; Raza, M; Tolkovsky, A; Mak, N-K; Wong, R N-S; Keynes, R

    2007-09-21

    We have investigated the neurite growth-stimulating properties of euxanthone, a xanthone derivative isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Polygala caudata. Euxanthone was shown to exert a marked stimulatory action on neurite outgrowth from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia explanted in collagen gels, in the absence of added neurotrophins. It was also shown to promote cell survival in explanted chick embryo ganglia, and to stimulate neurite outgrowth from isolated adult rat primary sensory neurons in vitro. The further finding that euxanthone stimulates neurite outgrowth from explants of chick embryo retina and ventral spinal cord suggests an action on signaling pathways downstream of neuronal receptors for specific neurotrophic factors. Consistent with this, euxanthone did not promote neurite outgrowth from non-transfected PC12 cells, or from PC12 cells transfected with TrkB or TrkC, under conditions in which these cells extended neurites in response to, respectively, the neurotrophins nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3. Western blot analysis of euxanthone-stimulated dorsal root ganglion explants showed that expression of phospho-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase was up-regulated after 1 h of euxanthone-treatment. Inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway using PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase, blocked all euxanthone-stimulated neurite outgrowth. However, analysis of phospho-Akt expression indicated that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway, another major signaling pathway engaged by neurotrophins, is not significantly activated by euxanthone. These results suggest that euxanthone promotes neurite outgrowth by selectively activating the MAP kinase pathway.

  12. Self-aligned Schwann cell monolayers demonstrate an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggio, A. M.; Narayanaswamy, A.; Roysam, B.; Thompson, D. M.

    2010-08-01

    In vivo nerve guidance channel studies have identified Schwann cell (SC) presence as an integral factor in axonal number and extension in an injury site, and in vitro studies have provided evidence that oriented SCs can direct neurite outgrowth. However, traditional methods used to create oriented SC monolayers (e.g. micropatterns/microtopography) potentially introduce secondary guidance cues to the neurons that are difficult to de-couple. Although SCs expanded on uniform laminin-coated coverslips lack a global orientation, the monolayers contain naturally formed regions of locally oriented cells that can be used to investigate SC-mediated neurite guidance. In this work, novel image analysis techniques have been developed to quantitatively assess local neurite orientation with respect to the underlying regional orientation of the Schwann cell monolayer. Results confirm that, in the absence of any secondary guidance cues, a positive correlation exists between neurite outgrowth and regional orientation of the SC monolayer. Thus, SCs alone possess an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth, and expansion of the co-culture-based quantitative method described can be used to further deconstruct specific biomolecular mechanisms of neurite guidance.

  13. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  14. Behavior of soil anchors under dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Picornell, M.; Olague, B.

    1997-07-01

    Helical anchors placed in a cohesionless soil in a laboratory setting were tested under static and dynamic loads. The dynamic tests were performed after subjecting the anchors to a seating load. The dynamic load had an intensity that changed in sinusoidal fashion and was superimposed to the static seating loads. Although, the anchors have a static pull-out capacity, when the dynamic loads are applied the anchor experiences additional deformations for each load cycle. The deformations per cycle are initially high but then decrease to a nearly constant rate. Eventually, the constant rate increases suddenly accelerating until failure. This failure can take place even at small fractions of the static pull-out capacity. The rate of deformation per load cycle is found to increase for larger seating loads and for larger dynamic pulsating loads. The results of this study shows that the designer can only adjust loads to decrease the deformation rate to suit the design life of the structure.

  15. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  16. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpyak, O. G.; Galyautdinov, Z. R.; Kokorin, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  17. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients’ neurons

    PubMed Central

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W.; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H.; Winner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients. PMID:24381312

  18. Applied electric field enhances DRG neurite growth: influence of stimulation media, surface coating and growth supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Matthew D.; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2009-08-01

    Electrical therapies have been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. This enhanced neural growth existed even after the electric field (EF) or stimulation was removed, but the factors that may influence the enhanced growth, such as stimulation media or surface coating, have not been fully investigated. This study characterized neurite outgrowth and branching under various conditions: EF magnitude and application time, ECM surface coating, medium during EF application and growth supplements. A uniform, low-magnitude EF (24 or 44 V m-1) was applied to dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglia seeded on collagen or laminin-coated surfaces. During the growth period, cells were either exposed to NGF or N2, and during stimulation cells were exposed to either unsupplemented media (Ca2+) or PBS (no Ca2+). Parallel controls for each experiment included cells exposed to the chamber with no stimulation and cells remaining outside the chamber. After brief electrical stimulation (10 min), neurite length significantly increased 24 h after application for all conditions studied. Of particular interest, increased stimulation time (10-100 min) further enhanced neurite length on laminin but not on collagen surfaces. Neurite branching was not affected by stimulation on any surface, and no preferential growth of neurites was noted after stimulation. Overall, the results of this report suggest that short-duration electric stimulation is sufficient to enhance neurite length under a variety of conditions. While further data are needed to fully elucidate a mechanism for this increased growth, these data suggest that one focus of those investigations should be the interaction between the growth cone and the substrata.

  19. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  20. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients. PMID:27088926

  1. Neurite outgrowth enhancement by jiadifenolide: possible targets.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, R A

    2016-04-01

    Covering: 1860-2016A mechanistic link may exist between convulsant plant substances typified by picrotoxinin, and 'neurotrophic' sesquiterpenes like jiadifenolide. Picrotoxinin elicits convulsion by anion blockade of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels. These same receptors mediate neuronal development and neurite outgrowth prior to synapse formation. Due to its structural homology with picrotoxin and anisatin, it is possible that jiadifenolide enhances NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth by modulation of the Cys-loop family of receptors. PMID:26891462

  2. Wave Journal Bearings Under Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Dimofte, Florin

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of the wave journal bearing was determined by running a three-wave bearing with an eccentrically mounted shaft. A transient analysis was developed and used to predict numerical data for the experimental cases. The three-wave journal bearing ran stably under dynamic loads with orbits well inside the bearing clearance. The orbits were almost circular and nearly free of the influence of, but dynamically dependent on, bearing wave shape. Experimental observations for both the absolute bearing-housing-center orbits and the relative bearing-housing-center-to-shaft-center orbits agreed well with the predictions. Moreover, the subsynchronous whirl motion generated by the fluid film was found experimentally and predicted theoretically for certain speeds.

  3. Differential intensity-dependent effects of magnetic stimulation on the longest neurites and shorter dendrites in neuroscreen-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. Approach. To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over the pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled via machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (∼5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (∼95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for three days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Main results. We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in bolstering longest neurite outgrowth, best seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. Significance. These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating its use into potential therapeutic strategies.

  4. Dynamic ionization of water under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Goldman, N; Fried, L E; Crowhurst, J C; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; Zaug, J M

    2004-07-19

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study fluid water at approximately 1000 K and 2 to 60 GPa in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have also been employed to simulate water under similar conditions. The experimental Raman intensity of the O-H stretch mode was observed to decrease with pressure, and beyond 50 GPa this mode was no longer visible. At approximately the same pressure we inferred a change in the slope of the melting curve. Consistent with these experimental observations, the MD simulations show that water under these conditions forms a dynamically ionized liquid state, which is dominated by very short lived (<10 fs) H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}O{sup +} and O{sup 2-} species.

  5. Dynamics of complete wetting liquid under evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Chi-Tuong; Berteloot, Guillaume; Lequeux, FranC.{C.}Ois; Limat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a contact line under evaporation and complete wetting conditions taking into account the divergent nature of evaporation near the border of the liquid, as evidenced by Deegan et al. [Nature 389, 827]. The model we propose shows the existence of a precursor film at the edge of the liquid. The length of the precursor film is controlled by Hamacker constant and evaporative flux. Past the precursor film, Tanner's law is generalized accounting for evaporative effects.

  6. Sulf1 and Sulf2 Differentially Modulate Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Sulfation during Postnatal Cerebellum Development: Evidence for Neuroprotective and Neurite Outgrowth Promoting Functions

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Rohn, Susanne; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M.; Guimond, Scott E.; Eyckerman-Kölln, Pieter J.; ten Dam, Gerdy; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Turnbull, Jeremy E.; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sulf1 and Sulf2 are cell surface sulfatases, which remove specific 6-O-sulfate groups from heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, resulting in modulation of various HS-dependent signaling pathways. Both Sulf1 and Sulf2 knockout mice show impairments in brain development and neurite outgrowth deficits in neurons. Methodology and Main Findings To analyze the molecular mechanisms behind these impairments we focused on the postnatal cerebellum, whose development is mainly characterized by proliferation, migration, and neurite outgrowth processes of precursor neurons. Primary cerebellar granule cells isolated from Sulf1 or Sulf2 deficient newborns are characterized by a reduction in neurite length and cell survival. Furthermore, Sulf1 deficiency leads to a reduced migration capacity. The observed impairments in cell survival and neurite outgrowth could be correlated to Sulf-specific interference with signaling pathways, as shown for FGF2, GDNF and NGF. In contrast, signaling of Shh, which determines the laminar organization of the cerebellar cortex, was not influenced in either Sulf1 or Sulf2 knockouts. Biochemical analysis of cerebellar HS demonstrated, for the first time in vivo, Sulf-specific changes of 6-O-, 2-O- and N-sulfation in the knockouts. Changes of a particular HS epitope were found on the surface of Sulf2-deficient cerebellar neurons. This epitope showed a restricted localization to the inner half of the external granular layer of the postnatal cerebellum, where precursor cells undergo final maturation to form synaptic contacts. Conclusion Sulfs introduce dynamic changes in HS proteoglycan sulfation patterns of the postnatal cerebellum, thereby orchestrating fundamental mechanisms underlying brain development. PMID:26448642

  7. The atRA-responsive gene neuron navigator 2 functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation.

    PubMed

    Muley, P D; McNeill, E M; Marzinke, M A; Knobel, K M; Barr, M M; Clagett-Dame, M

    2008-11-01

    Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) was first identified as an all-trans retinoic acid (atRA)-responsive gene in human neuroblastoma cells (retinoic acid-induced in neuroblastoma 1, RAINB1) that extend neurites after exposure to atRA. It is structurally related to the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-53 gene that is required for cell migration and axonal outgrowth. To gain insight into NAV2 function, the full-length human protein was expressed in C. elegans unc-53 mutants under the control of a mechanosensory neuron promoter. Transgene expression of NAV2 rescued the defects in unc-53 mutant mechanosensory neuron elongation, indicating that Nav2 is an ortholog of unc-53. Using a loss-of-function approach, we also show that Nav2 induction is essential for atRA to induce neurite outgrowth in SH-SY5Y cells. The NAV2 protein is located both in the cell body and along the length of the growing neurites of SH-SY5Y cells in a pattern that closely mimics that of neurofilament and microtubule proteins. Transfection of Nav2 deletion constructs in Cos-1 cells reveals a region of the protein (aa 837-1065) that directs localization with the microtubule cytoskeleton. Collectively, this work supports a role for NAV2 in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation and suggests this protein may act by facilitating interactions between microtubules and other proteins such as neurofilaments that are key players in the formation and stability of growing neurites.

  8. RTN/Nogo in forming Alzheimer’s neuritic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Marguerite; Shi, Qi; Hu, Xiangyou; He, Wanxia; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the pathological hallmarks in brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the presence of neuritic plaques, in which amyloid deposits are surrounded by reactive gliosis and dystrophic neurites. Within neuritic plaques, reticulon 3 (RTN3), a homolog of Nogo protein, appears to regulate the formation of both amyloid deposition via negative modulation of BACE1 activity and dystrophic neurites via the formation of RTN3 aggregates. Transgenic mice over-expressing RTN3, but not the other known markers of dystrophic neurites in AD brain, spontaneously develop RTN3-immunoreactive dystrophic neurites. The presence of dystrophic neurites impairs cognition. Blocking abnormal RTN3 aggregation will increase the available RTN3 monomer and is therefore a promising potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing cognitive function in AD patients. PMID:20144652

  9. Directed avalanche processes with underlying interface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chung; den Nijs, Marcel

    2002-07-01

    We describe a directed avalanche model; a slowly unloading sandbox driven by lowering a retaining wall. The directness of the dynamics allows us to interpret the stable sand surfaces as world sheets of fluctuating interfaces in one lower dimension. In our specific case, the interface growth dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class. We formulate relations between the critical exponents of the various avalanche distributions and those of the roughness of the growing interface. The nonlinear nature of the underlying KPZ dynamics provides a nontrivial test of such generic exponent relations. The numerical values of the avalanche exponents are close to the conventional KPZ values, but differ sufficiently to warrant a detailed study of whether avalanche-correlated Monte Carlo sampling changes the scaling exponents of KPZ interfaces. We demonstrate that the exponents remain unchanged, but that the traces left on the surface by previous avalanches give rise to unusually strong finite-size corrections to scaling. This type of slow convergence seems intrinsic to avalanche dynamics.

  10. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  11. Dynamics of complete wetting liquid under evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Chi-Tuong; Berteloot, Guillaume; Lequeux, François; Limat, Laurent

    2008-11-01

    The dynamics of a contact line under evaporation and total wetting conditions is studied taking into account the divergent nature of evaporation near the border of the liquid, as evidenced by Deegan et al. [Nature 389, 827 (1997)]. Complete wetting is assumed to be due to Van der Waals interactions. The existence of a precursor film at the edge of the liquid is shown analytically and numerically. The length of the precursor film is controlled by Hamacker constant and evaporative flux. Past the precursor film, Tanner's law is generalized accounting for evaporative effects.

  12. Chromatin Fiber Dynamics under Tension and Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Christophe; Victor, Jean-Marc; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information in eukaryotic cells is carried on chromosomes, basically consisting of large compact supercoiled chromatin fibers. Micromanipulations have recently led to great advances in the knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of DNA transaction events by nucleosome and chromatin structural changes. Indeed, magnetic and optical tweezers have allowed opportunities to handle single nucleosomal particles or nucleosomal arrays and measure their response to forces and torques, mimicking the molecular constraints imposed in vivo by various molecular motors acting on the DNA. These challenging technical approaches provide us with deeper understanding of the way chromatin dynamically packages our genome and participates in the regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:20480035

  13. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  14. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  15. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  16. Dynamic Strength of Tantalum under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glam, Benny; Werdiger, Meir; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2013-06-01

    Plane impact experiments of double shock and shock-rarefaction in Tantalum were carried out in a gas gun. VISAR diagnostics has been implemented to measure the particle velocity and the free surface velocity. The VISAR information was utilized to study the dynamic strength of Tantalum under compression and tension. The pressure in the experiments was below 35 GPa. In this pressure range the dominant mechanism is expected to be dislocation motion. A 1-d hydrodynamic code was used in order to match various strength models. As expected, both the Johnson-Cook and the Guinan-Steinberg models do not reproduce the experimental results. Therefore in this paper we compare the Zerilli-Armstrong model which has been recently calibrated at strain rate of 6 x 103 s-1 using the split Kowalsky-Hopkinson bar to our experimental results at strain rate of 106 s-1.

  17. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J N; Fiebach, Christian J

    2015-06-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  18. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J. N.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  19. Fabrication of Aligned Conducting PPy-PLLA Fiber Films and Their Electrically Controlled Guidance and Orientation for Neurites.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuanwen; Qin, Jiabang; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; He, Da

    2016-05-25

    Electrically conductive biomaterial scaffolds have great potential in neural tissue regeneration. In this work, an aligned conductive fibrous scaffold was prepared by electrospinning PLLA on rotating collector and chemical oxidation polymerization of pyrrole (PPy) codoped with poly(glutamic acid)/dodecyl benzenesulfonic acid sodium. The characterization results of composition, structure and mechanics of fiber films show that the existence of weak polar van der Waals' force between PPy coating and PLLA fibers. The resistivity of aligned rough PPy-PLLA fiber film (about 800 nm of fiber diameter) at the perpendicular and parallel directions is 0.971 and 0.874 Ω m, respectively. Aligned rough PPy-PLLA fiber film could guide the extension of 68% PC12 neurites along the direction of fiber axis. Under electrostimulation (ES) of 100, 200, and 400 mV/cm, median neurite lengths of differentiated PC12 on aligned fiber-films are 128, 149, and 141 μm, respectively. Furthermore, under ES of 100, 200, and 400 mV/cm, the alignment rate of neurite along the electropotential direction (angle between neurite and electropotential direction ≤10°) on random fibers film are 17, 23, and 28%, respectively, and the alignment rate of neurites along the fiber axis (angle between neurite and fiber axis ≤10°) on aligned fibers film reach to 76, 83, and 79%, respectively, indicating that the combination of ES and rough conducting aligned structure could adjust the alignment of cellular neurites along the direction of the fiber axis or electropotential. PMID:27172537

  20. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Veysi; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nelson, Tyler; Lannutti, John J.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2015-12-01

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies.

  1. Stochastic game dynamics under demographic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weini; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-07-21

    Frequency-dependent selection and demographic fluctuations play important roles in evolutionary and ecological processes. Under frequency-dependent selection, the average fitness of the population may increase or decrease based on interactions between individuals within the population. This should be reflected in fluctuations of the population size even in constant environments. Here, we propose a stochastic model that naturally combines these two evolutionary ingredients by assuming frequency-dependent competition between different types in an individual-based model. In contrast to previous game theoretic models, the carrying capacity of the population, and thus the population size, is determined by pairwise competition of individuals mediated by evolutionary games and demographic stochasticity. In the limit of infinite population size, the averaged stochastic dynamics is captured by deterministic competitive Lotka-Volterra equations. In small populations, demographic stochasticity may instead lead to the extinction of the entire population. Because the population size is driven by fitness in evolutionary games, a population of cooperators is less prone to go extinct than a population of defectors, whereas in the usual systems of fixed size the population would thrive regardless of its average payoff. PMID:26150518

  2. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Basak; Caglayan, Berrak; Hausott, Barbara; Erdogan, Burcu; Dag, Ugur; Demir, Ozlem; Sogut, Melis S.; Klimaschewski, Lars; Kurnaz, Isil A.

    2014-01-01

    Pea3 subfamily of E–twenty six transcription factors consist of three major -exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3. PMID:25018694

  3. The combinatorics of neurite self-avoidance.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Elizabeth M; Hunt, Jonathan J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2011-11-01

    During neural development in Drosophila, the ability of neurite branches to recognize whether they are from the same or different neurons depends crucially on the molecule Dscam1. In particular, this recognition depends on the stochastic acquisition of a unique combination of Dscam1 isoforms out of a large set of possible isoforms. To properly interpret these findings, it is crucial to understand the combinatorics involved, which has previously been attempted only using stochastic simulations for some specific parameter combinations. Here we present closed-form solutions for the general case. These reveal the relationships among the key variables and how these constrain possible biological scenarios.

  4. The combinatorics of neurite self-avoidance.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Elizabeth M; Hunt, Jonathan J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2011-11-01

    During neural development in Drosophila, the ability of neurite branches to recognize whether they are from the same or different neurons depends crucially on the molecule Dscam1. In particular, this recognition depends on the stochastic acquisition of a unique combination of Dscam1 isoforms out of a large set of possible isoforms. To properly interpret these findings, it is crucial to understand the combinatorics involved, which has previously been attempted only using stochastic simulations for some specific parameter combinations. Here we present closed-form solutions for the general case. These reveal the relationships among the key variables and how these constrain possible biological scenarios. PMID:21732864

  5. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S

    2014-01-15

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  6. Experimental and computational models of neurite extension at a choice point in response to controlled diffusive gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catig, G. C.; Figueroa, S.; Moore, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Ojective. Axons are guided toward desired targets through a series of choice points that they navigate by sensing cues in the cellular environment. A better understanding of how microenvironmental factors influence neurite growth during development can inform strategies to address nerve injury. Therefore, there is a need for biomimetic models to systematically investigate the influence of guidance cues at such choice points. Approach. We ran an adapted in silico biased turning axon growth model under the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and compared the results to corresponding in vitro experiments. We examined if growth simulations were predictive of neurite population behavior at a choice point. We used a biphasic micropatterned hydrogel system consisting of an outer cell restrictive mold that enclosed a bifurcated cell permissive region and placed a well near a bifurcating end to allow proteins to diffuse and form a gradient. Experimental diffusion profiles in these constructs were used to validate a diffusion computational model that utilized experimentally measured diffusion coefficients in hydrogels. The computational diffusion model was then used to establish defined soluble gradients within the permissive region of the hydrogels and maintain the profiles in physiological ranges for an extended period of time. Computational diffusion profiles informed the neurite growth model, which was compared with neurite growth experiments in the bifurcating hydrogel constructs. Main results. Results indicated that when applied to the constrained choice point geometry, the biased turning model predicted experimental behavior closely. Results for both simulated and in vitro neurite growth studies showed a significant chemoattractive response toward the bifurcated end containing an NGF gradient compared to the control, though some neurites were found in the end with no NGF gradient. Significance. The integrated model of neurite growth we describe will allow

  7. Real-time detection of neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Samhwan; Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    We developed a simple method for real-time detection of the neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device. Our microfluidic device contains three compartmentalized channels which are for cell seeding, hydrogel and growth factors. Collagen gel is filled in the middle channel and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are seeded in the left channel. To induce differentiation of PC12 cells, 50 ng/ml to1000 ng/ml of nerve growth factor (NGF) is introduced into the right channel. After three days of NGF treatment, PC12 cells begin to extend neurites and formed neurite network from sixth day. Quantification of neurite outgrowth is analyzed by measuring the total area of neurites. On sixth day, the area is doubled compared to the area on third day and increases by 20 times on ninth day.

  8. Dynamic expression patterns of G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1 (GRIN1) and its colocalization with Gαo implicate significant roles of Gαo-GRIN1 signaling in nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Mototani, Yasumasa; Sahara, Yoshinori; Asami, Junko; Nakamura, Shun; Kozasa, Tohru; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2008-01-01

    GRIN1 (Gprin 1) is a signaling molecule coexpression of which with constitutively active form of Gαo can stimulate neurite extensions in Neuro2a cells, yet its in vivo roles remain elusive. Here we examine expression profiles of GRIN1 during mouse development by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry. ISH analysis revealed that GRIN1 expression was limited to the nervous system at all developmental stages tested: in the central nervous system, GRIN1 expression occurred within the entire embryonic mantle zones, while it became restricted to sets of nuclei at postnatal to adult stages. Immunohistochemistry using a GRIN1 specific antibody demonstrated that GRIN1 colocalized with Gαo at neuronal dendrites and axons, but it was not detected in glial cells. These results suggest that Gαo-GRIN1 pathway could mediate significant roles in neuronal migration and differentiation at embryonic stages and exert functions in wiring and/or maintenance of specific neural circuitries at postnatal to adult stages. PMID:18729205

  9. Mechanical stability of trees under dynamic loads.

    PubMed

    James, Kenneth R; Haritos, Nicholas; Ades, Peter K

    2006-10-01

    Tree stability in windstorms and tree failure are important issues in urban areas where there can be risks of damage to people and property and in forests where wind damage causes economic loss. Current methods of managing trees, including pruning and assessment of mechanical strength, are mainly based on visual assessment or the experience of people such as trained arborists. Only limited data are available to assess tree strength and stability in winds, and most recent methods have used a static approach to estimate loads. Recent research on the measurement of dynamic wind loads and the effect on tree stability is giving a better understanding of how different trees cope with winds. Dynamic loads have been measured on trees with different canopy shapes and branch structures including a palm (Washingtonia robusta), a slender Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) and trees with many branches and broad canopies including hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii) and two species of eucalypt (Eucalyptus grandis, E. teretecornus). Results indicate that sway is not a harmonic, but is very complex due to the dynamic interaction of branches. A new dynamic model of a tree is described, incorporating the dynamic structural properties of the trunk and branches. The branch mass contributes a dynamic damping, termed mass damping, which acts to reduce dangerous harmonic sway motion of the trunk and so minimizes loads and increases the mechanical stability of the tree. The results from 12 months of monitoring sway motion and wind loading forces are presented and discussed.

  10. Increase in Growth Cone Size Correlates with Decrease in Neurite Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Several important discoveries in growth cone cell biology were made possible by the use of growth cones derived from cultured Aplysia bag cell neurons, including the characterization of the organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. The majority of these Aplysia studies focused on large growth cones induced by poly-L-lysine substrates at early stages in cell culture. Under these conditions, the growth cones are in a steady state with very little net advancement. Here, we offer a comprehensive cellular analysis of the motile behavior of Aplysia growth cones in culture beyond this pausing state. We found that average growth cone size decreased with cell culture time whereas average growth rate increased. This inverse correlation of growth rate and growth cone size was due to the occurrence of large growth cones with a peripheral domain larger than 100 μm2. The large pausing growth cones had central domains that were less consistently aligned with the direction of growth and could be converted into smaller, faster-growing growth cones by addition of a three-dimensional collagen gel. We conclude that the significant lateral expansion of lamellipodia and filopodia as observed during these culture conditions has a negative effect on neurite growth. PMID:27274874

  11. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  12. Sharpening of neurite morphology using complex coherence enhanced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Izadora; Trenado, Carlos; Rahim, Hazli Rafis Abd; Schafer, Karl-Herbert; Strauss, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    The study of the molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and differentiation, requires essential accurate and reproducible segmentation and quantification of neuronal processes. The common method used in this study is to detect and trace individual neurites, i.e. neurite tracing. The challenge comes mainly from the morphological problem in which these images contains ambiguities such as neurites discontinuities and intensity differences. In our work, we encounter a bigger challenge as the neurites in our images have a higher density of neurites. In this paper, we present a hybrid complex coherence-enhanced method for sharpening the morphology of neurons from such images. Coherence-enhanced diffusion (CED) is used to enhance the flowlike structures of the neurites, while the imaginary part of the complex nonlinear diffusion of the image cancels the appearance of 'clouds'. We also describe an elementary method for estimating the density of neuritis based on the obtained images. Our preliminary results show that the proposed methodology is a step ahead toward an effective neuronal morphology algorithm.

  13. Matrix interactions modulate neurotrophin-mediated neurite outgrowth and pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Madl, Christopher M; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-04-01

    Both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors are known to modulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding; however, the interplay between these two factors is less studied. While previous work has shown that the biochemical identity of the matrix can alter the outgrowth of neurites in response to neurotrophins, the importance of the concentration of cell-adhesive ligands is unknown. Using engineered elastin-like protein matrices, we recently demonstrated a synergistic effect between matrix-bound cell-adhesive ligand density and soluble nerve growth factor treatment on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. This synergism was mediated by Schwann cell-neurite contact through L1CAM. Cell-adhesive ligand density was also shown to alter the pathfinding behavior of dorsal root ganglion neurites in response to a gradient of nerve growth factor. While more cell-adhesive matrices promoted neurite outgrowth, less cell-adhesive matrices promoted more faithful neurite pathfinding. These studies emphasize the importance of considering both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors when designing biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26170800

  14. Matrix interactions modulate neurotrophin-mediated neurite outgrowth and pathfinding

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Christopher M.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors are known to modulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding; however, the interplay between these two factors is less studied. While previous work has shown that the biochemical identity of the matrix can alter the outgrowth of neurites in response to neurotrophins, the importance of the concentration of cell-adhesive ligands is unknown. Using engineered elastin-like protein matrices, we recently demonstrated a synergistic effect between matrix-bound cell-adhesive ligand density and soluble nerve growth factor treatment on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. This synergism was mediated by Schwann cell-neurite contact through L1CAM. Cell-adhesive ligand density was also shown to alter the pathfinding behavior of dorsal root ganglion neurites in response to a gradient of nerve growth factor. While more cell-adhesive matrices promoted neurite outgrowth, less cell-adhesive matrices promoted more faithful neurite pathfinding. These studies emphasize the importance of considering both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors when designing biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26170800

  15. Dynamics of social balance under temporal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Ryosuke; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Real social contacts are often intermittent such that a link between a pair of nodes in a social network is only temporarily used. The effects of such temporal networks on social dynamics have been investigated for several phenomenological models such as epidemic spreading, linear diffusion processes, and nonlinear oscillations. Here, we numerically investigate nonlinear social balance dynamics in such a situation. Social balance is a classical psychological theory, which dictates that a triad is balanced if the three agents are mutual friends or if the two of them are the friends of each other and hostile to the other agent. We show that the social balance dynamics is slowed down on the temporal complete graph as compared to the corresponding static complete graph.

  16. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.; Žnidarič, Marko

    2003-04-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model.

  17. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  18. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Schemann, Michael; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs) responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs) responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN), slowly (SAMEN), or ultra-slowly (USAMEN). The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut. PMID:26441520

  19. Dynamics Explorer twin spacecraft under evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites designed to explore the interactive processes occuring between the magnetosphere and Earth's ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and plasmasphere are described. Effects of these interactions, satellite orbits, data collecting antennas, solar power systems, axes, configurations, and Earth based command, control and data display systems are mentioned.

  20. Evaluation of flawed piping under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, R.E.; Quinones, D.F.; Gilman, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes analytical and interpretative research on results of large-scale dynamic tests of flawed pipe which were conducted for the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG). Here, the adequacy of dynamic analysis methods is examined, as well as margins against failure associated with flaw evaluation criteria. Experimental and analytical results are related to requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes. Code limits of operability bound all test results. Guidance is offered on selection of ``Z-factors`` for austenitic materials to retain code safety margins. In the IPIRG tests, efforts to produce a nearly instantaneous full severance pipe break were unsuccessful, indicating that this hypothetical basis for plant accident evaluations is conservative.

  1. Evaluation of flawed piping under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, R.E. ); Quinones, D.F. and Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA ); Gilman, J.D. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes analytical and interpretative research on results of large-scale dynamic tests of flawed pipe which were conducted for the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG). Here, the adequacy of dynamic analysis methods is examined, as well as margins against failure associated with flaw evaluation criteria. Experimental and analytical results are related to requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes. Code limits of operability bound all test results. Guidance is offered on selection of Z-factors'' for austenitic materials to retain code safety margins. In the IPIRG tests, efforts to produce a nearly instantaneous full severance pipe break were unsuccessful, indicating that this hypothetical basis for plant accident evaluations is conservative.

  2. Dynamics of Turing Patterns under Spatiotemporal Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, S.; Míguez, D. G.; Muñuzuri, A. P.; Sagués, F.; Casademunt, J.

    2003-03-01

    We study, both theoretically and experimentally, the dynamical response of Turing patterns to a spatiotemporal forcing in the form of a traveling-wave modulation of a control parameter. We show that from strictly spatial resonance, it is possible to induce new, generic dynamical behaviors, including temporally modulated traveling waves and localized traveling solitonlike solutions. The latter make contact with the soliton solutions of Coullet [

    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 56, 724 (1986)
    ] and generalize them. The stability diagram for the different propagating modes in the Lengyel-Epstein model is determined numerically. Direct observations of the predicted solutions in experiments carried out with light modulations in the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction are also reported.

  3. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  4. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  5. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  6. Preparation of embryonic retinal explants to study CNS neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Hanea, Sonia T; Shanmugalingam, Ushananthini; Fournier, Alyson E; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-05-01

    This protocol outlines the preparation of embryonic mouse retinal explants, which provides an effective technique to analyze neurite outgrowth in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. This validated ex vivo system, which displays limited neuronal death, is highly reproducible and particularly amenable to manipulation. Our previously published studies involving embryonic chick or adult mouse retinal explants were instrumental in the preparation of this protocol; aspects of these previous techniques were combined, adopted and optimized. This protocol thus permits more efficient analysis of neurite growth. Briefly, the retina is dissected from the embryonic mouse eye using precise techniques that take into account the small size of the embryonic eye. The approach applied ensures that the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer faces the adhesion substrate on coated cover slips. Neurite growth is clear, well-delineated and readily quantifiable. These retinal explants can therefore be used to examine the neurite growth effects elicited by potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27072342

  7. Planar polarity genes and inhibition of supernumerary neurites.

    PubMed

    Colavita, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have recently emerged as important players in sculpting neuronal connections. The bipolar VC neurons display stereotypical differences in axon extension along the anterior-posterior (AP) body axis: VC1-3 and VC6 polarize along the AP axis while VC4 and VC5 polarize along the orthogonal left-right (LR) axis generated by the developing vulva. vang-1 and prkl-1, the worm orthologs of Van Gogh and Prickle, are required to restrict the polarity of neurite emergence to a specific tissue axis. vang-1 and prkl-1 loss results in ectopic VC4 and VC5 neurites extending inappropriately along the AP axis. Conversely, prkl-1 overexpression in VC neurons suppresses neurite formation. These findings suggest that a PCP-like pathway acts to silence or antagonize neuronal responses to polarity cues that would otherwise be permissive for neurite growth.

  8. Cytonuclear dynamics in selfing populations under selection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renyi; Asmussen, Marjorie A.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model to delimit the role of natural selection in maintaining nuclear and cytoplasmic polymorphisms in selfing populations. We provide explicit time‐dependent solutions for joint cytonuclear frequencies under any combination of constant fertility, viability, and gametic selection and exact analytical conditions for the maintenance of polymorphisms under joint cytonuclear selection. The equilibrium structure is determined by the relative magnitude of echo fitnesses, defined as the rate at which individuals survive and produce offspring with their own genotype. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic polymorphisms can be maintained under biologically meaningful conditions, although the majority of the parameter combinations will lead to fixation. The theoretical framework developed here should be very useful in formally dissecting the form and strength of selection on cytonuclear genotypes in populations with negligible levels of outcrossing. PMID:17467019

  9. Dynamics of evolutionary radiation under ecological neutrality.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takanori Mizuno; Chiba, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The most spectacular phenomenon of evolutionary biota is the explosive radiation that occurs in depauperate environments in which there are fewer competitors and predators, such as oceanic islands and crater lakes. Adaptation to divergent niches has been proposed as a major cause for this accelerated speciation. Here, we show that neutral mutation, genetic drift, and neutral community dynamics are sufficient to lead to radiation. In addition, these processes yield overshooting dynamics with a decline in species richness in the later stages of radiation. We constructed an ecologically neutral model for a community on an island with a uniform environment. For the speciation process, we introduced a null model with minimal assumptions in which the incompatibilities between alleles in different lineages evolve by a random accumulation of mutations via genetic drift. Our simulations showed that the speciation rate, extinction rate and genetic variation of the species colonizing the island rapidly increased to a sharp peak followed by a decrease that approached zero. Because the extinction rate reached a peak later than the speciation rate, the species richness initially increased, but declined in the later stage, exhibiting "overshooting". The highest species richness was found for the largest island at the largest initial population size. Accordingly, speciation is accelerated by the large population size of depauperate biota, whereas it is decelerated with increasing species richness from the decreasing population size. Explosive radiation without ecological divergence can occur in depauperate environments via neutral stochastic processes. PMID:27297287

  10. Natural neural projection dynamics underlying social behavior.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Lisa A; Grosenick, Logan; Finkelstein, Joel C; Kauvar, Isaac V; Fenno, Lief E; Adhikari, Avishek; Lammel, Stephan; Mirzabekov, Julie J; Airan, Raag D; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Tye, Kay M; Anikeeva, Polina; Malenka, Robert C; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-06-19

    Social interaction is a complex behavior essential for many species and is impaired in major neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacological studies have implicated certain neurotransmitter systems in social behavior, but circuit-level understanding of endogenous neural activity during social interaction is lacking. We therefore developed and applied a new methodology, termed fiber photometry, to optically record natural neural activity in genetically and connectivity-defined projections to elucidate the real-time role of specified pathways in mammalian behavior. Fiber photometry revealed that activity dynamics of a ventral tegmental area (VTA)-to-nucleus accumbens (NAc) projection could encode and predict key features of social, but not novel object, interaction. Consistent with this observation, optogenetic control of cells specifically contributing to this projection was sufficient to modulate social behavior, which was mediated by type 1 dopamine receptor signaling downstream in the NAc. Direct observation of deep projection-specific activity in this way captures a fundamental and previously inaccessible dimension of mammalian circuit dynamics. PMID:24949967

  11. Natural neural projection dynamics underlying social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Lisa A.; Grosenick, Logan; Finkelstein, Joel C.; Kauvar, Isaac V.; Fenno, Lief E.; Adhikari, Avishek; Lammel, Stephan; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Airan, Raag D.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Tye, Kay M.; Anikeeva, Polina; Malenka, Robert C.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Social interaction is a complex behavior essential for many species, and is impaired in major neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacological studies have implicated certain neurotransmitter systems in social behavior, but circuit-level understanding of endogenous neural activity during social interaction is lacking. We therefore developed and applied a new methodology, termed fiber photometry, to optically record natural neural activity in genetically- and connectivity-defined projections to elucidate the real-time role of specified pathways in mammalian behavior. Fiber photometry revealed that activity dynamics of a ventral tegmental area (VTA)-to-nucleus accumbens (NAc) projection could encode and predict key features of social but not novel-object interaction. Consistent with this observation, optogenetic control of cells specifically contributing to this projection was sufficient to modulate social behavior, which was mediated by type-1 dopamine receptor signaling downstream in the NAc. Direct observation of projection-specific activity in this way captures a fundamental and previously inaccessible dimension of circuit dynamics. PMID:24949967

  12. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  13. Serum- and substratum-dependent modulation of neuritic growth.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Selak, I; Varon, S

    1983-01-01

    Explants of embryonic day 8 (E8) chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been cultured with medium containing serum or the serum-free supplement N1 on one of three substrata: collagen, polyornithine (PORN), or PORN exposed to a polyornithine-binding neurite-promoting factor (PNPF-PORN). Replicate cultures were maintained with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF elicited its classical neuritic outgrowth on all three substrata in serum-containing or serum-free medium. In the absence of NGF, however, a gradation of increasing neurite growth was seen with: PNPF-PORN greater than PORN greater than collagen. This response occurred in both media. In addition, the neuritic halo in each instance was markedly more developed in the absence of serum, especially on PNPF-PORN. Nonneuronal behaviors reflected both serum and substratum influences: thus, nonneuronal outgrowth consisted mainly of flat cells with serum and collagen, was nonexistent with serum and PORN or PNPF-PORN, and involved mostly Schwann-like scattered cells in the absence of serum on any one substratum. The serum-dependent behaviors of ganglionic neurites were examined further with explants from chicken E11 sympathetic ganglia. A single substratum was used (PORN), without exogenous trophic factor. Neurite outgrowth was depressed by the presence of fetal calf serum, thus supporting the generality of this phenomenon. Lastly, PC12 cells, a clonal line of rat pheochromocytoma, will grow neurites in the presence of NGF after 48 hr in serum-free, but not serum-containing media. Addition of serum to serum-free cultures at this time results in the rapid and complete retraction of neurites.

  14. Serum- and substratum-dependent modulation of neuritic growth.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Selak, I; Varon, S

    1983-01-01

    Explants of embryonic day 8 (E8) chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been cultured with medium containing serum or the serum-free supplement N1 on one of three substrata: collagen, polyornithine (PORN), or PORN exposed to a polyornithine-binding neurite-promoting factor (PNPF-PORN). Replicate cultures were maintained with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF elicited its classical neuritic outgrowth on all three substrata in serum-containing or serum-free medium. In the absence of NGF, however, a gradation of increasing neurite growth was seen with: PNPF-PORN greater than PORN greater than collagen. This response occurred in both media. In addition, the neuritic halo in each instance was markedly more developed in the absence of serum, especially on PNPF-PORN. Nonneuronal behaviors reflected both serum and substratum influences: thus, nonneuronal outgrowth consisted mainly of flat cells with serum and collagen, was nonexistent with serum and PORN or PNPF-PORN, and involved mostly Schwann-like scattered cells in the absence of serum on any one substratum. The serum-dependent behaviors of ganglionic neurites were examined further with explants from chicken E11 sympathetic ganglia. A single substratum was used (PORN), without exogenous trophic factor. Neurite outgrowth was depressed by the presence of fetal calf serum, thus supporting the generality of this phenomenon. Lastly, PC12 cells, a clonal line of rat pheochromocytoma, will grow neurites in the presence of NGF after 48 hr in serum-free, but not serum-containing media. Addition of serum to serum-free cultures at this time results in the rapid and complete retraction of neurites. PMID:6876195

  15. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  16. Space Station flexible dynamics under plume impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of the Space Station requires numerous construction flights by the Space Shuttle. A particularly challenging problem is that of control of each intermediate station configuration when the shuttle orbiter is approaching it to deliver the next component. The necessary braking maneuvers cause orbiter thruster plumes to impinge on the station, especially its solar arrays. This in turn causes both overall attitude errors and excitation of flexible-body vibration modes. These plume loads are predicted to lead to CMG saturation during the approach of the orbiter to the SC-5 station configuration, necessitating the use of the station RCS jets for desaturation. They are also expected to lead to significant excitation of solar array vibrations. It is therefore of great practical importance to investigate the effects of plume loads on the flexible dynamics of station configuration SC-5 as accurately as possible. However, this system possesses a great many flexible modes (89 below 5 rad/s), making analysis time-consuming and complicated. Model reduction techniques can be used to overcome this problem, reducing the system model to one which retains only the significant dynamics, i.e. those which are strongly excited by the control inputs or plume disturbance forces and which strongly couple with the measured outputs. The particular technique to be used in this study is the subsystem balancing approach which was previously developed by the present investigator. This method is very efficient computationally. Furthermore, it gives accurate results even for the difficult case where the structure has many closed-spaced natural frequencies, when standard modal truncation can give misleading results. Station configuration SC-5 is a good example of such a structure.

  17. Transgenic mice overexpressing reticulon 3 develop neuritic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangyou; Shi, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yi, Hong; Yin, Xinghua; Gearing, Marla; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic neurites are swollen dendrites or axons recognizable near amyloid plaques as a part of important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report herein that reticulon 3 (RTN3) is accumulated in a distinct population of dystrophic neurites named as RTN3 immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs). The occurrence of RIDNs is concomitant with the formation of high-molecular-weight RTN3 aggregates in brains of AD cases and mice expressing mutant APP. Ultrastructural analysis confirms accumulation of RTN3-containing aggregates in RIDNs. It appears that the protein level of RTN3 governs the formation of RIDNs because transgenic mice expressing RTN3 will develop RIDNs, initially in the hippocampal CA1 region, and later in other hippocampal and cortical regions. Importantly, we show that the presence of dystrophic neurites in Tg-RTN3 mice causes impairments in spatial learning and memory, as well as synaptic plasticity, implying that RIDNs potentially contribute to AD cognitive dysfunction. Together, we demonstrate that aggregation of RTN3 contributes to AD pathogenesis by inducing neuritic dystrophy. Inhibition of RTN3 aggregation is likely a therapeutic approach for reducing neuritic dystrophy. PMID:17476306

  18. Magnetic NGF-releasing PLLA/iron oxide nanoparticles direct extending neurites and preferentially guide neurites along aligned electrospun microfibers.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, Jonathan M; Provenza, Christina; Caliendo, Tyler; Dutz, Silvio; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2015-11-18

    Nerve growth factor releasing composite nanoparticles (NGF-cNPs) were developed to direct the extension of neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were incorporated into poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) nanoparticles in order to position the NGF-cNPs in a culture dish. Neurites growing from DRG extended toward the NGF released from the NGF-cNPs. DRG were then cultured on aligned PLLA microfibers in the presence of NGF-cNPs, and these biomaterials combined to align DRG neurite extension along one axis and preferentially toward the NGF-cNPs. This combinatorial biomaterial approach shows promise as a strategy to direct the extension of regenerating neurites. PMID:26322376

  19. Neural Dynamics Underlying Event-Related Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Bressler, Steven L.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Ding, Ming-Zhou; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, Istvan; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two opposing hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying sensory event-related potentials (ERPs). One holds that sensory ERPs are generated by phase resetting of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and the other that they result from signal averaging of stimulus-evoked neural responses. We tested several contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by direct intracortical analysis of neural activity in monkeys. Our findings clearly demonstrate evoked response contributions to the sensory ERP in the monkey, and they suggest the likelihood that a mixed (Evoked/Phase Resetting) model may account for the generation of scalp ERPs in humans.

  20. Ferroelectric domain dynamics under an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappe, Andrew; Shin, Young-Han; Grinberg, Ilya; Chen, I.-Wei

    2007-03-01

    Ferroelectric oxides with the perovskite structure are promising materials for nonvolatile random access computer memories. PbZr1-xTixO3 is currently used for this purpose. In these materials, storage of a bit involves the reorientation of polarization, or the movement of a ferroelectric domain wall. However, the intrinsic properties of the polarization reversal process of ferroelectrics at the microscopic level still have not been revealed, either by experiments or computations. In this talk, I will show how this problem can be studied with a multi-scale approach. First, an interatomic potential is parameterized to first-principles calculations, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed. Second, stochastic Monte Carlo simulations are conducted, with nucleation and growth rates extracted from the MD simulations. For PbTiO3, we find that while the overall domain-wall speed from our calculation is in good agreement with the recent experiments, the size of the critical nucleus is much smaller than predicted from the Miller-Weinreich model. We think that this discrepancy can be explained by a diffuse-boundary model and by the fact that the overall wall motion is controlled by both the nucleation and growth processes.

  1. Dynamic diagnostic and decision procedures under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we consider uncertainty that arises when the true state x {element_of} E is not accessible to direct observation and remains unknown. Instead, we observe some features {theta} {element_of} {Theta} that carry a certain information about the true state. This information is described by the conditional distribution P({Theta}{vert_bar}E), which we call the linkage distribution. Regarding this distribution we assume that it exists but is unknown. This leads to uncertainty with respect to states from E and the linkage distribution P({Theta}{vert_bar}E), which we denote by NEP. The substantive problem can be stated as follows: from observations of the features {theta}{element_of}{Theta} made at each time instant n = 1,2,...,recognize the state x {element_of} E, identify the linkage distribution P, and use the results of recognition and identification to choose a decision y {element_of} Y so that the decision process is optimal in some sense. State recognition is the subject of diagnostics. The uncertainty NEP thus generates a problem of diagnostics and dynamic decision making.

  2. Neurite outgrowth at the biomimetic interface.

    PubMed

    Kofron, Celinda M; Liu, Yu-Ting; López-Fagundo, Cristina Y; Mitchel, Jennifer A; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the cues that guide axons and how we can optimize these cues to achieve directed neuronal growth is imperative for neural tissue engineering. Cells in the local environment influence neurons with a rich combination of cues. This study deconstructs the complex mixture of guidance cues by working at the biomimetic interface--isolating the topographical information presented by cells and determining its capacity to guide neurons. We generated replica materials presenting topographies of oriented astrocytes (ACs), endothelial cells (ECs), and Schwann cells (SCs) as well as computer-aided design materials inspired by the contours of these cells (bioinspired-CAD). These materials presented distinct topographies and anisotropies and in all cases were sufficient to guide neurons. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells and neurites demonstrated the most directed response on bioinspired-CAD materials which presented anisotropic features with 90 degrees edges. DRG alignment was strongest on SC bioinspired-CAD materials followed by AC bioinspired-CAD materials, with more uniform orientation to EC bioinspired-CAD materials. Alignment on replicas was strongest on SC replica materials followed by AC and EC replicas. These results suggest that the topographies of anisotropic tissue structures are sufficient for neuronal guidance. This work is discussed in the context of feature dimensions, morphology, and guidepost hypotheses.

  3. Hearing development and spiral ganglion neurite growth in VASP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Schick, Bernhard; Hartensuer, Rene; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Hansen, Stefan; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa E; Eigenthaler, Martin; Walter, Ulrich; Ryan, Allen F; Brors, Dominik

    2007-10-31

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) has been found to be involved in intracellular signalling pathways and to play an important role in the actin associated organization and formation of the cytoskeleton. Since differential VASP expression was noted in inner ear tissues, the present study was performed to investigate the hearing development in VASP deficient mice. Hearing development in VASP-/- mice and wild type animals was investigated by auditory brain stem (ABR) measurements. In addition, inner ear tissues of wild type animals were tested for VASP expression using PCR, Western blot analysis, in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry. To compare spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth, SG explants from VASP-/- and wild type mice were analyzed under cell culture conditions. The electroacoustical results of the present study indicate that VASP deficient mice present with a later onset of hearing during postnatal development compared to wild type animals. Transient VASP expression was detected in neonatal SG of wild type mice. Tissue culture experiments with SG explants from VASP-/- animals revealed significant alterations in SG neurite extension compared to wild types. The present findings suggest a role for VASP during neonatal development of the mammalian cochlea and allow speculation on a possible delayed innervation of cochlear hair cells due to changes in SG neurite growth in VASP-deficient mice. Temporary VASP deficits in the neonatal inner ear may be compensated by related proteins like MENA leading to a delayed but complete development of hearing function in VASP-/- animals.

  4. Cadmium inhibits neurite outgrowth in differentiating human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pak, Eun Joo; Son, Gi Dong; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium, a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, is well known to induce neurotoxicity. However, the underlying mechanism of cadmium-mediated neurotoxicity remains unclear. We have studied cadmium inhibition of neurite outgrowth using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Cadmium, at a concentration of 3 μmol/L, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells 48 hours after cadmium treatment (1-3 μmol/L cadmium) was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 1 to 3 μmol/L cadmium resulted in decreased level of cross-reactivities with 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, NAC (N-acetyl-l-cysteine), recovered the expression of GAP-43 in cadmium-treated cells. The results indicate that cadmium is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells and that this effect might result from ROS generation by cadmium.

  5. Stochastic population dynamics under resource constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavane, Ajinkya S.; Nigam, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the population growth of a certain species in which every generation reproduces thrice over a period of predefined time, under certain constraints of resources needed for survival of population. We study the survival period of a species by randomizing the reproduction probabilities within a window at same predefined ages and the resources are being produced by the working force of the population at a variable rate. This randomness in the reproduction rate makes the population growth stochastic in nature and one cannot predict the exact form of evolution. Hence we study the growth by running simulations for such a population and taking an ensemble averaged over 500 to 5000 such simulations as per the need. While the population reproduces in a stochastic manner, we have implemented a constraint on the amount of resources available for the population. This is important to make the simulations more realistic. The rate of resource production then is tuned to find the rate which suits the survival of the species. We also compute the mean life time of the species corresponding to different resource production rate. Study for these outcomes in the parameter space defined by the reproduction probabilities and rate of resource production is carried out.

  6. Dynamic separation of macromolecules under temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yusuke; Buguin, Axel; Libchaber, Albert

    2011-03-01

    Thermophoresis is a motion of suspensions in a fluid that are subjected to a temperature gradient. Although its effect is widely studied in case of single solute in water, little is known about how the mixture of different solutes is affected. We heated water with an infrared laser by ΔTmax = 5C and ∇ T = 0.25C/um to induce thermophoresis of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and DNA. PEG is depleted from the hot region and results in a stationary gradient of its high volume fraction ϕ . Under this high concentration of PEG, DNA of small concentration is submitted to thermophoresis and osmotic pressure difference. The DNA shows regime of depletion, ring-like localization and accumulation as the volume fraction of PEG increases. As the osmotic force depends on the size of trapped solutes, DNA of different size accumulates at different regions. Depending whether the DNA size is below or above 5kbp a different scaling of position versus DNA size is observed. Thermal separation is a general phenomenon. It applies also to RNA and microbeads. YTM is supported by JSPS fellowship and M.Josee-H.Kravis fellowship from the Rockefeller University.

  7. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  8. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  9. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-12-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and superior cervical ganglia, and were co-cultured, either in a random or localized way. Neurite growth from SNs toward CMs was assessed by immunohistochemistry for neurofilament M and α-actinin in response to neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and a chemical repellent, semaphorin 3A. As a result, GDNF as well as NGF and BDNF stimulated neurite growth. GDNF enhanced neurite outgrowth even under the NGF-depleted culture condition, excluding an indirect effect of GDNF via NGF. Quantification of mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry at different developmental stages revealed that GDNF is abundantly expressed in the hearts of embryos and neonates, but not in adult hearts. GDNF plays an important role in inducing cardiac sympathetic innervation at the early developmental stages. A possible role in (re)innervation of injured or transplanted or cultured and transplanted myocardium may deserve investigation.

  10. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  11. Decentralized optimal control of dynamical systems under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasov, R.; Dmitruk, N. M.; Kirillova, F. M.

    2011-07-01

    The problem of optimal control of a group of interconnected dynamical objects under uncertainty is considered. The cases are examined in which the centralized control of the group of objects is impossible due to delay in the channel for information exchange between the group members. Optimal self-control algorithms in real time for each dynamical object are proposed. Various types of a priori and current information about the behavior of the group members and about uncertainties in the system are examined. The proposed methods supplement the earlier developed optimal control methods for an individual dynamical system and the methods of decentralized optimal control of deterministic objects. The results are illustrated with examples.

  12. Material Stiffness Effects on Neurite Alignment to Photopolymerized Micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line–space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 μm amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

  13. Neuroprotective Copper Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes Promote Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M.; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J.; White, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, CuII(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that CuII(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, CuII(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by CuII(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75–99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM CuII(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that CuII(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM CuII(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between CuII(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  14. A rapid, inexpensive high throughput screen method for neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Yeyeodu, Susan T; Witherspoon, Sam M; Gilyazova, Nailya; Ibeanu, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth assays are the most common phenotypic screen to assess chemical effects on neuronal cells. Current automated assays involve expensive equipment, lengthy sample preparation and handling, costly reagents and slow rates of data acquisition and analysis. We have developed a high throughput screen (HTS) for neurite outgrowth using a robust neuronal cell model coupled to fast and inexpensive visualization methods, reduced data volume and rapid data analysis. Neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cell, a subclone of PC12, possessing rapid growth and enhanced sensitivity to NGF was used as a model neuron. This method reduces preparation time by using cells expressing GFP or native cells stained with HCS CellMask(™) Red in a multiplexed 30 min fixation and staining step. A 2x2 camera binning process reduced both image data files and analysis times by 75% and 60% respectively, compared to current protocols. In addition, eliminating autofocus steps during montage generation reduced data collection time. Pharmacological profiles for stimulation and inhibition of neurite outgrowth by NGF and SU6656 were comparable to current standard method utilizing immunofluorescence detection of tubulin. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by members of a 1,120-member Prestwick compound library as assayed using this method identified six molecules, including etoposide, isoflupredone acetate, fludrocortisone acetate, thioguanosine, oxyphenbutazone and gibberellic acid, that more than doubled the neurite mass primed by 2 ng/ml NGF. This simple procedure represents an important routine approach in high throughput screening of large chemical libraries using the neurite outgrowth phenotype as a measure of the effects of chemical molecules on neuronal cells. PMID:21347208

  15. The role of calsyntenin-3 in dystrophic neurite formation in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya

    2016-03-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers may play an important role in the early pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: cognitive impairment caused by synaptic dysfunction. Dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques, another pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, are plaque-associated neuritic alterations preceding the appearance of synaptic loss. In the present review, we focus on the mechanism of dystrophic neurite formation by Aß oligomers, and discuss the neurotoxic role of Aβ-induced calsyntenin-3 in mediating dystrophic neurite formation. PMID:27018282

  16. Automatic quantification of neurite outgrowth by means of image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wouwer, Gert; Nuydens, Rony; Meert, Theo; Weyn, Barbara

    2004-07-01

    A system for quantification of neurite outgrowth in in-vitro experiments is described. The system is developed for routine use in a high-throughput setting and is therefore needs fast, cheap, and robust. It relies on automated digital microscopical imaging of microtiter plates. Image analysis is applied to extract features for characterisation of neurite outgrowth. The system is tested in a dose-response experiment on PC12 cells + Taxol. The performance of the system and its ability to measure changes on neuronal morphology is studied.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of ordering of polydimethylsiloxane under uniaxial extension

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N M; Gee, R H

    2005-03-11

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bulk melts of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are utilized to study chain conformation and ordering under constant uniaxial tension. We find that large extensions induce chain ordering in the direction of applied tension. We also find that voids are created via a cavitation mechanism. This study represents a validation of the current model for PDMS and benchmark for the future study of mechanical properties of PDMS melts enriched with fillers under tension.

  18. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics. PMID:26999636

  19. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics.

  20. Transthyretin provides trophic support via megalin by promoting neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, J R; Nogueira, RS; Vieira, M; Santos, SD; Ferraz-Nogueira, J P; Relvas, J B; Saraiva, M J

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a protein whose function has been associated to binding and distribution of thyroid hormones in the body and brain. However, little is known regarding the downstream signaling pathways triggered by wild-type TTR in the CNS either in neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia or in physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated how TTR affects hippocampal neurons in physiologic/pathologic conditions. Recombinant TTR significantly boosted neurite outgrowth in mice hippocampal neurons, both in number and length, independently of its ligands. This TTR neuritogenic activity is mediated by the megalin receptor and is lost in megalin-deficient neurons. We also found that TTR activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (ERK1/2) and Akt through Src, leading to the phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB. In addition, TTR promoted a transient rise in intracellular calcium through NMDA receptors, in a Src/megalin-dependent manner. Moreover, under excitotoxic conditions, TTR stimulation rescued cell death and neurite loss in TTR KO hippocampal neurons, which are more sensitive to excitotoxic degeneration than WT neurons, in a megalin-dependent manner. CREB was also activated by TTR under excitotoxic conditions, contributing to changes in the balance between Bcl2 protein family members, toward anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2/BclXL versus Bax). Finally, we clarify that TTR KO mice subjected to pMCAO have larger infarcts than WT mice, because of TTR and megalin neuronal downregulation. Our results indicate that TTR might be regarded as a neurotrophic factor, because it stimulates neurite outgrowth under physiological conditions, and promotes neuroprotection in ischemic conditions. PMID:27518433

  1. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  2. Protein displacements under external forces: An atomistic Langevin dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnandt, David; Utz, Nadine; Blumen, Alexander; Koslowski, Thorsten

    2009-02-01

    We present a fully atomistic Langevin dynamics approach as a method to simulate biopolymers under external forces. In the harmonic regime, this approach permits the computation of the long-term dynamics using only the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hessian matrix of second derivatives. We apply this scheme to identify polymorphs of model proteins by their mechanical response fingerprint, and we relate the averaged dynamics of proteins to their biological functionality, with the ion channel gramicidin A, a phosphorylase, and neuropeptide Y as examples. In an environment akin to dilute solutions, even small proteins show relaxation times up to 50 ns. Atomically resolved Langevin dynamics computations have been performed for the stretched gramicidin A ion channel.

  3. Soil Moisture Dynamics under Corn, Soybean, and Perennial Kura Clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T.; Venterea, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Rising global food and energy consumption call for increased agricultural production, whereas rising concerns for environmental quality call for farming systems with more favorable environmental impacts. Improved understanding and management of plant-soil water interactions are central to meeting these twin challenges. The objective of this research was to compare the temporal dynamics of soil moisture under contrasting cropping systems suited for the Midwestern region of the United States. Precipitation, infiltration, drainage, evapotranspiration, soil water storage, and freeze/thaw processes were measured hourly for three years in field plots of continuous corn (Zea mays L.), corn/soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation, and perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) in southeastern Minnesota. The evapotranspiration from the perennial clover most closely followed the temporal dynamics of precipitation, resulting in deep drainage which was reduced up to 50% relative to the annual crops. Soil moisture utilization also continued later into the fall under the clover than under the annual crops. In the annual cropping systems, crop sequence influenced the soil moisture dynamics. Soybean following corn and continuous corn exhibited evapotranspiration which was 80 mm less than and deep drainage which was 80 mm greater than that of corn following soybean. These differences occurred primarily during the spring and were associated with differences in early season plant growth between the systems. In the summer, soil moisture depletion was up to 30 mm greater under corn than soybean. Crop residue also played an important role in the soil moisture dynamics. Higher amounts of residue were associated with reduced soil freezing. This presentation will highlight key aspects of the soil moisture dynamics for these contrasting cropping systems across temporal scales ranging from hours to years. The links between soil moisture dynamics, crop yields, and nutrient leaching

  4. Mechanosensitive currents in the neurites of cultured mouse sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Lewin, Gary R

    2006-01-01

    Almost all sensory neurones in the dorsal root ganglia have a mechanosensory function. The transduction of mechanical stimuli in vivo takes place exclusively at the sensory ending. For cutaneous sensory receptors it has so far proved impossible to directly record the mechanically gated receptor potential because of the small size and inaccessibility of the sensory ending. Here we investigate whether mechanosensitive currents are present in the neurites of freshly isolated adult mouse sensory neurones in culture. Amost all sensory neurone neurites possess currents gated by submicrometre displacement stimuli (92%). Three types of mechanically activated conductance were characterized based on different inactivation kinetics. A rapidly adapting conductance was found in larger sensory neurones with narrow action potentials characteristic of mechanoreceptors. Slowly and intermediate adapting conductances were found exclusively in putative nociceptive neurones. Mechanically activated currents with similar kinetics were found also after stimulating the cell soma. However, soma currents were only observed in around 60% of cells tested and the displacement threshold was several times larger than for the neurite (∼6 μm). The reversal potential of the rapidly adapting current indicated that this current is largely selective for sodium ions whereas the slowly adapting current is non-selective. It is likely that distinct ion channel entities underlie these two currents. In summary, our data suggest that the high sensitivity and robustness of mechanically gated currents in the sensory neurite make this a useful in vitro model for the mechanosensitive sensory endings in vivo. PMID:17038434

  5. Dielectric relaxation of polymers: segmental dynamics under structural constraints.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2016-10-01

    In this article we review the recent polymer literature where dielectric spectroscopy has been used to investigate the segmental dynamics of polymers under the constraints produced by self-structuring. Specifically, we consider three cases: (i) semicrystalline polymers, (ii) segregated block-copolymers, and (iii) asymmetric miscible polymer blends. In these three situations the characteristics of the dielectric relaxation associated with the polymer segmental dynamics are markedly affected by the constraints imposed by the corresponding structural features. After reviewing in detail each of the polymer systems, the most common aspects are discussed in the context of the use of dielectric relaxation as a sensitive tool for analyzing structural features in nanostructured polymer systems.

  6. Thermomechanical behavior of EUV pellicle under dynamic exposure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Bloomfield, Max O.; Colburn, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of EUV pellicles as protective layers for EUV masks requires the use of refractory materials that can tolerate large temperature excursions due to the non-negligible absorption of EUV radiation during exposure. Additionally, the mechanical stress induced on the EUV pellicle by the thermal load is dependent on the thermal expansion of the material which can be responsible for transient wrinkling. In this study, an ultrathin (20 nm), free-standing membrane based on silicon nitride is utilized as a learning vehicle to understand the material requirements of EUV pellicles under dynamic exposure conditions that are typical of commercial EUV scanners. First, the nanoscale radiative properties (emissivity) and thermo-mechanical failure temperature of the dielectric film under vacuum conditions are experimentally investigated utilizing a pulsed ArF (193 nm) probing laser. The silicon nitride membrane is found to be marginally compatible with an equivalent 80W EUV source power under steady state illumination conditions. Next, the thermal behavior of the EUV pellicle under dynamic exposure conditions is simulated using a finite element solver. The transient temperature profile and stress distribution across the membrane under stationary state conditions are extracted for an equivalent 60W EUV power source and the pellicle wrinkling due to heating and consequent impact on CD uniformity is estimated. The present work provides a generalized methodology to anticipate the thermal response of a EUV pellicle under realistic exposure conditions.

  7. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  8. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  9. A subset of chicken statoacoustic ganglion neurites are repelled by Slit1 and Slit2

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, Andrea C.; Fantetti, Kristen N.; Moyers, Bryan A.; Fekete, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cells in the chicken inner ear are innervated by bipolar afferent neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG). During development, individual SAG neurons project their peripheral process to only one of eight distinct sensory organs. These neuronal subtypes may respond differently to guidance cues as they explore the periphery in search of their target. Previous gene expression data suggested that Slit repellants might channel SAG neurites into the sensory primordia, based on the presence of robo transcripts in the neurons and the confinement of slit transcripts to the flanks of the prosensory domains. This led to the prediction that excess Slit proteins would impede the outgrowth of SAG neurites. As predicted, axonal projections to the primordium of the anterior crista were reduced 2-3 days after electroporation of either slit1 or slit2 expression plasmids into the anterior pole of the otocyst on embryonic day 3 (E3). The posterior crista afferents, which normally grow through and adjacent to slit expression domains as they are navigating towards the posterior pole of the otocyst, did not show Slit responsiveness when similarly challenged by ectopic delivery of slit to their targets. The sensitivity to ectopic Slits shown by the anterior crista afferents was more the exception than the rule: responsiveness to Slits was not observed when the entire E4 SAG was challenged with Slits for 40 hours in vitro. The corona of neurites emanating from SAG explants was unaffected by the presence of purified human Slit1 and Slit2 in the culture medium. Reduced axon outgrowth from E8 olfactory bulbs cultured under similar conditions for 24 hours confirmed bioactivity of purified human Slits on chicken neurons. In summary, differential sensitivity to Slit repellents may influence the directional outgrowth of otic axons toward either the anterior or posterior otocyst. PMID:24456709

  10. Statistical Computations Underlying the Dynamics of Memory Updating

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Radulescu, Angela; Norman, Kenneth A.; Niv, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Psychophysical and neurophysiological studies have suggested that memory is not simply a carbon copy of our experience: Memories are modified or new memories are formed depending on the dynamic structure of our experience, and specifically, on how gradually or abruptly the world changes. We present a statistical theory of memory formation in a dynamic environment, based on a nonparametric generalization of the switching Kalman filter. We show that this theory can qualitatively account for several psychophysical and neural phenomena, and present results of a new visual memory experiment aimed at testing the theory directly. Our experimental findings suggest that humans can use temporal discontinuities in the structure of the environment to determine when to form new memory traces. The statistical perspective we offer provides a coherent account of the conditions under which new experience is integrated into an old memory versus forming a new memory, and shows that memory formation depends on inferences about the underlying structure of our experience. PMID:25375816

  11. A method of measuring dynamic strain under electromagnetic forming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinling; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Sijun; Lu, Jun; Guo, Chenglong; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Liu, Lin; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic strain measurement is rather important for the characterization of mechanical behaviors in electromagnetic forming process, but it has been hindered by high strain rate and serious electromagnetic interference for years. In this work, a simple and effective strain measuring technique for physical and mechanical behavior studies in the electromagnetic forming process has been developed. High resolution (˜5 ppm) of strain curves of a budging aluminum tube in pulsed electromagnetic field has been successfully measured using this technique. The measured strain rate is about 105 s-1, which depends on the discharging conditions, nearly one order of magnitude of higher than that under conventional split Hopkins pressure bar loading conditions (˜104 s-1). It has been found that the dynamic fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy is significantly enhanced during the electromagnetic forming, which explains why the formability is much larger under electromagnetic forging conditions in comparison with conventional forging processes.

  12. Phase separated microstructure and dynamics of polyurethane elastomers under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Ciprian; Padsalgikar, Ajay; Runt, James

    The molecular mobility of polyurethane elastomers is of the utmost importance in establishing physical properties for uses ranging from automotive tires and shoe soles to more sophisticated aerospace and biomedical applications. In many of these applications, chain dynamics as well as mechanical properties under external stresses/strains are critical for determining ultimate performance. In order to develop a more complete understanding of their mechanical response, we explored the effect of uniaxial strain on the phase separated microstructure and molecular dynamics of the elastomers. We utilize X-ray scattering to investigate soft segment and hard domain orientation, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy for interrogation of the dynamics. Uniaxial deformation is found to significantly perturb the phase-separated microstructure and chain orientation, and results in a considerable slowing down of the dynamics of the elastomers. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements of the polyurethanes under uniaxial deformation are also employed and the results are quantitatively correlated with mechanical tensile tests and the degree of phase separation from small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

  13. Bipolar transistor degradation under dynamic hot carrier stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Tadahiko; David Burnett, J.; Hu, Chenming

    1995-04-01

    Hot carrier induced bipolar transistor degradation under dynamic stress is studied. The model, ΔIB ∝ ( IR1.8t) 0.5, established from d.c. emitter-base reverse bias stress measurements is found to be still valid under pulse stress down to 20 ns pulse width, where ΔIB is drift of base current, IR is reverse emitter-base current under stress and t is stress time. Although partial degradation recovery is observed under d.c. emitter-base forward bias, ΔIB from alternating reverse-forward stress representative BiCMOS circuit operation agrees with the ΔIB model with no significant recovery effect. This is explained by a higher degradation rate after recovery of previous damage. An experimental basis of BiCMOS circuit reliability testing simulation is thus provided.

  14. Study of laser uncaging induced morphological alteration of rat cortical neurites using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Tu, Chunlong; Liang, Yitao; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-09-30

    Activity-dependent structural remodeling is an important aspect of neuronal plasticity. In the previous researches, neuronal structure variations resulting from external interventions were detected by the imaging instruments such as the fluorescence microscopy, the scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and the laser confocal microscopy. In this article, a new platform which combined the photochemical stimulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) was set up to detect the activity-dependent structural remodeling. In the experiments, the cortical neurites on the glass coverslips were stimulated by locally uncaged glutamate under the ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, and a calcium-related structural collapse of neurites (about 250 nm height decrease) was observed by an AFM. This was the first attempt to combine the laser uncaging with AFM in living cell researches. With the advantages of highly localized stimulation (<5 μm), super resolution imaging (<3.8 nm), and convenient platform building, this system was suitable for the quantitative observation of the neuron mechanical property variations and morphological alterations modified by neural activities under different photochemical stimulations, which would be helpful for studying physiological and pathological mechanisms of structural and functional changes induced by the biomolecule acting.

  15. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ya-Yun; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2013-11-01

    production and neuronal cell death. • BBR activates IGF-1/Akt/GSK-3β signaling under normal and high glucose conditions. • BBR enhances HO-1 and NGF expression through stimulating Nrf2 translocation. • BBR promotes neurite outgrowth through Nrf2-dependent pathway.

  16. AlphaII-spectrin participates in the surface expression of cell adhesion molecule L1 and neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Trinh-Trang-Tan, Marie-Marcelle; Bigot, Sylvain; Picot, Julien; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Kordeli, Ekaterini

    2014-04-01

    AlphaII-spectrin, a basic component of the spectrin-based scaffold which organizes and stabilizes membrane microdomains in most animal cells, has been recently implicated in cell adherence and actin dynamics. Here we investigated the contribution of αΙΙ-spectrin to neuritogenesis, a highly complex cellular process which requires continuous actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cross-talk between extracellular cues and their cell surface receptors, including cell adhesion molecules. Using RNA interference-mediated gene silencing to down-regulate αΙΙ-spectrin expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we observed major changes in neurite morphology and cell shape: (1) reduced mean length and a higher number of neurites per cell; occasional long neurites were thinner and displayed abnormal adhesiveness during cell migration resulting in frequent breaks; similar persisting adhesiveness and breaks were also observed in trailing edges of cell bodies; (2) irregular polygonal cell shape in parallel with loss of cortical F-actin from neuronal cell bodies; (3) reduction in protein levels of αΙ- and βΙ-spectrins, but not βΙΙ-spectrin (4) decreased global expression of adhesion molecule L1 and spectrin-binding adapter ankyrin-B, which links L1 to the plasma membrane. Remarkably, αΙΙ-spectrin depletion affected L1 - but not NCAM - cell surface expression, and L1 clustering at growth cones. This study demonstrates that αΙΙ-spectrin is implicated in normal morphology and adhesive properties of neuron cell bodies and neurites, and in cell surface expression and organization of adhesion molecule L1. PMID:24462599

  17. General polytropic dynamic cylinder under self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We explore self-similar hydrodynamics of general polytropic (GP) and isothermal cylinders of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry under self-gravity. Specific entropy conservation along streamlines serves as the dynamic equation of state. Together with possible axial flows, we construct classes of analytic and semi-analytic non-linear dynamic solutions for either cylindrical expansion or contraction radially by solving cylindrical Lane-Emden equations. By extensive numerical explorations and fitting trials in reference to asymptotes derived for large index n, we infer several convenient empirical formulae for characteristic solution properties of cylindrical Lane-Emden equations in terms of n values. A new type of asymptotic solutions for small x is also derived in the Appendix. These analyses offer hints for self-similar dynamic evolution of molecular filaments for forming protostars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets and of large-scale gaseous arms or starburst rings in (barred) spiral galaxies for forming young massive stars. Such dynamic solutions are necessary starting background for further three-dimensional (in)stability analysis of various modes. They may be used to initialize numerical simulations and serve as important benchmarks for testing numerical codes. Such GP formalism can be further generalized to include magnetic field for a GP magnetohydrodynamic analysis.

  18. Alignment and Stiffening of Liquid Crystal Elastomers under Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Aditya; Patra, Prabir; Ajayan, Pulickel; Chapman, Walter; Verduzco, Rafael

    2013-03-01

    Biological tissues have the remarkable ability to remodel and repair in response to disease, injury, and mechanical stresses, a phenomenon known ``functional adaptation'' or ``remodeling''. Herein, we report similar behavior in polydomain liquid crystal elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers dramatically increase in stiffness by up to 90 % under low-amplitude, repetitive (dynamic) compression. By studying a systematic series of materials, we demonstrate that the stiffness increase is directly influenced by the liquid crystal content of the elastomers, the presence of a nematic liquid crystal phase and the use of a dynamic as opposed to static deformation. Through a combination of rheological measurements, polarizing optical microscopy and 2-D X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that self-stiffening arises due to rotations of the nematic director in response to dynamic compression, and show that the behavior is consistent with the theory for nematic rubber elasticity. Previous work with liquid crystal elastomers has focused primarily on `soft elastic' deformations at large strains, but our findings indicate rich behavior at previously overlooked low-strain, dynamic deformations.

  19. Automated quantification of neurite outgrowth orientation distributions on patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew; Wang, Dadong; Sinclair, Catriona M.; Kapsa, Robert M. I.; Quigley, Anita F.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Razal, Joselito M.; Baughman, Ray H.; Münch, Gerald; Vallotton, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Objective. We have developed an image analysis methodology for quantifying the anisotropy of neuronal projections on patterned substrates. Approach. Our method is based on the fitting of smoothing splines to the digital traces produced using a non-maximum suppression technique. This enables precise estimates of the local tangents uniformly along the neurite length, and leads to unbiased orientation distributions suitable for objectively assessing the anisotropy induced by tailored surfaces. Main results. In our application, we demonstrate that carbon nanotubes arrayed in parallel bundles over gold surfaces induce a considerable neurite anisotropy; a result which is relevant for regenerative medicine. Significance. Our pipeline is generally applicable to the study of fibrous materials on 2D surfaces and should also find applications in the study of DNA, microtubules, and other polymeric materials.

  20. Dynamic performance of dissipative dielectric elastomers under alternating mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Sheng, Junjie; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yongquan; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study about the effect of dissipation on the dynamic performance of a dielectric elastomer membrane subject to a combination of mechanical load and voltage. The thermodynamic dissipative model is given and the equation of motion is deduced by a free energy method. It is found that when the applied mechanical load and voltage are static, the membrane may reach a state of equilibrium after the viscoelastic relaxation. When the voltage is static but the mechanical load is sinusoidal, the membrane will resonate at multiple frequencies. The study result indicates that the viscoelasticity can reduce the natural frequency and increase the mean stretch of the dielectric elastomer. After the power source is cut off, the effect of current leakage on dynamic performance under alternating mechanical load is that the natural frequency increases and the mean stretch reduces.

  1. Modeling the Underlying Dynamics of the Spread of Crime

    PubMed Central

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P.; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters—patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars—we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy. PMID:24694545

  2. Dielectric relaxation of polymers: segmental dynamics under structural constraints.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2016-10-01

    In this article we review the recent polymer literature where dielectric spectroscopy has been used to investigate the segmental dynamics of polymers under the constraints produced by self-structuring. Specifically, we consider three cases: (i) semicrystalline polymers, (ii) segregated block-copolymers, and (iii) asymmetric miscible polymer blends. In these three situations the characteristics of the dielectric relaxation associated with the polymer segmental dynamics are markedly affected by the constraints imposed by the corresponding structural features. After reviewing in detail each of the polymer systems, the most common aspects are discussed in the context of the use of dielectric relaxation as a sensitive tool for analyzing structural features in nanostructured polymer systems. PMID:27560167

  3. Modeling the underlying dynamics of the spread of crime.

    PubMed

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters--patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars--we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy.

  4. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  5. Piezoelectric substrates promote neurite growth in rat spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Royo-Gascon, Núria; Wininger, Michael; Scheinbeim, Jerry I; Firestein, Bonnie L; Craelius, William

    2013-01-01

    We tested the possibility that exogenous electrical activity from a piezoelectric substrate could influence neuronal structure in cultured spinal cord neurons. Oscillating electrical fields were delivered to rat neurons via substrates consisting of poly(vinylidene fluoride) film, both in its piezoelectric (PZ) and non-piezoelectric (PV) forms. To induce oscillating electrical fields at the film surfaces, a 50 Hz mechanical vibration was applied. After 4 days of mechano-electrical stimulation, neuronal densities were increased by 115% and neurons grew 79% more neurites, with more than double the branch points, compared with neurons grown on non-stimulated PZ films (p < 0.001). The effects were due to electrical field, because vibration applied to non-PZ films did not increase neurite growth. We conclude that the oscillating electric fields produced from PZ polymer substrates can induce plastic changes in neurons of the central nervous system and herein we show its influence on neurite growth and branching. PMID:22864823

  6. Foxp2 regulates gene networks implicated in neurite outgrowth in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Vernes, Sonja C; Oliver, Peter L; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Lockstone, Helen E; Puliyadi, Rathi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Ho, Joses; Mombereau, Cedric; Brewer, Ariel; Lowy, Ernesto; Nicod, Jérôme; Groszer, Matthias; Baban, Dilair; Sahgal, Natasha; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Davies, Kay E; Geschwind, Daniel H; Fisher, Simon E

    2011-07-01

    Forkhead-box protein P2 is a transcription factor that has been associated with intriguing aspects of cognitive function in humans, non-human mammals, and song-learning birds. Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. Reduced functional dosage of the mouse version (Foxp2) causes deficient cortico-striatal synaptic plasticity and impairs motor-skill learning. Moreover, the songbird orthologue appears critically important for vocal learning. Across diverse vertebrate species, this well-conserved transcription factor is highly expressed in the developing and adult central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms regulated by Foxp2 during brain development. We used an integrated functional genomics strategy to robustly define Foxp2-dependent pathways, both direct and indirect targets, in the embryonic brain. Specifically, we performed genome-wide in vivo ChIP-chip screens for Foxp2-binding and thereby identified a set of 264 high-confidence neural targets under strict, empirically derived significance thresholds. The findings, coupled to expression profiling and in situ hybridization of brain tissue from wild-type and mutant mouse embryos, strongly highlighted gene networks linked to neurite development. We followed up our genomics data with functional experiments, showing that Foxp2 impacts on neurite outgrowth in primary neurons and in neuronal cell models. Our data indicate that Foxp2 modulates neuronal network formation, by directly and indirectly regulating mRNAs involved in the development and plasticity of neuronal connections.

  7. Marginally subcritical dynamics explain enhanced stimulus discriminability under attention

    PubMed Central

    Tomen, Nergis; Rotermund, David; Ernst, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has established the hypothesis that cortical neurons operate close to a critical state which describes a phase transition from chaotic to ordered dynamics. Critical dynamics are suggested to optimize several aspects of neuronal information processing. However, although critical dynamics have been demonstrated in recordings of spontaneously active cortical neurons, little is known about how these dynamics are affected by task-dependent changes in neuronal activity when the cortex is engaged in stimulus processing. Here we explore this question in the context of cortical information processing modulated by selective visual attention. In particular, we focus on recent findings that local field potentials (LFPs) in macaque area V4 demonstrate an increase in γ-band synchrony and a simultaneous enhancement of object representation with attention. We reproduce these results using a model of integrate-and-fire neurons where attention increases synchrony by enhancing the efficacy of recurrent interactions. In the phase space spanned by excitatory and inhibitory coupling strengths, we identify critical points and regions of enhanced discriminability. Furthermore, we quantify encoding capacity using information entropy. We find a rapid enhancement of stimulus discriminability with the emergence of synchrony in the network. Strikingly, only a narrow region in the phase space, at the transition from subcritical to supercritical dynamics, supports the experimentally observed discriminability increase. At the supercritical border of this transition region, information entropy decreases drastically as synchrony sets in. At the subcritical border, entropy is maximized under the assumption of a coarse observation scale. Our results suggest that cortical networks operate at such near-critical states, allowing minimal attentional modulations of network excitability to substantially augment stimulus representation in the LFPs. PMID:25202240

  8. Dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Favi, Pelagie M; Zhang, Qiu; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Mamontov, Eugene; Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Palmer, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The effects of static electric field on the dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water have been investigated by means of incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). Measurements were performed on lysozyme samples, hydrated respectively with heavy water (D2O) to capture the protein dynamics, and with light water (H2O), to probe the dynamics of the hydration shell, in the temperature range from 210 < T < 260 K. The hydration fraction in both cases was about 0.38 gram of water per gram of dry protein. The field strengths investigated were respectively 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm ( 2 106 V/m) for the protein hydrated with D2O and 0 kV and 1 kV/mm for the H2O-hydrated counterpart. While the overall internal protons dynamics of the protein appears to be unaffected by the application of electric field up to 2 kV/mm, likely due to the stronger intra-molecular interactions, there is also no appreciable quantitative enhancement of the diffusive dynamics of the hydration water, as would be anticipated based on our recent observations in water confined in silica pores under field values of 2.5 kV/mm. This may be due to the difference in surface interactions between water and the two adsorption hosts (silica and protein), or to the existence of a critical threshold field value Ec 2 3 kV/mm for increased molecular diffusion, for which electrical breakdown is a limitation for our sample.

  9. Marginally subcritical dynamics explain enhanced stimulus discriminability under attention.

    PubMed

    Tomen, Nergis; Rotermund, David; Ernst, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has established the hypothesis that cortical neurons operate close to a critical state which describes a phase transition from chaotic to ordered dynamics. Critical dynamics are suggested to optimize several aspects of neuronal information processing. However, although critical dynamics have been demonstrated in recordings of spontaneously active cortical neurons, little is known about how these dynamics are affected by task-dependent changes in neuronal activity when the cortex is engaged in stimulus processing. Here we explore this question in the context of cortical information processing modulated by selective visual attention. In particular, we focus on recent findings that local field potentials (LFPs) in macaque area V4 demonstrate an increase in γ-band synchrony and a simultaneous enhancement of object representation with attention. We reproduce these results using a model of integrate-and-fire neurons where attention increases synchrony by enhancing the efficacy of recurrent interactions. In the phase space spanned by excitatory and inhibitory coupling strengths, we identify critical points and regions of enhanced discriminability. Furthermore, we quantify encoding capacity using information entropy. We find a rapid enhancement of stimulus discriminability with the emergence of synchrony in the network. Strikingly, only a narrow region in the phase space, at the transition from subcritical to supercritical dynamics, supports the experimentally observed discriminability increase. At the supercritical border of this transition region, information entropy decreases drastically as synchrony sets in. At the subcritical border, entropy is maximized under the assumption of a coarse observation scale. Our results suggest that cortical networks operate at such near-critical states, allowing minimal attentional modulations of network excitability to substantially augment stimulus representation in the LFPs.

  10. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  11. Dynamics of a Complete Wetting Liquid Under Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C.-T.; Lequeux, F.; Limat, L.

    We describe a simple model of a contact line under purely diffusive evaporation and complete wetting condition taking into account the divergent nature of evaporative flux near the contact line as proposed by Deegan et al. [Nature 389:827, 1997] by using electrostatic analogy. We show the existence of a precursor film at the edge of the liquid and generalize Tanner's law accounting for evaporative effects. We apply this model to the problem of evaporation of a liquid droplet and partly recover the dynamics of spreading and retraction found in experiments [Poulard et al., Langmuir 21:8226-8233, 2005].

  12. Dynamical structure underlying inverse stochastic resonance and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntarla, Muhammet; Cressman, John R.; Ozer, Mahmut; Barreto, Ernest

    2013-10-01

    We investigate inverse stochastic resonance (ISR), a recently reported phenomenon in which the spiking activity of a Hodgkin-Huxley model neuron subject to external noise exhibits a pronounced minimum as the noise intensity increases. We clarify the mechanism that underlies ISR and show that its most surprising features are a consequence of the dynamical structure of the model. Furthermore, we show that the ISR effect depends strongly on the procedures used to measure it. Our results are important for the experimentalist who seeks to observe the ISR phenomenon.

  13. Simulating spin dynamics in organic solids under heteronuclear decoupling.

    PubMed

    Frantsuzov, Ilya; Ernst, Matthias; Brown, Steven P; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in simulating the dynamics of multiple coupled nuclear spins, predicting the evolution of nuclear magnetisation in the presence of radio-frequency decoupling remains challenging. We use exact numerical simulations of the spin dynamics under simultaneous magic-angle spinning and RF decoupling to determine the extent to which numerical simulations can be used to predict the experimental performance of heteronuclear decoupling for the CW, TPPM and XiX sequences, using the methylene group of glycine as a model system. The signal decay times are shown to be strongly dependent on the largest spin order simulated. Unexpectedly large differences are observed between the dynamics with and without spin echoes. Qualitative trends are well reproduced by modestly sized spin system simulations, and the effects of finite spin-system size can, in favourable cases, be mitigated by extrapolation. Quantitative prediction of the behaviour in complex parameter spaces is found, however, to be very challenging, suggesting that there are significant limits to the role of numerical simulations in RF decoupling problems, even when specialist techniques, such as state-space restriction, are used.

  14. Stock price dynamics and option valuations under volatility feedback effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniainen, Juho; Piché, Robert

    2013-02-01

    According to the volatility feedback effect, an unexpected increase in squared volatility leads to an immediate decline in the price-dividend ratio. In this paper, we consider the properties of stock price dynamics and option valuations under the volatility feedback effect by modeling the joint dynamics of stock price, dividends, and volatility in continuous time. Most importantly, our model predicts the negative effect of an increase in squared return volatility on the value of deep-in-the-money call options and, furthermore, attempts to explain the volatility puzzle. We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism by which the market price of diffusion return risk, or an equity risk-premium, affects option prices and empirically illustrate how to identify that mechanism using forward-looking information on option contracts. Our theoretical and empirical results support the relevance of the volatility feedback effect. Overall, the results indicate that the prevailing practice of ignoring the time-varying dividend yield in option pricing can lead to oversimplification of the stock market dynamics.

  15. Dynamic Myofibrillar Remodeling in Live Cardiomyocytes under Static Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaxiao; Schmidt, Lucas P.; Wang, Zhonghai; Yang, Xiaoqi; Shao, Yonghong; Borg, Thomas K.; Markwald, Roger; Runyan, Raymond; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2016-01-01

    An increase in mechanical load in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy, either physiologically (heart development, exercise and pregnancy) or pathologically (high blood pressure and heart-valve regurgitation). Understanding cardiac hypertrophy is critical to comprehending the mechanisms of heart development and treatment of heart disease. However, the major molecular event that occurs during physiological or pathological hypertrophy is the dynamic process of sarcomeric addition, and it has not been observed. In this study, a custom-built second harmonic generation (SHG) confocal microscope was used to study dynamic sarcomeric addition in single neonatal CMs in a 3D culture system under acute, uniaxial, static, sustained stretch. Here we report, for the first time, live-cell observations of various modes of dynamic sarcomeric addition (and how these real-time images compare to static images from hypertrophic hearts reported in the literature): 1) Insertion in the mid-region or addition at the end of a myofibril; 2) Sequential addition with an existing myofibril as a template; and 3) Longitudinal splitting of an existing myofibril. The 3D cell culture system developed on a deformable substrate affixed to a stretcher and the SHG live-cell imaging technique are unique tools for real-time analysis of cultured models of hypertrophy. PMID:26861590

  16. Dynamic Myofibrillar Remodeling in Live Cardiomyocytes under Static Stretch.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaxiao; Schmidt, Lucas P; Wang, Zhonghai; Yang, Xiaoqi; Shao, Yonghong; Borg, Thomas K; Markwald, Roger; Runyan, Raymond; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-01-01

    An increase in mechanical load in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy, either physiologically (heart development, exercise and pregnancy) or pathologically (high blood pressure and heart-valve regurgitation). Understanding cardiac hypertrophy is critical to comprehending the mechanisms of heart development and treatment of heart disease. However, the major molecular event that occurs during physiological or pathological hypertrophy is the dynamic process of sarcomeric addition, and it has not been observed. In this study, a custom-built second harmonic generation (SHG) confocal microscope was used to study dynamic sarcomeric addition in single neonatal CMs in a 3D culture system under acute, uniaxial, static, sustained stretch. Here we report, for the first time, live-cell observations of various modes of dynamic sarcomeric addition (and how these real-time images compare to static images from hypertrophic hearts reported in the literature): 1) Insertion in the mid-region or addition at the end of a myofibril; 2) Sequential addition with an existing myofibril as a template; and 3) Longitudinal splitting of an existing myofibril. The 3D cell culture system developed on a deformable substrate affixed to a stretcher and the SHG live-cell imaging technique are unique tools for real-time analysis of cultured models of hypertrophy. PMID:26861590

  17. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.

    2014-05-15

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (Hybrane® S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na{sup +}-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-T{sub g} motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, T{sub g}. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- T{sub g} beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na{sup +}-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer T{sub g}, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  18. HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M.; Simms, D.

    2000-10-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time-varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modelling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high-load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal force histories were used to characterize dynamic stall vortex kinematics and normal force amplification. Dynamic stall vortices and normal force amplification were confirmed to occur in response to angle-of-attack excursions above the static stall threshold. Stall vortices occupied approximately one-half of the blade span and persisted for nearly one-fourth of the blade rotation cycle. Stall vortex convection varied along the blade, resulting in dramatic deformation of the vortex. Presence and deformation of the dynamic stall vortex produced corresponding amplification of normal forces. Analyses revealed consistent alterations to vortex kinematics in response to changes in reduced frequency, span location and yaw error. Finally, vortex structures and kinematics not previously documented for wind turbine blades were isolated. Published in 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Varying the diameter of aligned electrospun fibers alters neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Bing; Mullins, Michael E; Cregg, Jared M; McCarthy, Connor W; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2010-08-01

    Aligned, electrospun fibers have shown great promise in facilitating directed neurite outgrowth within cell and animal models. While electrospun fiber diameter does influence cellular behavior, it is not known how aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds of differing diameter influence neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell (SC) migration. Thus, the goal of this study was to first create highly aligned, electrospun fiber scaffolds of varying diameter and then assess neurite and SC behavior from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants. Three groups of highly aligned, electrospun poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers were created (1325+383 nm, large diameter fibers; 759+179 nm, intermediate diameter fibers; and 293+65 nm, small diameter fibers). Embryonic stage nine (E9) chick DRG were cultured on fiber substrates for 5 days and then the explants were stained against neurofilament and S100. DAPI stain was used to assess SC migration. Neurite length and SC migration distance were determined. In general, the direction of neurite extension and SC migration were guided along the aligned fibers. On the small diameter fiber substrate, the neurite length was 42% and 36% shorter than those on the intermediate and large fiber substrates, respectively. Interestingly, SC migration did not correlate with that of neurite extension in all situations. SCs migrated equivalently with extending neurites in both the small and large diameter scaffolds, but lagged behind neurites on the intermediate diameter scaffolds. Thus, in some situations, topography alone is sufficient to guide neurites without the leading support of SCs. Scanning electron microscopy images show that neurites cover the fibers and do not reside exclusively between fibers. Further, at the interface between fibers and neurites, filopodial extensions grab and attach to nearby fibers as they extend down the fiber substrate. Overall, the results and observations suggest that fiber diameter is an important parameter to consider when

  20. Polymer brushes with nanoinclusions under shear: A molecular dynamics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Milchev, A.; Dimitrov, D. I.; Binder, K.

    2010-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations with a dissipative particle dynamics thermostat to study the behavior of nanosized inclusions (colloids) in a polymer brush under shear whereby the solvent is explicitly included in the simulation. The brush is described by a bead-spring model for flexible polymer chains, grafted on a solid substrate, while the polymer-soluble nanoparticles in the solution are taken as soft spheres whose diameter is about three times larger than that of the chain segments and the solvent. We find that the brush number density profile, as well as the density profiles of the nanoinclusions and the solvent, remains insensitive to strong shear although the grafted chains tilt in direction of the flow. The thickness of the penetration layer of nanoinclusions, as well as their average concentration in the brush, stays largely unaffected even at the strongest shear. Our result manifests the remarkable robustness of polymer brushes with embedded nanoparticles under high shear which could be of importance for technological applications. PMID:21045924

  1. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  2. Three dimensional dynamics of rotating structures under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bediz, Bekir; Romero, L. A.; Ozdoganlar, O. Burak

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the spectral-Tchebychev (ST) technique for solution of three dimensional (3D) dynamics of rotating structures. In particular, structures that exhibit coupled dynamic response require a 3D modeling approach to capture their dynamic behavior. Rotational motions further complicate this behavior, inducing coriolis, centrifugal softening, and (nonlinear) stress-stiffening effects. Therefore, a 3D solution approach is needed to accurately capture the rotational dynamics. The presented 3D-ST technique provides a fast-converging and precise solution approach for rotational dynamics of structures with complex geometries and mixed boundary conditions. Specifically, unlike finite elements techniques, the presented technique uses a series expansion approach considering distributed-parameter system equations: The integral boundary value problem for rotating structures is discretized using the spectral-Tchebychev approach. To simplify the domain of the structures, cross-sectional and rotational transformations are applied to problems with curved cross-section and pretwisted geometry. The nonlinear terms included in the integral boundary value problem are linearized around an equilibrium solution using the quasi-static method. As a result, mass, damping, and stiffness matrices, as well as a forcing vector, are obtained for a given rotating structure. Several case studies are then performed to demonstrate the application and effectiveness of the 3D-ST solution. For each problem, the natural frequencies and modes shapes from the 3D-ST solution are compared to those from the literature (when available) and to those from a commercial finite elements software. The case studies include rotating/spinning parallelepipeds under free and mixed boundary conditions, and a cantilevered pretwisted beam (i.e., rotating blade) with an airfoil geometry rotating on a hub. It is seen that the natural frequencies and mode shapes from the 3D-ST technique differ from those from the

  3. Mechanical tension applied to substrate films specifies location of neuritogenesis and promotes major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurite development.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang-Qi; Franz, Eric W; Leach, Michelle K; Winterroth, Frank; White, Christina M; Rastogi, Arjun; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Corey, Joseph M

    2016-04-01

    One obstacle in neural repair is facilitating axon growth long enough to reach denervated targets. Recent studies show that axonal growth is accelerated by applying tension to bundles of neurites, and additional studies show that mechanical tension is critical to all neurite growth. However, no studies yet describe how individual neurons respond to tensile forces applied to cell bodies and neurites simultaneously; neither do any test motor neurons, a phenotype critical to neural repair. Here we examine the growth of dissociated motor neurons on stretchable substrates. E15 spinal motor neurons were cultured on poly-lactide-co-glycolide films stretched at 4.8, 9.6, or 14.3 mm day(-1). Morphological analysis revealed that substrate stretching has profound effects on developing motor neurons. Stretching increases major neurite length; it also forces neuritogenesis to occur nearest poles of the cell closest to the sources of tension. Stretching also reduces the number of neurites per neuron. These data show that substrate stretching affects neuronal morphology by specifying locations on the cell where neuritogenesis occurs and favoring major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurites. These results serve as a building block for development of new techniques to control and improve the growth of neurons for nerve repair purposes.

  4. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  5. Dynamics and Resilience of Desert Ecosystems under Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Wainwright, J.; Parsons, A. J.; Okin, G. S.; Bestelmeyer, B.; Fredrickson, E. L.; Schlesinger, W. H.

    2008-12-01

    Ecological models have been used to probe the causes of spatial complexity and predict specific responses of desert ecosystems. However, many models have been limited in their focus: models of dynamics have been developed with no consideration of the inherent patchiness or patterns in the vegetation, or else models have been developed to generate patterns with no consideration of the dynamics. Models that attempt to address both pattern and dynamics have been qualitative and descriptive. Furthermore, if, as is commonly believed, both dynamics and patterns/patchiness are a function of resource (specifically water) limitation, then there has been little integration of this relationship into such models. Consequently, these models have limited utility for understanding resilience of desert ecosystems. Here we present an integrated approach to the observed patchiness and dynamics in desert vegetation that is based on a sound process-based understanding and is formulated to accommodate previous conceptual models within an overarching framework. This framework is implemented as a mathematical model. Our contribution represents an advance over previous work in that we propose a general model framework for the analysis of ecosystem change in deserts that explicitly considers spatial interactions among multiple vegetation types and multiple resources, and predict specific responses to a variety of endogenous and exogenous disturbances. We present an application of this model to investigate conditions the conditions that would result in observed desert vegetation patterns in south-western desert systems of North America. In particular, we investigate the encroachment of shrubs (Larrea tridentata) into formerly pure stands of grass (Bouteloua eriopoda). We present the results of simulations that rest on rainfall data that was reconstructed for the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico, USA based on 300-year tree- ring records. The results

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins under asymmetric ionic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Ziervogel, Brigitte; Gumbart, James C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational method is developed to allow molecular dynamics simulations of biomembrane systems under realistic ionic gradients and asymmetric salt concentrations while maintaining the conventional periodic boundary conditions required to minimize finite-size effects in an all-atom explicit solvent representation. The method, which consists of introducing a nonperiodic energy step acting on the ionic species at the edge of the simulation cell, is first tested with illustrative applications to a simple membrane slab model and a phospholipid membrane bilayer. The nonperiodic energy-step method is then used to calculate the reversal potential of the bacterial porin OmpF, a large cation-specific β-barrel channel, by simulating the I-V curve under an asymmetric 10:1 KCl concentration gradient. The calculated reversal potential of 28.6 mV is found to be in excellent agreement with the values of 26–27 mV measured from lipid bilayer experiments, thereby demonstrating that the method allows realistic simulations of nonequilibrium membrane transport with quantitative accuracy. As a final example, the pore domain of Kv1.2, a highly selective voltage-activated K+ channel, is simulated in a lipid bilayer under conditions that recreate, for the first time, the physiological K+ and Na+ concentration gradients and the electrostatic potential difference of living cells. PMID:24081985

  7. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  8. The dynamic behaviour of postbuckled composite plates under acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.; White, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Ritz method was used to find the postbuckling static displacement pattern of a composite plane (CFRP) under uniaxial in-plane compression of uniform edge-shortening. The resonance frequencies and mode shapes at various postbuckled states are then evaluated by eigenvalue analysis of the dynamical matrix equation consisting of up-dated tangential stiffness matrix at corresponding static configuration. The theoretical results are compared with experimental results obtained in 16-layered CFRP laminate of aspect ratio 1.5. The resonance frequencies and mode shapes obtained are used to interpret the multimodal and nonlinear strain responses to high level of acoustic excitation. The dominance of second-mode contribution and softening-spring behavior are found in the strain response of postbuckled plates.

  9. The Structural and Dynamic Properties of Cobalt Metal Under Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, P. H.; Hung, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, cobalt metal is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the Pak-Doyam potential. The models of cobalt metal are constructed in a wide temperature range. The simulation reveals that the cobalt metal may exist in three phases: amorphous, nano-crystalline and liquid in the temperature range from 200 K to 1500 K. The structure of obtained models Co is analyzed through the radial distribution function (RDF), coordination number distribution and dependence of the Wendt-Abraham ratio defined as gmin/gmax under temperature. The simulation found a large number of native vacancies depending on the relaxation degree. The number of these native vacancies can play a role of diffusion vehicle for cobalt atom in amorphous matrix. The diffusion coefficient of cobalt atom in liquid and amorphous phases is evaluated by Einstein equation and concentration of native vacancies.

  10. Dynamic properties of structural transition in iron under uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Shao, J L; Duan, S Q; He, A M; Qin, C S; Wang, P

    2009-06-17

    By using molecular dynamics simulations, we have successfully simulated the bcc [Formula: see text] hcp structural transition in single-crystal iron under isothermal compression along the [001] direction. The results reveal a distinct softening of C(33) and a hardening of C(31) (or C(32)) prior to the transition and an over-relaxation of the stress after transition. Above the critical stress the morphology evolution of structural transition is analyzed, which can be divided into four stages: hcp homogeneously nucleated, columnar grains formed, nuclei competed and merged, and a laminar structure formed along {110} planes. Besides, our simulations demonstrate that in mixed phases the hcp phase has negative shear stress and the potential of the hcp phase is higher than the bcc phase, and the shear stress of the system keeps a linear decrease with hcp mass fraction. The effect of temperature on the structural transition is also discussed. PMID:21693955

  11. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-02-14

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of gas-water interfacial plasma under water

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, Y. C.; Ke, B.; Ding, F.; Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Zhu, X. D.

    2012-06-15

    Gas-water interfacial plasmas under water were generated in a compact space in a tube with a sandglass-like structure, where two metal wires were employed as electrodes with an applied 35 kHz ac power source. The dynamic behaviors of voltage/current were investigated for the powered electrode with/without water cover to understand the effect of the gas-water interface. It is found that the discharge exhibits periodic pulsed currents after breakdown as the powered electrode is covered with water, whereas the electrical current reveals a damped oscillation with time with a frequency about 10{sup 6} Hz as the powered electrode is in a vapor bubble. By increasing water conductivity, a discharge current waveform transition from pulse to oscillation presents in the water covering case. These suggest that the gas-water interface has a significant influence on the discharge property.

  13. Prototypes for the dynamics underlying precipitation and temperature extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelin, J. David

    Projecting changes in precipitation and temperature extreme events can be aided by a deeper understanding of the dynamics underlying such variations. For precipitation, this is closely connected to the interaction of fast, small-scale motions with variability of large-scale climate. Simple prototype models from the physics and applied math literature can point to analysis methods, connections among related quantities, and hypotheses for the dynamics, especially when the prototype models can be derived from climate-model equations. An overview will be provided including recent work with a number of collaborators. For distributions of precipitation-related variables, prototypes including Fokker-Planck solutions and first-passage problems for variations across an onset threshold yield insights into the form of present-day observed distributions and predictions for the form of the global warming change to evaluate in climate models. In distributions of water vapor and temperature, the widespread occurrence of non-Gaussian tails is likely explained in part by prototypes for tracer advection across a maintained gradient. The shape of these tails can have substantial implications for regional changes in probabilities of precipitation and temperature extremes with large-scale warming. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study of Polyethylene under Extreme Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritikos, G.; Sgouros, A.; Vogiatzis, G. G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    We present results concerning the dynamics and the structure of adsorbed layers of molten polyethylene (PE) between two graphite surfaces. The molecular weight of the monodisperse PE chains reaches the entanglement regime. We study three cases of interwall distances, equal to two, three and four times the unperturbed radius of gyration (Rg ) of PE chains. The confined system is equilibrated by use of efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms. Conducting molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we reveal the distribution of relaxation times as a function of distance from the graphite walls at the temperature of 450 K. From the atomic-level stresses we calculate a realistic estimate of the adhesion tension, which is not affected significantly by the width of the pore. Although the distance between the two walls is comparable to the width of the adsorbed layer, we do not record the formation of ‘glassy bridges’ under the studied conditions. The diffusion of polymer chains in the middle layer is not inhibited by the existence of the two adsorbed layers. Extreme confinement conditions imposed by the long range wall potentials bring about an increase in both the adsorption and desorption rates of chains. The presented results seem to cohere with a reduction in the calorimetric (heat capacity step) glass transition temperature (Tg ).

  15. Effect of Testosterone on Neuronal Morphology and Neuritic Growth of Fetal Lamb Hypothalamus-Preoptic Area and Cerebral Cortex in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Radhika C.; Amodei, Rebecka; Estill, Charles T.; Stormshak, Fred; Meaker, Mary; Roselli, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone plays an essential role in sexual differentiation of the male sheep brain. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN), is 2 to 3 times larger in males than in females, and this sex difference is under the control of testosterone. The effect of testosterone on oSDN volume may result from enhanced expansion of soma areas and/or dendritic fields. To test this hypothesis, cells derived from the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) and cerebral cortex (CTX) of lamb fetuses were grown in primary culture to examine the direct morphological effects of testosterone on these cellular components. We found that within two days of plating, neurons derived from both the HPOA and CTX extend neuritic processes and express androgen receptors and aromatase immunoreactivity. Both treated and control neurites continue to grow and branch with increasing time in culture. Treatment with testosterone (10 nM) for 3 days significantly (P < 0.05) increased both total neurite outgrowth (35%) and soma size (8%) in the HPOA and outgrowth (21%) and number of branch points (33%) in the CTX. These findings indicate that testosterone-induced somal enlargement and neurite outgrowth in fetal lamb neurons may contribute to the development of a fully masculine sheep brain. PMID:26053052

  16. Sustainable infrastructure system modeling under uncertainties and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongxi

    Infrastructure systems support human activities in transportation, communication, water use, and energy supply. The dissertation research focuses on critical transportation infrastructure and renewable energy infrastructure systems. The goal of the research efforts is to improve the sustainability of the infrastructure systems, with an emphasis on economic viability, system reliability and robustness, and environmental impacts. The research efforts in critical transportation infrastructure concern the development of strategic robust resource allocation strategies in an uncertain decision-making environment, considering both uncertain service availability and accessibility. The study explores the performances of different modeling approaches (i.e., deterministic, stochastic programming, and robust optimization) to reflect various risk preferences. The models are evaluated in a case study of Singapore and results demonstrate that stochastic modeling methods in general offers more robust allocation strategies compared to deterministic approaches in achieving high coverage to critical infrastructures under risks. This general modeling framework can be applied to other emergency service applications, such as, locating medical emergency services. The development of renewable energy infrastructure system development aims to answer the following key research questions: (1) is the renewable energy an economically viable solution? (2) what are the energy distribution and infrastructure system requirements to support such energy supply systems in hedging against potential risks? (3) how does the energy system adapt the dynamics from evolving technology and societal needs in the transition into a renewable energy based society? The study of Renewable Energy System Planning with Risk Management incorporates risk management into its strategic planning of the supply chains. The physical design and operational management are integrated as a whole in seeking mitigations against the

  17. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  18. The dynamics of interacting folds under biaxial compressive stresses.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjae; Dixit, Atray C; Stone, Howard A; Abkarian, Manouk; Kim, Pilnam

    2016-04-21

    The gradual in-plane compression of a solid film bonded to a soft substrate can lead to surface wrinkling and even to the formation of a network of folds for sufficiently high strain. An understanding of how these folds initiate, propagate, and interact with each other is still lacking. In a previous study, we developed an experimental system to observe the wrinkle-to-fold transition of layered elastic materials under biaxial compressive stresses. Here we focus on the dynamic interaction of a pair of propagating folds under biaxial compression. We find experimentally that their behavior is mediated through their tips and depends on the separation of the tips and their angle of interception. When the angle is lower than 45°, the two folds either form a unique fold by the coalescence of their tips when close enough, or bend their trajectories to intersect each other and form a lenticular region in analogy with cracks. When the angle is higher then 45°, the folds simply intersect and form a T-like junction. We rationalize this behavior by conducting numerical simulations to visualize the stress field around the two tips and find that the initial geometric position of the tips primarily determines the final state of the folds. PMID:27021924

  19. Thermographic measurement of thermal bridges in buildings under dynamic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; De Carli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accurate knowledge of the thermal performance could reduce significantly the impact of buildings on global energy consumption. Infrared thermography is widely recognized as one of the key technologies for building surveys, thanks to its ability to acquire at a glance thermal images of the building envelope. However, a spot measurement could be misleading when the building is under dynamic thermal conditions. In this case data should be acquired for hours or days, depending on the thermal properties of the walls. Long term thermographic monitoring are possible but imply strong challenges from a practical standpoint. This work investigates the possibilities and limitations of spot thermographic surveys coupled with contact probes, that are able to acquire continuously the thermal signal for days, to investigate the thermal bridges of a building. The goal is the estimation of the reliability and accuracy of the measurement under realistic environmental conditions. Firstly, numerical simulations are performed to determine the reference value of an experimental case. Then a long term thermographic survey is performed and integrated with the contact probe measurement, assessing the feasibility of the method.

  20. Dynamic jamming under impact in shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek

    2015-03-01

    Shear thickening fluids such as cornstarch and water show remarkable impact response allowing, for example, a person to run on the surface. We perform constant velocity impact experiments and imaging in shear thickening fluids at velocities lower than 500 mm/s and suspension heights of a few cm. In this regime where inertial effects are insignificant, we find that fronts with a dynamically jammed (DJ) region behind it are generated under impact. When this front and the DJ region reaches the opposite boundary it is able to support large stresses like a solid. These stresses are sufficient to support the weight of a running person. In addition we find a shear thickening transition under impact due to collision of the fronts with the boundary. There is a critical velocity required to generate these impact activated fronts. Using the observations on fronts, DJ region and using energy balance arguments we construct a model to explain the phenomena of running on the surface of cornstarch suspensions. The model shows quantitative agreement with our measurements using high-speed video of running on cornstarch and water suspensions. Supported by NSF DMR 1410157.

  1. Role of Tropomodulin’s Leucine Rich Repeat Domain in the Formation of Neurite-like Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Actin dynamics is fundamental for neurite development; monomer depolymerization from pointed ends is rate-limiting in actin treadmilling. Tropomodulins (Tmod) make up a family of actin pointed end-capping proteins. Of the four known isoforms, Tmod1–Tmod3 are expressed in brain cells. We investigated the role of Tmod’s C-terminal (LRR) domain in the formation of neurite-like processes by overexpressing Tmod1 and Tmod2 with deleted or mutated LRR domains in PC12 cells, a model system used to study neuritogenesis. Tmod1 overexpression results in a normal quantity and a normal length of processes, while Tmod2 overexpression reduces both measures. The Tmod2 overexpression phenotype is mimicked by overexpression of Tmod1 with the LRR domain removed or with three point mutations in the LRR domain that disrupt exposed clusters of conserved residues. Removal of Tmod2’s LRR domain does not significantly alter the outgrowth of neurite-like processes compared to that of Tmod2. Overexpression of chimeras with the N-terminal and C-terminal domains switched between Tmod1 and Tmod2 reinforces the idea that Tmod1’s LRR domain counteracts the reductive effect of the Tmod N-terminal domain upon formation of processes while Tmod2’s LRR domain does not. We suggest that the TM-dependent actin capping ability of both Tmods inhibits the formation of processes, but in Tmod1, this inhibition can be controlled via its LRR domain. Circular dichroism, limited proteolysis, and molecular dynamics demonstrate structural differences in the C-terminal region of the LRR domains of Tmod1, Tmod2, and the Tmod1 mutant. PMID:24746171

  2. Early expression of the high molecular weight neurofilament subunit attenuates axonal neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Edward; Vohnoutka, Rishel; Lee, Sangmook; Shea, Thomas B

    2015-09-14

    Phospho-dependent interactions of the C-terminal region of the high molecular weight NF subunit (NF-H) with each other and with other cytoskeletal elements stabilize the axonal cytoskeleton and contribute to an increase in axonal caliber. The same kinase cascades that mediate axonal pathfinding via growth cone dynamics are those that foster NF-mediated axonal stabilization, yet there is a developmental delay in the accumulation of NF C-terminal phosphorylation. Moreover, the phospho-mediated C-terminal NF-H interactions that stabilize the axonal cytoskeleton also inhibit axonal elongation. We hypothesized that a delay in expression and/or accumulation of NF-H within developing axons is essential to allow axonal elongation and pathfinding. We tested this hypothesis in differentiating NB2a/d1 cells. The first 3 days of differentiation of NB2a/d1 cells is normally accompanied by rapid elongation of axonal neurites. This period is followed by the accumulation of C-terminally phosphorylated NF-H, cessation of axonal elongation and an increase in axonal caliber. Herein, overexpression of GFP-tagged NF-H simultaneously with induction of differentiation fostered accumulation of C-terminally phosphorylated NF-H within developing axonal neurites within 48hr, which was accompanied by retardation of axonal elongation and a hastened increase in caliber. These effects were prevented by treatment with inhibitors of kinases that mediate the association of NFs with other cytoskeletal elements. Overexpression of GFP-NF-H lacking the C-terminal 187 amino acids (which mediate NF-NF interactions) did not retard elongation nor increase caliber. These findings support the hypothesis that a developmental delay in NF-H C-terminal phosphorylation is essential to allow appropriate axonal elongation prior to stabilization. PMID:26225928

  3. Rabin8 regulates neurite outgrowth in both GEF activity–dependent and –independent manners

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Yuta; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of membrane-trafficking events are regulated by Rab-family small GTPases. Neurite outgrowth requires massive addition of proteins and lipids to the tips of growing neurites by membrane trafficking, and although several Rabs, including Rab8, Rab10, and Rab11, have been implicated in this process, their regulatory mechanisms during neurite outgrowth are poorly understood. Here, we show that Rabin8, a Rab8-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), regulates nerve growth factor (NGF)–induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Knockdown of Rabin8 results in inhibition of neurite outgrowth, whereas overexpression promotes it. We also find that Rab10 is a novel substrate of Rabin8 and that both Rab8 and Rab10 function during neurite outgrowth downstream of Rabin8. Surprisingly, however, a GEF activity–deficient isoform of Rabin8 also promotes neurite outgrowth, indicating the existence of a GEF activity–independent role of Rabin8. The Arf6/Rab8-positive recycling endosomes (Arf6/Rab8-REs) and Rab10/Rab11-positive REs (Rab10/Rab11-REs) in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells are differently distributed. Rabin8 localizes on both RE populations and appears to activate Rab8 and Rab10 there. These localizations and functions of Rabin8 are Rab11 dependent. Thus Rabin8 regulates neurite outgrowth both by coordinating with Rab8, Rab10, and Rab11 and by a GEF activity–independent mechanism. PMID:27170183

  4. The neuritic plaque facilitates pathological conversion of tau in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Braunstein, Kerstin E.; Zhang, Juhong; Lau, Ashley; Sibener, Leslie; Deeble, Christopher; Wong, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    A central question in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is whether the neuritic plaque is necessary and sufficient for the development of tau pathology. Hyperphosphorylation of tau is found within dystrophic neurites surrounding β-amyloid deposits in AD mouse models but the pathological conversion of tau is absent. Likewise, expression of a human tau repeat domain in mice is insufficient to drive the pathological conversion of tau. Here we developed an Aβ-amyloidosis mouse model that expresses the human tau repeat domain and show that in these mice, the neuritic plaque facilitates the pathological conversion of wild-type tau. We show that this tau fragment seeds the neuritic plaque-dependent pathological conversion of wild-type tau that spreads from the cortex and hippocampus to the brain stem. These results establish that in addition to the neuritic plaque, a second determinant is required to drive the conversion of wild-type tau. PMID:27373369

  5. A Farnesyltransferase Acts to Inhibit Ectopic Neurite Formation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David; Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Imai, Janice H.; Slatculescu, Cristina; Noblett, Nathaniel; Mao, Lei; Beese, Lorena; Colavita, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pathways that regulate nascent neurite formation play a critical role in neuronal morphogenesis. The core planar cell polarity components VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle are involved in blocking inappropriate neurite formation in a subset of motor neurons in C. elegans. A genetic screen for mutants that display supernumerary neurites was performed to identify additional factors involved in this process. This screen identified mutations in fntb-1, the β subunit of farnesyltransferase. We show that fntb-1 is expressed in neurons and acts cell-autonomously to regulate neurite formation. Prickle proteins are known to be post-translationally modified by farnesylation at their C-terminal CAAX motifs. We show that PRKL-1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane in both a CAAX-dependent and CAAX-independent manner but that PRKL-1 can only inhibit neurite formation in a CAAX-dependent manner. PMID:27300162

  6. A Farnesyltransferase Acts to Inhibit Ectopic Neurite Formation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Carr, David; Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Imai, Janice H; Slatculescu, Cristina; Noblett, Nathaniel; Mao, Lei; Beese, Lorena; Colavita, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pathways that regulate nascent neurite formation play a critical role in neuronal morphogenesis. The core planar cell polarity components VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle are involved in blocking inappropriate neurite formation in a subset of motor neurons in C. elegans. A genetic screen for mutants that display supernumerary neurites was performed to identify additional factors involved in this process. This screen identified mutations in fntb-1, the β subunit of farnesyltransferase. We show that fntb-1 is expressed in neurons and acts cell-autonomously to regulate neurite formation. Prickle proteins are known to be post-translationally modified by farnesylation at their C-terminal CAAX motifs. We show that PRKL-1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane in both a CAAX-dependent and CAAX-independent manner but that PRKL-1 can only inhibit neurite formation in a CAAX-dependent manner.

  7. Growth, collapse, and stalling in a mechanical model for neurite motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Jerusalem, Antoine; Goriely, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Neurites, the long cellular protrusions that form the routes of the neuronal network, are capable of actively extending during early morphogenesis or regenerating after trauma. To perform this task, they rely on their cytoskeleton for mechanical support. In this paper, we present a three-component active gel model that describes neurites in the three robust mechanical states observed experimentally: collapsed, static, and motile. These states arise from an interplay between the physical forces driven by growth of the microtubule-rich inner core of the neurite and the acto-myosin contractility of its surrounding cortical membrane. In particular, static states appear as a mechanical traction or compression balance of these two parallel structures. The model predicts how the response of a neurite to a towing force depends on the force magnitude and recovers the response of neurites to several drug treatments that modulate the cytoskeleton active and passive properties.

  8. Absence of aluminium in neuritic plaque cores in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J P; McDonald, B; Watt, F

    1992-11-01

    Controversy exists over whether aluminium has a role in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is neuropathologically characterized by the occurrence of a minimum density of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the hippocampus and the association cortex of the brain. The purported association of aluminium with Alzheimer's disease is based on: (1) the experimental induction of fibrillary changes in the neurons of animals by the injection of aluminium salts into brain tissue; (2) reported detection of aluminium in neuritic plaques and tangle-bearing neurons; (3) epidemiological studies linking aluminium levels in the environment, notably water supplies, with an increased prevalence of dementia; and (4) a reported decrease in the rate of disease progression following the administration of desferroxamine, an aluminium chelator, to clinically diagnosed sufferers of Alzheimer's disease. Here we use nuclear microscopy, a new analytical technique involving million-volt nuclear particles, to identify and analyse plaques in postmortem tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease without using chemical staining techniques and fail to demonstrate the presence of aluminium in plaque cores in untreated tissue. PMID:1436075

  9. Influence of cAMP and protein kinase A on neurite length from spiral ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Engbers, Jonathan; Khaja, Sobia; Xu, Linjing; Clark, J. Jason; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2011-01-01

    Regrowth of peripheral spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) fibers is a primary objective in efforts to improve cochlear implant outcomes and to potentially reinnervate regenerated hair cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates neurite growth and guidance via activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Exchange Protein directly Activated by Cylic AMP (Epac). Here we explored the effects of cAMP signaling on SGN neurite length in vitro. We find that the cAMP analog, cpt-cAMP, exerts a biphasic effect on neurite length; increasing length at lower concentrations and reducing length at higher concentrations. This biphasic response occurs in cultures plated on laminin, fibronectin, or tenascin C suggesting that it is not substrate dependent. cpt-cAMP also reduces SGN neurite branching. The Epac-specific agonist, 8-pCPT-2’-O-Me-cAMP, does not alter SGN neurite length. Constitutively active PKA isoforms strongly inhibit SGN neurite length similar to higher levels of cAMP. Chronic membrane depolarization activates PKA in SGNs and also inhibits SGN neurite length. However, inhibition of PKA fails to rescue neurite length in depolarized cultures implying that activation of PKA is not necessary for the inhibition of SGN neurite length by chronic depolarization. Expression of constitutively active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, isoforms partially rescues SGN neurite length in the presence of activated PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP/PKA represents a potential strategy to enhance SGN fiber elongation following deafness; however such therapies will likely require careful titration so as to simultaneously promote rather than inhibit nerve fiber regeneration. PMID:22154930

  10. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  11. Quantum constraint dynamics for two spinless particles under vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace W.; van Alstine, Peter

    1984-12-01

    Using Dirac's constraint mechanics we derive two-body Klein-Gordon equations for two spinless particles under mutual vector interaction. We construct generalized mass-shell constraints which incorporate the gauge structure of this interaction for the constituent particles. The resultant direct-interaction formalism does more than just dress static potentials with relativistic two-body kinematics. It includes dynamical recoil effects in the potential characteristic of those that appear in field theories. We demonstrate this classically by showing its canonical equivalence in the slow-motion, weak-potential domain (the semirelativistic approximation) to the Darwin Hamiltonian. We also show this quantum mechanically by demonstrating its equivalence (for weak potentials) to Todorov's homogeneous quasipotential equation (which in turn leads to the standard Breit results for perturbative QED). Not only is our one-body Schrödinger-type equation local and covariant, but also it leads to forms of interaction that make nonperturbative quantum-mechanical sense at short distances. Thus this constraint approach is ideally suited for use in phenomenological applications where a perturbative treatment may be inadequate (with no need for extra smoothing parameters or finite particle size).

  12. Mechanisms underlying rhythmic locomotion: dynamics of muscle activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Tian, Jianghong; Iwasaki, Tetsuya; Friesen, W. Otto

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have studied the dynamical properties of tension development in leech longitudinal muscle during swimming. A new method is proposed for modeling muscle properties under functionally relevant conditions where the muscle is subjected to both periodic activation and rhythmic length changes. The ‘dual-sinusoid’ experiments were conducted on preparations of leech nerve cord and body wall. The longitudinal muscle was activated periodically by injection of sinusoidal currents into an identified motoneuron. Simultaneously, sinusoidal length changes were imposed on the body wall with prescribed phase differences (12 values equally spaced over 2π radians) with respect to the current injection. Through the singular value decomposition of appropriately constructed tension data matrices, the leech muscle was found to have a multiplicative structure in which the tension was expressed as the product of activation and length factors. The time courses of activation and length factors were determined from the tension data and were used to develop component models. The proposed modeling method is a general one and is applicable to contractile elements for which the effects of series elasticity are negligible. PMID:21562183

  13. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-07-28

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations.

  14. Surfactant-driven dynamics of immiscible jets under microfluidic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Joao; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of three water jets in oil (PDMS) under microfluidic confinement in the presence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate). Our experimental results demonstrate the occurrence of two flow regimes, ``jetting'' and ``dripping,'' depending on the choice of system parameters; the latter are the flow-rates of water and oil, the viscosity ratio, and the surfactant concentration. In the dripping regime, the average diameter of the water droplets decreases with increasing oil flow-rate until a transition to jetting occurs. In the jetting regime, and at high oil and water flow-rates, and high oil viscosity, our results demonstrate that each jet exhibit sinusoidal deformations that appear to be either in- or out-of-phase with those of their neighbours'. Numerical simulations of the system studied experimentally are also carried out using a volume-of-fluid approach, which account for the presence of insoluble surfactant. The results of these simulations capture the trends observed in the experiments. Skolkovo Foundation, UNIHEAT project.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of VN thin films under indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Yin, Deqiang; Li, Qibin; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-12-01

    We investigated with molecular dynamics simulation the mechanical responses of VN (0 0 1) thin films subjected to indentation with a diamond columnar indenter. We calculated the generalized stacking-fault energies as a function of the displacement in the rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 directions on the {0 0 1}, {1 1 0}, and {1 1 1} planes, and analyzed systematically the microstructures and their evolution during the indentation with the centro-symmetry parameters and the slices of the VN films. We found the slips on {1 1 0}rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 of the VN film under indentation at the initial stage. With the increase of indentation depth, slips are also activated on {1 1 1}rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 and {1 0 0}rbond2 0 1 1lbond2 systems. We further found that the slip system is determined by the stacking-fault energy rather than the layer spacing. The indentations with other different parameters were also performed, and the results further prove the validity of the conclusion.

  16. Behavior of sodium borosilicate glasses under compression using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Ispas, S.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2015-09-07

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to study the changes under compression in the local and medium range structural properties of three sodium borosilicate glasses with varying sodium content. These glasses have been isostatically compressed up to 20 GPa and then decompressed in order to analyze the different mechanisms that affect densification, alongside with the permanent modifications of the structure after a full compression/decompression cycle. The results show that the atomic packing is the prominent characteristic that governs the amount of densification in the glass, as well as the setup of the permanent densification. During compression, the bulk modulus increases linearly up to approximately 15 GPa and more rapidly for higher pressures, a behavior which is reflected on the rate of increase of the average coordination for B and Na. Radial distribution functions at different pressures during the cycle help to quantify the amount of distortions in the elementary structural units, with a pronounced shortening of the Na–Na and Na–O bond lengths during compression. A subsequent decomposition of the glassy matrix into elementary Voronoi volumes verifies the high compressibility of Na-rich regions.

  17. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  18. C dynamics in Amazonian podzols under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, Naoise; Soro, Andre; Potard, Kevin; Pouteau, Valerie; Montes, Celia; Melphi, Adolpho; Lucas, Yves; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been shown that the C stocks in Amazonian podzols are very large. They are much larger than was previously thought, particularly in the Bh horizon, which has been estimated to contain in excess of 13Pg C for Amazonia alone. It is predicted that the changes in regional climate will result in a drier soil water regime which may affect the C dynamics in these soils that are usually saturated. In order to determine the vulnerability to change of the organic C contained in the Amazonian podzols, a series of incubation experiments were established in which the effects of a number of different factors on microbial decomposition were measured. The direct effect of drier soil water regimes was tested by incubating undisturbed cores from the Bh horizon at a range of matric potentials (saturation to wilting point). Contrary to what is usually found in soils, no significant difference in mineralisation was found among matric potentials, suggesting that other factors control microbial mineralisation of this organic C. The effect of nitrogen additions, of anaerobic conditions and of the addition labile C substrate were also tested on undisturbed cores of the Bh horizon of the podzols. Samples incubated under aerobic conditions produced 3 times more CO2 than samples incubated under anaerobic conditions, whilst samples incubated under aerobic conditions with the addition of N mineralised 6.7 times more CO2 than the anaerobic samples. The addition of labile C did not have a significant effect on C mineralisation, i.e. there was no priming effect. The combined addition of labile C and mineral N did not stimulate C mineralisation more than N additions alone. By extrapolating the differences obtained here to the whole of the Amazonian podzols, it is estimated that changes in conditions which result in an increase in O2 and in N (i.e. changes in vegetation due to increases in dry periods with the establishment of a savanna for example) in the soil will cause the release

  19. Design improvement and dynamic finite element analysis of novel ITI dental implant under dynamic chewing loads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to introduce the application of a uniform design for experimental methods to drop the micromotion of a novel ITI dental implant model under the dynamic loads. Combining the characteristics of the traditional ITI and Nano-Tite implants, a new implant with concave holes has been constructed. Compared to the traditional ITI dental implant model, the micromotion of the new dental implant model was significantly reduced by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. From uniform design of experiments, the dynamic finite element analysis method was applied to caluculated the maximum micromotion of the full model. Finally, the chief design in all the experiment simulations which cause the minimum micromotion is picked as the advanced model of the design. Related to the original design, which was associated with a micromotion of 45.11 μm, the micromotion of the improved version was 31.37 μm, for an improvement rate of 30.5%. PMID:26406049

  20. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  1. Dynamics of transport under random fluxes on the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boñgolan-Walsh, Vena Pearl; Duan, Jinqiao; Özgökmen, Tamay

    2008-10-01

    The impact of boundary noise on the dynamical evolution of the scalar transport equation in shear flows is studied, taking off from earlier studies in shear-flow dispersion in internal waves, a mechanism for horizontal mixing in the ocean. In particular, we model a gravity current evolving under an assumed shear-flow. The transport equation is deterministic, with a noise term at the inlet boundary. This was motivated by observed seasonal fluctuations in some known sources of salty, dense water in the oceans, like the Red Sea overflow, as well as observed thermal and saline anomalies in the thermohaline circulation. The noises used were: Wiener white, Wiener colored, Lévy white, and Lévy colored noise. Lévy processes form a more general class of processes which are generally non-Gaussian in distribution, and may have infinitely many jumps in finite time. They have been used to model pollutant point-sources, the flight time of particles in vortices, and linear and nonlinear anomalous diffusion. The major finding was that white noises (Wiener and Lévy ) and colored Wiener noise all have the effect of impeding the diffusion process, by as much as 33%. However, colored Lévy noise (non-Gaussian, time-correlated) does not have this effect on diffusion. This would suggest that time-correlation is more important in distinguishing noises than the distribution of the process that produced the noise. This also explains why Lévy colored noise showed great sensitivity to the stability parameter α, while Lévy white noise is unaffected by its stability parameter.

  2. Neurite outgrowth at the interface of 2D and 3D growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Fong, Vivian J.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Growing neurons navigate complex environments, but in vitro systems for studying neuronal growth typically limit the cues to flat surfaces or a single type of cue, thereby limiting the resulting growth. Here we examined the growth of neurons presented with two-dimensional (2D) substrate-bound cues when these cues were presented in conjunction with a more complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants were cultured at the interface between a collagen I matrix and a glass coverslip. Laminin (LN) or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) were uniformly coated on the surface of the glass coverslip or patterned in 50 µm tracks by microcontact printing. Quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth with a novel grid system at multiple depths in the gel revealed several interesting trends. Most of the neurites extended at the surface of the gel when LN was presented whereas more neurites extended into the gel when CSPG was presented. Patterning of cues did not affect neurite density or depth of growth. However, neurite outgrowth near the surface of the gel aligned with LN patterns, and these extensions were significantly longer than neurites extended in other cultures. In interface cultures, DRG growth patterns varied with the type of cue where neurite density was higher in cultures presenting LN than in cultures presenting CSPG. These results represent an important step toward understanding how neurons integrate local structural and chemical cues to make net growth decisions.

  3. The neurite-initiating effect of microbial extracellular glycolipids in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Isoda, H; Shinmoto, H; Matsumura, M; Nakahara, T

    1999-09-01

    The effects of several kinds of microbial extracellular glycolipids on neurite initiation in PC12 cells were examined. Addition of mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A), MEL-B, and sophorose lipid (SL) to PC12 cells caused significant neurite outgrowth. Other glycolipids, such as polyol lipid (PL), rhamnose lipid (RL), succinoyl trehalose lipid-A (STL-A) and STL-B caused no neurite-initiation. MEL-A increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity to an extent similar to nerve growth factor (NGF). However, MEL-A induced one or two long neurites from the cell body, while NGF induced many neurites. In addition, MEL-A-induced differentiation was transient, and after 48 h, percentage of cells with neurites started to decrease in contrast to neurons induced by NGF, which occurred in a time-dependent manner. MEL-A could induce neurite outgrowth after treatment of PC12 cells with an anti-NGF receptor antibody that obstructed NGF action. These results indicate that MEL-A and NGF induce differentiation of PC12 cells through different mechanisms. PMID:19003137

  4. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  5. Evidence for direct effect of magnetic fields on neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F. ); Benane, S.G.; House, D.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Electric fields can cause changes in cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. Alternating magnetic fields have been proposed to act through the electric fields induced in the conducting medium surrounding the cells. We have used a simple exposure system to test the relative contribution of magnetic fields compared to induced electric fields in a standard PC-12 cell culture assay, in which cells respond to nerve growth factor by producing neurites. This response to stimulation by nerve growth factor is inhibited by sinusoidal, 50-Hz magnetic fields at field strengths below 10 [mu]T (100 mG). A standard procedure to distinguish magnetic- vs. electric-field effects demonstrates that the induced electric field is not involved. Additional work is necessary to identify the critical reaction site (or sites), and to establish the molecular mechanisms responsible for these result, 27 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, F; Cox, J H; Meyer, S; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peripheral nerve involved. While, in this model, fatal encephalopathogenic rabies develops only after depletion of the CD4 subset of T lymphocytes and without contribution of the CD8 subset, RVNP is identified as an immunopathological process in which both the CD4 and CD8 subsets of T lymphocytes are critically implicated. Images PMID:1629964

  7. Single Polymer Dynamics under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extensional (LAOE) Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    Over the past two decades, advances in fluorescence imaging and particle manipulation have enabled the direct observation of single polymer dynamics in model flows such as shear flow and planar extensional flow. The vast majority of single polymer studies, however, has focused on chain dynamics using simple transient step forcing functions. In order to study single polymer dynamics in non-idealized model flows, there is a clear need to implement more complicated transient flow forcing functions. In bulk rheology, large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was widely used to study the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of materials, but not yet been applied to molecular rheology. In this work, we directly probe single polymer dynamics using oscillatory extensional flow in precisely controlled microfluidic devices. We are able to generate large and small amplitude sinusoidal oscillatory extensional flow in a cross-slot microfluidic device while imaging the conformational dynamics of a single polymer trapped at the stagnation point. In this flow, polymer chains are stretched, squeezed, and rotated between extensional/compressional axes in a highly dynamic and transient manner. Using this technique, we studied the dynamics and coil-stretch transition of a single λ-DNA as a function of the Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number (De). Moreover, we use Brownian dynamics simulation to map a wide range of Pipkin space for polymers from linear steady-state conditions to non-linear unsteady-states. Our results reveal a critical Wi at the coil-stretch transition that is function of the De in LAOE flow. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  8. Galanin stimulates neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons by inhibition of Cdc42 and Rho GTPases and activation of cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny A; Pope, Robert J P; Kerr, Niall C H; Wynick, David

    2013-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the neuropeptide galanin modulates neurite outgrowth from adult sensory neurons via activation of the second galanin receptor; however, the intracellular signalling pathways that mediate this neuritogenic effect have yet to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that galanin decreases the activation state in adult sensory neurons and PC12 cells of Rho and Cdc42 GTPases, both known regulators of filopodial and growth cone motility. Consistent with this, activated levels of Rho and Cdc42 levels are increased in the dorsal root ganglion of adult galanin knockout animals compared with wildtype controls. Furthermore, galanin markedly increases the activation state of cofilin, a downstream effector of many of the small GTPases, in the cell bodies and growth cones of sensory neurons and in PC12 cells. We also demonstrate a reduction in the activation of cofilin, and alteration in growth cone motility, in cultured galanin knockout neurons compared with wildtype controls. These data provide the first evidence that galanin regulates the Rho family of GTPases and cofilin to stimulate growth cone dynamics and neurite outgrowth in sensory neurons. These findings have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of peripheral sensory neuropathies. PMID:23895321

  9. Single polymer dynamics under large amplitude oscillatory extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the conformational dynamics of polymers in time-dependent flows is of key importance for controlling materials properties during processing. Despite this importance, however, it has been challenging to study polymer dynamics in controlled time-dependent or oscillatory extensional flows. In this work, we study the dynamics of single polymers in large-amplitude oscillatory extension (LAOE) using a combination of experiments and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. Two-dimensional LAOE flow is generated using a feedback-controlled stagnation point device known as the Stokes trap, thereby generating an oscillatory planar extensional flow with alternating principal axes of extension and compression. Our results show that polymers experience periodic cycles of compression, reorientation, and extension in LAOE, and dynamics are generally governed by a dimensionless flow strength (Weissenberg number Wi) and dimensionless frequency (Deborah number De). Single molecule experiments are compared to BD simulations with and without intramolecular hydrodynamic interactions (HI) and excluded volume (EV) interactions, and good agreement is obtained across a range of parameters. Moreover, transient bulk stress in LAOE is determined from simulations using the Kramers relation, which reveals interesting and unique rheological signatures for this time-dependent flow. We further construct a series of single polymer stretch-flow rate curves (defined as single molecule Lissajous curves) as a function of Wi and De, and we observe qualitatively different dynamic signatures (butterfly, bow tie, arch, and line shapes) across the two-dimensional Pipkin space defined by Wi and De. Finally, polymer dynamics spanning from the linear to nonlinear response regimes are interpreted in the context of accumulated fluid strain in LAOE.

  10. Interferon-gamma but not TNF alpha promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of murine adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Galaxy; Goldshmit, Yona; Turnley, Ann M

    2004-05-01

    Neural trauma, such as traumatic brain injury or stroke, results in a vigorous inflammatory response at and near the site of injury, with cytokine production by endogenous glial cells and invading immune cells. Little is known of the effect that these cytokines have on neural stem cell function. Here we examine the effects of two inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), on adult neural stem cells. Neural stem cells grown in the presence of either cytokine failed to generate neurospheres. Cytotoxicity assays showed that TNF alpha but not IFN gamma was toxic to the neural stem cells under proliferative conditions. Under differentiating conditions, neither cytokine was toxic; however, IFN gamma enhanced neuronal differentiation, rapidly increasing beta III-tubulin positive cell numbers 3-4 fold and inhibiting astrocyte generation. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites per neuron was enhanced in cells differentiated in the presence of IFN gamma. Therefore, both inflammatory cytokines examined have substantial, but different effects on neural stem cell function and suggests that regulation of the inflammatory environment following brain injury may influence the ability of neural stem cells to repair the damage. PMID:15081598

  11. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  12. Dynamics of range margins for metapopulations under climate change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Akçakaya, H R; Araújo, M B; Fordham, D A; Martinez-Meyer, E; Thuiller, W; Brook, B W

    2009-04-22

    We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribution patterns, shifts at the edge of the range were more pronounced than shifts in the overall metapopulation. For Romerolagus diazi (volcano rabbit), the lower elevation range limit shifted upslope by approximately 700 m. This reduced the area occupied by the metapopulation, as the mountain peak currently lacks suitable vegetation. For Lepus timidus (European mountain hare), we modelled the British metapopulation. Increasing the dispersive estimate caused the metapopulation to shift faster on the northern range margin (leading edge). By contrast, it caused the metapopulation to respond to climate change slower, rather than faster, on the southern range margin (trailing edge). The differential responses of the leading and trailing range margins and the relative sensitivity of range limits to climate change compared with that of the metapopulation centroid have important implications for where conservation monitoring should be targeted. Our study demonstrates the importance and possibility of moving from simple bioclimatic envelope models to second-generation models that incorporate both dynamic climate change and metapopulation dynamics. PMID:19324811

  13. Low-temperature Glauber dynamics under weak competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, M D

    2015-03-01

    We consider the low but nonzero-temperature regimes of the Glauber dynamics in a chain of Ising spins with first- and second-neighbor interactions J1,J2. For 0<-J2/|J1|<1 it is known that at T=0 the dynamics is both metastable and noncoarsening, while being always ergodic and coarsening in the limit of T→0+. Based on finite-size scaling analyses of relaxation times, here we argue that in that latter situation the asymptotic kinetics of small or weakly frustrated -J2/|J1| ratios is characterized by an almost ballistic dynamic exponent z≃1.03(2) and arbitrarily slow velocities of growth. By contrast, for noncompeting interactions the coarsening length scales are estimated to be almost diffusive. PMID:25871076

  14. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu-Feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-Bo; Feng, Da-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  15. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  17. Altered dynamics of forest recovery under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Miller, Adam D; Mohan, Jacqueline E; Hudiburg, Tara W; Duval, Benjamin D; Delucia, Evan H

    2013-07-01

    Forest regeneration following disturbance is a key ecological process, influencing forest structure and function, species assemblages, and ecosystem-climate interactions. Climate change may alter forest recovery dynamics or even prevent recovery, triggering feedbacks to the climate system, altering regional biodiversity, and affecting the ecosystem services provided by forests. Multiple lines of evidence - including global-scale patterns in forest recovery dynamics; forest responses to experimental manipulation of CO2 , temperature, and precipitation; forest responses to the climate change that has already occurred; ecological theory; and ecosystem and earth system models - all indicate that the dynamics of forest recovery are sensitive to climate. However, synthetic understanding of how atmospheric CO2 and climate shape trajectories of forest recovery is lacking. Here, we review these separate lines of evidence, which together demonstrate that the dynamics of forest recovery are being impacted by increasing atmospheric CO2 and changing climate. Rates of forest recovery generally increase with CO2 , temperature, and water availability. Drought reduces growth and live biomass in forests of all ages, having a particularly strong effect on seedling recruitment and survival. Responses of individual trees and whole-forest ecosystems to CO2 and climate manipulations often vary by age, implying that forests of different ages will respond differently to climate change. Furthermore, species within a community typically exhibit differential responses to CO2 and climate, and altered community dynamics can have important consequences for ecosystem function. Age- and species-dependent responses provide a mechanism by which climate change may push some forests past critical thresholds such that they fail to recover to their previous state following disturbance. Altered dynamics of forest recovery will result in positive and negative feedbacks to climate change. Future research

  18. Impedance control complements incomplete internal models under complex external dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Naoki; Gouko, Manabu; Ito, Koji

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate motor adaptation of human arm movements to external dynamics. In an experiment, we tried to determine whether humans can learn an internal model of a mixed force field (V+P) that was the sum of a velocity-dependent force field (V) and a position-dependent force field (P). The experimental results show that the subjects did not learn the internal model of V+P accurately and they compensated for the loads by using impedance control. Our results suggest that humans use impedance control when internal models become inaccurate because of the complexity of the external dynamics.

  19. γ-Enolase C-terminal peptide promotes cell survival and neurite outgrowth by activation of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Anja; Obermajer, Nataša; Kos, Janko

    2012-04-15

    γ-Enolase, a glycolytic enzyme, is expressed specifically in neurons. It exerts neurotrophic activity and has been suggested to regulate growth, differentiation, survival and regeneration of neurons. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of γ-enolase in PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) signalling, the two pathways triggered predominantly by neurotrophic factors. Whereas the PI3K/Akt pathway, rather than the MAPK/ERK pathway, is involved in γ-enolase-enhanced cell survival, γ-enolase-stimulated neurite outgrowth requires both pathways, i.e. the activation of both PI3K and ERK1/2, leading to subsequent expression of the growth-cone-specific protein GAP-43 (growth-associated protein of 43 kDa). MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase) and PI3K inhibition blocked or attenuated the neurite outgrowth associated with dynamic remodelling of the actin-based cytoskeleton. We show that γ-enolase-mediated PI3K activation regulates RhoA kinase, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization. Moreover, the inhibition of RhoA downstream effector ROCK (Rho-associated kinase) results in enhanced γ-enolase-induced neurite outgrowth, accompanied by actin polymerization and its redistribution to growth cones. Our results show that γ-enolase controls neuronal survival, differentiation and neurite regeneration by activating the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling pathways, resulting in downstream regulation of the molecular and cellular processes of cytoskeleton reorganization and cell remodelling, activation of transcriptional factors and regulation of the cell cycle.

  20. Effects of serum, tissue extract, conditioned medium, and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sakai, M; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    The effects of serum, tissue extracts, conditioned medium, (CM), and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of 6- to 8-day-old chick embryos were investigated. In Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) with no supplement neurites from explants did not appear on collagen coating but on polyornithine coating (PORN). It is concluded that cell-to-substratum interaction is important in neurite appearance. CM, serum and tissue extract potentiated neurite appearance, but their activities were highly dependent on the coating. The amount of collagen was also crucial. On collagen, neurite appearance was observed only when promoting substances were present. CM and serum contained at least two components; one affected neurite appearance after deposition on collagen and the other affected neurite appearance when present in the culture medium. The former was included also in tissue extracts. Both of adsorbable and non-adsorbable components from any origin were necessary for effective induction of neurite appearance. Heat treatment and dialysis differentiated these active components. On PORN, CM highly potentiated neurite appearance. The activity of the CM was reproduced by its low molecular weight fraction. Serum also promoted neurite appearance, but to a lesser extent than CM. The effect of tissue extract was not remarkable.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulations of nanosheet solutions under shear.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueyi; Green, Micah J

    2014-07-14

    The flow-induced conformation dynamics of nanosheets are simulated using a Brownian Dynamics (BD) formulation applied to a bead-rod sheetlike molecular model. This is the first-ever use of BD to simulate flow-induced dynamics of two-dimensional structures. Using this framework, we simulate dilute suspensions of coarse-grained nanosheets and compute conformation dynamics for simple shear flow. The data show power law scaling relationships between nanosheet parameters (such as bending moduli and molecular weight) and the resulting intrinsic viscosity and conformation. For nonzero bending moduli, an effective dimension of 2.77 at equilibrium is calculated from the scaling relationship between radius of gyration and molecular weight. We also find that intrinsic viscosity varies with molecular weight with an exponent of 2.12 ± 0.23; this dependence is significantly larger than those found for linear polymers. Weak shear thinning is observed at high Weissenberg number (Wi). This simulation method provides a computational basis for developing manufacturing processes for nanosheet-derived materials by relating flow forces and nanosheet parameters to the resulting material morphology.

  2. Soil phosphorus dynamics under sprinkler and furrow irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furrow irrigation detaches and transports soil particles and subsequently nutrients such as phosphorus. To reduce the risk of erosion and offsite phosphorus movement, producers can convert from furrow to sprinkler irrigation. We completed research on soil phosphorus dynamics in furrow versus sprin...

  3. Functional coordination of muscles underlying changes in behavioural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Carlijn A; Rao, Guillaume; Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical systems approach addresses Bernstein's degrees of freedom problem by assuming that the neuro-musculo-skeletal system transiently assembles and dismantles its components into functional units (or synergies) to meet task demands. Strikingly, little is known from a dynamical point of view about the functioning of the muscular sub-system in this process. To investigate the interaction between the dynamical organisation at muscular and behavioural levels, we searched for specific signatures of a phase transition in muscular coordination when a transition is displayed at the behavioural level. Our results provide evidence that, during Fitts' task when behaviour switches to a different dynamical regime, muscular activation displays typical signatures of a phase transition; a reorganisation in muscular coordination patterns accompanied by a peak in the variability of muscle activation. This suggests that consistent changes occur in coordination processes across the different levels of description (i.e., behaviour and muscles). Specifically, in Fitts' task, target size acts as a control parameter that induces a destabilisation and a reorganisation of coordination patterns at different levels of the neuro-musculo-skeletal system. PMID:27282349

  4. Functional coordination of muscles underlying changes in behavioural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vernooij, Carlijn A.; Rao, Guillaume; Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical systems approach addresses Bernstein’s degrees of freedom problem by assuming that the neuro-musculo-skeletal system transiently assembles and dismantles its components into functional units (or synergies) to meet task demands. Strikingly, little is known from a dynamical point of view about the functioning of the muscular sub-system in this process. To investigate the interaction between the dynamical organisation at muscular and behavioural levels, we searched for specific signatures of a phase transition in muscular coordination when a transition is displayed at the behavioural level. Our results provide evidence that, during Fitts’ task when behaviour switches to a different dynamical regime, muscular activation displays typical signatures of a phase transition; a reorganisation in muscular coordination patterns accompanied by a peak in the variability of muscle activation. This suggests that consistent changes occur in coordination processes across the different levels of description (i.e., behaviour and muscles). Specifically, in Fitts’ task, target size acts as a control parameter that induces a destabilisation and a reorganisation of coordination patterns at different levels of the neuro-musculo-skeletal system. PMID:27282349

  5. Amyloid β-Protein as a Substrate Interacts with Extracellular Matrix to Promote Neurite Outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Edward H.; Park, Lisa; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1993-05-01

    Progressive deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain parenchyma and blood vessels is a characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease. Recent evidence suggests that addition of solubilized synthetic Aβ to medium may produce toxic or trophic effects on cultured hippocampal neurons. Because soluble Aβ may not accumulate in significant quantities in brain, we asked whether immobilized Aβ peptide as a substrate alters neurite outgrowth from cultured rat peripheral sensory neurons. This paradigm may closely mimic the conditions in Alzheimer disease brain tissue, in which neurites contact insoluble, extracellular aggregates of β-amyloid. We detected no detrimental effects of Aβ substrate on neurite outgrowth. Rather, Aβ in combination with low doses of laminin or fibronectin enhanced neurite out-growth from these neuronal explants. Our results suggest that insoluble Aβ in the cerebral neuropil may serve as a neurite-promoting matrix, perhaps explaining the apparent regenerative response of neurites observed around amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease. Moreover, in concert with the recent discovery of Aβ production by cultured neurons, our data suggest that Aβ plays a normal physiological role in brain by complexing with the extracellular matrix.

  6. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors.

  7. Multiscale Analysis of Neurite Orientation and Spatial Organization in Neuronal Images.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj; Negi, Pooran; Laezza, Fernanda; Papadakis, Manos; Labate, Demetrio

    2016-10-01

    The spatial organization of neurites, the thin processes (i.e., dendrites and axons) that stem from a neuron's soma, conveys structural information required for proper brain function. The alignment, direction and overall geometry of neurites in the brain are subject to continuous remodeling in response to healthy and noxious stimuli. In the developing brain, during neurogenesis or in neuroregeneration, these structural changes are indicators of the ability of neurons to establish axon-to-dendrite connections that can ultimately develop into functional synapses. Enabling a proper quantification of this structural remodeling would facilitate the identification of new phenotypic criteria to classify developmental stages and further our understanding of brain function. However, adequate algorithms to accurately and reliably quantify neurite orientation and alignment are still lacking. To fill this gap, we introduce a novel algorithm that relies on multiscale directional filters designed to measure local neurites orientation over multiple scales. This innovative approach allows us to discriminate the physical orientation of neurites from finer scale phenomena associated with local irregularities and noise. Building on this multiscale framework, we also introduce a notion of alignment score that we apply to quantify the degree of spatial organization of neurites in tissue and cultured neurons. Numerical codes were implemented in Python and released open source and freely available to the scientific community. PMID:27369547

  8. In vitro neurite guidance effects induced by polylysine pinstripe micropatterns with polylysine background.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sunghoon; Kang, Kyungtae; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-08-01

    Engineered culture substrates with chemical neurite guidance cues have been used for studying the mechanism of axon pathfinding at cellular level. In this study, we designed a novel poly-l-lysine (PLL) micropattern ("pinstripe micropattern") to investigate how the same biomolecules with slightly different surface concentration can affect in vitro neuronal growth. The pinstripe micropattern was fabricated by stamping PLL on a PLL-coated glass coverslip, which resulted in denser PLL lines and a less-dense PLL background. There were two effects of the substrate on cultured primary hippocampal neuron: neurite initiation and growth cone turning. Although the whole surface was permissive for neurite outgrowth, we observed that the growth direction of neurites had a strong tendency to follow the stamped PLL line patterns with PLL background. However, the micropattern did not affect the spreading of cell body on the substrate. According to these investigations, we concluded that the PLL pinstripe pattern with PLL background, which had the step difference of polylysine concentrations, would be very useful for designing novel cell assays for the investigation of neurite guidance mechanisms, and suggested it as a new design method for controlling the direction of neurite growth on in vitro neural network.

  9. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain.

  10. VANG-1 and PRKL-1 cooperate to negatively regulate neurite formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Visanuvimol, Jiravat; McEwan, Andrea; Su, Anna; Imai, Janice H; Colavita, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Neuritogenesis is a critical early step in the development and maturation of neurons and neuronal circuits. While extracellular directional cues are known to specify the site and orientation of nascent neurite formation in vivo, little is known about the genetic pathways that block inappropriate neurite emergence in order to maintain proper neuronal polarity. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of Van Gogh (vang-1), Prickle (prkl-1), and Dishevelled (dsh-1), core components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, are required in a subset of peripheral motor neurons to restrict neurite emergence to a specific organ axis. In loss-of-function mutants, neurons display supernumerary neurites that extend inappropriately along the orthogonal anteroposterior (A/P) body axis. We show that autonomous and non-autonomous gene activities are required early and persistently to inhibit the formation or consolidation of growth cone protrusions directed away from organ precursor cells. Furthermore, prkl-1 overexpression is sufficient to suppress neurite formation and reorient neuronal polarity in a vang-1- and dsh-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest a novel role for a PCP-like pathway in maintaining polarized neuronal morphology by inhibiting neuronal responses to extrinsic or intrinsic cues that would otherwise promote extraneous neurite formation.

  11. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors. PMID:7104764

  12. Myoblasts and myoblast-conditioned medium attract the earliest spinal neurites from frog embryos.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, C D

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of newly segmented somites, unsegmented mesoderm and medium conditioned by each of these tissues to attract the growth of the earliest spinal neurites from the neural tube of Xenopus laevis in tissue culture. When presented with segmented somitic myoblasts or sheets of skin, spinal neurites grew selectively towards the somitic myoblasts. Neurites were not attracted specifically to somitic myoblasts from their own rostrocaudal level. A variable proportion of myoblasts from unsegmented caudal mesoderm differentiated and elongated in co-culture with neural tube and skin. These myoblasts also attracted neural outgrowths, but only if present in sufficient numbers. An agar slab containing medium conditioned by the presence of segmented myoblasts for 1 day attracted neurite outgrowths. A source of medium conditioned by the presence of undifferentiated, unsegmented myotomal mesoderm alone did not attract neurite outgrowths. Nerve growth factor (NGF) at a range of concentrations in the agar source (500-10,000 ng/ml) did not attract the earliest neurite outgrowths. It is concluded that the earliest skeletal myoblasts from Xenopus laevis embryos may attract neural outgrowths by releasing a soluble factor. Myoblasts may have to develop to the stage of somite segmentation before secretion of such an agent begins. The release of a myoblast-derived factor so early in development may assist directed nerve growth in vivo. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3795063

  13. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain. PMID:27598554

  14. Studies of TLP dynamic response under wind, waves and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jia-yang; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning

    2012-09-01

    Investigated is the coupled response of a tension leg platform (TLP) for random waves. Inferred are the mass matrix, coupling stiffness matrix, damping matrix in the vibration differential equation and external load of TLP in moving coordinating system. Infinitesimal method is applied to divide columns and pontoons into small parts. Time domain motion equation is solved by Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Jonswap spectrum is simulated in the random wave, current is simulated by linear interpolation, and NPD spectrum is applied as wind spectrum. The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate random waves and fluctuated wind. Coupling dynamic response, change of tendon tension and riser tension in different sea conditions are analyzed by power spectral density (PSD). The influence of approach angle on dynamic response of TLP and tendon tension is compared.

  15. Dynamical instabilities of quasistatic crack propagation under thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Hentschel, H. George; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-09-01

    We address the theory of quasistatic crack propagation in a strip of glass that is pulled from a hot oven towards a cold bath. This problem had been carefully studied in a number of experiments that offer a wealth of data to challenge the theory. We improve upon previous theoretical treatments in a number of ways. First, we offer a technical improvement of the discussion of the instability towards the creation of a straight crack. This improvement consists in employing Padé approximants to solve the relevant Wiener-Hopf factorization problem that is associated with this transition. Next we improve the discussion of the onset of oscillatory instability towards an undulating crack. We offer a way of considering the problem as a sum of solutions of a finite strip without a crack and an infinite medium with a crack. This allows us to present a closed form solution of the stress intensity factors in the vicinity of the oscillatory instability. Most importantly we develop a dynamical description of the actual trajectory in the regime of oscillatory crack. This theory is based on the dynamical law for crack propagation proposed by Hodgdon and Sethna. We show that this dynamical law results in a solution of the actual crack trajectory in post-critical conditions; we can compute from first principles the critical value of the control parameters, and the characteristics of the solution such as the wavelength of the oscillations. We present detailed comparison with experimental measurements without any free parameters. The comparison appears quite excellent. Finally we show that the dynamical law can be translated to an equation for the amplitude of the oscillatory crack; this equation predicts correctly the scaling exponents observed in experiments.

  16. Analysis of vehicle dynamics under sadden cross wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the way of calculating aerodynamic forces acting on a vehicle passing in the region of sadden cross wind was presented. The CarDyn, a vehicle dynamics simulation program, developed by the author was used. The effects of the cross wind were studied with a fixed steering wheel simulation. On the base of computer simulations the car cross wind sensitivity were determined, and vehicle responses such as lateral offset, side acceleration and yaw angular velocity are presented.

  17. Genetic Analysis of a Novel Tubulin Mutation That Redirects Synaptic Vesicle Targeting and Causes Neurite Degeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L.; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress. PMID:25392990

  18. Dynamics of a deformable active particle under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Menzel, Andreas M; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-09-14

    The motion of a deformable active particle in linear shear flow is explored theoretically. Based on symmetry considerations, we propose coupled nonlinear dynamical equations for the particle position, velocity, deformation, and rotation. In our model, both, passive rotations induced by the shear flow as well as active spinning motions, are taken into account. Our equations reduce to known models in the two limits of vanishing shear flow and vanishing particle deformability. For varied shear rate and particle propulsion speed, we solve the equations numerically in two spatial dimensions and obtain a manifold of different dynamical modes including active straight motion, periodic motions, motions on undulated cycloids, winding motions, as well as quasi-periodic and chaotic motions induced at high shear rates. The types of motion are distinguished by different characteristics in the real-space trajectories and in the dynamical behavior of the particle orientation and its deformation. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on self-propelled droplets exposed to a linear shear flow.

  19. Ultrasonic Study of Crack Under a Dynamic Thermal Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, J.; Kemppainen, M.; Virkkunen, I.

    2004-02-01

    In piping the defects play a key role for determining the life of component. Also the risk for pipe failure combined to the defects has to be taken into account. In this study thermal dynamic load has been applied to austenitic material (AISI 304) in order to introduce dynamic behaviour into the crack. The studied crack (˜20 mm × 7 mm) has been produced by thermal fatigue in advance. Different ultrasonic techniques were used to reveal information from interaction of ultrasonic waves from dynamic behaviour of a crack face in the sonified volume. The ultrasonic probes in the study are typical probes for defect detection and sizing on site inspections This information helps us to understand some effects in nuclear piping such as detection of cracks with special techniques and difficulties in sizing of the cracks in real situations. In this case the material is loaded to exceed the yield strength. The thermal cycles used caused high variations in the temperature scale from 20°C (68 F) to 600°C (1112 F) in the crack volume especially on the crack surface area. These factors cause large stress variations in the vicinity of the crack. Effects which have been detected during analysis from the measurements explain well difficulties in ultrasonic inspections of those materials on site. Experimental work explains reasons why some defects are missed in the real piping. Ultrasonic techniques used are described in details and conclusion for applicability of those techniques has been drawn.

  20. Dynamical Models for Sloshing Dynamics of Helium 2 Under Low-G Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1997-01-01

    Coupling of sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 with spacecraft dynamics are investigated in response to the realistic environmental disturbance forces and torques acting on the spacecraft during normal operation. This study investigates: (1) the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacting to combined environmental disturbances, including gravity gradient, aerodynamic, and magnetic forces and torques; (2) characteristics of slosh reaction forces and torques coupling with spacecraft dynamics; (3) the contribution of slosh dynamics to over-all spacecraft dynamics; and (4) activating of attitude and translation control system. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the rotational frame, while the spacecraft dynamics is associated with non-rotational frame. Results show that the contributions of spacecraft dynamics are driven by the environmental disturbances coupling with slosh dynamics. Without considering the effects of environmental disturbances-driven slosh dynamics acting on spacecraft coupling with the spacecraft dynamics may lead to the wrong results for the development of spacecraft system guidance and attitude control techniques.

  1. A bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model for visualization of neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Chen, Chen; Sun, Jie; Peng, YaJing; Zhu, MinSheng

    2015-04-01

    Class III β-tubulin (Tubb3) is a component of the microtubules in neurons and contributes to microtubule dynamics that are required for axon outgrowth and guidance during neuronal development. We here report a novel bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line that expresses Class III β-tubulin fused to mCherry, an improved monomeric red fluorescent protein, for the visualization of microtubules during neuronal development. A BAC containing Tubb3 gene was modified by insertion of mCherry complementary DNA downstream of Tubb3 coding sequence via homologous recombination. mCherry fusion protein was expressed in the nervous system and testis of the transgenic animal, and the fluorescent signal was observed in the neurons that located in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, cerebellum, as well as the retina. Besides, Tubb3-mCherry fusion protein mainly distributed in neurites and colocalized with endogenous Class III β-tubulin. The fusion protein labels Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation. Therefore, this transgenic line might be a novel tool for scientific community to study neuronal development both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Effects of fundamental structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel under hydrodynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xu; Ge, Fei; Wang, Lei; Hong, Youshi

    2009-06-01

    This paper investigates the effects of structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel (SFT) under hydrodynamic loads. The structure parameters includes buoyancy-weight ratio (BWR), stiffness coefficients of the cable systems, tunnel net buoyancy and tunnel length. First, the importance of structural damp in relation to the dynamic responses of SFT is demonstrated and the mechanism of structural damp effect is discussed. Thereafter, the fundamental structure parameters are investigated through the analysis of SFT dynamic responses under hydrodynamic loads. The results indicate that the BWR of SFT is a key structure parameter. When BWR is 1.2, there is a remarkable trend change in the vertical dynamic response of SFT under hydrodynamic loads. The results also indicate that the ratio of the tunnel net buoyancy to the cable stiffness coefficient is not a characteristic factor affecting the dynamic responses of SFT under hydrodynamic loads.

  3. Neuritic regeneration and synaptic reconstruction induced by withanolide A

    PubMed Central

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether withanolide A (WL-A), isolated from the Indian herbal drug Ashwagandha (root of Withania somnifera), could regenerate neurites and reconstruct synapses in severely damaged neurons. We also investigated the effect of WL-A on memory-deficient mice showing neuronal atrophy and synaptic loss in the brain. Axons, dendrites, presynapses, and postsynapses were visualized by immunostaining for phosphorylated neurofilament-H (NF-H), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), respectively. Treatment with Aβ(25–35) (10 μM) induced axonal and dendritic atrophy, and pre- and postsynaptic loss in cultured rat cortical neurons. Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 μM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 μmol kg−1 day−1, for 13 days, p.o.) recovered Aβ(25–35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks. PMID:15711595

  4. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by EGF and KCl depolarization: a Ca(2+)-independent phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    MAP kinase activity is necessary for growth factor induction of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Although NGF and EGF both stimulate MAP kinase activity, EGF does not stimulate neurite extension. We report that EGF, in combination with KCl, stimulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. This phenomenon was independent of intracellular Ca2+ increases and not due to enhancement of MAP kinase activity over that seen with EGF alone. However, EGF plus KCl increased intracellular cAMP, and other cAMP elevating agents acted synergistically with EGF to promote neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth by cAMP and EGF was blocked by inhibitors of transcription suggesting that synergistic regulation of transcription by the cAMP and MAP kinase pathways may stimulate neurite growth. PMID:7622569

  5. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Slimane; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and formulate analytical models for the evolution of learning rules. We consider a population of individuals repeatedly interacting during their lifespan, and where the stage game faced by the individuals fluctuates according to an environmental stochastic process. Individuals adjust their behavioral actions according to learning rules belonging to the class of experience-weighted attraction learning mechanisms, which includes standard reinforcement and Bayesian learning as special cases. We use stochastic approximation theory in order to derive differential equations governing action play probabilities, which turn out to have qualitative features of mutator-selection equations. We then perform agent-based simulations to find the conditions where the deterministic approximation is closest to the original stochastic learning process for standard 2-action 2-player fluctuating games, where interaction between learning rules and preference reversal may occur. Finally, we analyze a simplified model for the evolution of learning in a producer-scrounger game, which shows that the exploration rate can interact in a non-intuitive way with other features of co-evolving learning rules. Overall, our analyses illustrate the usefulness of applying stochastic approximation theory in the study of animal learning.

  6. Receptors, Ion Channels, and Signaling Mechanisms Underlying Microglial Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Christian; Attwell, David

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS, play a pivotal role in brain injury and disease. Microglia are extremely motile; their highly ramified processes constantly survey the brain parenchyma, and they respond promptly to brain damage with targeted process movement toward the injury site. Microglia play a key role in brain development and function by pruning synapses during development, phagocytosing apoptotic newborn neurons, and regulating neuronal activity by direct microglia-neuron or indirect microglia-astrocyte-neuron interactions, which all depend on their process motility. This review highlights recent discoveries about microglial dynamics, focusing on the receptors, ion channels, and signaling pathways involved. PMID:25855789

  7. Existing plaques and neuritic abnormalities in APP:PS1 mice are not affected by administration of the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411575

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Subramanian, Meenakshi; Thyssen, Diana; Borrelli, Laura A; Fauq, Abdul; Das, Pritam; Golde, Todd E; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskai, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    The γ-secretase complex is a major therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have shown that treatment of young APP mice with specific inhibitors of γ-secretase prevented formation of new plaques. It has not yet been shown directly whether existing plaques would be affected by γ-secretase inhibitor treatment. Similarly, alterations in neuronal morphology in the immediate vicinity of plaques represent a plaque-specific neurotoxic effect. Reversal of these alterations is an important endpoint of successful therapy whether or not a treatment affects plaque size. In the present study we used longitudinal imaging in vivo with multiphoton microscopy to study the effects of the orally active γ-secretase inhibitor LY-411575 in 10–11 month old APP:PS1 mice with established amyloid pathology and neuritic abnormalities. Neurons expressed YFP allowing fluorescent detection of morphology whereas plaques were labelled with methoxy-XO4. The same identified neurites and plaques were followed in weekly imaging sessions in living mice treated daily (5 mg/kg) for 3 weeks with the compound. Although LY-411575 reduced Aβ levels in plasma and brain, it did not have an effect on the size of existing plaques. There was also no effect on the abnormal neuritic curvature near plaques, or the dystrophies in very close proximity to senile plaques. Our results suggest that therapeutics aimed at inhibition of Aβ generation are less effective for reversal of existing plaques than for prevention of new plaque formation and have no effect on the plaque-mediated neuritic abnormalities, at least under these conditions where Aβ production is suppressed but not completely blocked. Therefore, a combination therapy of Aβ suppression with agents that increase clearance of amyloid and/or prevent neurotoxicity might be needed for a more effective treatment in patients with pre-existing pathology. PMID:19419556

  8. Chemicals eluting from disposable plastic syringes and syringe filters alter neurite growth, axogenesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Montgomery, Johanna M; Birch, Nigel P

    2015-04-01

    Cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons are often used to study neuronal cell biology. We report that the development of these neurons is strongly affected by chemicals leaching from commonly used disposable medical-grade syringes and syringe filters. Contamination of culture medium by bioactive substance(s) from syringes and filters occurred with multiple manufacturing lots and filter types under normal use conditions and resulted in changes to neurite growth, axon formation and the neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. The effects on neuronal morphology were concentration dependent and significant effects were detected even after substantial dilution of the contaminated medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed many chemicals eluting from the syringes and filters. Three of these chemicals (stearic acid, palmitic acid and 1,2-ethanediol monoacetate) were tested but showed no effects on neurite growth. Similar changes in neuronal morphology were seen with high concentrations of bisphenol A and dibutyl phthalate, two hormonally active plasticisers. Although no such compounds were detected by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, unknown plasticisers in leachates may affect neurites. This is the first study to show that leachates from laboratory consumables can alter the growth of cultured hippocampal neurons. We highlight important considerations to ensure leachate contamination does not compromise cell biology experiments.

  9. Dynamics of sex ratio and female unmatedness under haplodiploidy

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Haplodiploid sex determination allows unmated females to produce sons. Consequently, a scarcity of males may lead to a significant proportion of females remaining unmated, which may in turn give rise to a surfeit of males in the following generation. Stable oscillation of the sex ratio has been predicted by classic models, and it remains a puzzle as to why this is not observed in natural populations. Here, I investigate the dynamics of sex allocation over ecological and evolutionary timescales to assess the potential for sustained oscillation. I find that, whilst stable oscillation of the sex ratio is possible, the scope for such dynamical behavior is reduced if sex allocation strategies are evolutionary labile, especially if mated females may facultatively adjust their sex allocation according to the present availability of mating partners. My model, taken together with empirical estimates of female unmatedness in haplodiploid taxa, suggests that sustained oscillation of the sex ratio is implausible in natural populations. However, this phenomenon may be relevant to artificially introduced biological control agents. PMID:24967080

  10. Dynamical Response of Networks Under External Perturbations: Exact Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinellato, David D.; Epstein, Irving R.; Braha, Dan; Bar-Yam, Yaneer; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We give exact statistical distributions for the dynamic response of influence networks subjected to external perturbations. We consider networks whose nodes have two internal states labeled 0 and 1. We let nodes be frozen in state 0, in state 1, and the remaining nodes change by adopting the state of a connected node with a fixed probability per time step. The frozen nodes can be interpreted as external perturbations to the subnetwork of free nodes. Analytically extending and to be smaller than 1 enables modeling the case of weak coupling. We solve the dynamical equations exactly for fully connected networks, obtaining the equilibrium distribution, transition probabilities between any two states and the characteristic time to equilibration. Our exact results are excellent approximations for other topologies, including random, regular lattice, scale-free and small world networks, when the numbers of fixed nodes are adjusted to take account of the effect of topology on coupling to the environment. This model can describe a variety of complex systems, from magnetic spins to social networks to population genetics, and was recently applied as a framework for early warning signals for real-world self-organized economic market crises.

  11. Binary dynamics on star networks under external perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Carolina A.; Schneider, David M.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study a binary dynamical process that is a representation of the voter model with two candidates and opinion makers. The voters are represented by nodes of a network of social contacts with internal states labeled 0 or 1 and nodes that are connected can influence each other. The network is also perturbed by opinion makers, a set of external nodes whose states are frozen in 0 or 1 and that can influence all nodes of the network. The quantity of interest is the probability of finding m nodes in state 1 at time t . Here we study this process on star networks, which are simple representations of hubs found in complex systems, and compare the results with those obtained for networks that are fully connected. In both cases a transition from disordered to ordered equilibrium states is observed as the number of external nodes becomes small. For fully connected networks the probability distribution becomes uniform at the critical point. For star networks, on the other hand, we show that the equilibrium distribution splits in two peaks, reflecting the two possible states of the central node. We obtain approximate analytical solutions for the equilibrium distribution that clarify the role of the central node in the process. We show that the network topology also affects the time scale of oscillations in single realizations of the dynamics, which are much faster for the star network. Finally, extending the analysis to two stars we compare our results with simulations in simple scale-free networks.

  12. Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Jazdzewska, Monika; Palmer, Jeremy; Mamontov, Eugene; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  13. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress.

  14. Dynamics of public opinion under the influence of epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhui; Ni, Shunjiang; Shen, Shifei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model with dynamically adjusted confidence level of others to investigate the propagation of public opinion on whether to buy chicken in the case of avian influenza infection in humans. We study how people adjust their confidence level in other people’s opinions according to their perceived infection risk and how the opinion evolution and epidemic spreading affect each other on different complex networks by taking into account the spreading feature of avian influenza, that is, only people who buy chicken are possible to be infected. The simulation results show that in a closed system, people who support buying chicken and people who are infected can achieve a dynamic balance after a few time-steps, and the final stable state is mainly dependent on the level of people’s risk perception, rather than the initial distribution of the different opinions. Our results imply that in the course of the epidemic spread, transparent and timely announcement of the number of infections and the risk of infection can help people take the right self-protection actions, and thus help control the spread of avian influenza.

  15. Cupula dynamics under caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A. V.; Sirenko, S. P.

    Caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal SC is widely applied in studies of vestibular impairments Barany 1906 suggested that caloric response of SC results from mechanism of endolymph convection due to density changes of endolymph and therefore depends on the action of gravity forces However the Skylab experiments 1983 showed that the caloric reaction of SC can take place even under microgravity The studies of Scherer Clarke 1985 Harada Ariki 1985 Baumgarten et al 1985 considered the thermal expansion of endolymph to be a concurrent mechanism The model of caloric response based on the buoyancy force due to density change in the endolymph induced by thermal stimulation was proposed by Gentine et al 1990 1991 It should be noted that the first qualitative model that took into account the effect of endolymph thermal expansion under local heating to analyze the properties of primary afferents was proposed by Gusev Orlov 1977 However these models failed to answer the question which of the mentioned effects will be dominant under certain conditions The purpose of present study was to account for the expansion and convection of endolymph and to determine under which conditions one mechanism dominates over the other The consideration is based on the following model of SC Kondrachuk Sirenko 1990 an isolated torus filled by a compressible viscous Newton liquid endolymph the torus interior is plugged by an elastic body cupula the cupula surface in contact with endolymph is supposed to be stretched along the

  16. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  19. The unique dynamical system underlying RR Lyrae pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic models of RR Lyrae pulsation display a very rich behaviour. Contrary to earlier expectations, high order resonances play a crucial role in the nonlinear dynamics representing the interacting modes. Chaotic attractors can be found at different time scales: both in the pulsation itself and in the amplitude equations shaping the possible modulation of the oscillations. Although there is no one-to-one connection between the nonlinear features found in the numerical models and the observed behaviour, the richness of the found phenomena suggests that the interaction of modes should be taken seriously in the study of the still unsolved puzzle of Blazhko effect. One of the main lessons of this complex system is that we should rethink the simple interpretation of the observed effect of resonances.

  20. Entanglement dynamics of nonidentical oscillators under decohering environments

    SciTech Connect

    Galve, Fernando; Giorgi, Gian Luca; Zambrini, Roberta

    2010-06-15

    We study the evolution of entanglement for a pair of coupled nonidentical harmonic oscillators in contact with an environment. For both cases of a common bath and of two separate baths for each of the oscillators, a full master equation is provided without rotating-wave approximation. The entanglement dynamics is analyzed as a function of the diversity between the oscillators' frequencies and their positive or negative mutual coupling and also the correlation between the occupation numbers. The singular effect of the resonance condition (identical oscillators) and its relationship with the possibility of preserving asymptotic entanglement are discussed. The importance of the bath's memory properties is investigated by comparing Markovian and non-Markovian evolutions.

  1. DYNAMICS OF CHROMOSPHERIC UPFLOWS AND UNDERLYING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P.

    2013-04-10

    We used H{alpha}-0.1 nm and magnetic field (at 1.56{mu}) data obtained with the New Solar Telescope to study the origin of the disk counterparts to type II spicules, so-called rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs). The high time cadence of our chromospheric (10 s) and magnetic field (45 s) data allowed us to generate x-t plots using slits parallel to the spines of the RBEs. These plots, along with potential field extrapolation, led us to suggest that the occurrence of RBEs is generally correlated with the appearance of new, mixed, or unipolar fields in close proximity to network fields. RBEs show a tendency to occur at the interface between large-scale fields and small-scale dynamic magnetic loops and thus are likely to be associated with the existence of a magnetic canopy. Detection of kinked and/or inverse {sup Y-}shaped RBEs further confirm this conclusion.

  2. Dynamic shear of granular material under variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Klein, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes some experiments with granular materials which recently have been conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft during variable gravity maneuvers. The main experimental apparatus consisted of a small drum containing granular material which was rotated slowly while the angle assumed by the slip surface with respect to the horizontal was observed and recorded photographically. Conventional wisdom has held that this 'dynamic angle of response' was a material constant, independent of (among other things) gravitational level. The results presented here are quite contrary, suggesting instead an angle that varies with the reciprocal of the square root of gravity. This finding may have important consequences on the understanding of many active processes in Planetary Geology involving granular materials and may provide qualitative confirmation of some of the theoretical predictions of modern models of granular shear flows.

  3. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  4. Fundamental studies on the Cs dynamics under ion source conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedl, R. Fantz, U.

    2014-02-15

    The performance of surface conversion based negative hydrogen ion sources is mainly determined by the caesium dynamics. Therefore, fundamental investigations in vacuum and plasma are performed at a flexible laboratory setup with ion source parameters. Studies on the influence of Cs on the plasma parameters of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} plasmas showed that n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the bulk plasma are not affected by relevant amounts of Cs and no isotopic differences could be observed. The coating of the vessel surfaces with Cs, however, leads to a considerable gettering of hydrogen atoms from the plasma volume and to the decrease of n{sub e} close to a sample surface due to the formation of negative ions.

  5. Electrical and Neurotrophin Enhancement of Neurite Outgrowth within a 3D Collagen Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Rendell, Sara R.; Counts, Lauren R.; Papke, Jason B.; Willits, Rebecca K.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical and chemical stimulation have been studied as potent mechanisms of enhancing nerve regeneration and wound healing. However, it remains unclear how electrical stimuli affect nerve growth, particularly in the presence of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this study was to explore (1) the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) supplementation to support neurite outgrowth in a 3D scaffold, and (2) the effect of brief, low voltage, electrical stimulation (ES) on neurite outgrowth prior to neurotrophin supplementation. Dissociated E11 chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were seeded within a 1.5 mg/mL type-I collagen scaffold. For neurotrophin treatments, scaffolds were incubated for 24 hrs in culture media containing nerve growth factor (NGF, 10 ng/mL) or BDNF (200 ng/mL), or both. For ES groups, scaffolds containing neurons were stimulated for 10 min at 8–10 V/m DC, then incubated for 24 hrs with neurotrophin. Fixed and labeled neurons were imaged to measure neurite growth and directionality. BDNF supplementation was not as effective as NGF at supporting DRG neurite outgrowth. ES prior to NGF supplementation improved DRG neurite outgrowth compared to NGF alone. This combination of brief ES with NGF treatment was the most effective treatment compared to NGF or BDNF alone. Brief ES had no impact on neurite directionality in the 3D scaffolds. These results demonstrate that ES improves neurite outgrowth in the presence of neurotrophins, and could provide a potential therapeutic approach to improve nerve regeneration when coupled with neurotrophin treatment. PMID:24710795

  6. Soap film dynamics and topological jumps under continuous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Consider the dynamics of a soap-film bounded by a flexible wire (or wires) which can be continuously and slowly deformed. At each instant the soap-film relaxes in quasi-static manner to a minimum-area (i.e. minimum-energy) state compatible with the boundary configuration. This can however pass through a critical configuration at which a topological jump is inevitable. We have studied an interesting example of this behaviour: the jump of a one-sided (Möbius strip) soap-film to a two-sided film as the boundary is unfolded and untwisted from the double cover of a circle. The nature of this jump will be demonstrated and explained. More generally, dynamical systems have a natural tendency to relax through dissipative processes to a minimum-energy state, subject to any relevant constraints. An example is provided by the relaxation of a magnetic field in a perfectly conducting but viscous fluid, subject to the constraint that the magnetic field lines are frozen in the fluid. One may infer the existence of magnetostatic equilibria (and analogous steady Euler flows) of arbitrary field-line topology. In general, discontinuities (current sheets) appear during this relaxation process, and this is where reconnection of field-lines (with associated change of topology) can occur. Just as for the soap film, slow change of boundary conditions can lead to critical conditions in which such topological jumps are inevitable. (Work in collaboration with Ray Goldstein, Adriana Pesci, Renzo Ricca and Gareth Alexander.) This work was supported by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/I036060/1.

  7. Activation of Rac1-dependent redox signaling is critically involved in staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Du Sik; An, Jeong Mi; Lee, Han Gil; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Seon Sook; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kang, Jeong Wan; Bae, Yun Soo; Seo, Jeong Taeg

    2013-02-01

    Staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, but the mechanism by which staurosporine induces neurite outgrowth is still obscure. In the present study, we investigated whether the activation of Rac1 was responsible for the neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. Staurosporine caused rapid neurite outgrowth independent of the ERK signaling pathways. In contrast, neurite outgrowth in response to staurosporine was accompanied by activation of Rac1, and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated the staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, suppression of Rac1 activity by expression of the dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 also blocked the staurosporine-induced morphological differentiation of PC12 cells. Staurosporine caused an activation of NADPH oxidase and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by NSC23766 and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth was attenuated by pretreatment with DPI and exogenous addition of sublethal concentration of H2O2 accelerated neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. These results indicate that activation of Rac1, which leads to ROS generation, is required for neurite outgrowth induced by staurosporine in PC12 cells.

  8. Modeling dissolved and free phase gas dynamics under decompression.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    1990-04-01

    Dissolved and free gases do not behave the same way in tissue under pressure, and their interaction is complex. Differences are highlighted, particularly with respect to time scales, gradients and transport. Impacts of free phases on diving are described, contrasting increased off-gassing pressures, slower ascent rates, safety stops and reduced repetitive exposures as consistent practical measures within Haldane models (limited supersaturation) which can be played off against buildup of dissolved gas. Simple computations illustrate the points.

  9. Salubrinal inhibits the expression of proteoglycans and favors neurite outgrowth from cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    After CNS injury, astrocytes and mesenchymal cells attempt to restore the disrupted glia limitans by secreting proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs), forming the so-called glial scar. Although the glial scar is important in sealing the lesion, it is also a physical and functional barrier that prevents axonal regeneration. The synthesis of secretory proteins in the RER is under the control of the initiation factor of translation eIF2α. Inhibiting the synthesis of secretory proteins by increasing the phosphorylation of eIF2α, might be a pharmacologically efficient way of reducing proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins present in the glial scar. Salubrinal, a neuroprotective drug, decreased the expression and secretion of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins induced by EGF or TGFβ, maintaining eIF2α phosphorylated. Besides, Salubrinal also reduced the transcription of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins, suggesting that it induced the degradation of non-translated mRNA. In a model in vitro of the glial scar, cortical neurons grown on cocultures of astrocytes and fibroblasts with TGFβ treated with Salubrinal, showed increased neurite outgrowth compared to untreated cells. Our results suggest that Salubrinal may be considered of therapeutic value facilitating axonal regeneration, by reducing overproduction and secretion of proteoglycans and profibrotic protein inhibitors of axonal growth. PMID:25882497

  10. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography in Pure Neuritic Leprosy: First Experience Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tallarida, Giuseppe; d'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Noto, Salvatore; Parodi, Aurora; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Five years after both right ulnar and median nerve decompression for paraesthesias and palsy, a patient, coming from Nigeria but living in Italy, came to our unit claiming to have persistent pain and combined median and ulnar palsy. Under suspicion of leprosy, skin and left sural nerve biopsy were performed. Skin tests were negative, but Schwann cells resulted as positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB), leading to the diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy (PNL). The patient was given PB multidrug therapy and recovered from pain in two months. After nine months both High Resolution Ultrasonography (HRUS) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were performed, revealing thickening of the nerves. Since demyelination is common in PNL, the Authors started to use Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography (DTIT) to get better morphological and functional data about myelination than does the traditional imaging. DTIT proved successful in showing myelin discontinuity, reorganization, and myelination, and the Authors suggest that it can give more information about the evolution of the disease, as well as further indications for surgery (nerve decompression, nerve transfers, and babysitting for distal effector protection), and should be added to traditional imaging tools in leprosy. PMID:27738537

  11. AMPK over-activation leads to accumulation of α-synuclein oligomers and decrease of neurites

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peizhou; Gan, Ming; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Dickson, Dennis W.; Yen, Shu-Hui C.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal inclusions of α-synuclein (α-syn), termed Lewy bodies, are a hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Increased α-syn levels can occur in brains of aging human and neurotoxin treated mice. Since previous studies have shown increased brain lactate levels in aging brains, in PD affected subjects when compared to age-matched controls, and in mice treated with MPTP, we tested the effects of lactate exposure on α-syn in a cell based-study. We demonstrated that (i) lactate treatment led to α-syn accumulation and oligomerization in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, (ii) such alterations were mediated via adenosine-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and associated with increasing cytoplasmic phosphorylated AMPK levels, (iii) AMPK activation facilitated α-syn accumulation and phosphorylation, (iv) lactate treatment or overexpression of active form of AMPK decreased α-syn turnover and neurite outgrowth and (v) Lewy body-bearing neurons displayed abnormal cytoplasmic distribution of phosphorylated AMPK, which normally is located in nuclei. Together, our results suggest that chronic neuronal accumulation of α-syn induced by lactate-triggered AMPK activation in aging brains may be a novel mechanism underlying α-synucleionpathies in PD and related disorders. PMID:23200460

  12. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes.

    PubMed

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. 'Mombaça' (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day(-1)) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day(-1)) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change. PMID:26894932

  13. Dynamics of relative entropy of coherence under Markovian channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Situ, Haozhen; Hu, Xueyuan

    2016-08-01

    We study the relative entropy of coherence under the effect of certain one-qubit channels that are Markovian and noisy. The cohering power and decohering power of phase damping, amplitude damping, flip and depolarizing channels are analytically calculated. For phase damping channel, the decohering power on the x, y, and z bases is the same. The same phenomenon is observed for the flip and depolarizing channels. Further, we show that weak measurement and its reversal can be employed to suppress the decohering power of the amplitude damping channel.

  14. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. ‘Mombaça’ (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day-1) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day-1) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change. PMID:26894932

  15. Dynamic Void Growth and Shrinkage in Mg under Electron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W. Z.; Zhang, Y. F.; Cheng, G. M.; Jian, W. W.; Millett, P. C.; Koch, C. C.; Mathaudhu, S. N.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2014-04-30

    We report in-situ atomic-scale investigation of void evolution, including growth, coalescence and shrinkage, under electron irradiation. With increasing irradiation dose, the total volume of voids increased linearly, while nucleation rate of new voids decreased slightly, and the total number of voids decreased. Some voids continued to grow while others shrank to disappear, depending on the nature of their interactions with nearby self-interstitial loops. For the first time, surface diffusion of adatoms was observed largely responsible for the void coalescence and thickening. These findings provide fundamental understanding to help with the design and modeling of irradiation-resistant materials.

  16. Dynamic relaxation of a liquid cavity under amorphous boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Andrea; Grigera, Tomás S; Verrocchio, Paolo

    2012-05-28

    The growth of cooperatively rearranging regions was invoked long ago by Adam and Gibbs to explain the slowing down of glass-forming liquids. The lack of knowledge about the nature of the growing order, though, complicates the definition of an appropriate correlation function. One option is the point-to-set (PTS) correlation function, which measures the spatial span of the influence of amorphous boundary conditions on a confined system. By using a swap Monte Carlo algorithm we measure the equilibration time of a liquid droplet bounded by amorphous boundary conditions in a model glass-former at low temperature, and we show that the cavity relaxation time increases with the size of the droplet, saturating to the bulk value when the droplet outgrows the point-to-set correlation length. This fact supports the idea that the point-to-set correlation length is the natural size of the cooperatively rearranging regions. On the other hand, the cavity relaxation time computed by a standard, nonswap dynamics, has the opposite behavior, showing a very steep increase when the cavity size is decreased. We try to reconcile this difference by discussing the possible hybridization between mode-coupling theory and activated processes, and by introducing a new kind of amorphous boundary conditions, inspired by the concept of frozen external state as an alternative to the commonly used frozen external configuration. PMID:22667566

  17. Peru-Chile upwelling dynamics under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerder, Véra; Colas, Francois; Echevin, Vincent; Codron, Francis; Tam, Jorge; Belmadani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The consequences of global warming on the Peru-Chile Current System (PCCS) ocean circulation are examined with a high-resolution, eddy-resolving regional oceanic model. We performed a dynamical downscaling of climate scenarios from the IPSL-CM4 Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM), corresponding to various levels of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. High-resolution atmospheric forcing for the regional ocean model are obtained from the IPSL atmospheric model run on a stretched grid with increased horizontal resolution in the PCCS region. When comparing future scenarios to preindustrial (PI) conditions, the circulation along the Peru and Chile coasts is strongly modified by changes in surface winds and increased stratification caused by the regional warming. While the coastal poleward undercurrent is intensified, the surface equatorial coastal jet shoals and the nearshore mesoscale activity are reinforced. Reduction in alongshore wind stress and nearshore wind stress curl drive a year-round reduction in upwelling intensity off Peru. Modifications in geostrophic circulation mitigate this upwelling decrease in late austral summer. The depth of the upwelling source waters becomes shallower in warmer conditions, which may have a major impact on the system's biological productivity.

  18. Piezoresistance response of ytterbium under static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Walter, D. F.

    1982-04-01

    Resistance change measurements in ytterbium foils (encapsulated in a PMMA matric) subjected to quasi-static triaxial (to 0.4 GPa) and shock wave loading (to 1.2 GPa) have been obtained. The use of a solid matrix in the quasi-static experiments is a new feature and ensures consistent comparisons between the two types of experiments. Two sets of gauge orientations, with respect to the matrix stresses, were examined in each type of experiment. Experimental results were analyzed in terms of the recently developed theoretical analysis. Both sets of experimental data confirm the general theoretical framework; an important difference between the static and dynamic measurements can be explained on the basis of the inclusion analysis. Results from these data have pointed out areas in need of refinement in the theoretical work and provided calibration data for lateral stress measurement in uniaxial strain experiments. These necessary theoretical developments, along with a determination of the piezoresistive coefficients, will be examined in the future.

  19. Beller Lectureship: Dynamics of skyrmions under electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    Current-driven motion of the skyrmions and skyrmion crystal is attracting intense attention because of the very small critical current density, but the microscopic mechanism of their motion is not yet explored. In this talk, I will present a numerical simulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and an analytic theory, which reveals a remarkably robust and universal current-velocity relation of the skyrmion motion driven by the spin transfer torque unaffected by either impurities or nonadiabatic effect in sharp contrast to the case of domain wall or spin helix. This is due to the peculiar dynamics of skyrmions characterized by inherent absence of the intrinsic pinning and flexible shape-deformation of skyrmions so as to avoid pinning centers. The effect of the constricted geometry will be also discussed. This work has been done in collaboration with J. Iwasaki and M. Mochizuki. This work was supported by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (No. 24224009) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan, Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST).

  20. Polymer Brushes under Shear: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Compared to Experiments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjesh K; Ilg, Patrick; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Kröger, Martin; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-04-28

    Surfaces coated with polymer brushes in a good solvent are known to exhibit excellent tribological properties. We have performed coarse-grained equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate dextran polymer brushes in an aqueous environment in molecular detail. In a first step, we determined simulation parameters and units by matching experimental results for a single dextran chain. Analyzing this model when applied to a multichain system, density profiles of end-tethered polymer brushes obtained from equilibrium MD simulations compare very well with expectations based on self-consistent field theory. Simulation results were further validated against and correlated with available experimental results. The simulated compression curves (normal force as a function of surface separation) compare successfully with results obtained with a surface forces apparatus. Shear stress (friction) obtained via nonequilibrium MD is contrasted with nanoscale friction studies employing colloidal-probe lateral force microscopy. We find good agreement in the hydrodynamic regime and explain the observed leveling-off of the friction forces in the boundary regime by means of an effective polymer-wall attraction.

  1. Eliminating Piezoresistivity in Flexible Conducting Polymers for Accurate Temperature Sensing under Dynamic Mechanical Deformations.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Melda; Register, Jeffrey T; Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2016-06-01

    The polarity and the magnitude of polyaniline's gauge factor are tuned through structural modification. Combining conducting polymers with gauge factors of opposite polarities yields an accurate temperature sensor, even when deployed under dynamic strains. PMID:27061270

  2. Motor Coordination Dynamics Underlying Graphic Motion in 7- to 11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danna, Jeremy; Enderli, Fabienne; Athenes, Sylvie; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Using concepts and tools of a dynamical system approach in order to understand motor coordination underlying graphomotor skills, the aim of the current study was to establish whether the basic coordination dynamics found in adults is already established in children at elementary school, when handwriting is trained and eventually acquired. In the…

  3. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-01

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals. PMID:26321152

  4. [Soil moisture dynamics under artificial Caragana microphylla shrub].

    PubMed

    Alamusa; Jiang, Deming; Fan, Shixiang; Luo, Yongming

    2002-12-01

    Applying the methods of deducing time series from vegetation space alignment, we analyzed the spatial and temporal variation features of soil moisture under artificial Caragana microphylla shrubs built in 1984, 1987, 1995, 1999. The results showed that affected by mechanical composition of mobile sandy dunes, the soil of sandy land was mainly composed of sandy particle, and the particles of > 0.01 mm were accounted for 97%. The withered moisture was 1.55%. The field waterhold capacity was 5.5%, and the available moisture storage was 3.95%. With the increase of the dominance of fix-sand vegetation, the moisture content of soil under artificial Caragana microphylla shrubs was decreased. The soil moisture of vegetation built in 1984 was lower than that built in 1999. The soil moisture conditions of four stages vegetation were continued depressing from April to June in a year, the lowest point presenced in June, and then gradually increased from July to October. The vertical change of soil moisture showed the tendency of increasing with soil depth. The soil moisture decreased by the degrees of early built vegetation (1984, 1987). Especially in 70 cm soil depth, the moisture content of soil decreased obviously. Caragana microphylla shrubs absorbed water and aggravated the shortage of soil moisture content near the root system, which affected the component of vegetation in Caragana microphylla shrubs. The species of herbaceous plants and annual plants increased during the growth of Caragana microphylla shrub.

  5. The impact of laminin on 3D neurite extension in collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn E.; Papke, Jason B.; Kutosky, Hannah P.; Throm, Allison; Hammer, Joshua A.; Harkins, Amy B.; Kuntz Willits, Rebecca

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this research was to characterize the effect of laminin on three-dimensional (3D) neurite growth. Gels were formed using type I collagen at concentrations of 0.4-2.0 mg mL-1 supplemented with laminin at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 µg mL-1. When imaged with confocal microscopy, laminin was shown to follow the collagen fibers; however, the addition of laminin had minimal effect on the stiffness of the scaffolds at any concentration of collagen. Individual neurons dissociated from E9 chick dorsal root ganglia were cultured in the gels for 24 h, and neurite lengths were measured. For collagen gels without laminin, a typical bimodal response of neurite outgrowth was observed, with increased growth at lower concentrations of collagen gel. However, alteration of the chemical nature of the collagen gel by the laminin additive shifted, or completely mitigated, the bimodal neurite growth response seen in gels without laminin. Expression of integrin subunits, α1, α3, α6 and β1, were confirmed by PCR and immunolabeling in the 3D scaffolds. These results provide insight into the interplay between mechanical and chemical environment to support neurite outgrowth in 3D. Understanding the relative impact of environmental factors on 3D nerve growth may improve biomaterial design for nerve cell regeneration.

  6. Neurite-outgrowth regulating functions of the amyloid protein precursor of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Small, D H; Clarris, H L; Williamson, T G; Reed, G; Key, B; Mok, S S; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Nurcombe, V

    1999-11-01

    Many studies have shown that breakdown of the amyloid protein precursor (APP) to produce the amyloid protein is an important step in the pathogenic mechanism which causes Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the normal function of APP. Developmental studies show that APP expression increases during the period of brain development when neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis is maximal. APP is expressed highly within growing neurites and in growth cones, and purified APP has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth from cells in culture. Thus APP may regulate neurite outgrowth or synaptogenesis in vivo. APP is actively secreted from many cells, and the C-terminally secreted APP has been shown to associate with components of the extracellular matrix, such as the heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Two putative heparin-binding domains on APP have been reported. Binding of HSPGs to an N-terminal heparin-binding domain (HBD-1) stimulates the effect of substrate-bound APP on neurite outgrowth. In the mature nervous system, APP may play an important role in the regulation of wound repair. It is highly likely that studies on the normal functions of APP will shed further light on aspects of the pathogenesis of AD.

  7. Essential role of NKCC1 in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori . E-mail: marunaka@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    The Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporter (NKCC) mediates electroneutral transport of 2Cl{sup -} coupled with Na{sup +} and K{sup +} across the plasma membrane, and plays crucial roles in Cl{sup -} uptake into the cells, homeostasis of cellular Cl{sup -}, and cell volume regulation. However, we have very limited information on the roles of ion transporters in neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells. In the present study, we report the role of NKCC1 (an isoform of NKCC) in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma PC12D cells. The expression level of NKCC1 protein was increased by NGF treatment. Knock-down of NKCC1 by RNA interference (RNAi) drastically diminished the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Transfection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged rat NKCC1 into cells for clarification of intracellular localization of NKCC1 revealed that the EGFP-rNKCC1 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane at growth cone during neurite outgrowth. These observations suggest that NKCC1 plays a fundamental role in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12D cells.

  8. Polystyrene replicas of neuronal basal lamina act as excellent guides for regenerating neurites.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Martin; Johansson, Fredrik; Kanje, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Various scaffolds, natural or artificial, have been used for neural repair, including basal lamina scaffolds obtained through extraction of nerves. Here we tested whether plastic casts of such preparations could be used for neurite guidance. To this end, longitudinal micron thick sections of rat sciatic nerve were extracted with detergents and treated with Dnase, yielding an acellular basal lamina master. From the basal lamina master a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold was made. Then a polystyrene replica was made using the PDMS mold as the master. The polystyrene replica showed high similarity to the master within nanometer resolution as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Organ cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia grown on the polystyrene replica and the master preparation exhibited guided outgrowth of neurites as assayed by two-dimensional fast Fourier transform analysis on preparations, where the neurites had been visualized by β-III-tubulin staining. The neurites aligned longitudally in the direction of the original basal lamina tubes. Thus, using inexpensive methods it is possible to make replicas of basal lamina which can be used for neurite guidance. This opens a new avenue for nerve reconstruction.

  9. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  10. Mutations changing tropomodulin affinity for tropomyosin alter neurite formation and extension.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Natalia; Guillaud, Laurent; Desai, Brinda; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the actin cytoskeleton is an important part of formation of neurites in developing neurons. Tropomodulin, a tropomyosin-dependent capping protein for the pointed end of the actin filament, is one of the key players in this process. Tropomodulin binds tropomyosin in two binding sites. Tmod1 and Tmod2, tropomodulin isoforms found in neurons, were overexpressed in PC12 cells, a model system for neuronal differentiation. Tmod1 did not affect neuronal differentiation; while cells expressing Tmod2 showed a significant reduction in the number and the length of neurites. Both tropomodulins bind short α-, γ- and δ-tropomyosin isoforms. Mutations in one of the tropomyosin-binding sites of Tmod1, which increased its affinity to short γ- and δ-tropomyosin isoforms, caused a decrease in binding short α-tropomyosin isoforms along with a 2-fold decrease in the length of neurites. Our data demonstrate that Tmod1 is involved in neuronal differentiation for proper neurite formation and outgrowth, and that Tmod2 inhibits these processes. The mutations in the tropomyosin-binding site of Tmod1 impair neurite outgrowth, suggesting that the integrity of this binding site is critical for the proper function of Tmod1 during neuronal differentiation.

  11. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  12. Tiam1 mediates neurite outgrowth induced by ephrin-B1 and EphA2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Riuko; Nakamura, Ritsuko; Shinmura, Kazuya; Kamo, Takaharu; Sakai, Ryuichi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Bidirectional signals mediated by Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, play pivotal roles in the formation of neural networks by induction of both collapse and elongation of neurites. However, the downstream molecular modules to deliver these cues are largely unknown. We report here that the interaction of a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide-exchanging factor, Tiam1, with ephrin-B1 and EphA2 mediates neurite outgrowth. In cells coexpressing Tiam1 and ephrin-B1, Rac1 is activated by the extracellular stimulation of clustered soluble EphB2 receptors. Similarly, soluble ephrin-A1 activates Rac1 in cells coexpressing Tiam1 and EphA2. Cortical neurons from the E14 mouse embryos and neuroblastoma cells significantly extend neurites when placed on surfaces coated with the extracellular domain of EphB2 or ephrin-A1, which were abolished by the forced expression of the dominant-negative mutant of ephrin-B1 or EphA2. Furthermore, the introduction of a dominant-negative form of Tiam1 also inhibits neurite outgrowth induced by the ephrin-B1 and EphA2 signals. These results indicate that Tiam1 is required for neurite outgrowth induced by both ephrin-B1-mediated reverse signaling and EphA2-mediated forward signaling. PMID:14988728

  13. Two stages in neurite formation distinguished by differences in tubulin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, S; Tashiro, T; Komiya, Y

    1995-01-01

    Changes in tubulin solubility during neurite formation were studied biochemically using rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. When fractionated with Ca(2+)-containing buffer at low temperature, a considerable proportion of total cellular tubulin was recovered in the insoluble fraction. We designated this cold/Ca(2+)-insoluble tubulin (InsT) and distinguished it from cold/Ca(2+)-soluble tubulin (SoIT). From the relative amount of InsT, neurite formation was found to proceed through two distinct stages. The first 6 days after plating (stage 1) in which the proportion of InsT increased dramatically (from 5 to 60%) coincided with neurite outgrowth. In the following period (stage 2), a constant level of InsT was maintained, whereas neurite maturation took place. Pulse-labeling experiments further revealed that the two stages differed significantly in terms of tubulin metabolism. High rates of synthesis as well as conversion from SoIT to InsT were observed in stage 1, whereas stage 2 was characterized by a decrease in both of these rates and an increase in the rate of degradation. The results show for the first time the coordinated changes in tubulin metabolism that underlie the process of neurite formation. PMID:7798932

  14. c-Fos activated phospholipid synthesis is required for neurite elongation in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Germán A; Bussolino, Daniela F; Portal, Maximiliano M; Alfonso Pecchio, Adolfo; Renner, Marianne L; Borioli, Graciela A; Guido, Mario E; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2004-04-01

    We have previously shown that c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. Herein, using PC12 cells induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor, the genomic effect of c-Fos in initiating neurite outgrowth is shown as distinct from its nongenomic effect of activating phospholipid synthesis and sustaining neurite elongation. Blocking c-Fos expression inhibited differentiation, phospholipid synthesis activation, and neuritogenesis. In cells primed to grow, blocking c-Fos expression determined neurite retraction. However, transfected cells expressing c-Fos or c-Fos deletion mutants with capacity to activate phospholipid synthesis sustain neurite outgrowth and elongation in the absence of nerve growth factor. Results disclose a dual function of c-Fos: it first releases the genomic program for differentiation and then associates to the endoplasmic reticulum and activates phospholipid synthesis. Because phospholipids are key membrane components, we hypothesize this latter phenomenon as crucial to support membrane genesis demands required for cell growth and neurite elongation. PMID:14767061

  15. Dynamics of Dark-Fly Genome Under Environmental Selections

    PubMed Central

    Izutsu, Minako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu; Fuse, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Environmental adaptation is one of the most fundamental features of organisms. Modern genome science has identified some genes associated with adaptive traits of organisms, and has provided insights into environmental adaptation and evolution. However, how genes contribute to adaptive traits and how traits are selected under an environment in the course of evolution remain mostly unclear. To approach these issues, we utilize “Dark-fly”, a Drosophila melanogaster line maintained in constant dark conditions for more than 60 years. Our previous analysis identified 220,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Dark-fly genome, but did not clarify which SNPs of Dark-fly are truly adaptive for living in the dark. We found here that Dark-fly dominated over the wild-type fly in a mixed population under dark conditions, and based on this domination we designed an experiment for genome reselection to identify adaptive genes of Dark-fly. For this experiment, large mixed populations of Dark-fly and the wild-type fly were maintained in light conditions or in dark conditions, and the frequencies of Dark-fly SNPs were compared between these populations across the whole genome. We thereby detected condition-dependent selections toward approximately 6% of the genome. In addition, we observed the time-course trajectory of SNP frequency in the mixed populations through generations 0, 22, and 49, which resulted in notable categorization of the selected SNPs into three types with different combinations of positive and negative selections. Our data provided a list of about 100 strong candidate genes associated with the adaptive traits of Dark-fly. PMID:26637434

  16. Dynamics of Dark-Fly Genome Under Environmental Selections.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Minako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu; Fuse, Naoyuki

    2015-12-04

    Environmental adaptation is one of the most fundamental features of organisms. Modern genome science has identified some genes associated with adaptive traits of organisms, and has provided insights into environmental adaptation and evolution. However, how genes contribute to adaptive traits and how traits are selected under an environment in the course of evolution remain mostly unclear. To approach these issues, we utilize "Dark-fly", a Drosophila melanogaster line maintained in constant dark conditions for more than 60 years. Our previous analysis identified 220,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Dark-fly genome, but did not clarify which SNPs of Dark-fly are truly adaptive for living in the dark. We found here that Dark-fly dominated over the wild-type fly in a mixed population under dark conditions, and based on this domination we designed an experiment for genome reselection to identify adaptive genes of Dark-fly. For this experiment, large mixed populations of Dark-fly and the wild-type fly were maintained in light conditions or in dark conditions, and the frequencies of Dark-fly SNPs were compared between these populations across the whole genome. We thereby detected condition-dependent selections toward approximately 6% of the genome. In addition, we observed the time-course trajectory of SNP frequency in the mixed populations through generations 0, 22, and 49, which resulted in notable categorization of the selected SNPs into three types with different combinations of positive and negative selections. Our data provided a list of about 100 strong candidate genes associated with the adaptive traits of Dark-fly.

  17. Venom Down Under: Dynamic Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Koludarov, Ivan; Chan, Angelo H. C.; Sanders, Kate; Ali, Syed A.; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Fry, Bryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the unparalleled diversity of venomous snakes in Australia, research has concentrated on a handful of medically significant species and even of these very few toxins have been fully sequenced. In this study, venom gland transcriptomes were sequenced from eleven species of small Australian elapid snakes, from eleven genera, spanning a broad phylogenetic range. The particularly large number of sequences obtained for three-finger toxin (3FTx) peptides allowed for robust reconstructions of their dynamic molecular evolutionary histories. We demonstrated that each species preferentially favoured different types of α-neurotoxic 3FTx, probably as a result of differing feeding ecologies. The three forms of α-neurotoxin [Type I (also known as (aka): short-chain), Type II (aka: long-chain) and Type III] not only adopted differential rates of evolution, but have also conserved a diversity of residues, presumably to potentiate prey-specific toxicity. Despite these differences, the different α-neurotoxin types were shown to accumulate mutations in similar regions of the protein, largely in the loops and structurally unimportant regions, highlighting the significant role of focal mutagenesis. We theorize that this phenomenon not only affects toxin potency or specificity, but also generates necessary variation for preventing/delaying prey animals from acquiring venom-resistance. This study also recovered the first full-length sequences for multimeric phospholipase A2 (PLA2) ‘taipoxin/paradoxin’ subunits from non-Oxyuranus species, confirming the early recruitment of this extremely potent neurotoxin complex to the venom arsenal of Australian elapid snakes. We also recovered the first natriuretic peptides from an elapid that lack the derived C-terminal tail and resemble the plesiotypic form (ancestral character state) found in viper venoms. This provides supporting evidence for a single early recruitment of natriuretic peptides into snake venoms. Novel forms of kunitz

  18. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Stout, Robert F; Khair, Aditya S

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of V_{o}/(k_{B}T/e), where V_{o} is the amplitude of the driving voltage and k_{B}T/e is the thermal voltage with k_{B} as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D/λ_{D}L, where D is the ion diffusivity, λ_{D} is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O(V_{o}^{3}) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in V_{o}. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing V_{o}. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer. PMID:26465471

  19. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors.

  20. Cholinergic neuronotrophic factors: V. Segregation of survival- and neurite-promoting activities in heart-conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Varon, S

    1980-04-28

    Chick embryo ciliary ganglionic (CG) neurons will not survive in monolayer culture unless special supplements are provided in the medium. We have previously reported that two such supplements, chick embryo extract and medium conditioned over chick heart cell cultures (HCM) share the capacity to support survival of CG neurons but differ in their neurite-promoting effects. Thus, embryo extract elicited neuritic outgrowth only on collagen and HCM did so only on polyornithine (PORN), although both agents supported neuronal survival on both substrata. We report here the separation and quantitation of two different HCM components. One is a trophic agent which supports survival of CG neurons on either collagen or PORN, but does not seem to adsorb to either substratum. The other is a neurite-promoting factor (NPF) which adsorbs to PORN but not to collagen. Overnight incubation of HCM on PORN yields two products: (i) an NPF-deprived HCM, that has no neurite-promoting activity and (ii) an NPF-coated PORN, that promotes neuritic development of CG neurons trophically supported by either embryo extract or NPF-deprived HCM. CG requirements for neuritic outgrowth were also examined in explant cultures. No neurites were present after 24 h when explants were cultured in plain medium on PORN. Very extensive radial neuritic outgrowth was observed when explants were cultured in HCM on fresh PORN, or in NPF-deprived HCM on NPF-derivatized PORN. In contrast to what happens with dissociated cells, neuritic outgrowth was also present when ganglia were cultured in NPF-deprived HCM on fresh PORN. However, neurites grew radially only to a limited extent, after which they adopted a circular pattern grossly concentric to the ganglionic explant. It is proposed that explanted ciliary ganglia produce a neurite-promoting factor that coats the PORN substratum in widening circles.

  1. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  2. Numerical SHPB Tests of Rocks Under Combined Static and Dynamic Loading Conditions with Application to Dynamic Behavior of Rocks Under In Situ Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. B.; Liao, Z. Y.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) numerical testing system is established to study the characteristics of rocks under simultaneous static and dynamic loading conditions following verification of the capability of the SHPB numerical system through comparison with laboratory measurements (Liao et al. in Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00603-016-0954-8). Three different methods are employed in this numerical testing system to address the contact problem between a rock specimen and bars. The effects of stand-alone static axial pressure, stand-alone lateral confining pressures, and a combination of them are analyzed. It is determined that the rock total strength and the dynamic strength are greatly dependent on the static axial and confining pressures. Moreover, the friction along the interfaces between the rock specimen and bars cannot be ignored, particularly for high axial pressure conditions. Subsequently, the findings are applied to determine the dynamic behavior of rocks with in situ stresses. The effects of the magnitude of horizontal and vertical initial stresses at varied depths and their ratios are investigated. It is observed that the dynamic strength of deep rocks increases with increasing depth or the ratio of horizontal-to-vertical initial stresses ( K). The dynamic behavior of deeper rocks is more sensitive to K, and the rock dynamic strength increases faster with depth in areas with higher K.

  3. Mycorrhizal dynamics under CO2 and nitrogen enrichment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. O.; Ovasapyan, T.; Finzi, A.; Treseder, K.

    2006-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that elevated atmospheric CO2 would increase the prevalence of mycorrhizal fungi, because plant investment in mycorrhizal fungi should increase if soil nutrients become limiting. Likewise, mycorrhizal abundance should decline under N fertilization. At four dates between December 2004 and November 2005, soil was collected from fertilized and unfertilized sectors within replicate rings of the Duke FACE experiment. CO2 fumigation began in summer of 1996, and N fertilization in spring of 2005. CO2 enrichment significantly increased colonization of roots by ectomycorrhizal fungi, from 31+/-4% root length in ambient plots to 39+/-4% in enriched plots (P=.036). We found no effect of CO2 or nitrogen fertilization on root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (average:43% root length), hyphal length of AM fungi (average: 1.2 m g-1 soil), or glomalin (average: 7.7 mg g-1 soil). Radiocarbon signatures indicated that glomalin residence times were approximately 7 years in this site, (Δ14C=107+/- 5.1), so this glycoprotein could constitute a longlived sink of nutrients. Neither elevated CO2 nor nitrogen fertilization altered ECM production of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) or glycine aminopeptidase (GAP), which break down chitin and proteins, respectively. Moreover, ECM produced enzymes might only contribute to a small fraction (0 to 1.5%) of chitin and protein degradation in the soil. Our CO2 hypothesis was supported with respect to ECM fungi, but not AM fungi. The general lack of response to nitrogen may be due to the short duration of the fertilization treatment at the time of sample collection.

  4. Dynamically triggered slip leading to sustained fault gouge weakening under laboratory shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Carmeliet, J.; Savage, H. M.; Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate dynamic wave-triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is composed of a three-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a biaxial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at a normal load of 4 MPa, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a dynamic wave, corresponding to material weakening and softening if the system is in a critical shear stress state (near failure). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in a perturbed state over multiple slip cycles as evidenced by the recovery of the material strength, shear modulus, and slip recurrence time. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  5. Bioassay, isolation and studies on the mechanism of action of neurite extension factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kligman, D.

    1984-01-01

    The identification and purification of molecules active in promoting neurite outgrowth requires a sensitive reproducible bioassay. A quantitative bioassay was utilized to purify a neurite extension factor (NEF) based on counting the number of phase bright neurons with processes at least equal to one cell body diameter after 20 hrs. in culture is defined, serum free medium. Using a combination of heat treatment DEAE cellulose chromatography and gel filtration, an acidic protein of M sub r = 75,000 was highly purified. Upon reduction, it yields subunits of M sub r = 37,000. Purified fractions are active half maximally at 100 ng/ml in inducing neurite outgrowth in this bioassay. Currently, monoclonal antibodies to NEF are being produced. Female Balb C mice were immunized with the antigen and fusions with mouse myeloma cells will be performed to yield hybridoma cells.

  6. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  7. Inhibition of dynein but not kinesin induces aberrant focal accumulation of neurofilaments within axonal neurites.

    PubMed

    Motil, Jennifer; Dubey, Maya; Chan, Walter K-H; Shea, Thomas B

    2007-08-20

    Studies from several laboratories indicate that the microtubule motors kinesin and dynein respectively participate in anterograde and retrograde axonal transport of neurofilaments. Inhibition of dynein function by transfection with a construct expressing dynamitin or intracellular delivery of anti-dynein antibodies accelerates anterograde transport, which has been interpreted to indicate that the opposing action of both motors mediates the normal distribution of neurofilaments along axons. Herein, we demonstrate that, while expression of relatively low levels of exogenous dynamitin indeed accelerated anterograde neurofilament transport along axonal neurites in culture, expression of progressively increasing levels of dynamitin induced focal accumulation of neurofilaments within axonal neurites and eventually caused neurite retraction. Inhibition of kinesin inhibited anterograde transport, but did not induce similar focal accumulations. These findings are consistent with studies indicating that perturbations in dynein activity can contribute to the aberrant accumulations of neurofilaments that accompany ALS/motor neuron disease.

  8. Dynamic Response Assessment for the MEMS Accelerometer Under Severe Shock Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Shaw, Harry C.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has evaluated the dynamic response of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device made by Analog Device, Inc. The device is designated as ADXL250 and is designed mainly for sensing dynamic acceleration. It is also used to measure the tilting angle of any system or component from its original level position. The device has been in commercial use (e.g., in automobile airbag deployment system as a dual-axial accelerometer and in the electronic game play-station as a tilting sensor) with success, but NASA needs an in-depth assessment of its performance under severe dynamic shock environments. It was realized while planning this evaluation task that two assessments would be beneficial to NASA's missions: (1) severe dynamic shock response under nominal thermal environments; and (2) general dynamic performance under cryogenic environments. The first evaluation aims at obtaining a good understanding of its micromachined structure within a framework of brittle fracture dynamics, while the second evaluation focuses on the structure integrity under cryogenic temperature conditions. The information we gathered from the manufacturer indicated that the environmental stresses under NASA's evaluation program have been far beyond what the device has experienced with commercial applications, for which the device was designed. Thus NASA needs the outcome of this evaluation in order to make the selection for possible use for its missions. This paper provides details of the first evaluation the dynamic response under severe multi-axial single-pulse shock load. It was performed using finite element tools with nonlinear dynamics procedures.

  9. MicroRNA miR-124 Regulates Neurite Outgrowth during Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Deo, Monika; Thompson, Robert C.; Turner, David L.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs with diverse regulatory roles. The miR-124 miRNA is expressed in neurons in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that overexpression of miR-124 in differentiating mouse P19 cells promotes neurite outgrowth, while blocking miR-124 function delays neurite outgrowth and decreases acetylated α-tubulin. Altered neurite outgrowth also was observed in mouse primary cortical neurons when miR-124 expression was increased, or when miR-124 function was blocked. In uncommitted P19 cells, miR-124 expression led to disruption of actin filaments and stabilization of microtubules. Expression of miR-124 also decreased Cdc42 protein and affected the subcellular localization of Rac1, suggesting that miR-124 may act in part via alterations to members of the Rho GTPase family. Furthermore, constitutively active Cdc42 or Rac1 attenuated neurite outgrowth promoted by miR-124. To obtain a broader perspective, we identified mRNAs downregulated by miR-124 in P19 cells using microarrays. mRNAs for proteins involved in cytoskeletal regulation were enriched among mRNAs downregulated by miR-124. A miR-124 variant with an additional 5’ base failed to promote neurite outgrowth and downregulated substantially different mRNAs. These results indicate that miR-124 contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth during neuronal differentiation, possibly by regulation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:18619591

  10. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  11. Neurite outgrowth on electrospun PLLA fibers is enhanced by exogenous electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach. To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide films or electrospun fibers (2 µm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Main Results. Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurites, indicating topographical cues are responsible for guiding neurite extension. Significance. Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  12. Arylsulfatase B modulates neurite outgrowth via astrocyte chondroitin-4-sulfate: dysregulation by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Kusumo, Handojo; Goodlett, Charles R; Tobacman, Joanne K; Guizzetti, Marina

    2014-02-01

    In utero ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, associated with reduced brain plasticity; the mechanisms of these effects are not well understood, particularly with respect to glial involvement. Astrocytes release factors that modulate neurite outgrowth. We explored the hypothesis that ethanol inhibits neurite outgrowth by increasing the levels of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in astrocytes. Astrocyte treatment with ethanol inhibited the activity of arylsulfatase B (ARSB), the enzyme that removes sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) and triggers the degradation of C4S, increased total sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), C4S, and neurocan core-protein content and inhibited neurite outgrowth in neurons cocultured with ethanol-treated astrocytes in vitro, effects reversed by treatment with recombinant ARSB. Ethanol also inhibited ARSB activity and increased sulfate GAG and neurocan levels in the developing hippocampus after in vivo ethanol exposure. ARSB silencing increased the levels of sulfated GAGs, C4S, and neurocan in astrocytes and inhibited neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons, indicating that ARSB activity directly regulates C4S and affects neurocan expression. In summary, this study reports two major findings: ARSB modulates sulfated GAG and neurocan levels in astrocytes and astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in cocultured neurons; and ethanol inhibits the activity of ARSB, increases sulfated GAG, C4S, and neurocan levels, and thereby inhibits astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth. An unscheduled increase in CSPGs in the developing brain may lead to altered brain connectivity and to premature decrease in neuronal plasticity and therefore represents a novel mechanism by which ethanol can exert its neurodevelopmental effects.

  13. Neurite Outgrowth On Electrospun PLLA Fibers Is Enhanced By Exogenous Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, A. N.; Zaccor, N. W.; Rivet, C. J.; Williams, L. A.; Piselli, J. M.; Gilbert, R. J.; Thompson, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both electrical stimuli (endogenous and exogenous) and topographical cues are instructive to axonal extension. This report, for the first time, investigated the relative dominance of directional topographical guidance cues and directional electrical cues to enhance and/or direct primary neurite extension. We hypothesized the combination of electrical stimulation with electrospun fiber topography would induce longer neurite extension from DRG neurons than the presence of electrical stimulation or aligned topography alone. Approach To test the hypothesis, neurite outgrowth was examined on laminin-coated poly-L-lactide (PLLA) films or electrospun fibers (2 μm in diameter) in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation. Immunostained neurons were semi-automatically traced using Neurolucida software and morphology was evaluated. Results Neurite extension increased 74% on the aligned fibers compared to film controls. Stimulation alone increased outgrowth by 32% on films or fibers relative to unstimulated film controls. The co-presentation of topographical (fibers) with biophysical (electrical stimulation) cues resulted in a synergistic 126% increase in outgrowth relative to unstimulated film controls. Field polarity had no influence on the directionality of neurite, indicating topographical cues are responsible to guide neurite extension. Significance Both cues (electrical stimulation and fiber geometry) are modular in nature and can be synergistically applied in conjunction with other common methods in regenerative medicine such as controlled release of growth factors to further influence axonal growth in vivo. The combined application of electrical and aligned fiber topographical guidance cues described herein, if translated in vivo, could provide a more supportive environment for directed and robust axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:24891494

  14. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  15. Neurite outgrowth and branching of PC12 cells on very soft substrates sharply decreases below a threshold of substrate rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Jennie B.; Brown, Xin Q.; Jacot, Jeffrey G.; Di Milla, Paul A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2007-06-01

    Rationally designed matrices for nerve tissue engineering and encapsulated cell therapies critically rely on a comprehensive understanding of neural response to biochemical as well as biophysical cues. Whereas biochemical cues are established mediators of neuronal behavior (e.g., outgrowth), physical cues such as substrate stiffness have only recently been recognized to influence cell behavior. In this work, we examine the response of PC12 neurites to substrate stiffness. We quantified and controlled fibronectin density on the substrates and measured multiple neurite behaviors (e.g., growth, branching, neurites per cell, per cent cells expressing neurites) in a large sample population. We found that PC12 neurons display a threshold response to substrate stiffness. On the softest substrates tested (shear modulus ~10 Pa), neurites were relatively few, short in length and unbranched. On stiffer substrates (shear modulus ~102-104 Pa), neurites were longer and more branched and a greater percentage of cells expressed neurites; significant differences in these measures were not found on substrates with a shear modulus >102 Pa. Based on these data and comparisons with published neurobiology and neuroengineering reports of neurite mechanotransduction, we hypothesize that results from studies of neuronal response to compliant substrates are cell-type dependent and sensitive to ligand density, sample size and the range of stiffness investigated.

  16. Secreted glypican binds to the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease (APP) and inhibits APP-induced neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Williamson, T G; Mok, S S; Henry, A; Cappai, R; Lander, A D; Nurcombe, V; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Small, D H

    1996-12-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. The effect of APP on neurite outgrowth can be enhanced if APP is presented to neurons in substrate-bound form, in the presence of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. To identify specific heparan sulfate proteoglycans that bind to APP, conditioned medium from neonatal mouse brain cells was subjected to affinity chromatography with recombinant APP695 as a ligand. Glypican bound strongly to the APP affinity column. Purified glypican bound to APP with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.8 nM and inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic neurons. The effect of glypican was specific for APP, as glypican did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, treatment of cultures with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-xyloside, a competitive inhibitor of proteoglycan glycanation, inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth but did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. This result suggests that endogenous proteoglycans are required for substrate-bound APP to stimulate neurite outgrowth. Secreted glypican may act to inhibit APP-induced neurite outgrowth in vivo by competing with endogenous proteoglycans for binding to APP.

  17. Preparation of Primary Neurons for Visualizing Neurites in a Frozen-hydrated State Using Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradian, Sarah H.; Galiano, Mauricio R.; Wu, Chengbiao; Chen, Shurui; Rasband, Matthew N.; Mobley, William C.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Neurites, both dendrites and axons, are neuronal cellular processes that enable the conduction of electrical impulses between neurons. Defining the structure of neurites is critical to understanding how these processes move materials and signals that support synaptic communication. Electron microscopy (EM) has been traditionally used to assess the ultrastructural features within neurites; however, the exposure to organic solvent during dehydration and resin embedding can distort structures. An important unmet goal is the formulation of procedures that allow for structural evaluations not impacted by such artifacts. Here, we have established a detailed and reproducible protocol for growing and flash-freezing whole neurites of different primary neurons on electron microscopy grids followed by their examination with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). This technique allows for 3-D visualization of frozen, hydrated neurites at nanometer resolution, facilitating assessment of their morphological differences. Our protocol yields an unprecedented view of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurites, and a visualization of hippocampal neurites in their near-native state. As such, these methods create a foundation for future studies on neurites of both normal neurons and those impacted by neurological disorders. PMID:24561719

  18. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on spiral ganglion neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, D; Hansen, S; Minovi, A; Laub, M; Jennissen, H P; Dazert, S; Neumann, A

    2009-09-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is a growth factor of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. Members of this protein family are involved in the development of various mammalian tissues, including the inner ear. As their notations indicate, they also have well-known effects on bone formation and regeneration. In this study, we examined the influence of rhBMP-2 on spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth in vitro and showed the presence of its most preferred receptor BMPR-IB in spiral ganglion cells both in vitro and in vivo. SG explants of postnatal day 4 rats were analysed for neurite length and number after organotypical cell culture for 72 h, fixation and immunolabeling. Different concentrations of rhBMP-2 were used in a serum-free culture media. Neurite growth was compared with control groups that lacked stimulative effects; with neutrophin-3 (NT-3), which is a well-established positive stimulus on neurite length and number; and with combinations of these parameters. The results display that neurite number and total neurite length per explant in particular concentrations of rhBMP-2 increased by a maximum factor of two, while the mean neurite length was not affected. NT-3 demonstrated a much more potent effect, delivering a maximum increase of a factor of five. Furthermore, a combination of both growth factors shows a predominant effect on NT-3. Immunohistological detection of BMPR-IB was successful both in cell culture explants and in paraffin-embedded sections of animals of different ages. The results show that rhBMP-2 is, among other growth factors, a positive stimulus for SG neurite growth in vitro. Most growth factors are unstable and cannot be attached to surfaces without loss of their biological function. In contrast, rhBMP-2 can be attached to metal surfaces without loss of activity. Our findings suggest in vivo studies and a future clinical application of rhBMP-2 in cochlear implant technology to improve the tissue

  19. A simplified micropatterning method for straight-line neurite extension of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Odawara, Aoi; Alhebshi, Amani; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We report a simplified micropatterning method for the straight-line extension of the neurites of cultured neurons. We prepared a poly-D-lysine (PDL)-patterned surface using a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic stamp. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on the PDL-bound substrate with the stamp removed, allowing for conventional cell seeding and detailed optical observation without fluorescent label. Cultured neurons elongated neurites along straight lines at the single-cell level and displayed spontaneous firing as detected by time-lapse imaging and Ca(2+) imaging.

  20. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  1. Research on dynamic creep strain and settlement prediction under the subway vibration loading.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhui; Miao, Linchang

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore the dynamic characteristics and settlement prediction of soft soil. Accordingly, the dynamic shear modulus formula considering the vibration frequency was utilized and the dynamic triaxial test conducted to verify the validity of the formula. Subsequently, the formula was applied to the dynamic creep strain function, with the factors influencing the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soft soil being analyzed. Meanwhile, the variation law of dynamic stress with sampling depth was obtained through the finite element simulation of subway foundation. Furthermore, the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soil layer was determined based on the dynamic stress. Thereafter, it could to estimate the long-term settlement under subway vibration loading by norms. The results revealed that the dynamic shear modulus formula is straightforward and practical in terms of its application to the vibration frequency. The values predicted using the improved dynamic creep strain formula closed to the experimental values, whilst the estimating settlement closed to the measured values obtained in the field test. PMID:27536535

  2. Geometric phase of a qubit driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.

    2014-01-15

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to the environmental effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we study quantitatively the GP of a two-level atom system driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics in terms of different parameters involved in the whole system. We find that with the change of the damping coupling, the GP is very sensitive to its properties exhibiting long collapse and revival phenomena, which play a significant role in enhancing the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Moreover, we show that the GP can be considered as a tool for testing and characterizing the nature of the qubit–environment coupling. Due to the significance of how a system is quantum correlated with its environment in the construction of a scalable quantum computer, the entanglement dynamics between the qubit with its environment under external classical noise is evaluated and investigated during the time evolution. -- Highlights: •Geometric phase under noise phase laser. •Dynamics of the geometric phase under non-Markovian dynamics in the presence of classical noise. •Solution of master equation of the system in terms atomic inversion. •Nonlocal correlation between the system and its environment under non-Markovianity.

  3. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well's wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well's dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t{sup 3/2} behavior to t{sup 1/2}. It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  4. Dynamic Crush Behaviors Of Aluminum Honeycomb Specimens Under Compression Dominant Inclined Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Pan, Jwo; Tyan, Tau; Prasad, Priya

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic crush behaviors of aluminum 5052-H38 honeycomb specimens under out-of-plane inclined loads are investigated by experiments. Different types of honeycomb specimens were designed for crush tests under pure compressive and inclined loads with respect to the out-of-plane direction. A test fixture was designed for both quasi-static and dynamic crush tests under inclined loads. The results of the quasi-static crush tests indicate that the normal crush and shear strengths under inclined loads are consistent with the corresponding results under combined loads. The results of the dynamic crush tests indicate that as the impact velocity increases, the normal crush strength increases and the shear strength remains nearly the same. The trends of the normalized normal crush strengths under inclined loads for specimens with different in-plane orientation angles as functions of the impact velocity are very similar to each other. Based on the experimental results, a macroscopic yield criterion as a function of the impact velocity is proposed. The experimental results suggest that as the impact velocity increases, the shape of the macroscopic yield surface changes, or more specifically, the curvature of the yield surface increases near the pure compression state. The experimental results also show similar microscopic progressive folding mechanisms in honeycomb specimens under pure compressive and inclined loads. However, honeycomb specimens under inclined loads show inclined stacking patterns of folds due to the asymmetric location of horizontal plastic hinge lines.

  5. Dynamic permeability of electrically conducting fluids under magnetic fields in annular ducts.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, S; del Río, J A

    2001-07-01

    The dynamic response of an electrically conducting fluid (either Newtonian or Maxwellian) flowing between straight concentric circular cylinders under a constant radial magnetic field, is analyzed. The isothermal flow is studied using the time Fourier transform, so that the dynamic generalization of Darcy's law in the frequency domain is obtained and analytical expressions for the dynamic permeability are derived. For the Newtonian case, the range of frequencies where the dynamic permeability approaches the static value is enlarged the smaller the gap between the cylinders and the higher the magnetic-field strength. For the Maxwell fluid, the presence of the inner cylinder shifts the frequencies that lead to the enhancement of the real part of the dynamic permeability to larger values and increases its maximum values relative to the case where the inner cylinder is absent. In addition, the Ohmic dissipation causes the damping of the amplitude of the response. PMID:11461397

  6. Static and dynamic moduli of posterior dental resin composites under compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi

    2011-10-01

    Dental resin composites are commonly used as restorative materials for dental treatment. To comprehend the static and dynamic moduli of dental resin composites, we investigated the mechanical behaviors of resin composites under static and dynamic loading conditions. Four commercially available resin composites for posterior restorations were evaluated. The percentages, by weight, of inorganic fillers of resin composites were examined by the ashing technique. The static compressive tests were undertaken with a constant loading speed of 1.0 mm/min using a computer-controlled INSTRON testing machine. The dynamic properties of composites were determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique. When inorganic filler content was increased, a remarkable increase in the static modulus and dynamic modulus were observed. Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between the static modulus and dynamic modulus (r(2) = 0.947). The SHPB technique clearly demonstrated the dynamic properties of composites, and was a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of composites under dynamic compressive loading.

  7. Patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds in three-dimensional hydrogel constructs enhance neurite outgrowth and directional control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, Richard J.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural tissue engineering holds incredible potential to restore functional capabilities to damaged neural tissue. It was hypothesized that patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds could control neurite direction and enhance neurite outgrowth. Approach. A method of creating aligned electrospun nanofibers was implemented and fiber characteristics were analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Nanofibers were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer, PCL mixed with gelatin, or PCL with a laminin coating. Three-dimensional hydrogels were then integrated with embedded aligned nanofibers to support neuronal cell cultures. Microscopic images were captured at high-resolution in single and multi-focal planes with eGFP-expressing neuronal SH-SY5Y cells in a fluorescent channel and nanofiber scaffolding in another channel. Neuronal morphology and neurite tracking of nanofibers were then analyzed in detail. Main results. Aligned nanofibers were shown to enable significant control over the direction of neurite outgrowth in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) neuronal cultures. Laminin-functionalized nanofibers in 3D hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels enabled significant alignment of neurites with nanofibers, enabled significant neurite tracking of nanofibers, and significantly increased the distance over which neurites could extend. Specifically, the average length of neurites per cell in 3D HA constructs with laminin-functionalized nanofibers increased by 66% compared to the same laminin fibers on 2D laminin surfaces, increased by 59% compared to 2D laminin-coated surface without fibers, and increased by 1052% compared to HA constructs without fibers. Laminin functionalization of fibers also doubled average neurite length over plain PCL fibers in the same 3D HA constructs. In addition, neurites also demonstrated tracking directly along the fibers, with 66% of neurite lengths directly tracking laminin-coated fibers in 3D HA

  8. Phase-dependent dynamics of the lac promoter under nutrient stress.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Anisha; Anufrieva, Olga; Sala, Adrien; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2016-01-01

    To survive, a bacterial population must sense nutrient availability and adjust its growth phase accordingly. Few studies have quantitatively analyzed the single-cell behavior of stress and growth phase-related transcriptional changes in Escherichia coli. To investigate the dynamic changes in transcription during different growth phases and starvation, we analyzed the single-cell transcriptional dynamics of the E. coli lac promoter. Cells were grown under different starvation conditions, including glucose, magnesium, phosphate and thiamine limitations, and transcription dynamics was quantified using a single RNA detection method at different phases. Differences in gene expression over conditions and phases indicate that stochasticity in transcription dynamics is directly connected to cell phase and availability of nutrients. Except for glucose, the pattern of transcription dynamics under all starvation conditions appears to be similar. Transcriptional bursts were more prominent in lag and stationary phase cells starved for energy sources. Identical behavior was observed in exponential phase cells starved for phosphate and thiamine. Noise measurements under all nutrient exhaustion conditions indicate that intrinsic noise is higher than extrinsic noise. Our results, obtained in a relA1 mutational background, which led to suboptimal production of ppGpp, suggest that the single-cell transcriptional changes we observed were largely ppGpp-independent. Taken together, we propose that, under different starvation conditions, cells are able to decrease the trend in cell-to-cell variability in transcription as a common means of adaptation.

  9. Solidification and fcc- to metastable hcp- phase transition in krypton under modulating dynamic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the solidification, melting and fcc-hcp transitions of Krypton under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The time-resolved diffraction patterns and dynamic pressure responses show compression-rate dependencies associated with both the decay and growth time constants of the liquid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. According to the Avrami equation, both the solidified and melting processes are spontaneous nucleation and a rod-like (1-D) growth. Furthermore, under dynamic loading conditions, Kr-hcp forms from fcc close to the melting line. The nucleation time of fcc and hcp are very fast, with little dependence of compression rates or shorter than the time resolutions. The threshold pressure for the formation of Kr-hcp is ~ 0.8 GPa at the dynamic loadings of 0.004-13 GPa/s. This work was carried out at DESY. This work was performed under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under contracts(W-7405-Eng-48 and DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD(11-ERD-046). The work at WSU was funded by NSF-DMR(1203834), DTRA(HDTRA1-12-01-0020).

  10. Transient processes under dynamic excitation of a coherent population trapping resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khripunov, S. A.; Radnatarov, D. A.; Kobtsev, S. M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu; Balabas, M. V.; Andryushkov, V. A.; Popkov, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown for the first time that under dynamic excitation of a coherent population trapping resonance in Rb vapours at different bichromatic pump modulation frequencies from a few tens of hertz and higher, the resonance is dramatically deformed as a result of emerging intensity oscillations of radiation transmitted through an Rb vapour cell. A significant change in the shape of the resonance under its dynamic excitation is confirmed experimentally and theoretically. A possible impact of the identified changes in the shape of the coherent population trapping resonance on the stability of an atomic clock is qualitatively discussed.

  11. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells: dependence on adhesion surface--cell surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth of C 1300 neuroblastoma cells, which were dispersed from adherent cultures or grown in suspension, was studied on different protein-coated surfaces. Of 29 different surface structures studied, including surfaces treated with various fibronectins, lectins, glycosidases, or glycosyltransferases capable of stimulating fibroblast spreading, only the surfaces coated with plasma fibronectin or with a protein mixture secreted by C6 glioma cells displayed an extensive activity in the sprouting assay. Neurite outgrowth was inhibited by brain gangliosides and by colominic acid (a sialic acid polymer). A 50% inhibition of neurite outgrowth of N18 neuroblasts induced by the glioma cell proteins was observed at the following approximate concentration: 100 microM (0.2 mg/ml) GD1A ganglioside, 20 microM (0.04 mg/ml) GT1B ganglioside, and 5 mg/ml colominic acid. Specificity of inhibition was suggested by the finding that a few polyanionic substances tested were not inhibitory in the sprouting assay, and that the type of gangliosides inhibiting sprouting were found to be major sialoglycolipids of the neuroblasts. A hypothesis is discussed, according to which neurite outgrowth of neuroblasts is stimulated by adhesion involving interactions of the adhesion-mediating protein with cell surface carbohydrates characteristic of brain gangliosides. PMID:6699078

  12. Oriented collagen as a potential cochlear implant electrode surface coating to achieve directed neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Kirkwood, John E; Lai, Edwina; Dazert, Stefan; Fuller, Gerald G; Heller, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    In patients with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the only therapeutic option when the amplification with conventional hearing aids does no longer lead to a useful hearing experience. Despite its great success, there are patients in which benefit from these devices is rather limited. One reason may be a poor neuron-device interaction, where the electric fields generated by the electrode array excite a wide range of tonotopically organized spiral ganglion neurons at the cost of spatial resolution. Coating of CI electrodes to provide a welcoming environment combined with suitable surface chemistry (e.g. with neurotrophic factors) has been suggested to create a closer bioelectrical interface between the electrode array and the target tissue, which might lead to better spatial resolution, better frequency discrimination, and ultimately may improve speech perception in patients. Here we investigate the use of a collagen surface with a cholesteric banding structure, whose orientation can be systemically controlled as a guiding structure for neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that spiral ganglion neurons survive on collagen-coated surfaces and display a directed neurite growth influenced by the direction of collagen fibril deposition. The majority of neurites grow parallel to the orientation direction of the collagen. We suggest collagen coating as a possible future option in CI technology to direct neurite outgrowth and improve hearing results for affected patients.

  13. Androgen-induced neurite outgrowth is mediated by neuritin in motor neurones.

    PubMed

    Marron, T U; Guerini, V; Rusmini, P; Sau, D; Brevini, T A L; Martini, L; Poletti, A

    2005-01-01

    In the brain, the spinal cord motor neurones express the highest levels of the androgen receptor (AR). Experimental data have suggested that neurite outgrowth in these neurones may be regulated by testosterone or its derivative 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), formed by the 5alpha-reductase type 2 enzyme. In this study we have produced and characterized a model of immortalized motor neuronal cells expressing the mouse AR (mAR) [neuroblastoma-spinal cord (NSC) 34/mAR] and analysed the role of androgens in motor neurones. Androgens either activated or repressed several genes; one has been identified as the mouse neuritin, a protein responsible for neurite elongation. Real-time PCR analysis has shown that the neuritin gene is expressed in the basal condition in immortalized motor neurones and is selectively up-regulated by androgens in NSC34/mAR cells; the DHT effect is counteracted by the anti-androgen Casodex. Moreover, DHT induced neurite outgrowth in NSC34/mAR, while testosterone was less effective and its action was counteracted by the 5alpha-reductase type 2 enzyme inhibitor finasteride. Finally, the androgenic effect on neurite outgrowth was abolished by silencing neuritin with siRNA. Therefore, the trophic effects of androgens in motor neurones may be explained by the androgenic regulation of neuritin, a protein linked to neurone development, elongation and regeneration. PMID:15606892

  14. Pale neurites, premature α-synuclein aggregates with centripetal extension from axon collaterals.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Toshiro; Adachi, Eijiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Ayako; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Progressive aggregation of α-synuclein (αS) from pale bodies (PBs) and extension from Lewy neurites (LNs) are candidate mechanisms for Lewy body (LB) formation. To identify how aggregation of αS is related to its extension along neurites, 60-µm-thick brainstem sections of Parkinson disease (PD) patients were prepared for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of αS-positive neurites with neurofilament (NF) and thiazin red (TR), a fluorochrome with an affinity to solid aggregates. This demonstrated 3D layering of αS surrounded by NF with the aggregates probed by TR in the center, corresponding to the eosinophilic core of mature LBs. This eosinophilic/TR-positive profile, characteristically absent in PBs, premature counterpart of LBs, was similarly absent in some LNs. We would like to refer these premature LNs as "pale neurites" (PNs). Their premature nature was evidenced by 3D fluoroprofiling with quantum dots (QDs) and subsequent electron microscopic identification (3D-oriented immunoelectron microscopy) as loosely packed αS (QDs)-positive filaments. Quantification of LNs, frequently extended around branching axons, demonstrated that LNs are initiated at axon collaterals to extend centripetally into proximal segments. This branching-oriented extension of αS is related to its selective predisposition to systems with highly divergent axons, preferentially affected in PD, which may explain barely somatotopic manifestations of PD.

  15. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be...

  16. Tissue kallikrein mediates neurite outgrowth through epidermal growth factor receptor and flotillin-2 pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengyu; Cui, Mei; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Yan; Dong, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein (TK) was previously shown to take most of its biological effects through bradykinin receptors. In this study, we assumed that TK mediated neurite outgrowth was independent of bradykinin receptors. To test the hypothesis, we investigated TK-induced neurite outgrowth and its signaling mechanisms in cultured primary neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells. We found that TK stimulation could increase the number of processes and mean process length of primary neurons, which were blocked by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor or down-regulation, small interfering RNA for flotillin-2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 inhibitor. Moreover, TK-induced neurite outgrowth was associated with EGFR and ERK1/2 activation, which were inhibited by EGFR antagonist or RNA interference and flotillin-2 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibition of bradykinin receptors had no significant effects on EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In the present research, our data also suggested that EGFR and flotillin-2 formed constitutive complex that translocated to around the nuclei in the TK stimulation. In sum, our findings provided evidence that TK could promote neurite outgrowth via EGFR, flotillin-2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathway in vitro. PMID:24211626

  17. APP independent and dependent effects on neurite outgrowth are modulated by the receptor associated protein (RAP).

    PubMed

    Billnitzer, Andrew J; Barskaya, Irina; Yin, Cailing; Perez, Ruth G

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its secreted form, sAPP, contribute to the development of neurons in hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Full-length APP binds the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), which stimulates APP endocytosis. LRP also contributes to neurite growth. Furthermore, the receptor associated protein (RAP) binds LRP in a manner that blocks APP-LRP interactions. To elucidate APP contributions to neurite growth for full-length APP and sAPP, we cultured wild type (WT) and APP knockout (KO) neurons in sAPPα and/or RAP and measured neurite outgrowth at 1 day in vitro. Our data reveal that WT neurons had less axonal outgrowth including less axon branching. RAP treatment potentiated the inhibitory effects of APP. KO neurons had significantly more outgrowth and branching, especially in response to RAP, effects which were also associated with ERK2 activation. Our results affirm a major inhibitory role by full-length APP on all aspects of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and show that RAP-LRP binding stimulated axon growth independently of APP. These findings support a major role for APP as an inhibitor of neurite growth and reveal novel signaling functions for LRP that may be disrupted by Alzheimer's pathology or therapies aimed at APP processing.

  18. Neurite outgrowth resistance to rho kinase inhibitors in PC12 Adh cell.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Hou, Xiaolin; Tao, Tingrui; Lv, Xiaoman; Zhang, Luyong; Duan, Weigang

    2015-05-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor is a promising agent for neural injury disorders, which mechanism is associated with neurite outgrowth. However, neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell was treated with ROCK inhibitors for a longer time. PC12 Adh cells were treated with ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or NGF for different durations. Neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell exposed to Y27632 (33 µM) for 3 or more days, but not happen when exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF, 100 ng/mL). The gene expression in the PC12 Adh cells treated with Y27632 (33 µM) or NGF (100 ng/mL) for 2 or 4 days was assayed by gene microarray, and the reliability of the results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Cluster analysis proved that the gene expression profile of PC12 Adh cell treated with Y27632 for 4 days was different from that treated with Y27632 for 2 days and those treated with NGF for 2 and 4 days, respectively. Pathway analysis hinted that the neurite outgrowth resistance could be associated with up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, especially rno04610 (complement and coagulation cascades), and down-regulation of cell cycle pathways, especially rno04110.

  19. SCIRR39 promotes neurite extension via RhoA in NGF-induced PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C F; Liu, Y; Ni, Y L; Yang, J W; Hui, H D; Sun, Z B; Liu, S J

    2013-01-01

    SCIRR39 is an identified upregulated gene in rat primary neuron injury and/or regeneration process with roles largely unexplored. Using real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence, SCIRR39 expression was detected in normal PC12 cells and upregulated in differentiated cells. The results of cell proliferation by Cell Counting Kit and cell cycle by flow cytometry indicated that SCIRR39 inhibited cell proliferation and induced the decrease in S phase. Importantly, immunofluorescent and RhoA pull-down assays showed that SCIRR39 strongly affected the neurite extension of NGF-treated PC12 cells through a RhoA-dependent mechanism, but the truncated mutants of SCIRR39 containing a truncation from 141AA to 211AA or from 397AA to 424AA failed to mock the SCIRR39 effect on neurite extension. Moreover, change of SCIRR39 expression in NGF-treated PC12 cells regulated the expression and phosphorylation of Fyn, a regulator of RhoA activity, but not the expression of ROCK II protein. Finally, immunofluorescence and RhoA pull-down assays revealed that obvious inhibition of neurite extension by SCIRR39 shRNA was reversed by RhoA inhibitor C3-transferase. Our results indicated that SCIRR39 increased the neurite extension in NGF-treated PC12 cells via RhoA, suggesting that SCIRR39 contributes to the regeneration of neuron injury by specifically altering the differentiation program.

  20. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications. PMID:27779221

  1. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    PubMed Central

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  2. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth and alteration of cytoskeletal gene expression by sodium arsenite.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw Htet; Kurihara, Ryohei; Nakashima, Shizuka; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Nohara, Keiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic compounds that are often found in drinking water increase the risk of developmental brain disorders. In this study, we performed live imaging analyses of Neuro-2a cells expressing SCAT3, a caspase-3 cleavage peptide sequence linking two fluorescent proteins; enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) and Venus, to determine whether sodium arsenite (NaAsO(2); 0, 1, 5, or 10 μM) affects both neurite outgrowth and/or induces apoptosis with the same doses and in the same cell cultures. We observed that the area ratio of neurite to cell body in SCAT3-expressing cells was significantly reduced by 5 and 10 μM NaAsO(2), but not by 1 μM, although the emission ratio of ECFP to Venus, an endpoint of caspase-3 activity, was not changed. However, cytological assay using apoptotic and necrotic markers resulted in that apoptosis, but not necrosis, was significantly induced in Neuro-2a cells when NaAsO(2) exposure continued after the significant effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth were found by live imaging. These results suggested that neurite outgrowth was suppressed by NaAsO(2) prior to NaAsO(2)-induced apoptosis. Next, we examined the effects of NaAsO(2) on cytoskeletal gene expression in Neuro-2a cells. NaAsO(2) increased the mRNA levels of the light and medium subunits of neurofilament and decreased the mRNA levels of tau and tubulin in a dose-dependent manner; no significant effect was found in the mRNA levels of the heavy subunit of neurofilament, microtubule-associated protein 2, or actin. The changes in cytoskeletal gene expression are likely responsible for the inhibitory effects of NaAsO(2) on neurite outgrowth.

  3. Hydrocortisone Stimulates Neurite Outgrowth from Mouse Retinal Explants by Modulating Macroglial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Berlinicke, Cynthia; Zack, Donald J.; Nickells, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is mounting evidence that retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) require a complex milieu of trophic factors to enhance cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. The authors' goal was to examine the contribution of components of a combination of hormones, growth factors, steroids, and small molecules to creating a regenerative environment and to determine if any of these components modulated macroglial behavior to aid in regeneration. Methods Postnatal day 7 mouse retinal explants embedded in collagen were used as an in vitro model of neurite regeneration. Explants were treated with the culture supplements fetal bovine serum, N2, and G5 and a mixture of G5 and N2 components, designated enhanced N2 (EN2). Explants were evaluated for neurite outgrowth over 7 days in culture. The effects of each treatment were also evaluated on cultured RGCs purified by Thy1 immunopanning. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR analysis were used to evaluate differences in gene expression in the explants due to different treatments. Results EN2 stimulated significant neurite outgrowth from explants but not from purified RGCs. Elimination of hydrocortisone (HC) from EN2 reduced the mean neurites per explant by 37%. EN2-treated explants demonstrated increased expression of Gfap, Glul, Glt1, Cntf, Pedf, and VegfA compared with explants treated with EN2 without HC. Subsequent experiments showed that increased expression of Cntf and Glul was critical to the trophic effect of HC. Conclusions These data suggest that the HC in EN2 indirectly contributed to neurite outgrowth by activating macroglia to produce neurotrophic and neuroprotective molecules. PMID:22395888

  4. NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Schneider, Torben; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Alexander, Daniel C

    2012-07-16

    This paper introduces neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), a practical diffusion MRI technique for estimating the microstructural complexity of dendrites and axons in vivo on clinical MRI scanners. Such indices of neurites relate more directly to and provide more specific markers of brain tissue microstructure than standard indices from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). Mapping these indices over the whole brain on clinical scanners presents new opportunities for understanding brain development and disorders. The proposed technique enables such mapping by combining a three-compartment tissue model with a two-shell high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) protocol optimized for clinical feasibility. An index of orientation dispersion is defined to characterize angular variation of neurites. We evaluate the method both in simulation and on a live human brain using a clinical 3T scanner. Results demonstrate that NODDI provides sensible neurite density and orientation dispersion estimates, thereby disentangling two key contributing factors to FA and enabling the analysis of each factor individually. We additionally show that while orientation dispersion can be estimated with just a single HARDI shell, neurite density requires at least two shells and can be estimated more accurately with the optimized two-shell protocol than with alternative two-shell protocols. The optimized protocol takes about 30 min to acquire, making it feasible for inclusion in a typical clinical setting. We further show that sampling fewer orientations in each shell can reduce the acquisition time to just 10 min with minimal impact on the accuracy of the estimates. This demonstrates the feasibility of NODDI even for the most time-sensitive clinical applications, such as neonatal and dementia imaging.

  5. Reelin Prevents Apical Neurite Retraction during Terminal Translocation and Dendrite Initiation

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Ryan S.; Cameron, David A.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling cortical dendrite initiation and targeting are poorly understood. Multiphoton imaging of developing mouse cortex reveals that apical dendrites emerge by direct transformation of the neuron's leading process during the terminal phase of neuronal migration. During this ∼110 min period, the dendritic arbor increases ∼2.5-fold in size and migration arrest occurs below the first stable branch point in the developing arbor. This dendritic outgrowth is triggered at the time of leading process contact with the marginal zone (MZ) and occurs primarily by neurite extension into the extracellular matrix of the MZ. In reeler cortices that lack the secreted glycoprotein Reelin, a subset of neurons completed migration but then retracted and reorganized their arbor in a tangential direction away from the MZ soon after migration arrest. For these reeler neurons, the tangential oriented primary neurites were longer lived than the radially oriented primary neurites, whereas the opposite was true of wild-type (WT) neurons. Application of Reelin protein to reeler cortices destabilized tangential neurites while stabilizing radial neurites and stimulating dendritic growth in the MZ. Therefore, Reelin functions as part of a polarity signaling system that links dendritogenesis in the MZ with cellular positioning and cortical lamination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whether the apical dendrite emerges by transformation of the leading process of the migrating neuron or emerges de novo after migration is completed is unclear. Similarly, it is not clear whether the secreted glycoprotein Reelin controls migration and dendritic growth as related or separate processes. Here, multiphoton microscopy reveals the direct transformation of the leading process into the apical dendrite. This transformation is coupled to the successful completion of migration and neuronal soma arrest occurs below the first stable branch point of the nascent dendrite. Deficiency in Reelin causes

  6. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations.

  7. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations. PMID:25447789

  8. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for linear buckling analysis under dynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Grady, Joseph E.

    1989-01-01

    A modification to the NASTRAN solution sequence for transient analysis with direct time integration (COSMIC NASTRAN rigid format 9) was developed and incorporated into a DMAP alter. This DMAP alter calculates the buckling stability of a dynamically loaded structure, and is used to predict the onset of structural buckling under stress-wave loading conditions. The modified solution sequence incorporates the linear buckling analysis capability (rigid format 5) of NASTRAN into the existing Transient solution rigid format in such a way as to provide a time dependent eigensolution which is used to assess the buckling stability of the structure as it responds to the impulsive load. As a demonstration of the validity of this modified solution procedure, the dynamic buckling of a prismatic bar subjected to an impulsive longitudinal compression is analyzed and compared to the known theoretical solution. In addition, a dynamic buckling analysis is performed for the analytically less tractable problem of the localized dynamic buckling of an initially flawed composite laminate under transverse impact loading. The addition of this DMAP alter to the transient solution sequence in NASTRAN facilitates the computational prediction of both the time at which the onset of dynamic buckling occurs in an impulsively loaded structure, and the dynamic buckling mode shapes of that structure.

  9. Searching target sites on DNA by proteins: Role of DNA dynamics under confinement

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Anupam; Bhattacherjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) rapidly search and specifically bind to their target sites on genomic DNA in order to trigger many cellular regulatory processes. It has been suggested that the facilitation of search dynamics is achieved by combining 3D diffusion with one-dimensional sliding and hopping dynamics of interacting proteins. Although, recent studies have advanced the knowledge of molecular determinants that affect one-dimensional search efficiency, the role of DNA molecule is poorly understood. In this study, by using coarse-grained simulations, we propose that dynamics of DNA molecule and its degree of confinement due to cellular crowding concertedly regulate its groove geometry and modulate the inter-communication with DBPs. Under weak confinement, DNA dynamics promotes many short, rotation-decoupled sliding events interspersed by hopping dynamics. While this results in faster 1D diffusion, associated probability of missing targets by jumping over them increases. In contrast, strong confinement favours rotation-coupled sliding to locate targets but lacks structural flexibility to achieve desired specificity. By testing under physiological crowding, our study provides a plausible mechanism on how DNA molecule may help in maintaining an optimal balance between fast hopping and rotation-coupled sliding dynamics, to locate target sites rapidly and form specific complexes precisely. PMID:26400158

  10. Ca2+ transients are not required as signals for long-term neurite outgrowth from cultured sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A method for clamping cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in cultures of rat sympathetic neurons at or below resting levels for several days was devised to determine whether Ca2+ signals are required for neurite outgrowth from neurons that depend on Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) for their growth and survival. To control [Ca2+]i, normal Ca2+ influx was eliminated by titration of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA and reinstated through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. The rate of neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites thus became dependent on the extent of depolarization by KCl, and withdrawal of KCl caused an immediate cessation of growth. Neurite outgrowth was completely blocked by the L type Ca2+ channel antagonists nifedipine, nitrendipine, D600, or diltiazem at sub- or micromolar concentrations. Measurement of [Ca2+]i in cell bodies using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura-2 established that optimal growth, similar to that seen in normal medium, was obtained when [Ca2+]i was clamped at resting levels. These levels of [Ca2+]i were set by serum, which elevated [Ca2+]i by integral of 30 nM, whereas the addition of NGF had no effect on [Ca2+]i. The reduction of [Ca2+]o prevented neurite fasciculation but this had no effect on the rate of neurite elongation or on the number of extending neurites. These results show that neurite outgrowth from NGF-dependent neurons occurs over long periods in the complete absence of Ca2+ signals, suggesting that Ca2+ signals are not necessary for operating the basic machinery of neurite outgrowth. PMID:2324199

  11. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  12. Dynamic response of CFRP plates under the action of random acoustic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. G.; Mousley, R. F.

    Acoustic fatigue design procedures for metallic, stiffened skin, and plate-type structures have been well established and validated in the past for aircraft structures. The advent of CFRP and its use in aircraft has necessitated reappraisal of dynamic design techniques. Experimental and theoretical studies of CFRP plates under the action of random acoustic loading are discussed. Attention is given to the nature and levels of the dynamic strains induced in terms of statistical properties and relative modal contributions, the latter being important in consideration of using simple single mode formulas for dynamic response prediction. The effects of high levels of excitation, up to 160 dB, which can produce nonlinear responses are discussed. The case of forced response of plates under the action of combined static in-plane compressive loading and acoustic excitation is also considered.

  13. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction of Reactive Solids Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-06-01

    We present novel time-resolved (TR) x-ray diffraction and TR Raman spectroscopy capable of probing structural and chemical evolutions of solids undergoing chemical and phase transformations. These methods are applicable to a wide range of dynamic experiments to study both single event phenomena of solids under thermal, electric or mechanical impact conditions and non-single event phenomena under dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) and high frequency pulse (or ramp) laser-heated DAC. In this talk, relevant technology developments are described with several examples of our recent studies on reactive metals and dense molecular systems, which are synergistic to many proposed activities to develop dynamic synchrotron x-ray diffraction capabilities centered at advanced third and fourth generation light sources.

  14. Dynamics of Helium-Loaded Grain Boundaries under Shear Deformation in alpha-Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Yang, Li; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    To simulate the motion and behavior of helium-loaded grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe under shear deformation using the molecular dynamics simulation method. Here, we report preliminary results on the effects of helium on coupled migration and relative translation of a sigma3 GB at 300 K.

  15. Exploration of Multi-State Conformational Dynamics and Underlying Global Functional Landscape of Maltose Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Tang, Chun; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of biological machines have been revealed to have more than two macroscopic states. Quantifying the underlying multiple-basin functional landscape is essential for understanding their functions. However, the present models seem to be insufficient to describe such multiple-state systems. To meet this challenge, we have developed a coarse grained triple-basin structure-based model with implicit ligand. Based on our model, the constructed functional landscape is sufficiently sampled by the brute-force molecular dynamics simulation. We explored maltose-binding protein (MBP) which undergoes large-scale domain motion between open, apo-closed (partially closed) and holo-closed (fully closed) states responding to ligand binding. We revealed an underlying mechanism whereby major induced fit and minor population shift pathways co-exist by quantitative flux analysis. We found that the hinge regions play an important role in the functional dynamics as well as that increases in its flexibility promote population shifts. This finding provides a theoretical explanation of the mechanistic discrepancies in PBP protein family. We also found a functional “backtracking” behavior that favors conformational change. We further explored the underlying folding landscape in response to ligand binding. Consistent with earlier experimental findings, the presence of ligand increases the cooperativity and stability of MBP. This work provides the first study to explore the folding dynamics and functional dynamics under the same theoretical framework using our triple-basin functional model. PMID:22532792

  16. A DYNAMIC NONLINEAR MODEL OF OZONE-INDUCED FEV1 RESPONSE UNDER CHANGING EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Dynamic Nonlinear Model of Ozone-induced FEV1 Response under Changing Exposure Conditions. 1WF McDonnell, 2PW Stewart, 3MV Smith. 1Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. 2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. 3ASI, Durham, NC.

    Ozone exposure result...

  17. Effect of grain size on deformation stability of copper under quasi- static and dynamic tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Gourdin, W.H.

    1991-10-31

    The effects of grain size on the deformation stability of copper deformed in tension under quasi-static and dynamic conditions have been studied experimentally and analytically. Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) copper samples with grain sizes of 15 {mu} and 120 {mu}m were tested. Results of the tests indicated that an increase in grain size resulted in greater extents of elongation prior to deformation instability and eventual failure under both quasi-static and dynamic loading. We have applied the deformation stability condition of Considere to both a simple power law modified to include a Hall-Petch grain size dependence and the more descriptive mechanical threshold stress (MTS) model. Calculations of the stress-strain behavior in uniaxial tension and the instability strain under quasi-static loading are compared with experiment. Both models predict an increase in the instability strain with increasing grain size, but the power law, included as a heuristic, yields a poor overall fit to both the stress-strain and the instability strains. Under dynamic loading comparison of the experimental results with analytical predictions were difficult due to inherent inaccuracy in the dynamic stress-strain data.

  18. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  19. Nonstationary desertification dynamics of desert oasis under climate change and human interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guohe; Qin, Xiaosheng; He, Li; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yongping; Li, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Desertification is becoming a major ecological concern in arid and semiarid regions, especially under climate change. Globally, it is burning up lands for human habitats with a rapidly spreading tendency. Many scientists have been struggling to explore the related mechanisms. Challenges remain in revealing the fundamental principle in terms of desert-oasis interactions that are associated with nonstationary variations. Here we present a theory of desertification dynamics through examining nonstationary effects of climate change and human interference. We hypothesize that such dynamics can be described as the fate and transport of dry air mass continuously generated from desert. We simulate a region in northwestern China and reveal that dynamics of the nonstationary desertification process is subject to interactive impacts from a variety of factors. Our study moves forward the field of desertification studies through initiation of the dynamics and nonstationarity concepts which allow the fundamental mechanism to be disclosed.

  20. Dynamical Evolution of Anisotropic Response in Black Phosphorus under Ultrafast Photoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shaofeng; Li, Chaokai; Zhang, Zhiming; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Yudao; Qiu, Jun; Wang, Qinsheng; Liu, Junku; Jia, Shuang; Feng, Ji; Sun, Dong

    2015-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a promising material for high-performance electronic and optoelectronic device for its high mobility, tunable mid-infrared bandgap, and anisotropic electronic properties. Dynamical evolution of photoexcited carriers and the induced transient change of electronic properties are critical for materials' high-field performance but remain to be explored for black phosphorus. In this work, we perform angle-resolved transient reflection spectroscopy to study the dynamical evolution of anisotropic properties of black phosphorus under photoexcitation. We find that the anisotropy of reflectivity is enhanced in the pump-induced quasi-equilibrium state, suggesting an extraordinary enhancement of the anisotropy in dynamical conductivity in hot carrier dominated regime. These results raise attractive possibilities of creating high-field, angle-sensitive electronic, optoelectronic, and remote sensing devices exploiting the dynamical electronic anisotropy with black phosphorus.

  1. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    PubMed

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  2. Static and Dynamic Behaviors of Fine Particles in a Plasma under Microgravity Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Yasuaki

    2005-10-31

    Fine particle behaviors in a plasma conditions were investigated under microgravity conditions using drop experiment facility and parabolic flight. By static analysis of fine particle arrangement, radially aligned fine particles were observed under microgravity. From the dynamic behavior of a fine particle, an acceleration force in a plasma under microgravity was analyzed to be in the range of 10-17 N, which is much smaller than estimated value from ion drag and electrostatic forces in the range of 10-14 N. A new control method of fine particle behavior is shown.

  3. Summary of work completed under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification research program (EDQP)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Bramwell, D.L.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the main projects undertaken under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification Research Program (EDQP) sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under FIN A6322. Lasting from fiscal year 1983 to 1987, the program dealt with environmental and dynamic (including seismic) equipment qualification issues for mechanical and electromechanical components and systems used in nuclear power plants. The research results have since been used by both the NRC and industry. The program included seven major research projects that addressed the following issues: (a) containment purge and vent valves performing under design basis loss of coolant accident loads, (b) containment piping penetrations and isolation valves performing under seismic loadings and design basis and severe accident containment wall displacements, (c) shaft seals for primary coolant pumps performing under station blackout conditions, (d) electrical cabinet internals responding to in-structure generated motion (rattling), and (e) in situ piping and valves responding to seismic loadings. Another project investigating whether certain containment isolation valves will close under design basis conditions was also started under this program. This report includes eight main section, each of which provides a brief description of one of the projects, a summary of the findings, and an overview of the application of the results. A bibliography lists the journal articles, papers, and reports that document the research.

  4. Dynamic proteome analysis of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, Uma K.; Stockel, Jana; Welsh, Eric A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Jacobs, Jon M.

    2012-02-03

    Understanding the dynamic nature of protein abundances provides insights into protein turnover not readily apparent from conventional, static mass spectrometry measurements. This level of data is particularly informative when surveying protein abundances in biological systems subjected to large perturbations or alterations in environment such as cyanobacteria. Our current analysis expands upon conventional proteomic approaches in cyanobacteria by measuring dynamic changes of the proteome using a 13C15N-L-leucine metabolic labeling in Cyanothece ATCC51142. Metabolically labeled Cyanothece ATCC51142 cells grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions in continuous light were monitored longitudinally for isotope incorporation over a 48 h period, revealing 422 proteins with dynamic changes in abundances. In particular, proteins involved in carbon fixation, pentose phosphate pathway, cellular protection, redox regulation, protein folding, assembly and degradation showed higher levels of isotope incorporation suggesting that these biochemical pathways are important for growth under non-diazotrophic conditions. Calculation of relative isotope abundances (RIA) values allowed to measure actual active protein synthesis over time for different biochemical pathways under non-diazotrophic conditions. Overall results demonstrated the utility of 'non-steady state' pulsed metabolic labeling for systems-wide dynamic quantification of the proteome in Cyanothece ATCC51142 that can also be applied to other cyanobacteria.

  5. The dynamic mechanical behavior of insaturated clay under quasi-one-dimensional strain state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Song-ji; Lu, Fang-yun; Chen, Rong; Qin, Jin-gui; Pang, Chun-jing

    2008-11-01

    An improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method with passive confined pressure was used to study the dynamic mechanical behaviors of an insaturated clay under quasi-one dimensional strain state. Experimental results show that both modulus of elasticity and yield strength of the clay were sensitive to strain rates. The confined pressures of the specimens were also obtained from the dynamic tests. In addition, the quasi-static responses of the clay were obtained with the unconsolidated and undrained (UU) test with confined pressure from 0.1MPa to 1MPa. Results of the quasi-static experiments show that the yield strength of clay increased with the confined pressure. The quasi-static and dynamic stress-strain behavior of the clay under confinement exhibited an elastic-plastic-like response. Based on the results of both dynamic and quasi-static tests, a phenomenological elastic-plastic type of material model was employed to describe the strain-rate-dependent properties of the clay under tri-axial state of stress, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  6. Dynamics of the cell-cycle network under genome-rewiring perturbations.

    PubMed

    Katzir, Yair; Elhanati, Yuval; Averbukh, Inna; Braun, Erez

    2013-12-01

    The cell-cycle progression is regulated by a specific network enabling its ordered dynamics. Recent experiments supported by computational models have shown that a core of genes ensures this robust cycle dynamics. However, much less is known about the direct interaction of the cell-cycle regulators with genes outside of the cell-cycle network, in particular those of the metabolic system. Following our recent experimental work, we present here a model focusing on the dynamics of the cell-cycle core network under rewiring perturbations. Rewiring is achieved by placing an essential metabolic gene exclusively under the regulation of a cell-cycle's promoter, forcing the cell-cycle network to function under a multitasking challenging condition; operating in parallel the cell-cycle progression and a metabolic essential gene. Our model relies on simple rate equations that capture the dynamics of the relevant protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions, while making a clear distinction between these two different types of processes. In particular, we treat the cell-cycle transcription factors as limited 'resources' and focus on the redistribution of resources in the network during its dynamics. This elucidates the sensitivity of its various nodes to rewiring interactions. The basic model produces the correct cycle dynamics for a wide range of parameters. The simplicity of the model enables us to study the interface between the cell-cycle regulation and other cellular processes. Rewiring a promoter of the network to regulate a foreign gene, forces a multitasking regulatory load. The higher the load on the promoter, the longer is the cell-cycle period. Moreover, in agreement with our experimental results, the model shows that different nodes of the network exhibit variable susceptibilities to the rewiring perturbations. Our model suggests that the topology of the cell-cycle core network ensures its plasticity and flexible interface with other cellular processes, without a

  7. Dynamics of the cell-cycle network under genome-rewiring perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Yair; Elhanati, Yuval; Averbukh, Inna; Braun, Erez

    2013-12-01

    The cell-cycle progression is regulated by a specific network enabling its ordered dynamics. Recent experiments supported by computational models have shown that a core of genes ensures this robust cycle dynamics. However, much less is known about the direct interaction of the cell-cycle regulators with genes outside of the cell-cycle network, in particular those of the metabolic system. Following our recent experimental work, we present here a model focusing on the dynamics of the cell-cycle core network under rewiring perturbations. Rewiring is achieved by placing an essential metabolic gene exclusively under the regulation of a cell-cycle's promoter, forcing the cell-cycle network to function under a multitasking challenging condition; operating in parallel the cell-cycle progression and a metabolic essential gene. Our model relies on simple rate equations that capture the dynamics of the relevant protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions, while making a clear distinction between these two different types of processes. In particular, we treat the cell-cycle transcription factors as limited ‘resources’ and focus on the redistribution of resources in the network during its dynamics. This elucidates the sensitivity of its various nodes to rewiring interactions. The basic model produces the correct cycle dynamics for a wide range of parameters. The simplicity of the model enables us to study the interface between the cell-cycle regulation and other cellular processes. Rewiring a promoter of the network to regulate a foreign gene, forces a multitasking regulatory load. The higher the load on the promoter, the longer is the cell-cycle period. Moreover, in agreement with our experimental results, the model shows that different nodes of the network exhibit variable susceptibilities to the rewiring perturbations. Our model suggests that the topology of the cell-cycle core network ensures its plasticity and flexible interface with other cellular processes, without

  8. Lithium Alters the Morphology of Neurites Regenerating from Cultured Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. M.; Patel, C. H.; Feng, A. S.; Kollmar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The small-molecule drug lithium (as a monovalent ion) promotes neurite regeneration and functional recovery, is easy to administer, and is approved for human use to treat bipolar disorder. Lithium exerts its neuritogenic effect mainly by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3, a constitutively-active serine/threonine kinase that is regulated by neurotrophin and “wingless-related MMTV integration site” (Wnt) signaling. In spiral ganglion neurons of the cochlea, the effects of lithium and the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 have not been investigated. We, therefore, set out to test whether lithium modulates neuritogenesis from adult spiral ganglion neurons. Primary cultures of dissociated spiral ganglion neurons from adult mice were exposed to lithium at concentrations between 0 and 12.5 mM. The resulting neurite morphology and growth-cone appearance were measured in detail by using immunofluorescence microscopy and image analysis. We found that lithium altered the morphology of regenerating neurites and their growth cones in a differential, concentration-dependent fashion. Low concentrations of 0.5 to 2.5 mM (around the half-maximal inhibitory concentration for glycogen synthase kinase 3 and the recommended therapeutic serum concentration for bipolar disorder) enhanced neurite sprouting and branching. A high concentration of 12.5 mM, in contrast, slowed elongation. As the lithium concentration rose from low to high, the microtubules became increasingly disarranged and the growth cones more arborized. Our results demonstrate that lithium selectively stimulates phases of neuritogenesis that are driven by microtubule reorganization. In contrast, most other drugs that have previously been tested on spiral ganglion neurons are reported to inhibit neurite outgrowth or affect only elongation. Lithium sensitivity is a necessary, but not sufficient condition for the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Our results are, therefore, consistent with, but do not

  9. Entanglement and quantum discord dynamics of two atoms under practical feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yang; Luo Bin; Guo Hong

    2011-07-15

    We study the dynamics of two identical atoms resonantly coupled to a single-mode cavity under practical feedback control, and focus on the detection inefficiency. The entanglement is induced to vanish in finite time by the inefficiency of detection. Counterintuitively, the asymptotic entanglement and quantum discord can be increased by the inefficiency of detection. The noise of detection triggers the control field to create entanglement and discord when no photons are emitted from the atoms. Furthermore, sudden change happens to the dynamics of entanglement.

  10. Lattice dynamics and electronic structure of mixed halofluoride scintillators under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kanchana, V.; Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-06-24

    We report the structural, lattice dynamics and electronic structure of mixed halo-fluoride scintillators MClF (M = Ca, Sr) based on density functional theory within generalized gradient approximation. The pressure dependent structural parameters and zone centered phonon frequencies are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. Both the structures are dynamically stable up to 50 GPa. MClF compounds are found to have a direct band gap along Γ−Γ direction at ambient as well as under pressure. It is found that these materials can serve as good storage phosphors in the low pressure region from the calculated electronic structure and optical spectra.

  11. Probing the dynamic responses of individual actin filaments under fluidic mechanical stimulation via microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Yang, Chung-Yao; Kim, YongTae; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2013-05-01

    Herein, we demonstrate an easy-to-handle approach that employs a combination of microcurvilinear flow and fluorescence microscopy for probing the dynamic responses of individual synthesized actin filaments. We observed morphological changes of single actin filaments with different spatiotemporal responses when they were elongated with rotation or underwent significant bending during fluidic shear stress, and found that they may initially increase their curvature but then start releasing the external force immediately thereafter. Our approach allowed us to visibly examine the dynamic responses of individual actin filaments under simultaneous forces of rotation and elongation, as well as bending resulting from fluidic shear stress.

  12. Symbolic dynamics and entropies of copepod behaviour under non-turbulent and turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moison, Maud; Schmitt, François G.; Souissi, Sami; Seuront, Laurent; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2009-06-01

    We consider here behavioural activity of copepods as a succession of symbols associated with swimming states: slow swimming, fast swimming, break and grooming. We characterise these symbolic sequences using tools from symbolic dynamics: probability density function of the residence times in each state; transition probability at each time step; Shannon entropy and dynamic entropy. This approach is applied to the swimming behaviour of Centropages hamatus which we have analyzed as an example of application, in order to stress the differences associated with turbulent and non-turbulent conditions. We characterise in this theoretical framework the behavioural changes exhibited by the copepod under turbulent conditions.

  13. Plant-soil interactions and soil carbon dynamics under climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Climate extremes have been suggested to increase significantly in intensity and frequency in the coming decades, and may influence ecosystem processes and the carbon cycle more profoundly than gradual climate warming. While there is a growing understanding of plant-soil interactions in extreme environments and from lab experiments, we still know very little about how such interactions affect soil carbon dynamics in real-world ecosystems exposed to climate extremes. In this talk I will give a brief overview of the topic and will present evidence from in-situ experiments on plant-soil interactions and their consequences for soil carbon dynamics under severe drought.

  14. Analysis of nonlinear dynamic response for delaminated fiber-metal laminated beam under unsteady temperature field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yiming; Chen, Yang; Zhong, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The nonlinear dynamic response problems of fiber-metal laminated beams with delamination are studied in this paper. Basing on the Timoshenko beam theory, and considering geometric nonlinearity, transverse shear deformation, temperature effect and contact effect, the nonlinear governing equations of motion for fiber-metal laminated beams under unsteady temperature field are established, which are solved by the differential quadrature method, Nermark-β method and iterative method. In numerical examples, the effects of delamination length, delamination depth, temperature field, geometric nonlinearity and transverse shear deformation on the nonlinear dynamic response of the glass reinforced aluminum laminated beam with delamination are discussed in details.

  15. A dynamic model for the p53 stress response networks under ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Qi, J-P; Shao, S-H; Li, D-D; Zhou, G-P

    2007-07-01

    P53 controls the cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis through interaction with the downstream genes and their signal pathways. To stimulate the investigation into the complicated responses of p53 under the circumstance of ion radiation (IR) in the cellular level, a dynamic model for the p53 stress response networks is proposed. The model can be successfully used to simulate the dynamic processes of generating the double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repairing, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, as well as the oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop. PMID:17072789

  16. Dynamic stability of simply supported composite cylindrical shells under partial axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Tanish; Ramachandra, L. S.

    2015-09-01

    The parametric vibration of a simply supported composite circular cylindrical shell under periodic partial edge loadings is discussed in this article. Donnell's nonlinear shallow shell theory considering first order shear deformation theory is used to model the shell. The applied partial edge loading is represented in terms of a Fourier series and stress distributions within the cylindrical shell are determined by prebuckling analysis. The governing equations of the dynamic instability of shells are derived in terms of displacements (u-v-w) and rotations (φx, φθ). Employing the Galerkin and Bolotin methods the dynamic instability regions are computed. Using the expression for the stress function derived in this paper, the pre-buckling stresses in the cylindrical shell due to partial loading can be calculated explicitly. Numerical results are presented to show the influence of radius-to-thickness ratio, different partial edge loading distributions and shear deformation on the dynamic instability regions. The linear and nonlinear responses in the stable and unstable regions are presented to bring out the characteristic features of the dynamic instability regions, such as the existence of beats, its dependence on forcing frequency and effect of nonlinearity on the response. The effect of dynamic load amplitude on the nonlinear response is also studied. It is found that for higher values of dynamic loading, the shell exhibits chaotic behavior.

  17. Quantitative assessment of neurite outgrowth in human embryonic stem-cell derived neurons using automated high-content image analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    During development neurons undergo a number of morphological changes including neurite outgrowth from the cell body. Exposure to neurotoxicants that interfere with this process may cause in permanent deficits in nervous system function. While many studies have used rodent primary...

  18. Attenuation of actinomyosinII contractile activity in growth cones accelerates filopodia-guided and microtubule-based neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Harald; Möller, Wolfgang; Wassermann, Torsten; Mihatsch, Julia; Blum, Martin

    2007-10-24

    The myosinII-specific inhibitor blebbistatin was used to attenuate actinomyosinII contractility in E7-chicken retina explant, medulla and spinal cord neuronal cell cultures. Addition of 20-100 microM blebbistatin, a concentration range that reversibly disrupts actin stress fibers, led to a reduction of growth cone lamellipodial areas and to an elongation of filopodia within 5 to 10 min. These morphological changes were completely reversed after removing the inhibitor. In the continued presence of blebbistatin for several hours, a dose-dependent acceleration (up to 6-fold) of neurite outgrowth was observed. The rapidly elongating neuritic processes displayed narrowed growth cones with one to three long filopodia at the leading edge. At the same time, thin neuritic branches emerged in a "push"-like fashion guided by filopodial extensions. Immunocytochemical characterization of these thin sprouts revealed that they contained actin filaments, myosinIIA, phosphorylated neurofilament/tau epitopes, MAP2, NCAM-PSA, and microtubules, demonstrating that these processes presented neurites and not filopodia. The crucial involvement of microtubules in blebbistatin-induced accelerated neurite extension was confirmed by its inhibition in the presence of nocodazole or taxol. The promotion by blebbistatin of neurite outgrowth occurred on polylysine, laminin, as well as on fibronectin as substrate. The presence of the Rho/ROCK-inhibitor Y-27632 also caused a dose-dependent promotion of neurite growth which was, however, 3-fold less pronounced as compared to blebbistatin. In contrast to blebbistatin, Y-27632 led to the enlargement of growth cone lamellipodial extensions. Our data demonstrate that neurite outgrowth and branching are inversely correlated with the degree of actinomyosinII contractility which determines the speed of retrograde flow and turnover of actin filaments and, by this, microtubule extension.

  19. L- and D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) inhibit neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Hynds, D L; Takehana, A; Inokuchi, J; Snow, D M

    2002-01-01

    Gangliosides and extracellular matrix molecules influence neurite outgrowth, but the combinatorial effects of these endogenous agents on outgrowth are unclear. Exogenous gangliosides inhibit neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and different isoforms of the ceramide analog threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) stimulate (L-PDMP) or inhibit (D-PDMP) glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. In this study, we determined whether altering the endogenous ganglioside levels with PDMP in SH-SY5Y cells regulates neurite outgrowth on the outgrowth-supporting extracellular matrix molecule, laminin. In cells stimulated with 20 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor-BB to promote outgrowth, we used image analysis to evaluate neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells grown on endogenous matrix or laminin and exposed to L- or D-PDMP. Both L- and D-PDMP decreased neurite initiation (the number of neurites/cell, the percent of neurite-bearing cells), elongation (the length of the longest neurite/cell, the total neurite length/cell), and branching (the number of branch points/neurite) from SH-SY5Y cells on endogenous matrix or laminin in a dose-dependent manner in serum-free or serum-containing medium. The inhibitory effects of each PDMP isoform were reversible. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth by L-PDMP could be mimicked by addition of exogenous gangliosides or C2-ceramide. Our analyses of neurite outgrowth in SH-SY5Y cells, a model of developing or regenerating noradrenergic neurons, demonstrate that increasing or decreasing endogenous ganglioside levels decreases neurite outgrowth. These results may indicate that SH-SY5Y cells undergo tight regulation by gangliosides, possibly through modulation of growth/trophic factor- and/or extracellular matrix-activated signaling cascades.

  20. G12V Kras mutations in cervical cancer under virtual microscope of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, X P; Xu, W H; Xu, D F; Fu, S M; Ma, Z C

    2016-01-01

    Kras mutations and cancers are common and their role in the progression of cancer is well known and elucidated. The present work is searching for the most deleterious mutation of the four found at codon 12 and 13 of Kras in cervical cancers using prediction servers; different servers were used to look into different factors that govern the protein function. The in silico results predicted G12V to be the most devastating; this particular mutation was then subjected to molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) for further analysis. The authors' approach of MDSs helped them to place the native and mutant structure under virtual microscope and observe their dynamics over time. The results generated are enlightening the effect of G12V variation on the dynamics of Kras. The structural variation between the native and mutant Kras over 50 nanoseconds (ns) run varied at every parameter checked and the results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. PMID:27048113

  1. XPCS study of dynamic correlation in polyurethane gel-carbonyl iron composite under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriew, Helena; Wiegart, Lutz; Boczkowska, Anna; Mirkowska, Monika

    2010-10-01

    An X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) study of composite-type material consisting of polyurethane gel and carbonyl iron micrometric spheres was performed under magnetic fields of 0, 300 and 600 mT. The onion-like spheres structure was destroyed during the composite processing. The following conclusions were obtained from the study: -The polyurethane matrix is preferred as a source for the observed dynamic effects. -Below 300mT the material dynamics in direction of the outer magnetic field are very clear. -For 600 mT the dependence of the dynamics on magnetic field direction disappears, but the correlation rate is much higher. These findings may be caused by a disturbance of the polymer mesostructure by larger strain leading to its cross-linking.

  2. The effect of grain size on deformation and failure of copper under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; LeBlanc, M.M.; Magness, F.H.

    1994-02-01

    In this work, we show experimentally, and using computer modeling that the effect of grain size manifested as an effect on constitutive behavior can have an appreciable effect on the deformation stability of copper deformed in tension under both quasi-static and dynamic loading: an increase in grain size results in greater extents of deformation. In a work previously published by Gourdin and Lassila, the effect of grain size was incorporated into the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) material model applied to OFE copper. Dynamic tensile tests were modeled using a 3-D computer code in which the MTS material model was incorporated. The computer code model accurately predicted the occurrence and growth of necking during dynamic deformation as a function of grain size.

  3. A Neural Network Model to Learn Multiple Tasks under Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Kenji; Ozawa, Seiichi

    When environments are dynamically changed for agents, the knowledge acquired in an environment might be useless in future. In such dynamic environments, agents should be able to not only acquire new knowledge but also modify old knowledge in learning. However, modifying all knowledge acquired before is not efficient because the knowledge once acquired may be useful again when similar environment reappears and some knowledge can be shared among different environments. To learn efficiently in such environments, we propose a neural network model that consists of the following modules: resource allocating network, long-term & short-term memory, and environment change detector. We evaluate the model under a class of dynamic environments where multiple function approximation tasks are sequentially given. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model possesses stable incremental learning, accurate environmental change detection, proper association and recall of old knowledge, and efficient knowledge transfer.

  4. An experimental and mathematical analysis of lymphopoiesis dynamics under continuous irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zukhbaya, T.M.; Smirnova, O.A. )

    1991-07-01

    A mathematical model describing the dynamics of lymphopoiesis in mammals continuously exposed to ionizing radiation has been developed. It is based on the theory of chalone regulation of hematopoiesis. The model comprises a system of nine differential equations. Results from the model were compared with our experimental data for bone marrow and blood lymphocytes of rats continuously exposed to gamma radiation in a wide range of dose rates. The model reproduces the lymphopoiesis dynamics that we observed in our experiment, in particular, the radiation hormesis at low dose rates, the reduction of lymphopoiesis at intermediate dose rates, and extinction of lymphopoiesis at high dose rates of continuous radiation. The possible explanation of the hormesis is suggested by the framework of the model. The model can be used for predicting the lymphopoiesis dynamics in mammals under continuous irradiation.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in <300fs, then followed by vibrational cooling and recombination within 2ps. Such impulsive bond breaking and late rebinding generate proteinquakes, which relaxes in several tens of picoseconds. The photo excited dynamics of eNOS-oxy with L-arginine substrate mainly occurs at the local site of heme, including ultrafast internal conversion within 400fs, vibrational cooling, charge transfer, and complete ground-state recovery within 1.4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps.

  6. Guaifenesin derivatives promote neurite outgrowth and protect diabetic mice from neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hadimani, Mallinath B; Purohit, Meena K; Vanampally, Chandrashaker; Van der Ploeg, Randy; Arballo, Victor; Morrow, Dwane; Frizzi, Katie E; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2013-06-27

    In diabetic patients, an early index of peripheral neuropathy is the slowing of conduction velocity in large myelinated neurons and a lack of understanding of the basic pathogenic mechanisms hindered therapeutics development. Racemic (R/S)-guaifenesin (1) was identified as a potent enhancer of neurite outgrowth using an in vitro screen. Its R-enantiomer (R)-1 carried the most biological activity, whereas the S-enantiomer (S)-1 was inactive. Focused structural variations to (R/S)-1 was conducted to identify potentially essential groups for the neurite outgrowth activity. In vivo therapeutic studies indicated that both (R/S)-1 and (R)-1 partially prevented motor nerve conduction velocity slowing in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. In vitro microsomal assays suggested that compounds (R)-1 and (S)-1 are not metabolized rapidly, and PAMPA assay indicated moderate permeability through the membrane. Findings revealed here could lead to the development of novel drugs for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23758573

  7. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  8. Anisotropic three-dimensional peptide channels guide neurite outgrowth within a biodegradable hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Musoke-Zawedde, Patricia; Shoichet, Molly S

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the neurite guidance potential of concentration gradients of glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (GRGDS) oligopeptides immobilized within three-dimensional patterned cylindrical volumes created in a biodegradable nerve guidance matrix. This was achieved using ultraviolet (UV) laser micropatterning of a hyaluronan (HA) hydrogel matrix modified with S-2-nitrobenzyl cysteine. Upon exposure to focused laser light, the 2-nitrobenzyl group was cleaved, exposing thiol groups which reacted with maleimide-terminated GRGDS exclusively within these laser-defined volumes. We show that the UV laser micropatterning technique can be used to create GRGDS peptide concentration gradients within the oligopeptide channels and that these channels guide neurite outgrowth from primary neural cells. PMID:18458398

  9. Mechanisms involved in the regulation of neuropeptide-mediated neurite outgrowth: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Bakos, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The present knowledge, regarding the neuronal growth and neurite extension, includes neuropeptide action in the central nervous system. Research reports have brought much information about the multiple intracellular signaling pathways of neuropeptides. However, regardless of the differences in the local responses elicited by neuropeptides, there exist certain functional similarities in the effects of neuropeptides, mediated by their receptors. In the present review, data of the relevant studies, focused on G protein-coupled receptors activated by neuropeptides, are summarized. Particularly, receptors that activate phosphatidylinositol-calcium system and protein kinase C pathways, resulting in the reorganization of the neuronal cytoskeleton and changes in the neuronal morphology, are discussed. Based on our data received, we are showing that oxytocin increases the gene expression of GTPase cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42), implicated in many aspects of the neuronal growth and morphology. We are also paying a special attention to neurite extension and retraction in the context of neuropeptide regulation. PMID:27560639

  10. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it. PMID:25060339

  11. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca < 0.0075), whole-capsule deformation confers the capsule a flattened bottom in contact with the functionalized surface, which hence promotes the rolling-to-firm-adhesion transition. It is consistent with the observations from previous studies that cell deformation promotes the adhesion of cells lying in the rolling regime. However, it is surprising to find that, at relatively high capillary numbers (e.g. 0.0075 < Ca < 0.0175), the effect of capsule deformability on its adhesion dynamics is far more complex than just promoting adhesion. High deformability of capsules makes their bottom take a concave shape with no adhesion bond formation in the middle. The appearance of this specific capsule shape inhibits the transitions of both rolling-to-firm-adhesion and detachment-to-rolling, and it means that capsule deformation no longer promotes the capsule adhesion. Besides, it is interesting to note that, when the capillary number exceeds a critical value (e.g. Ca = 0.0175), the rolling state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape

  12. Mechanical behavior of bovine nasal cartilage under static and dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Vera; Cadová, Michala; Gallo, Luigi M

    2013-09-01

    Abnormal mechanical loading may trigger cartilage degeneration associated with osteoarthritis. Tissue response to load has been the subject of several in vitro studies. However, simple stimuli were often applied, not fully mimicking the complex in vivo conditions. Therefore, a rolling/plowing explant test system (RPETS) was developed to replicate the combined in vivo loading patterns. In this work we investigated the mechanical behavior of bovine nasal septum (BNS) cartilage, selected as tissue approximation for experiments with RPETS, under static and dynamic loading. Biphasic material properties were determined and compared with those of other cartilaginous tissues. Furthermore, dynamic loading in plowing modality was performed to determine dynamic response and experimental results were compared with analytical models and Finite Elements (FE) computations. Results showed that BNS cartilage can be modeled as a biphasic material with Young's modulus E=2.03 ± 0.7 MPa, aggregate modulus HA=2.35 ± 0.7 MPa, Poisson's ratio ν=0.24 ± 0.07, and constant hydraulic permeability k0=3.0 ± 1.3 × 10(-15)m(4)(Ns)(-1). Furthermore, dynamic analysis showed that plowing induces macroscopic reactions in the tissue, proportionally to the applied loading force. The comparison among analytical, FE analysis and experimental results showed that predicted tangential forces and sample deformation lay in the range of variation of experimental results for one specific experimental condition. In conclusion, mechanical properties of BNS cartilage under both static and dynamic compression were assessed, showing that this tissue behave as a biphasic material and has a viscoelastic response to dynamic forces.

  13. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development. PMID:24158140

  14. Microtopographical features generated by photopolymerization recruit RhoA/ROCK through TRPV1 to direct cell and neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shufeng; Tuft, Bradley; Xu, Linjing; Polacco, Marc; Clarke, Joseph C.; Guymon, C. Allan; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell processes, including growth cones, respond to biophysical cues in their microenvironment to establish functional tissue architecture and intercellular networks. The mechanisms by which cells sense and translate biophysical cues into directed growth are unknown. We used photopolymerization to fabricate methacrylate platforms with patterned microtopographical features that precisely guide neurite growth and Schwann cell alignment. Pharmacologic inhibition of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or reduced expression of TRPV1 by RNAi significantly disrupts neurite guidance by these microtopographical features. Exogenous expression of TRPV1 induces alignment of NIH3T3 fibroblasts that fail to align in the absence of TRPV1, further implicating TRPV1 channels as critical mediators of cellular responses to biophysical cues. Microtopographic features increase RhoA activity in growth cones and in TRPV1-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Further, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) phosphorylation is elevated in growth cones and neurites on micropatterned surfaces. Inhibition of RhoA/ROCK by pharmacological compounds or reduced expression of either ROCKI or ROCKII isoforms by RNAi abolishes neurite and cell alignment, confirming that RhoA/ROCK signaling mediates neurite and cell alignment to microtopographic features. These studies demonstrate that microtopographical cues recruit TRPV1 channels and downstream signaling pathways, including RhoA and ROCK, to direct neurite and cell growth. PMID:25890710

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development.

  16. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in vesicular transport mediating neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Arca, S; Alberts, P; Zahraoui, A; Louvard, D; Galli, T

    2000-05-15

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH(2)-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH(2)-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH(2)-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process.

  17. Role of Tetanus Neurotoxin Insensitive Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein (Ti-Vamp) in Vesicular Transport Mediating Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Alberts, Philipp; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Louvard, Daniel; Galli, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH2-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH2-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH2-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process. PMID:10811829

  18. Predicting extinction risks under climate change: coupling stochastic population models with dynamic bioclimatic habitat models.

    PubMed

    Keith, David A; Akçakaya, H Resit; Thuiller, Wilfried; Midgley, Guy F; Pearson, Richard G; Phillips, Steven J; Regan, Helen M; Araújo, Miguel B; Rebelo, Tony G

    2008-10-23

    Species responses to climate change may be influenced by changes in available habitat, as well as population processes, species interactions and interactions between demographic and landscape dynamics. Current methods for assessing these responses fail to provide an integrated view of these influences because they deal with habitat change or population dynamics, but rarely both. In this study, we linked a time series of habitat suitability models with spatially explicit stochastic population models to explore factors that influence the viability of plant species populations under stable and changing climate scenarios in South African fynbos, a global biodiversity hot spot. Results indicate that complex interactions between life history, disturbance regime and distribution pattern mediate species extinction risks under climate change. Our novel mechanistic approach allows more complete and direct appraisal of future biotic responses than do static bioclimatic habitat modelling approaches, and will ultimately support development of more effective conservation strategies to mitigate biodiversity losses due to climate change.

  19. Dynamic response characteristics analysis of the doubly-fed wind power system under grid voltage drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, L.; Chen, W.; Xu, Y. T.

    2016-08-01

    Double-fed induction generator (DFIG) is sensitive to the disturbances of grid, so the security and stability of the grid and the DFIG itself are under threat with the rapid increase of DFIG. Therefore, it is important to study dynamic response of the DFIG when voltage drop failure is happened in power system. In this paper, firstly, mathematical models and the control strategy about mechanical and electrical response processes is respectively introduced. Then through the analysis of response process, it is concluded that the dynamic response characteristics are related to voltage drop level, operating status of DFIG and control strategy adapted to rotor side. Last, the correctness of conclusion is validated by the simulation about mechanical and electrical response processes in different voltage levels drop and different DFIG output levels under DIgSILENT/PowerFactory software platform.

  20. Dynamics of Freely Oscillating and Coupled Hair Cell Bundles under Mechanical Deflection

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Strimbu, C. Elliott; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, attachment to the overlying membrane was found to affect the resting position of the hair cell bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. To assess the effects of such a deflection on mechanically decoupled hair bundles, comparable offsets were imposed on decoupled spontaneously oscillating bundles. Strong modulation was observed in their dynamic state under deflection, with qualitative changes in the oscillation profile, amplitude, and characteristic frequency of oscillation seen in response to stimulus. Large offsets were found to arrest spontaneous oscillation, with subsequent recovery upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamic state of the hair bundle displayed hysteresis and a dependence on the direction of the imposed offset. The coupled system of hair bundles, with the overlying membrane left on top of the preparation, also exhibited a dependence on offset position, with an increase in the linear response function observed under deflections in the inhibitory direction. PMID:22768934

  1. Dynamics of freely oscillating and coupled hair cell bundles under mechanical deflection.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Strimbu, C Elliott; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Bozovic, Dolores

    2012-04-18

    In vitro, attachment to the overlying membrane was found to affect the resting position of the hair cell bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. To assess the effects of such a deflection on mechanically decoupled hair bundles, comparable offsets were imposed on decoupled spontaneously oscillating bundles. Strong modulation was observed in their dynamic state under deflection, with qualitative changes in the oscillation profile, amplitude, and characteristic frequency of oscillation seen in response to stimulus. Large offsets were found to arrest spontaneous oscillation, with subsequent recovery upon reversal of the stimulus. The dynamic state of the hair bundle displayed hysteresis and a dependence on the direction of the imposed offset. The coupled system of hair bundles, with the overlying membrane left on top of the preparation, also exhibited a dependence on offset position, with an increase in the linear response function observed under deflections in the inhibitory direction. PMID:22768934

  2. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  3. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Glasses Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin

    2011-08-23

    : In this chapter, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. Both soda-lime and borosilicate glass materials are investigated. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  4. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Soda-lime Glass Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Chen, Weinong W.; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-27

    In this paper, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a soda-lime glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  5. Hidden state dynamics in laser Doppler vibrometery measurements of the carotid pulse under resting conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Alan D; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Sirevaag, Erik J; Kristjansson, Sean D; Lai, Po-Hsiang; Rohrbaugh, John W

    2010-01-01

    A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to sense movements of the skin overlying the carotid artery. Fluctuations in carotid artery diameter due to variations in the underlying blood pressure are sensed at the surface of the skin. Portions of the LDV signal corresponding to single heartbeats, called the LDV pulses, are extracted. This paper introduces the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) to model the dynamics of the LDV pulse from beat to beat based on pulse morphology, which under resting conditions are primarily due to breathing effects. LDV pulses are classified according to state, by computing the optimal state path through the data using trained HMMs. HMM state dynamics are compared to simultaneous recordings of strain gauges placed on the abdomen. The work presented here provides a robust statistical approach to modeling the dependence of the LDV pulse on latent states.

  6. A dynamic programming-based particle swarm optimization algorithm for an inventory management problem under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zeng, Ziqiang; Han, Bernard; Lei, Xiao

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a dynamic programming-based particle swarm optimization (DP-based PSO) algorithm for solving an inventory management problem for large-scale construction projects under a fuzzy random environment. By taking into account the purchasing behaviour and strategy under rules of international bidding, a multi-objective fuzzy random dynamic programming model is constructed. To deal with the uncertainties, a hybrid crisp approach is used to transform fuzzy random parameters into fuzzy variables that are subsequently defuzzified by using an expected value operator with optimistic-pessimistic index. The iterative nature of the authors' model motivates them to develop a DP-based PSO algorithm. More specifically, their approach treats the state variables as hidden parameters. This in turn eliminates many redundant feasibility checks during initialization and particle updates at each iteration. Results and sensitivity analysis are presented to highlight the performance of the authors' optimization method, which is very effective as compared to the standard PSO algorithm.

  7. Studying the unfolding kinetics of proteins under pressure using long molecular dynamic simulation runs.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl; McCarthy, Andrés N

    2007-12-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101,325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 mus suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure.

  8. Identification of explosive media using spectrum dynamics under the action of a THz pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2009-09-01

    A method of THz spectral dynamics analysis (SDA) of medium response in the THz and GHz ranges, which was developed by us in previous papers for detection and identification of materials, is used for the treatment of experimentally measured signals, passed through selected explosives, including those hidden under covering materials. This technique is based on the window sliding method and on restoration of the THz pulse. It allows researchers to follow the dynamics of many spectral lines in one set of measurements simultaneously and to obtain the full information about the spectrum dynamics of the THz pulse. Relaxation time of rotational transitions, for example, can be determined too. This information gives an opportunity to detect and identify materials despite the similarity in their THz spectra-which may be identical. We show that the spectrum dynamics of THz pulses, passed through the explosives hidden under plastic, cotton and leather barriers-covers, differ widely for these media despite little difference in their spectra. Consequently, our method allows for detection and identification of the hidden explosives with high probability.

  9. [Dynamic changes of soil ecological factors in Ziwuling secondary forest area under human disturbance].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengchao; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2005-09-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon, disturbance is considered as a discrete event occurred in natural ecosystems at various spatial and temporal scales. The occurrence of disturbance directly affects the structure, function and dynamics of ecosystems. Forest logging and forestland assart, the common human disturbances in forest area, have caused the dynamic changes of forest soil ecological factors in a relatively consistent environment. A study on the dynamics of soil bulk density, soil organic matter, soil microbes and other soil ecological factors under different human disturbance (logging and assart, logging but without assart, control) were conducted in the Ziwuling secondary forest area. The results indicated that human disturbance had a deep impact on the soil ecological factors, with soil physical and chemical properties become bad, soil organic matter decreased from 2.2% to 0.8%, and soil stable aggregates dropped more than 30%. The quantity of soil microbes decreased sharply with enhanced human disturbance. Soil organic matter and soil microbes decreased more than 50% and 90%, respectively, and soil bulk density increased from 0.9 to 1.21 g x cm(-3) with increasing soil depth. Ditch edge level also affected the dynamics of soil factors under the same disturbance, with a better soil ecological condition at low-than at high ditch edge level.

  10. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for linear buckling analysis under dynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Grady, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    A unique modification to the NASTRAN solution sequence for transient analysis with direct time integration (COSMIC NASTRAN rigid format 9) was developed and incorporated into a DMAP alter. This DMAP alter calculates the buckling stability of a dynamically loaded structure, and is used to predict the onset of structural buckling under stress wave loading conditions. The modified solution sequence incorporates the linear buckling analysis capability (rigid format 5) of NASTRAN into the existing Transient solution rigid format in such a way as to provide a time dependent eigensolution which is used to assess the buckling stability of the structure as it responds to the impulsive load. As a demonstration of the validity of this modified solution procedure, the dynamic buckling of a prismatic bar subjected to an impulsive longitudinal compression is analyzed and compared to the known theoretical solution. In addition, a dynamic buckling analysis is performed for the analytically less tractable problem of the localized dynamic buckling of an initially flawed composite laminate under transverse impact loading. The addition of this DMAP alter to the transient solution sequence in NASTRAN facilitates the prediction of both time and mode of buckling.

  11. Two-dimensional vesicle dynamics under shear flow: Effect of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoui, Badr; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2011-06-01

    Dynamics of a single vesicle under shear flow between two parallel plates is studied in two-dimensions using lattice-Boltzmann simulations. We first present how we adapted the lattice-Boltzmann method to simulate vesicle dynamics, using an approach known from the immersed boundary method. The fluid flow is computed on an Eulerian regular fixed mesh while the location of the vesicle membrane is tracked by a Lagrangian moving mesh. As benchmarking tests, the known vesicle equilibrium shapes in a fluid at rest are found and the dynamical behavior of a vesicle under simple shear flow is being reproduced. Further, we focus on investigating the effect of the confinement on the dynamics, a question that has received little attention so far. In particular, we study how the vesicle steady inclination angle in the tank-treading regime depends on the degree of confinement. The influence of the confinement on the effective viscosity of the composite fluid is also analyzed. At a given reduced volume (the swelling degree) of a vesicle we find that both the inclination angle, and the membrane tank-treading velocity decrease with increasing confinement. At sufficiently large degree of confinement the tank-treading velocity exhibits a nonmonotonous dependence on the reduced volume and the effective viscosity shows a nonlinear behavior.

  12. Computational model of particle deposition in the nasal cavity under steady and dynamic flow.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Paraskevi; Alexopoulos, Aleck H; Kiparissides, Costas

    2015-01-01

    A computational model for flow and particle deposition in a three-dimensional representation of the human nasal cavity is developed. Simulations of steady state and dynamic airflow during inhalation are performed at flow rates of 9-60 l/min. Depositions for particles of size 0.5-20 μm are determined and compared with experimental and simulation results from the literature in terms of deposition efficiencies. The nasal model is validated by comparison with experimental and simulation results from the literature for particle deposition under steady-state flow. The distribution of deposited particles in the nasal cavity is presented in terms of an axial deposition distribution as well as a bivariate axial deposition and particle size distribution. Simulations of dynamic airflow and particle deposition during an inhalation cycle are performed for different nasal cavity outlet pressure variations and different particle injections. The total particle deposition efficiency under dynamic flow is found to depend strongly on the dynamics of airflow as well as the type of particle injection.

  13. The optimal dynamic immunization under a controlled heterogeneous node-based SIRS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Draief, Moez; Yang, Xiaofan

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic immunizations, under which the state of the propagation network of electronic viruses can be changed by adjusting the control measures, are regarded as an alternative to static immunizations. This paper addresses the optimal dynamical immunization under the widely accepted SIRS assumption. First, based on a controlled heterogeneous node-based SIRS model, an optimal control problem capturing the optimal dynamical immunization is formulated. Second, the existence of an optimal dynamical immunization scheme is shown, and the corresponding optimality system is derived. Next, some numerical examples are given to show that an optimal immunization strategy can be worked out by numerically solving the optimality system, from which it is found that the network topology has a complex impact on the optimal immunization strategy. Finally, the difference between a payoff and the minimum payoff is estimated in terms of the deviation of the corresponding immunization strategy from the optimal immunization strategy. The proposed optimal immunization scheme is justified, because it can achieve a low level of infections at a low cost.

  14. Optimal overlap length in staggered architecture composites under dynamic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Abhishek; Tekalur, Srinivasan Arjun; Miklavcic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid staggered architecture composites, like nacre and bone, are known for two discernible aspects: superior strength and synergistic toughness. What is lacking is the scientific rationale proving suitability of these materials under impact/time dependent loading. The current investigation aims to address the structure-property correlationship of these materials by development of an analytical model under dynamic rates of loading. Existing literature studies address behavior of staggered materials under quasi-static loading conditions. Critical overlap length was computed for three natural composites-nacre, spider-silk and, collagen in bone/tendon, and showed reasonable agreement with experimental data. Applicability of the analytical approach to predict lap-joint strength has been briefly discussed and quantified against experimental data. Choice of nanometer sized building blocks in natural composites has been addressed and explained from shear transfer efficiency point of view. The potentiality of these composites for use as biomimetic protective material under impact loading has been addressed as well.

  15. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  16. NeuriteQuant: An open source toolkit for high content screens of neuronal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, some of the most useful and physiologically relevant neuronal cell culture systems, such as high density co-cultures of astrocytes and primary hippocampal neurons, or differentiated stem cell-derived cultures, are characterized by high cell density and partially overlapping cellular structures. Efficient analytical strategies are required to enable rapid, reliable, quantitative analysis of neuronal morphology in these valuable model systems. Results Here we present the development and validation of a novel bioinformatics pipeline called NeuriteQuant. This tool enables fully automated morphological analysis of large-scale image data from neuronal cultures or brain sections that display a high degree of complexity and overlap of neuronal outgrowths. It also provides an efficient web-based tool to review and evaluate the analysis process. In addition to its built-in functionality, NeuriteQuant can be readily extended based on the rich toolset offered by ImageJ and its associated community of developers. As proof of concept we performed automated screens for modulators of neuronal development in cultures of primary neurons and neuronally differentiated P19 stem cells, which demonstrated specific dose-dependent effects on neuronal morphology. Conclusions NeuriteQuant is a freely available open-source tool for the automated analysis and effective review of large-scale high-content screens. It is especially well suited to quantify the effect of experimental manipulations on physiologically relevant neuronal cultures or brain sections that display a high degree of complexity and overlap among neurites or other cellular structures. PMID:21989414

  17. Induction of neurite outgrowth in 3D hydrogel-based environments.

    PubMed

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C; Oliveira, Cátia Costa; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Gomes, Eduardo D; Sahar, Abraham; Sousa, Nuno; Silva, Nuno A; Salgado, António J

    2015-09-01

    The ability of peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons to regenerate and re-innervate their targets after an injury has been widely recognized. However, despite the considerable advances made in microsurgical techniques, complete functional recovery is rarely achieved, especially for severe peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs). Therefore, alternative therapies that can successfully repair peripheral nerves are still essential. In recent years the use of biodegradable hydrogels enriched with growth-supporting and guidance cues, cell transplantation, and biomolecular therapies have been explored for the treatment of PNIs. Bearing this in mind, the aim of this study was to assess whether Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser synthetic peptide (GRGDS)-modified gellan gum (GG) based hydrogels could foster an amenable environment for neurite/axonal growth. Additionally, strategies to further improve the rate of neurite outgrowth were also tested, namely the use of adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs), as well as the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In order to increase its stability and enhance its bioactivity, the GDNF was conjugated covalently to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The impact of hydrogel modification as well as the effect of the GDNF-IONPs on ASC behavior was also screened. The results revealed that the GRGDS-GG hydrogel was able to support dorsal root ganglia (DRG)-based neurite outgrowth, which was not observed for non-modified hydrogels. Moreover, the modified hydrogels were also able to support ASCs attachment. In contrast, the presence of the GDNF-IONPs had no positive or negative impact on ASC behavior. Further experiments revealed that the presence of ASCs in the hydrogel improved axonal growth. On the other hand, GDNF-IONPs alone or combined with ASCs significantly increased neurite outgrowth from DRGs, suggesting a beneficial role of the proposed strategy for future applications in PNI regenerative medicine. PMID:26480959

  18. Induction of neurite outgrowth in 3D hydrogel-based environments.

    PubMed

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C; Oliveira, Cátia Costa; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Gomes, Eduardo D; Sahar, Abraham; Sousa, Nuno; Silva, Nuno A; Salgado, António J

    2015-09-01

    The ability of peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons to regenerate and re-innervate their targets after an injury has been widely recognized. However, despite the considerable advances made in microsurgical techniques, complete functional recovery is rarely achieved, especially for severe peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs). Therefore, alternative therapies that can successfully repair peripheral nerves are still essential. In recent years the use of biodegradable hydrogels enriched with growth-supporting and guidance cues, cell transplantation, and biomolecular therapies have been explored for the treatment of PNIs. Bearing this in mind, the aim of this study was to assess whether Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser synthetic peptide (GRGDS)-modified gellan gum (GG) based hydrogels could foster an amenable environment for neurite/axonal growth. Additionally, strategies to further improve the rate of neurite outgrowth were also tested, namely the use of adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs), as well as the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In order to increase its stability and enhance its bioactivity, the GDNF was conjugated covalently to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The impact of hydrogel modification as well as the effect of the GDNF-IONPs on ASC behavior was also screened. The results revealed that the GRGDS-GG hydrogel was able to support dorsal root ganglia (DRG)-based neurite outgrowth, which was not observed for non-modified hydrogels. Moreover, the modified hydrogels were also able to support ASCs attachment. In contrast, the presence of the GDNF-IONPs had no positive or negative impact on ASC behavior. Further experiments revealed that the presence of ASCs in the hydrogel improved axonal growth. On the other hand, GDNF-IONPs alone or combined with ASCs significantly increased neurite outgrowth from DRGs, suggesting a beneficial role of the proposed strategy for future applications in PNI regenerative medicine.

  19. Influence of micro-patterned PLLA membranes on outgrowth and orientation of hippocampal neurites.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Piscioneri, Antonella; Papenburg, Bernke J; Di Vito, Anna; Giusi, Giuseppina; Canonaco, Marcello; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2010-09-01

    In neuronal tissue engineering many efforts are focused on creating biomaterials with physical and chemical pathways for controlling cellular proliferation and orientation. Neurons have the ability to respond to topographical features in their microenvironment causing among others, axons to proliferate along surface features such as substrate grooves in micro-and nanoscales. As a consequence these neuronal elements are able to correctly adhere, migrate and orient within their new environment during growth. Here we explored the polarization and orientation of hippocampal neuronal cells on nonpatterned and micro-patterned biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) membranes with highly selective permeable properties. Dense and porous nonpatterned and micro-patterned membranes were prepared from PLLA by Phase Separation Micromolding. The micro-patterned membranes have a three-dimensional structure consisting of channels and ridges and of bricks of different widths. Nonpatterned and patterned membranes were used for hippocampal neuronal cultures isolated from postnatal days 1-3 hamsters and the neurite length, orientation and specific functions of cells were investigated up to 12 days of culture. Neurite outgrowth, length plus orientation tightly overlapped the pattern of the membrane surface. Cell distribution occurred only in correspondence to membrane grooves characterized by continuous channels whereas on membranes with interconnected channels, cells not only adhered to and elongated their cellular processes in the grooves but also in the breaking points. High orientation degrees of cells were determined particularly on the patterned porous membranes with channel width of 20 mum and ridges of 17 mum whereas on dense nonpatterned membranes as well as on polystyrene culture dish (PSCD) controls, a larger number of primary developed neurites were distributed. Based on these results, PLLA patterned membranes may directly improve the guidance of neurite extension and

  20. Determination of the elasticity of parachute materials under dynamic loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, V.L.; Clements, P.J.; Silbert, M.N.

    1996-12-31

    In the design of parachute systems it is important to use material properties that have been acquired under representative strain rates expected in flight. Without such data the designer is potentially forced to incorporate unrealistic safety margins resulting in a heavier and costlier than required design. Laboratory test data has generally been limited to that which can be acquired at quasi-steady strain rates. This paper investigates a technique, which takes advantage of advances in solid state electronics in the past ten years, to achieve an economical means of acquiring material properties under dynamic strain conditions. Data obtained with this technique is compared to standard test data for representative parachute materials.

  1. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, L.

    2012-08-01

    The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  2. Elevated Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Nitride Under Dynamic, Static and Cyclic Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Nemeth, Noel; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of a hot-pressed silicon nitride were determined at 1200 and 1300 C in air by statically, dynamically and cyclicly loading bend specimens. The fatigue parameters were estimated using the recently developed CARES/Life computer code. Good agreement exists between the flexural results. However, fatigue susceptibility under static uniaxial tensile loading, reported elsewhere, was greater than in flexure. Cyclic flexural loading resulted in the lowest apparent flexural fatigue susceptibility.

  3. Experimental evidence of dynamic re-organization of evolving landscapes under changing climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Zaliapin, Ilya; Reinhardt, Liam; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the dynamic re-organization of an evolving landscape under a scenario of changing climatic forcing for improving our knowledge of geomorphic transport laws under transient conditions and developing predictive models of landscape response to external perturbations. Real landscape observations for long-term analysis are limited and to this end a high resolution controlled laboratory experiment was conducted at the St. Anthony Falls laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Elevation data were collected at temporal resolution of 5 mins and spatial resolution of 0.5 mm as the landscape approached steady state (constant uplift and precipitation rate) and in the transient state (under the same uplift and 5x precipitation). The results reveal rapid topographic re-organization under a five-fold precipitation increase with the fluvial regime expanding into the previously debris dominated regime, accelerated erosion happening at hillslope scales, and rivers shifting from an erosion-limited to a transport-limited regime. From a connectivity and clustering analysis of the erosional and depositional events, we demonstrate the strikingly different spatial patterns of landscape evolution under steady-state (SS) and transient-state (TS), even when the time under SS is "stretched" compared to that under TS such as to match the total volume and PDF of erosional and depositional amounts. We quantify the spatial coupling of hillslopes and channels and demonstrate that hillslopes lead and channels follow in re-organizing the whole landscape under such an amplified precipitation regime.

  4. Dynamic Stability Optimization of Laminated Composite Plates under Combined Boundary Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, Erfan; Kabir, Mohammad Zaman

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stability and design optimization of laminated simply supported plates under planar conservative boundary loads are investigated in current study. Examples can be found in internal connecting elements of spacecraft and aerospace structures subjected to edge axial and shear loads. Designation of such elements is function of layup configuration, plate aspect ratio, loading combinations, and layup thickness. An optimum design aims maximum stability load satisfying a predefined stable vibration frequency. The interaction between compound loading and layup angle parameter affects the order of merging vibration modes and may stabilize the dynamic response. Laminated plates are assumed to be angle-plies symmetric to mid-plane surface. Dynamic equilibrium PDE has been solved using kernel integral transformation for modal frequency values and eigenvalue-based orthogonal functions for critical stability loads. The dictating dynamic stability mode is shown to be controlled by geometric stiffness distributions of composite plates. Solution of presented design optimization problem has been done using analytical approach combined with interior penalty multiplier algorithm. The results are verified by FEA approach and stability zones of original and optimized plates are stated as final data. Presented method can help designers to stabilize the dynamic response of composite plates by selecting an optimized layup orientation and thickness for prescribed design circumstances.

  5. Repeatable Population Dynamics among Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Lineages Evolved under High Co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Elizabeth S. C. P.; Morales, Nadya M.; Wasik, Brian R.; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P. J.; Turner, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and hosts can experience oscillatory cycles, where the densities of these interacting species dynamically fluctuate through time. Viruses with different replication strategies can also interact to produce cyclical dynamics. Frequent cellular co-infection can select for defective-interfering particles (DIPs): “cheater” viruses with shortened genomes that interfere with intracellular replication of full-length (ordinary) viruses. DIPs are positively selected when rare because they out-replicate ordinary viruses during co-infection, but DIPs are negatively selected when common because ordinary viruses become unavailable for intracellular exploitation via cheating. Here, we tested whether oscillatory dynamics of ordinary viruses were similar across independently evolved populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Results showed identical cyclical dynamics across populations in the first 10 experimental passages, which transitioned to repeatable dampened oscillations by passage 20. Genomic analyses revealed parallel molecular substitutions across populations, particularly novel mutations that became dominant by passage 10. Our study showed that oscillatory dynamics and molecular evolution of interacting viruses were highly repeatable in VSV populations passaged under frequent co-infection. Furthermore, our data suggested that frequent co-infection with DIPs caused lowered performance of full-length viruses, by reducing their population densities by orders of magnitude compared to reproduction of ordinary viruses during strictly clonal infections. PMID:27065953

  6. Repeatable Population Dynamics among Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Lineages Evolved under High Co-infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth S C P; Morales, Nadya M; Wasik, Brian R; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P J; Turner, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and hosts can experience oscillatory cycles, where the densities of these interacting species dynamically fluctuate through time. Viruses with different replication strategies can also interact to produce cyclical dynamics. Frequent cellular co-infection can select for defective-interfering particles (DIPs): "cheater" viruses with shortened genomes that interfere with intracellular replication of full-length (ordinary) viruses. DIPs are positively selected when rare because they out-replicate ordinary viruses during co-infection, but DIPs are negatively selected when common because ordinary viruses become unavailable for intracellular exploitation via cheating. Here, we tested whether oscillatory dynamics of ordinary viruses were similar across independently evolved populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Results showed identical cyclical dynamics across populations in the first 10 experimental passages, which transitioned to repeatable dampened oscillations by passage 20. Genomic analyses revealed parallel molecular substitutions across populations, particularly novel mutations that became dominant by passage 10. Our study showed that oscillatory dynamics and molecular evolution of interacting viruses were highly repeatable in VSV populations passaged under frequent co-infection. Furthermore, our data suggested that frequent co-infection with DIPs caused lowered performance of full-length viruses, by reducing their population densities by orders of magnitude compared to reproduction of ordinary viruses during strictly clonal infections. PMID:27065953

  7. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions. PMID:21216023

  8. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  9. Total Variation Regularized RPCA for Irregularly Moving Object Detection Under Dynamic Background.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochun; Yang, Liang; Guo, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    Moving object detection is one of the most fundamental tasks in computer vision. Many classic and contemporary algorithms work well under the assumption that backgrounds are stationary and movements are continuous, but degrade sharply when they are used in a real detection system, mainly due to: 1) the dynamic background (e.g., swaying trees, water ripples and fountains in real scenarios, as well as raindrops and snowflakes in bad weather) and 2) the irregular object movement (like lingering objects). This paper presents a unified framework for addressing the difficulties mentioned above, especially the one caused by irregular object movement. This framework separates dynamic background from moving objects using the spatial continuity of foreground, and detects lingering objects using the temporal continuity of foreground. The proposed framework assumes that the dynamic background is sparser than the moving foreground that has smooth boundary and trajectory. We regard the observed video as being made up of the sum of a low-rank static background, a sparse and smooth foreground, and a sparser dynamic background. To deal with this decomposition, i.e., a constrained minimization problem, the augmented Lagrangian multiplier method is employed with the help of the alternating direction minimizing strategy. Extensive experiments on both simulated and real data demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches, especially for the cases with dynamic backgrounds and discontinuous movements. PMID:25910272

  10. Experimental Characterization of the Anatomical Structures of the Lumbar Spine Under Dynamic Sagittal Bending.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, C A; Demetropoulos, C K; Luongo, M E; Pyles, C O; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events transmit high-rate vertical loads through the seated occupant’s lumbar spine and have a high probability of inducing severe injury. While previous studies have characterized the lumbar spine under quasi-static loading, additional work should focus on the complex kinetic and kinematic response under high loading rates. To discern the biomechanical influence of the lumbar spine’s anatomical structures during dynamic loading, the axial force, flexion-extension moments and range of motion for lumbar motion segments (n=18) were measured during different states of progressive dissection. Pre-compression was applied using a static mass while dynamic bending was applied using an offset drop mass. Dynamic loading resulted in peak axial loads of 4,224±133 N, while maximum peak extension and flexion moments were 19.6±12.5 and -44.8±8.6 Nm in the pre-dissected state, respectively. Upon dissection, transection of the interspinous ligament, ligamentum flavum and facet capsules resulted in significantly larger flexion angles, while the removal of the posterior elements increased the total peak angular displacement in extension from 3.3±1.5 to 5.0±1.7 degrees (p=0.002). This study provides insight on the contribution of individual anatomical components on overall lumbar response under high-rate loading, as well as validation data for numerical models. PMID:25996712

  11. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  12. Regulation of microglial migration, phagocytosis, and neurite outgrowth by HO-1/CO signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheiblich, Hannah; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    Clearance of infected and apoptotic neuronal corpses during inflammatory conditions is a fundamental process to create a favorable environment for neuronal recovery. Microglia are the resident immune cells and the predominant phagocytic cells of the CNS, showing a multitude of cellular responses upon activation. Here, we investigated in functional assays how the CO generating enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) influences BV-2 microglial migration, clearance of debris, and neurite outgrowth of human NT2 neurons. Stimulation of HO-1 activity attenuated microglial migration in a scratch wound assay, and phagocytosis in a cell culture model of acute inflammation comprising lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia and apoptosis-induced neurons. Application of a CO donor prevented the production of NO during LPS stimulation, and reduced microglial migration and engulfment of neuronal debris. LPS-activated microglia inhibited neurite elongation of human neurons without requiring direct cell-cell surface contact. The inhibition of neurite outgrowth was totally reversed by application of exogenous CO or increased internal CO production through supply of the substrate hemin to HO. Our results point towards a vital cytoprotective role of HO-1/CO signaling after microglial activation. In addition, they support a therapeutic potential of CO releasing chemical agents in the treatment of excessive inflammatory conditions in the CNS.

  13. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-07-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells.

  14. Spatial confinement of neurite regrowth from dorsal root ganglia within nonporous microconduits.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Richard G; Molino, Yves; Williams, Philip M; Tendler, Saul J B; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2003-04-01

    Tissue engineering is founded on the concept of controlling the behavior of individual cells to stimulate tissue formation. This control is achieved by mimicking signals that manage natural tissue development or repair. These interdependent signals include cytokine delivery, extracellular matrix interactions, and cell-cell communication. Here, we report on the effect of spatial guidance as a signal for nerve tissue regeneration, using a simple in vitro model. We observe the acceleration of neurite extension from rat dorsal root ganglia within micron-scale tubes. Within these hydrogel-filled conduits, neurites were observed to extend more rapidly than when cultured within the hydrogel alone. The spatial cue also induced a change in tissue architecture, with the cabling of cells within the microconduit. The acceleration of neurite extension was found to be independent of conduit diameter within the range of 200 to 635 microm. Finally, our in vitro model enabled quantification of the effect of combining spatial control and localized nerve growth factor delivery.

  15. Propolis Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth in Differentiating SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Bit; Yoo, Byung Sun

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a multicomponent, active, complex resinous substance collected by honeybees from a variety of plant sources. We have studied the effect of propolis on neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Propolis, at a concentration of 3 μg/mL, had no significant effect on the viability of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. However, the neurite outgrowth of the differentiating SH-SY5Y cells treated with propolis (0.3~3 μg/mL) for 48 hr was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of RA-stimulated differentiating SH-SY5Y cells with 0.3 to 3 μg/mL propolis resulted in decreased level of transglutaminase and 43-kDa growth-associated protein (GAP-43) in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that propolis is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth of differentiating SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:27437091

  16. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field on Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 and PC12D Cells and Evaluation by Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakanishi, Akio; Takatsuki, Hideyo; Yoshikoshi, Akio; Fujiwara, Yasuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    A pheochromocytoma cell (PC12), and its derivative (PC12D), differentiate to nervelike cells in culture with the nerve growth factor (NGF) and forskolin respectively. We introduced a morphological factor σ=L/2(π A)1/2 for quantitating neurite outgrowth under a microscope in the presence of extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields for 22 hours, where L and A are the contour length and the area of the cells in clump determined using an image-analysis system. ELF magnetic fields B1 were generated with a single coil or double coils in Helmholtz configuration together with static fields B0 of -53, -20 and 67 μT. σ increased with increasing NGF or forskolin level at B0=-53 μT (geomagnetism), in agreement with the cytometric observation of micrographs. With the addition of an AC field B1 at 60 Hz (100 μT > B1 > 3 μT rms) to B0, neurite outgrowth represented by σ was depressed for PC12 and stimulated for PC12D. We discuss the cyclotron resonance and the ion parametric resonance models.

  17. Receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a more important role in cellular survival than in neurite outgrowth during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan; Huttunen, Henri; Rauvala, Heikki; Munch, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is known to interact with amphoterin. This interaction has been proposed to play a role in neurite outgrowth and process elongation during neurodifferentiation. However, there is as yet no direct evidence of the relevance of this pathway to neurodifferentiation under physiological conditions. In this study we have investigated a possible role of RAGE and amphoterin in the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. The functional inactivation of RAGE by dominant negative and antisense strategies showed that RAGE is not required for process outgrowth or differentiation, although overexpression of RAGE accelerates the elongation of neuritic processes. Using the antisense strategy, amphoterin was shown to be essential for process outgrowth and differentiation, suggesting that amphoterin may interact with other molecules to exert its effect in this context. Interestingly, the survival of the neuroblastoma cells treated with retinoic acid was partly dependent on the expression of RAGE, and inhibition of RAGE function partially blocked the increase in anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 following retinoic acid treatment. Based on these results we propose that a combination therapy using RAGE blockers and retinoic acid may prove as a useful approach for chemotherapy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  18. MicroRNA-127 targeting of mitoNEET inhibits neurite outgrowth, induces cell apoptosis and contributes to physiological dysfunction after spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    He, Qin-Qin; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Liu, Fei; He, Xiang; Feng, Guo-Ying; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Wang, You-Cui; Qiu, De-Lu; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Liu, Jia; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroregeneration and apoptosis are two important pathophysiologic changes after spinal cord injury (SCI), but their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in the regulation of neuroregeneration and neuronal apoptosis, research areas that have been greatly expanded in recent years. Here, using miRNA arrays to profile miRNA transcriptomes, we demonstrated that miR-127-3p was significantly down-regulated after spinal cord transection (SCT). Then, bioinformatics analyses and experimental detection showed that miR-127-3p exhibited specific effects on the regulation of neurite outgrowth and the induction of neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein mitoNEET. Moreover, knockdown of MitoNEET leaded to neuronal loss and apoptosis in primary cultured spinal neurons. This study therefore revealed that miR-127-3p, which targets mitoNEET, plays a vital role in regulating neurite outgrowth and neuronal apoptosis after SCT. Thus, modificatioin of the mitoNEET expression, such as mitoNEET activition may provide a new strategy for the treatment of SCI in preclinical trials. PMID:27748416

  19. Impaired Neurite Contact Guidance in Ubiquitin Ligase E3a (Ube3a)-Deficient Hippocampal Neurons on Nanostructured Substrates.

    PubMed

    Tonazzini, I; Meucci, S; Van Woerden, G M; Elgersma, Y; Cecchini, M

    2016-04-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that during neuronal development the signaling processes that regulate extracellular sensing (e.g., adhesion, cytoskeletal dynamics) are important targets for ubiquitination-dependent regulation, in particular through E3 ubiquitin ligases. Among these, Ubiquitin E3a ligase (UBE3A) has a key role in brain functioning, but its function and how its deficiency results in the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome is still unclear. Here, the role of UBE3A is investigated in neurite contact guidance during neuronal development, in vitro. The microtopography sensing of wild-type and Ube3a-deficient hippocampal neurons is studied by exploiting gratings with different topographical characteristics, with the aim to compare their capabilities to read and follow physical directional stimuli. It is shown that neuronal contact guidance is defective in Ube3a-deficient neurons, and this behavior is linked to an impaired activation of the focal adhesion signaling pathway. Taken together, the results suggest that the neuronal contact sensing machinery might be affected in Angelman syndrome. PMID:26845073

  20. Modeling dynamic stall on wind turbine blades under rotationally augmented flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur, S.; Schreck, S.; Sorensen, N. N.; Bergami, L.

    2015-04-22

    It is well known that airfoils under unsteady flow conditions with a periodically varying angle of attack exhibit aerodynamic characteristics different from those under steady flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as dynamic stall. It is also well known that the steady aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils in the inboard region of a rotating blade differ from those under steady two-dimensional (2D) flow conditions, a phenomenon commonly known as rotational augmentation. This paper presents an investigation of these two phenomena together in the inboard parts of wind turbine blades. This analysis is carried out using data from three sources: (1) the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI experimental data, including constant as well as continuously pitching blade conditions during axial operation, (2) data from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES) carried out using the Technical University of Denmark’s in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D, and (3) data from a simplified model based on the blade element momentum method with a dynamic stall subroutine that uses rotationally augmented steady-state polars obtained from steady Phase VI experimental sequences, instead of the traditional 2D nonrotating data. The aim of this work is twofold. First, the blade loads estimated by the DDES simulations are compared to three select cases of the N sequence experimental data, which serves as a validation of the DDES method. Results show reasonable agreement between the two data in two out of three cases studied. Second, the dynamic time series of the lift and the moment polars obtained from the experiments are compared to those from the dynamic stall subroutine that uses the rotationally augmented steady polars. This allowed the differences between the stall phenomenon on the inboard parts of harmonically pitching blades on a rotating wind turbine and the classic dynamic stall representation in 2D flow to be

  1. Inactivation model equations and their associated parameter values obtained under static acid stress conditions cannot be used directly for predicting inactivation under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Janssen, M; Verhulst, A; Valdramidis, V; Devlieghere, F; Van Impe, J F; Geeraerd, A H

    2008-11-30

    Organic acids (e.g., lactic acid, acetic acid and citric acid) are popular preservatives. In this study, the Listeria innocua inactivation is investigated under dynamic conditions of pH and undissociated lactic acid ([LaH]). A combined primary (Weibull-type) and secondary model developed for the L. innocua inactivation under static conditions [Janssen, M., Geeraerd, A.H., Cappuyns, A., Garcia-Gonzalez, L., Schockaert, G., Van Houteghem, N., Vereecken, K.M., Debevere, J., Devlieghere, F., Van Impe, J.F., 2007. Individual and combined effects of pH and lactic acid concentration on L. innocua inactivation: development of a predictive model and assessment of experimental variability. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 73(5), 1601-1611] was applied to predict the microbial inactivation under dynamic conditions. Because of its non-autonomous character, two approaches were proposed for the application of the Weibull-type model to dynamic conditions. The results quantitatively indicated that the L. innocua cell population was able to develop an induced acid stress resistance under dynamic conditions of pH and [LaH]. From a modeling point of view, it needs to be stressed that (i) inactivation model equations and associated parameter values, derived under static conditions, may not be suitable for use as such under dynamic conditions, and (ii) non-autonomous dynamic models reveal additional technical intricacies in comparison with autonomous models.

  2. Uncertainty in predicting range dynamics of endemic alpine plants under climate warming.

    PubMed

    Hülber, Karl; Wessely, Johannes; Gattringer, Andreas; Moser, Dietmar; Kuttner, Michael; Essl, Franz; Leitner, Michael; Winkler, Manuela; Ertl, Siegrun; Willner, Wolfgang; Kleinbauer, Ingrid; Sauberer, Norbert; Mang, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Correlative species distribution models have long been the predominant approach to predict species' range responses to climate change. Recently, the use of dynamic models is increasingly advocated for because these models better represent the main processes involved in range shifts and also simulate transient dynamics. A well-known problem with the application of these models is the lack of data for estimating necessary parameters of demographic and dispersal processes. However, what has been hardly considered so far is the fact that simulating transient dynamics potentially implies additional uncertainty arising from our ignorance of short-term climate variability in future climatic trends. Here, we use endemic mountain plants of Austria as a case study to assess how the integration of decadal variability in future climate affects outcomes of dynamic range models as compared to projected long-term trends and uncertainty in demographic and dispersal parameters. We do so by contrasting simulations of a so-called hybrid model run under fluctuating climatic conditions with those based on a linear interpolation of climatic conditions between current values and those predicted for the end of the 21st century. We find that accounting for short-term climate variability modifies model results nearly as differences in projected long-term trends and much more than uncertainty in demographic/dispersal parameters. In particular, range loss and extinction rates are much higher when simulations are run under fluctuating conditions. These results highlight the importance of considering the appropriate temporal resolution when parameterizing and applying range-dynamic models, and hybrid models in particular. In case of our endemic mountain plants, we hypothesize that smoothed linear time series deliver more reliable results because these long-lived species are primarily responsive to long-term climate averages. PMID:27061825

  3. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients. PMID:26717236

  4. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients. PMID:26717236

  5. Age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Wataru; Fukaya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Ohashi, Yukari

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the age effects on the control of dynamic balance during step adjustments under temporal constraints. Fifteen young adults and 14 older adults avoided a virtual white planar obstacle by lengthening or shortening their steps under free or constrained conditions. In the anterior-posterior direction, older adults demonstrated significantly decreased center of mass velocity at the swing foot contact under temporal constraints. Additionally, the distances between the 'extrapolated center of mass' position and base of support at the swing foot contact were greater in older adults than young adults. In the mediolateral direction, center of mass displacement was significantly increased in older adults compared with young adults. Consequently, older adults showed a significantly increased step width at the swing foot contact in the constraint condition. Overall, these data suggest that older adults demonstrate a conservative strategy to maintain anterior-posterior stability. By contrast, although older adults are able to modulate their step width to maintain mediolateral dynamic balance, age-related changes in mediolateral balance control under temporal constraints may increase the risk of falls in the lateral direction during obstacle negotiation.

  6. Prenatal low-dose methylmercury exposure impairs neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression and suppresses TrkA pathway activity and eEF1A1 expression in the rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic environmental chemical that can cause developmental impairments. Human fetuses and neonates are particularly susceptible to MeHg toxicity; however, the mechanisms governing its effects in the developing brain are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of prenatal and lactational MeHg exposure on the developing cerebellum in rats. We demonstrated that exposure to 5ppm MeHg decreased postnatal expression of pre- and postsynaptic proteins, suggesting an impairment in synaptic development. MeHg exposure also reduced neurite outgrowth, as shown by a decrease in the expression of the neurite marker neurofilament H. These changes were not observed in rats exposed to 1ppm MeHg. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we investigated the effects of MeHg exposure on the tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) A pathway, which plays important roles in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. We demonstrated suppression of the TrkA pathway on gestation day 20 in rats exposed to 5ppm MeHg. In addition, down-regulation of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) was observed on postnatal day 1. eEF1A1 knockdown in differentiating PC12 cells impaired neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression, similar to the results of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum. These results suggest that suppression of the TrkA pathway and subsequent decreases in eEF1A1 expression induced by prenatal exposure to MeHg may lead to reduced neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression in the developing cerebellum.

  7. Integrin-mediated neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells depends on the activation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Electrical signals elicited by integrin interaction with ECM components and their role in neurite outgrowth were studied in two clones (N1 and N7) isolated from 41A3 murine neuroblastoma cell line. Although the two clones similarly adhered to fibronectin (FN) and vitronectin (VN), this adhesion induced neurite outgrowth in N1 but not in N7 cells. Patch clamp recordings in whole cell configuration showed that, upon adhesion to FN or VN but not to platelet factor 4 (PF4), N1 cells undergo a marked (approximately equal to 20 mV) hyperpolarization of the resting potential (Vrest) that occurred within the first 20 min after cell contact with ECM, and persisted for approximately 1 h before reverting to the time zero values. This hyperpolarization was totally absent in N7 cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in N1 and N7 cell adhesion to ECM substrata was performed by using antibodies raised against the FN receptor and synthetic peptides variously competing with the FN or VN binding to integrin receptor (GRGDSP and GRGESP). Antibodies, as well as GRGDSP, abolished adhesion of N1 and N7 clones to FN and VN, revealing a similar implication of integrins in the adhesion of these clones to the ECM proteins. However, these anti-adhesive treatments, while ineffective on Vrest of N7 cells, abolished in N1 cells the FN- or VN-induced hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, that appeared therefore strictly associated and integrin-mediated phenomena. The nature of this association was deepened through a comparative analysis of the integrin profiles and the ion channels of N1 and N7 cells. The integrin immunoprecipitation profile resulted very similarly in the two clones, with only minor differences concerning the alpha V containing complexes. Both clones possessed Ca2+ and K+ delayed rectifier (KDR) channels, while only N1 cells were endowed with inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels. The latter governed the Vrest, and, unlike KDR channels, were blocked by

  8. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Results Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Conclusion Mycolactone

  9. TRBUCKL - A NASTRAN DMAP ALTER FOR LINEAR BUCKLING ANALYSIS UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations near the outer surface of a laminate are susceptible to local buckling and buckling-induced delamination propagation when the laminate is subjected to transverse impact loading. This results in a loss of stiffness and strength. TRBUCKL is an unique dynamic delamination buckling and delamination propagation analysis capability that can be incorporated into the structural analysis program, NASTRAN. This capability will aid engineers in the design of structures incorporating composite laminates. The capability consists of: (1) a modification of the direct time integration solution sequence which provides a new analysis algorithm that can be used to predict delamination buckling in a laminate subjected to dynamic loading; and (2) a new method of modeling the composite laminate using plate bending elements and multipoint constraints. The capability now exists to predict the time at which the onset of dynamic delamination buckling occurs, the dynamic buckling mode shape, and the dynamic delamination strain energy release rate. A procedure file for NASTRAN, TRBUCKL predicts both impact induced buckling in composite laminates with initial delaminations and the strain energy release rate due to extension of the delamination. In addition, the file is useful in calculating the dynamic delamination strain energy release rate for a composite laminate under impact loading. This procedure simplifies the simulation of progressive crack extension. TRBUCKL has been incorporated into COSMIC NASTRAN. TRBUCKL is a DMAP Alter for NASTRAN. It is intended for use only with the COSMIC NASTRAN Direct Transient Analysis (RF 9) solution sequence. The program is available as a listing only. TRBUCKL was developed in 1987.

  10. Dynamic and failure properties of high damping rubber bearing under high axial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Hidetake; Murota, Nobuo; Fukumori, Takeshi

    1995-12-01

    Seismic isolation bearings have been used under axial stresses less than 100(kgf/cm{sup 2}) for many years. If higher axial loads can be applied, however, a larger period shift will be achieved and the size of the isolation devices may be reduced resulting in a cost reduction of the bearing. This paper describes experimental studies of dynamic and failure properties of high damping rubber bearings (HDR) under high axial stress of over 120(kgf/cm{sup 2}) compared with the conventional stress of 65(kgf/cm{sup 2}). The results show that HDR continues to have stable performance under high axial stress with high shear strain. It indicates that high axial stress over 100(kgf/cm{sup 2}) is within the capability of the BDR isolation bearing.

  11. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-07

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H{sub 2}. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H{sub 2} under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H{sub 2}. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H{sub 2} molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H–H vibrational frequencies as well as H–H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H{sub 2} solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  12. Under-the-barrier dynamics in laser-induced relativistic tunneling.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2013-04-12

    The tunneling dynamics in relativistic strong-field ionization is investigated with the aim to develop an intuitive picture for the relativistic tunneling regime. We demonstrate that the tunneling picture applies also in the relativistic regime by introducing position dependent energy levels. The quantum dynamics in the classically forbidden region features two time scales, the typical time that characterizes the probability density's decay of the ionizing electron under the barrier (Keldysh time) and the time interval which the electron spends inside the barrier (Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith tunneling time). In the relativistic regime, an electron momentum shift as well as a spatial shift along the laser propagation direction arise during the under-the-barrier motion which are caused by the laser magnetic field induced Lorentz force. The momentum shift is proportional to the Keldysh time, while the wave-packet's spatial drift is proportional to the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time. The signature of the momentum shift is shown to be present in the ionization spectrum at the detector and, therefore, observable experimentally. In contrast, the signature of the Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time delay disappears at far distances for pure quasistatic tunneling dynamics.

  13. Communication: Dynamical and structural analyses of solid hydrogen under vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear quantum effects play a dominant role in determining the phase diagram of H2. With a recently developed quantum molecular dynamics simulation method, we examine dynamical and structural characters of solid H2 under vapor pressure, demonstrating the difference from liquid and high-pressure solid H2. While stable hexagonal close-packed lattice structures are reproduced with reasonable lattice phonon frequencies, the most stable adjacent configuration exhibits a zigzag structure, in contrast with the T-shape liquid configuration. The periodic angular distributions of H2 molecules indicate that molecules are not a completely free rotor in the vapor-pressure solid reflecting asymmetric potentials from surrounding molecules on adjacent lattice sites. Discrete jumps of librational and H-H vibrational frequencies as well as H-H bond length caused by structural rearrangements under vapor pressure effectively discriminate the liquid and solid phases. The obtained dynamical and structural information of the vapor-pressure H2 solid will be useful in monitoring thermodynamic states of condensed hydrogens.

  14. Mechanisms of compensatory dynamics in zooplankton and maintenance of food chain efficiency under toxicant stress.

    PubMed

    Mano, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2016-03-01

    Communities with species that are tolerant to environmental stresses may be able to maintain the ecosystem functions under the stress, because the tolerant species can compensate for the loss of sensitive species. In this study, we focused on the food chain efficiency (FCE), the trophic transfer across three trophic levels, as an important process for ecosystem function, and examined the conditions under which such compensation could occur with aquarium experiments using an insecticide (methomyl) as the stressor. Our aquariums included one of two pairs of insecticide-tolerant and insecticide-sensitive cladoceran species, and a fish as the predator. The response of FCE to the insecticide stress, as indicated by the fish biomass production, depended on the zooplankton species combinations. FCE and total zooplankton biomass were maintained in the pair in which the compensatory changes of species abundances were clear, whereas they decreased in the pair in which the compensatory changes were not clear. This indicated the compensatory dynamics in the zooplankton community responsible for the observed resistance to the stress. We inferred the driving factors for the compensatory dynamics and the community resistance with respect to species traits of ecological importance, and concluded that a dissimilarity between species as regards the tolerance trait and a clear trade-off between the tolerance and the competitive ability was required to drive the compensatory dynamics, and a similarity or a superiority of the tolerant species as regards the functional effect trait (the predator avoidance and the reproductive potential) were required to maintain FCE.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of initially imperfect functionally graded circular cylindrical shell under complex loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Hao, Y. X.; Zhang, W.; Chen, J.; Li, S. B.

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear vibration of a simply supported FGM cylindrical shell with small initial geometric imperfection under complex loads is studied. The effects of radial harmonic excitation, compressive in-plane force combined with supersonic aerodynamic and thermal loads are considered. The small initial geometric imperfection of the cylindrical shell is characterized in the form of the sine-type trigonometric functions. The effective material properties of this FGM cylindrical shell are graded in the radial direction according to a simple power law in terms of the volume fractions. Based on Reddy's third-order shear deformation theory, von Karman-type nonlinear kinematics and Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear partial differential equation that controls the shell dynamics is derived. Both axial symmetric and driven modes of the cylindrical shell deflection pattern are included. Furthermore, the equations of motion can be reduced into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by applying Galerkin's method. In the study of the nonlinear dynamics responses of small initial geometric imperfect FGM cylindrical shell under complex loads, the 4th order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain time history, phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Poincare maps with different parameters. The effects of external loads, geometric imperfections and volume fractions on the nonlinear dynamics of the system are discussed.

  16. Mechanisms of compensatory dynamics in zooplankton and maintenance of food chain efficiency under toxicant stress.

    PubMed

    Mano, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2016-03-01

    Communities with species that are tolerant to environmental stresses may be able to maintain the ecosystem functions under the stress, because the tolerant species can compensate for the loss of sensitive species. In this study, we focused on the food chain efficiency (FCE), the trophic transfer across three trophic levels, as an important process for ecosystem function, and examined the conditions under which such compensation could occur with aquarium experiments using an insecticide (methomyl) as the stressor. Our aquariums included one of two pairs of insecticide-tolerant and insecticide-sensitive cladoceran species, and a fish as the predator. The response of FCE to the insecticide stress, as indicated by the fish biomass production, depended on the zooplankton species combinations. FCE and total zooplankton biomass were maintained in the pair in which the compensatory changes of species abundances were clear, whereas they decreased in the pair in which the compensatory changes were not clear. This indicated the compensatory dynamics in the zooplankton community responsible for the observed resistance to the stress. We inferred the driving factors for the compensatory dynamics and the community resistance with respect to species traits of ecological importance, and concluded that a dissimilarity between species as regards the tolerance trait and a clear trade-off between the tolerance and the competitive ability was required to drive the compensatory dynamics, and a similarity or a superiority of the tolerant species as regards the functional effect trait (the predator avoidance and the reproductive potential) were required to maintain FCE. PMID:26683817

  17. Quench dynamics of a Bose gas under synthetic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Wei Yi's Group Team; Wei Zhang`s Group Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under a Raman-asssited synthetic spin-orbit coupling. To model the dynamical process, we adopt a self-consistent Bogoliubov approach, which is equivalent to applying the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de-Gennes equations. We investigate the dynamics of the condensate fraction as well as the momentum distribution of the Bose gas following a sudden change of system parameters. Typically, the system evolves into a steady state in the long-time limit, which features a stationary condensate fraction and an oscillating momentum distribution. The condensate fraction of the steady state depends on the quench parameter. We investigate how different quench parameters such as the inter- and intra-species interactions and the spin-orbit-coupling parameters affect the condensate fraction in the steady state. Furthermore, we find that the oscillatory momentum distribution in the long-time limit can be described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with two branches of momentum-dependent Gibbs temperatures. Our study is relevant to the experimental investigation of dynamical processes in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

  18. Quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under synthetic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-05-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate under a Raman-assisted synthetic spin-orbit coupling. To model the dynamical process, we adopt a self-consistent Bogoliubov approach, which is equivalent to applying the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. We investigate the dynamics of the condensate fraction as well as the momentum distribution of the Bose gas following a sudden change of system parameters. Typically, the system evolves into a steady state in the long-time limit, which features an oscillating momentum distribution and a stationary condensate fraction. We investigate how different quench parameters such as the inter- and intraspecies interactions and the spin-orbit-coupling parameters affect the condensate fraction in the steady state. Furthermore, we find that the time average of the oscillatory momentum distribution in the long-time limit can be described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with two branches of momentum-dependent Gibbs temperatures. Our study is relevant to the experimental investigation of dynamical processes in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate.

  19. Translocation dynamics of knotted polymers under a constant or periodic external field.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Vivek; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-14

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations to examine how knots alter the dynamics of polymers moving through nanopores under an external field. In the first part of this paper, we study the situation when the field is constant. Here, knots halt translocation above a critical force with jamming occurring at smaller forces for twist topologies compared to non-twist topologies. Slightly below the jamming transition, the polymer's transit times exhibit large fluctuations. This phenomenon is an example of the knot's molecular individualism since the conformation of the knot plays a large role in the chain's subsequent dynamics. In the second part of the paper, we study the motion of the chain when one cycles the field on and off. If the off time is comparable to the knot's relaxation time, one can adjust the swelling of the knot at the pore and hence design strategies to ratchet the polymer in a controllable fashion. We examine how the off time affects the ratcheting dynamics. We also examine how this strategy alters the fluctuations in the polymer's transit time. We find that cycling the force field can reduce fluctuations near the knot's jamming transition, but can enhance the fluctuations at very high forces since knots get trapped in metastable states during the relaxation process. The latter effect appears to be more prominent for non-torus topologies than torus ones. We conclude by discussing the feasibility of this approach to control polymer motion in biotechnology applications such as sequencing. PMID:27181288

  20. Dynamic response analysis of structure under time-variant interval process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baizhan; Qin, Yuan; Yu, Dejie; Jiang, Chao

    2016-10-01

    Due to the aggressiveness of the environmental factor, the variation of the dynamic load, the degeneration of the material property and the wear of the machine surface, parameters related with the structure are distinctly time-variant. Typical model for time-variant uncertainties is the random process model which is constructed on the basis of a large number of samples. In this work, we propose a time-variant interval process model which can be effectively used to deal with time-variant uncertainties with limit information. And then two methods are presented for the dynamic response analysis of the structure under the time-variant interval process model. The first one is the direct Monte Carlo method (DMCM) whose computational burden is relative high. The second one is the Monte Carlo method based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion (MCM-CPE) whose computational efficiency is high. In MCM-CPE, the dynamic response of the structure is approximated by the Chebyshev polynomials which can be efficiently calculated, and then the variational range of the dynamic response is estimated according to the samples yielded by the Monte Carlo method. To solve the dependency phenomenon of the interval operation, the affine arithmetic is integrated into the Chebyshev polynomial expansion. The computational effectiveness and efficiency of MCM-CPE is verified by two numerical examples, including a spring-mass-damper system and a shell structure.

  1. Dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system with Brusselator kinetics under feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karafyllis, Iasson; Christofides, Panagiotis D.; Daoutidis, Prodromos

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the reaction-diffusion Brusselator model with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, under linear and nonlinear modal feedback control. The bifurcation parameters are for the Neumann problem the concentration of one of the reactants and for the Dirichlet problem the diffusion coefficient of one of the reactants. The study of the dynamics of the system is based on methods of bifurcation theory and the application of Poincaré maps. A direct comparison of the dynamics of the open-loop and closed-loop systems establishes that the use of feedback control significantly suppresses the rich open-loop dynamics. In addition, the superiority of the nonlinear controller over a linear controller, in attenuating the effect of bifurcations on the output of the closed-loop system, and the ability of the nonlinear controller to stabilize the system states at the spatially uniform solution provided the number of manipulated inputs is sufficiently large are shown for both the Neumann and Dirichlet problems.

  2. Bounded Confidence under Preferential Flip: A Coupled Dynamics of Structural Balance and Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Parravano, Antonio; Andina-Díaz, Ascensión; Meléndez-Jiménez, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the coupled dynamics of social balance and opinion formation. We propose a model where agents form opinions under bounded confidence, but only considering the opinions of their friends. The signs of social ties -friendships and enmities- evolve seeking for social balance, taking into account how similar agents’ opinions are. We consider both the case where opinions have one and two dimensions. We find that our dynamics produces the segregation of agents into two cliques, with the opinions of agents in one clique differing from those in the other. Depending on the level of bounded confidence, the dynamics can produce either consensus of opinions within each clique or the coexistence of several opinion clusters in a clique. For the uni-dimensional case, the opinions in one clique are all below the opinions in the other clique, hence defining a “left clique” and a “right clique”. In the two-dimensional case, our numerical results suggest that the two cliques are separated by a hyperplane in the opinion space. We also show that the phenomenon of unidimensional opinions identified by DeMarzo, Vayanos and Zwiebel (Q J Econ 2003) extends partially to our dynamics. Finally, in the context of politics, we comment about the possible relation of our results to the fragmentation of an ideology and the emergence of new political parties. PMID:27716815

  3. Sleep Propensity under Forced Desynchrony in a Model of Arousal State Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Postnova, Svetlana; Lockley, Steven W; Robinson, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    An improvement to our current quantitative model of arousal state dynamics is presented that more accurately predicts sleep propensity as measured with sleep dynamics depending on circadian phase and prior wakefulness. A nonlinear relationship between the circadian variables within the dynamic circadian oscillator model is introduced to account for the skewed shape of the circadian rhythm of alertness that peaks just prior to the onset of the biological night (the "wake maintenance zone") and has a minimum toward the end of the biological night. The revised circadian drive thus provides a strong inhibitory input to the sleep-active neuronal population in the evening, counteracting the excitatory effects of the increased homeostatic sleep drive as originally proposed in the opponent process model of sleep-wake regulation. The revised model successfully predicts the sleep propensity profile as reflected in the dynamics of the total sleep time, sleep onset latency, wake/sleep ratio, and sleep efficiency during a wide range of experimental protocols. Specifically, all of these sleep measures are predicted for forced desynchrony schedules with day lengths ranging from 1.5 to 42.85 h and scheduled time in bed from 0.5 to 14.27 h. The revised model is expected to facilitate more accurate predictions of sleep under normal conditions as well as during circadian misalignment, for example, during shiftwork and jetlag. PMID:27432116

  4. Dynamic analysis of parametrically excited system under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sha; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2016-05-01

    Some system parameters in mechanical systems are always uncertain due to uncertainties in geometric and material properties, lubrication condition and wear. For a more reasonable estimation of dynamic analysis of the parametrically excited system, the effect of uncertain parameters should be taken into account. This paper presents a new non-probabilistic analysis method for solving the dynamic responses of parametrically excited systems under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. By using the multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (MHBM) and the Chebyshev inclusion function (CIF), an interval multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (IMHBM) is obtained. To illustrate the accuracy of the proposed method, a time-varying geared system of wind turbine with different kinds of uncertainties is demonstrated. By comparing with the results of the scanning method, it is shown that the presented method is valid and effective for the parametrically excited system with uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. The effects of some uncertain system parameters including uncertain mesh stiffnesses and uncertain bearing stiffnesses on the frequency responses of the system are also discussed in detail. It is shown that the dynamic responses of the system are insensitive to the uncertain mesh stiffness and bearing stiffnesses of the planetary gear stage. The uncertain bearing stiffnesses of the intermediate and high-speed stages will lead to relatively large uncertainties in the dynamic responses around resonant regions. It will provide valuable guidance for the optimal design and condition monitoring of wind turbine gearboxes.

  5. Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth of Human Model (NT2) Neurons by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Rho/ROCK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Frank; Scheiblich, Hannah; Dewitz, Carola; Dempewolf, Silke; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase) activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored. PMID:25714396

  6. Identification of a peripheral nerve neurite growth-promoting activity by development and use of an in vitro bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, A W; Matthew, W D

    1987-01-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay. Images PMID:3477817

  7. Thrombin Enhances NGF-Mediated Neurite Extension via Increased and Sustained Activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Rania E.; Sarker, Krishna; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Rapid neurite remodeling is fundamental to nervous system development and plasticity. It involves neurite extension that is regulated by NGF through PI3K/AKT, p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. It also involves neurite retraction that is regulated by the serine protease, thrombin. However, the intracellular signaling pathway by which thrombin causes neurite retraction is unknown. Using the PC12 neuronal cell model, we demonstrate that thrombin utilizes the PI3K/AKT pathway for neurite retraction in NGF-differentiated cells. Interestingly, however, we found that thrombin enhances NGF-induced neurite extension in differentiating cells. This is achieved through increased and sustained activation of p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. Thus, thrombin elicits opposing effects in differentiated and differentiating cells through activation of distinct signaling pathways: neurite retraction in differentiated cells via PI3K/AKT, and neurite extension in differentiating cells via p44/42 MAPK and p38 MAPK. These findings, which also point to a novel cooperative role between thrombin and NGF, have significant implications in the development of the nervous system and the disease processes that afflicts it as well as in the potential of combined thrombin and NGF therapy for impaired learning and memory, and spinal cord injury which all require neurite extension and remodeling. PMID:25061982

  8. A dynamic marker of very short-term heartbeat under pathological states via network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Feng-Zhen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Chuan; Yan, Fang-Rong

    2014-09-01

    We developed a novel network to probe pathological states with the aid of heartbeat time series, by regarding each vector in the embedding phase space as one node of the network and using a permutation-based measure to determine links between nodes. The entropy of the degree distribution (E_{{DD}}) of the network shows a general and significant reduction under pathological conditions, even when there are only ultra short-term heartbeats (\\approx 50\\text{ beats}) available. The reduction of E_{{DD}} is possibly a dynamic marker of cardiac disorders. Our results reveal that a comparatively strong “memory” should usually exist in the healthy cardiovascular system whereas it dramatically declines when a cardiac disease is arising. The proposed method shows great promise in screening cardiac diseases and monitoring dynamic changes of the autonomic nervous system. Besides, as a universal method for analyzing the time series, the proposed approach seems to be promising also for other research disciplines.

  9. A dynamic physics-based model for tubular IPMC sensors under torsional excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Sharif, Montassar Aidi; Tan, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) have intrinsic sensing and actuation properties. An IPMC sensor typically has the beam shape and responds to bending deflections only. Recently tubular IPMCs have been proposed for omnidirectional sensing of bending stimuli. In this paper we report, to our best knowledge, the first study on torsion sensing with tubular IPMCs. In particular, a dynamic, physics-based model is presented for a tubular IPMC sensor under pure torsional stimulus. With the symmetric tubular structure and the pure torsion condition, the stress distribution inside the polymer only varies along the radial direction, resulting in a one-dimensional model. The dynamic model is derived by analytically solving the governing partial differential equation, accommodating the assumed boundary condition that the charge density is proportional to the mechanically induced stress. Experiments are further conducted to estimate the physical parameters of the proposed model.

  10. Finite element analysis of the Arquin-designed CMU wall under a dynamic (blast) load.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Carlos; Petti, Jason P.

    2008-12-01

    The Arquin Corporation designed a CMU (concrete masonry unit) wall construction and reinforcement technique that includes steel wire and polymer spacers that is intended to facilitate a faster and stronger wall construction. Since the construction method for an Arquin-designed wall is different from current wall construction practices, finite element computer analyses were performed to estimate the ability of the wall to withstand a hypothetical dynamic load, similar to that of a blast from a nearby explosion. The response of the Arquin wall was compared to the response of an idealized standard masonry wall exposed to the same dynamic load. Results from the simulations show that the Arquin wall deformed less than the idealized standard wall under such loading conditions. As part of a different effort, Sandia National Laboratories also looked at the relative static response of the Arquin wall, results that are summarized in a separate SAND Report.

  11. Comparative explorations of the revival and robustness for quantum dynamics under decoherence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the revival and robustness of quantum dynamics under local decoherent evolutions through investigating the dynamical behaviors of quantum correlation. The results show that in depolarizing channel, quantum discord damps faster and revivals after a dark interval of time, while the others will revival immediately at the critical point. In addition, in hybrid channel the declining initial condition can speed up the attenuation of quantum discord within a limited time, while it can enable trace distance discord and Bures distance discord to damp more smoothly. In this sense, quantum discord is typically less robust against decoherence than the others. Interestingly, nonlocality shows different decay rates in the vicinity of critical point. Additionally, we lastly provide a physical interpretation concerning these phenomena.

  12. Dynamics of Order Parameters in Oscillator Associative Memory Models with Scattered Natural Frequency under External Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we consider the dynamics of the order parameters in oscillator associative memory models with scattered natural frequency under external noise. We first study the stationary state of the continuous-time model. Based on this knowledge, by applying the adiabatic approximation and the ergodic hypothesis to the continuous-time model, we propose a discrete-time model. For the discrete-time model, we derive maps of order parameters by applying statistical neuro dynamics. When the external noise is large, the system cannot retrieve an imbedded pattern, and hence, the overlap becomes zero and variance of the crosstalk noise becomes small in the stationary state. We discuss the limitations of our theory and the reason for the gaps between simulation results and theoretical results.

  13. Testing for contagion under asymmetric dynamics: Evidence from the stock markets between US and Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuan-Min; Nguyen Thi, Thanh-Binh

    2007-03-01

    This article is an attempt to test, through the use of forward forecasting test on dynamic conditional correlation (DCC), for contagion between Taiwan and US stocks under asymmetry. The process includes three steps. The first step uses the iterated cumulative sums of squares (ICSS) algorithm to detect the structural breaks of market return. The second step creates dummy variables for breaks, estimates EGARCH model of conditional generalized error distribution, and computes dynamic conditional correlation coefficients of DCC multivariate GARCH model. The third step employs one-step and N-step forecast test to check for contagion effect. The evidences prove the asymmetric leverage effect of Taiwan weighted stock index and New York-NYSE Composite Index. Interestingly, we discovered that there are two kinds of contagion, “positive” and “negative”, between markets.

  14. Dynamics of mechanical feedback-type hydraulic servomotors under inertia loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Harold; Otto, Edward W; Ransom, Victor L

    1953-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of mechanical feedback-type hydraulic servomotors under inertia loads is developed and experimental verification is presented. The analysis, which is developed in terms of two physical parameters, yields direct expressions for the following dynamic responses: (1) the transient response to a step input and the maximum cylinder pressure during the transient and (2) the variation of amplitude attenuation and phase shift with the frequency of a sinusoidally varying input. The validity of the analysis is demonstrated by means of recorded transient and frequency responses obtained on two servomotors. The calculated responses are in close agreement with the measured responses. The relations presented are readily applicable to the design as well as to the analysis of hydraulic servomotors.

  15. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  16. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  17. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  18. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows.

  19. [The dynamics of anxious depression under the treatment with antidepressants with different mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, N M; Vertogradova, O P

    2012-01-01

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of anxious depression under the treatment with selective serotonergic antidepressants with different mechanisms of action on the serotonin reuptake were investigated. It was examined 61 patients with anxious depression (ICD-10 F32.1, F33.1, F34.1) treated with zoloft (sertraline) or coaxil (tianeptine) as a monotherapy. The following methods were used: clinical-psychopathological, psychometric (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, the Sheehan Patient-Related Anxiety Scale) and statistical analysis. The comparative investigation has shown that both zoloft and coaxil are practically equally effective in the treatment of anxious depression with some peculiarities in the dynamics of clinical parameters. PMID:23257755

  20. Dynamics of dual-polarization VCSEL-based optical frequency combs under optical injection locking.

    PubMed

    Prior, E; de Dios, C; Criado, R; Ortsiefer, M; Meissner, P; Acedo, P

    2016-09-01

    The present experimental work studies the dynamics of dual-polarization optical frequency combs (OFCs) based on gain switching (GS) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes under optical injection locking (OIL). This study presents two main results. First, we have obtained an overall comb formed by two orthogonally polarized sub-combs with comparable span and power. The overall comb shows enhanced optical span and flatness and high coherence between its modes. The second result is that we have been able to control the polarization state of the overall comb by tuning the polarization state of the injected light by locking the same single teeth of the comb. This produces an overall comb with single polarization that is parallel or orthogonal. These are novel findings that provide for the development of efficient and compact OFCs based on GS VCSEL sources with versatile polarization dynamics. PMID:27607978

  1. Gain recovery dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers with distributed feedback grating under assist light injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Cui; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Huilong; Zhang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The gain recovery dynamic characteristics of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with distributed feedback (DFB) grating are theoretically investigated. The interaction of the grating structure and the assist light is used to accelerate the gain recovery process in the SOA. The effects of the assist light that is injected into the SOA with DFB structure on the gain recovery dynamics, the steady-state carrier density, and field intensity distributions are analyzed, respectively. Results show that the recovery time in the DFB SOA is successfully reduced by injecting relatively high power assist light, whose wavelength is set at the gain region. Finally, under assist light injection, the effects of DFB grating on the gain recovery process are also discussed. It is shown that the gain recovery in the SOA with DFB grating is faster than that in the SOA without DFB grating. In addition, the coupling factor in the DFB grating structure can be optimized to shorten the gain recovery time.

  2. Application of a nanosecond laser pulse to evaluate dynamic hardness under ultra-high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziejewska, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents results of experimental tests of plastic metals deformation generated by a shock wave induced by laser pulse. Tests were carried out on the Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the laser pulse of 10 ns duration. The shock wave generate by the laser pulse was used to induced local plastic deformation of the material surface. The study examined the possibility of application the process to develop a new method of measuring the dynamic hardness of materials under ultra-high strain rate. It has been shown that the shock wave induced by the laser pulse with an energy of 0.35-1.22 J causes a repeatable plastic deformation of surface of commercially available metals and alloys without thermal effects on the surfaces. Based on the knowledge of an imprint geometry, it is possible to evaluate the dynamic hardness of materials at strain rate in the range of 107 s-1.

  3. Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Schwab, B; Durisin, M; Kontorinis, G

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI patients by using the EquiTest and to help answer the question of whether electrically stimulating the inner ear using a cochlear implant influences the balance system in any way. Material and Methods. A test population (n = 50) was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest) was performed with the device switched off an switched on. Results. In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an extent, even lead to a stabilization of balance function under the static conditions of dynamic posturography, but nevertheless also to a significant destabilization. Significant improvements in vestibular function were seen mainly in equilibrium scores under conditions 4 and 5, the composite equilibrium score, and the vestibular components as revealed by sensory analysis. Conclusions. Only under the static conditions are significantly poorer scores achieved when stimulation is applied. It may be that the explanation for any symptoms of dizziness lies precisely in the fact that they occur in supposedly noncritical situations, since, when the cochlear implant makes increased demands on the balance system, induced disturbances can be centrally suppressed. PMID:20671908

  4. Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B.; Durisin, M.; Kontorinis, G.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI patients by using the EquiTest and to help answer the question of whether electrically stimulating the inner ear using a cochlear implant influences the balance system in any way. Material and Methods. A test population (n = 50) was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest) was performed with the device switched off an switched on. Results. In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an extent, even lead to a stabilization of balance function under the static conditions of dynamic posturography, but nevertheless also to a significant destabilization. Significant improvements in vestibular function were seen mainly in equilibrium scores under conditions 4 and 5, the composite equilibrium score, and the vestibular components as revealed by sensory analysis. Conclusions. Only under the static conditions are significantly poorer scores achieved when stimulation is applied. It may be that the explanation for any symptoms of dizziness lies precisely in the fact that they occur in supposedly noncritical situations, since, when the cochlear implant makes increased demands on the balance system, induced disturbances can be centrally suppressed. PMID:20671908

  5. Dynamical instability induced by the zero mode under symmetry breaking external perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, J. Nakamura, Y. Yamanaka, Y.

    2014-08-15

    A complex eigenvalue in the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations for a stationary Bose-Einstein condensate in the ultracold atomic system indicates the dynamical instability of the system. We also have the modes with zero eigenvalues for the condensate, called the zero modes, which originate from the spontaneous breakdown of symmetries. Although the zero modes are suppressed in many theoretical analyses, we take account of them in this paper and argue that a zero mode can change into one with a pure imaginary eigenvalue by applying a symmetry breaking external perturbation potential. This emergence of a pure imaginary mode adds a new type of scenario of dynamical instability to that characterized by the complex eigenvalue of the usual excitation modes. For illustration, we deal with two one-dimensional homogeneous Bose–Einstein condensate systems with a single dark soliton under a respective perturbation potential, breaking the invariance under translation, to derive pure imaginary modes. - Highlights: • Zero modes are important but ignored in many theories for the cold atomic system. • We discuss the zero mode under symmetry breaking potential in this system. • We consider the zero mode of translational invariance for a single dark soliton. • We show that it turns into an anomalous or pure imaginary mode.

  6. Saturated sodium chloride solution under an external static electric field: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Gan; Wang, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of saturated aqueous NaCl solutions under a constant external electric field (E) was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our dynamic MD simulations indicated that the irreversible nucleation process towards crystallization is accelerated by a moderate E but retarded or even prohibited under a stronger E, which can be understood by the competition between self-diffusion and drift motion. The former increases with E, thereby accelerating the nucleation process, whereas the latter pulls oppositely charged ions apart under a stronger E, thereby decelerating nucleation. Additionally, our steady-state MD simulations indicated that a first-order phase transition occurs in saturated solutions at a certain threshold Ec. The magnitude of Ec increases with concentration because larger clusters form more easily when the solution is more concentrated and require a stronger E to dissociate. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB932804) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91227115, 11274319, and 11421063).

  7. Simulation of Space Charge Dynamic in Polyethylene Under DC Continuous Electrical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhari, Hamed; Rogti, Fatiha

    2016-10-01

    The space charge dynamic plays a very important role in the aging and breakdown of polymeric insulation materials under high voltage. This is due to the intensification of the local electric field and the attendant chemical-mechanical effects in the vicinity around the trapped charge. In this paper, we have investigated the space charge dynamic in low-density polyethylene under high direct-current voltage, which is evaluated by experimental conditions. The evaluation is on the basis of simulation using a bipolar charge transport model consisting of charge injection, transports, trapping, detrapping, and recombination phenomena. The theoretical formulation of the physical problem is based on the Poisson, the continuity, and the transport equations. Numerical results provide temporal and local distributions of the electric field, the space charge density for the different kinds of charges (net charge density, mobile and trapped of electron density, mobile hole density), conduction and displacement current densities, and the external current. The result shows the appearance of the negative packet-like space charge with a large amount of the bulk under the dc electric field of 100 kV/mm, and the induced distortion of the electric field is largely near to the anode, about 39% higher than the initial electric field applied.

  8. Physical mechanisms underlying neurite outgrowth: A quantitative analysis of neuronal shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, F.; Stanley, H. E.; Eldred, W. D.; Daccord, G.; Hausman, R. E.; Nittmann, J.

    1990-01-01

    We show that-over a range of length scales r-the shapes of quasi-two-dimensional retinal neurons are fractal objects, and hence may be quantitatively characterized in part by their fractal dimension df. We analyze the shapes of numerous retinal neurons, both in vivo and in vitro. The neurons in vivo are found to have a fractal dimension df of 1.68+/-0.15. We also propose an explanation of certain stages of neuronal shape development in terms of a diffusion-limited-aggregation model, which predicts df=1.70+/-0.1.

  9. Calibration of hyperelastic material properties of the human lumbar intervertebral disc under fast dynamic compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Garo, Anaïs; El-Rich, Marwan; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2011-10-01

    Under fast dynamic loading conditions (e.g. high-energy impact), the load rate dependency of the intervertebral disc (IVD) material properties may play a crucial role in the biomechanics of spinal trauma. However, most finite element models (FEM) of dynamic spinal trauma uses material properties derived from quasi-static experiments, thus neglecting this load rate dependency. The aim of this study was to identify hyperelastic material properties that ensure a more biofidelic simulation of the IVD under a fast dynamic compressive load. A hyperelastic material law based on a first-order Mooney-Rivlin formulation was implemented in a detailed FEM of a L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) to represent the mechanical behavior of the IVD. Bony structures were modeled using an elasto-plastic Johnson-Cook material law that simulates bone fracture while ligaments were governed by a viscoelastic material law. To mimic experimental studies performed in fast dynamic compression, a compressive loading velocity of 1 m/s was applied to the superior half of L2, while the inferior half of L3 was fixed. An exploratory technique was used to simulate dynamic compression of the FSU using 34 sets of hyperelastic material constants randomly selected using an optimal Latin hypercube algorithm and a set of material constants derived from quasi-static experiments. Selection or rejection of the sets of material constants was based on compressive stiffness and failure parameters criteria measured experimentally. The two simulations performed with calibrated hyperelastic constants resulted in nonlinear load-displacement curves with compressive stiffness (7335 and 7079 N/mm), load (12,488 and 12,473 N), displacement (1.95 and 2.09 mm) and energy at failure (13.5 and 14.7 J) in agreement with experimental results (6551 ± 2017 N/mm, 12,411 ± 829 N, 2.1 ± 0.2 mm and 13.0 ± 1.5 J respectively). The fracture pattern and location also agreed with experimental results. The simulation performed with

  10. Damage and fracture in fabric-reinforced composites under quasi-static and dynamic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Fabric-reinforced polymer composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large deformations caused by quasi-static and dynamic loading. Composite materials subjected to such bending loads can demonstrate various damage modes - matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in composites affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. Such behaviour needs adequate means of analysis and investigation, the main approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates caused by quasi-static and dynamic bending. Experimental tests were carried out to characterise the behaviour of a CFRP material under large-deflection bending, first in quasi-static and then in dynamic conditions. Izod-type impact bending tests were performed on un-notched specimens of CFRP using a Resil impactor to assess the transient response and energy absorbing capability of the material. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) was used to analyse various damage modes in the tested specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply and intra-ply delamination such as tow debonding, and fabric fracture were the prominent damage modes both in quasi-static and dynamic test specimens. However, the inter-ply damage was localised at impact location in dynamically tested specimens, whereas in the quasi-static specimens, it spread almost over the entire interface.

  11. Three-layered structure shared between Lewy bodies and lewy neurites-three-dimensional reconstruction of triple-labeled sections.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Toshiro; Uchihara, Toshiki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Ayako; Orimo, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2008-07-01

    Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs) are the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although LBs and LNs, frequently coexistent, share some histological properties, their appearances are quite different under conventional two-dimensional observation. In order to clarify how these apparently different structures (LBs and LNs) are related during their formation, we performed three-dimensional observation on post-mortem brainstem tissues with PD. Sixty-microm thick floating sections were multi-immunofluorolabeled for alpha-synuclein (alphaS), ubiquitin (Ub) and neurofilament (NF). Serial confocal images were reconstructed with software. External three-dimensional configuration of LBs, double-labeled for alphaS and NF, exhibited frequent continuity with LNs (70%). Internally, alphaS and Ub formed the three-dimensional concentric inner layers and NF rimmed these inner layers. This layered structure was shared among spherical LBs, rod-shaped LNs and even convoluted forms of LBs/LNs. Furthermore, each layer exhibited continuity without interruption even in the convoluted form and around its junction to spherical LBs. This three-layered structure shared among various Lewy pathologies and their layered continuity on three-dimensional basis favor the hypothesis that LNs evolve into LBs. Besides progression from pale bodies to LBs, structural evolution from LNs into LBs may provide an alternative explanation for the variability of alphaS deposits and their interrelation.

  12. Steady-state responses of a belt-drive dynamical system under dual excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hu

    2016-02-01

    The stable steady-state periodic responses of a belt-drive system with a one-way clutch are studied. For the first time, the dynamical system is investigated under dual excitations. The system is simultaneously excited by the firing pulsations of the engine and the harmonic motion of the foundation. Nonlinear discrete-continuous equations are derived for coupling the transverse vibration of the belt spans and the rotations of the driving and driven pulleys and the accessory pulley. The nonlinear dynamics is studied under equal and multiple relations between the frequency of the firing pulsations and the frequency of the foundation motion. Furthermore, translating belt spans are modeled as axially moving strings. A set of nonlinear piecewise ordinary differential equations is achieved by using the Galerkin truncation. Under various relations between the excitation frequencies, the time histories of the dynamical system are numerically simulated based on the time discretization method. Furthermore, the stable steady-state periodic response curves are calculated based on the frequency sweep. Moreover, the convergence of the Galerkin truncation is examined. Numerical results demonstrate that the one-way clutch reduces the resonance amplitude of the rotations of the driven pulley and the accessory pulley. On the other hand, numerical examples prove that the resonance areas of the belt spans are decreased by eliminating the torque-transmitting in the opposite direction. With the increasing amplitude of the foundation excitation, the damping effect of the one-way clutch will be reduced. Furthermore, as the amplitude of the firing pulsations of the engine increases, the jumping phenomena in steady-state response curves of the belt-drive system with or without a one-way clutch both occur.

  13. On the mechanical characterization and modeling of polymer gel brain substitute under dynamic rotational loading.

    PubMed

    Fontenier, B; Hault-Dubrulle, A; Drazetic, P; Fontaine, C; Naceur, H

    2016-10-01

    The use of highly sensitive soft materials has become increasingly apparent in the last few years in numerous industrial fields, due to their viscous and damping nature. Unfortunately these materials remain difficult to characterize using conventional techniques, mainly because of the very low internal forces supported by these materials especially under high strain-rates of deformation. The aim of this work is to investigate the dynamic response of a polymer gel brain analog material under specific rotational-impact experiments. The selected polymer gel commercially known as Sylgard 527 has been studied using a specific procedure for its experimental characterization and numerical modeling. At first an indentation experiment was conducted at several loading rates to study the strain rate sensitivity of the Sylgard 527 gel. During the unloading several relaxation tests were performed after indentation, to assess the viscous behavior of the material. A specific numerical procedure based on moving least square approximation and response surface method was then performed to determine adequate robust material parameters of the Sylgard 527 gel. A sensitivity analysis was assessed to confirm the robustness of the obtained material parameters. For the validation of the obtained material model, a second experiment was conducted using a dynamic rotational loading apparatus. It consists of a metallic cylindrical cup filled with the polymer gel and subjected to an eccentric transient rotational impact. Complete kinematics of the cup and the large strains induced in the Sylgard 527 gel, have been recorded at several patterns by means of optical measurement. The whole apparatus was modeled by the Finite Element Method using explicit dynamic time integration available within Ls-dyna(®) software. Comparison between the physical and the numerical models of the Sylgard 527 gel behavior under rotational choc shows excellent agreements. PMID:27341290

  14. Measurement accuracy of weighing and tipping-bucket rainfall intensity gauges under dynamic laboratory testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, M.; Lanza, L. G.; La Barbera, P.; Chan, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of any single uncertainty factor in the resulting performance of infield rain gauge measurements still has to be comprehensively assessed due to the high number of real world error sources involved, such as the intrinsic variability of rainfall intensity (RI), wind effects, wetting losses, the ambient temperature, etc. In recent years the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) addressed these issues by fostering dedicated investigations, which revealed further difficulties in assessing the actual reference rainfall intensity in the field. This work reports on an extensive assessment of the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauge accuracy when measuring rainfall intensity under laboratory dynamic conditions (time varying reference flow rates). The results obtained from the weighing rain gauge (WG) were also compared with a MTX tipping-bucket rain gauge (TBR) under the same test conditions. Tests were carried out by simulating various artificial precipitation events, with unsteady rainfall intensity, using a suitable dynamic rainfall generator. Real world rainfall data measured by an Ogawa catching-type drop counter at a field test site located within the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) were used as a reference for the artificial rain generation system. Results demonstrate that the differences observed between the laboratory and field performance of catching-type gauges are only partially attributable to the weather and operational conditions in the field. The dynamics of real world precipitation events is responsible for a large part of the measurement errors, which can be accurately assessed in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. This allows for new testing methodologies and the development of instruments with enhanced performance in the field.

  15. On the mechanical characterization and modeling of polymer gel brain substitute under dynamic rotational loading.

    PubMed

    Fontenier, B; Hault-Dubrulle, A; Drazetic, P; Fontaine, C; Naceur, H

    2016-10-01

    The use of highly sensitive soft materials has become increasingly apparent in the last few years in numerou