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Sample records for dynamics underlying neurite

  1. Mechanisms underlying the initiation and dynamics of neuronal filopodia: from neurite formation to synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Filopodia are finger-like cellular protrusions found throughout the metazoan kingdom and perform fundamental cellular functions during development and cell migration. Neurons exhibit a wide variety of extremely complex morphologies. In the nervous system, filopodia underlie many major morphogenetic events. Filopodia have roles spanning the initiation and guidance of neuronal processes, axons and dendrites to the formation of synaptic connections. This chapter addresses the mechanisms of the formation and dynamics of neuronal filopodia. Some of the major lessons learned from the study of neuronal filopodia are (1) there are multiple mechanisms that can regulate filopodia in a context-dependent manner, (2) that filopodia are specialized subcellular domains, (3) that filopodia exhibit dynamic membrane recycling which also controls aspects of filopodial dynamics, (4) that neuronal filopodia contain machinery for the orchestration of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and (5) localized protein synthesis contributes to neuronal filopodial dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurite, a Finite Difference Large Scale Parallel Program for the Simulation of Electrical Signal Propagation in Neurites under Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    García-Grajales, Julián A.; Rucabado, Gabriel; García-Dopico, Antonio; Peña, José-María; Jérusalem, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite—explicit and implicit—were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon, a segmented

  3. Large-scale analysis of neurite growth dynamics on micropatterned substrates†‡

    PubMed Central

    Wissner-Gross, Zachary D.; Scott, Mark A.; Ku, David; Ramaswamy, Priya

    2011-01-01

    During both development and regeneration of the nervous system, neurons display complex growth dynamics, and several neurites compete to become the neuron’s single axon. Numerous mathematical and biophysical models have been proposed to explain this competition, which remain experimentally unverified. Large-scale, precise, and repeatable measurements of neurite dynamics have been difficult to perform, since neurons have varying numbers of neurites, which themselves have complex morphologies. To overcome these challenges using a minimal number of primary neurons, we generated repeatable neuronal morphologies on a large scale using laser-patterned micron-wide stripes of adhesive proteins on an otherwise highly non-adherent substrate. By analyzing thousands of quantitative time-lapse measurements of highly reproducible neurite growth dynamics, we show that total neurite growth accelerates until neurons polarize, that immature neurites compete even at very short lengths, and that neuronal polarity exhibits a distinct transition as neurites grow. Proposed neurite growth models agree only partially with our experimental observations. We further show that simple yet specific modifications can significantly improve these models, but still do not fully predict the complex neurite growth behavior. Our high-content analysis puts significant and nontrivial constraints on possible mechanistic models of neurite growth and specification. The methodology presented here could also be employed in large-scale chemical and target-based screens on a variety of complex and subtle phenotypes for therapeutic discoveries using minimal numbers of primary neurons. PMID:20976322

  4. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  5. Dynamic aspects of amphibian neurite growth and the effects of an applied electric field.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, C D

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of growth of earliest spinal neurites from Xenopus laevis have been studied in vitro in the presence and absence of an applied d.c. electric field. Control and cathode-directed neurites grew at a rate of about 30 micron/h: growth of anodal-facing neurites was 8 times slower. Periods of arrested growth were common in cultured neurones; these lasted 2-3 times longer in an applied electric field. The likelihood and the severity of neurite reabsorption was greatest in neurites directed towards the anode. Many neurites turned to direct their growth towards the cathode. As this happened their rate of growth increased 2-3-fold. The electric field further shaped neurite morphology by increasing the number of filopodia at the growth cone and by increasing the number of cytoplasmic spines along a neurite shaft. The electric field induced an asymmetry in the distribution of these cytoplasmic projections; greater numbers being found on the cathodal-facing than on the anodal-facing side. Implications of these data for nerve growth in development and in regeneration are discussed. Images Plate 1 PMID:3795068

  6. New potent accelerator of neurite outgrowth from Lawsonia inermis flower under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshimi; Nakashima, Souichi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yano, Mamiko; Akiyama, Masanori; Imai, Kayo; Kimura, Tomohito; Nakata, Akiko; Tani, Miyuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    The methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) showed accelerative effects on nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells under non-fasting conditions. To elucidate the active constituents responsible for the neuronal differentiation, we conducted a search of the constituents and examined their accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. We isolated a new acetophenone glycoside, inermioside A, which exerted a significant accelerative effect on neurite outgrowth. We also confirmed the activities of nine known compounds, including quercetin and lalioside. In addition, we found that quercetin, one of the active constituents, increased Vav3 mRNA expression.

  7. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1±0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80±0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  8. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1 ± 0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80 ± 0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine.

  9. Positive and negative cues for modulating neurite dynamics and receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Melissa R; Sundararaghavan, Harini G

    2017-03-27

    Many current peripheral nerve repair strategies focus on delivering positive, growth promoting cues (e.g. extracellular matrix, ECM) while eliminating negative, growth inhibiting cues (e.g. chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, CSPGs) at the injury site. We hypothesized that recapitulating the positive and negative cues of the peripheral nerve injury microenvironment would improve regeneration. First, we tested the effects of a characteristic CSPG, chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) on neurite dynamics of dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using time lapse video microscopy. DRG growth was recorded on different adhesive substrates, including a novel, porcine-derived spinal cord matrix (SCM). The SCM significantly increased frequency of neurite extension coordinated by a significant reduction in the neurites' time spent stalled. The SCM also mitigated inhibitory effects of CSA, producing longer neurites than the controls without CSA treatment. Next we aimed to elucidate receptors involved in mediating this behavior by testing the ability of CSA to upregulate cell-substrate binding receptors using flow cytometry. Our results showed a significant increase in syndecan-3 receptor expression in neurons treated with CSA. Furthermore, syndecans would most likely bind to the sulfated glycosaminoglycans measured in the SCM. Finally, we evaluated neurite growth on biomaterial scaffolds featuring CSA and SCM cues. Our results showed significantly increased neurite outgrowth on electrospun hyaluronic acid fibers with SCM and low levels of CSA. Higher incorporation of CSA maintained its inhibitory properties. Future work will evaluate coupling CSPGs with growth-permissive ECM to assess the combined effect on neurite outgrowth.

  10. Dynamic peripheral traction forces balance stable neurite tension in regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Callen; Mertz, Aaron F; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric

    2014-05-14

    Growth cones of elongating neurites exert force against the external environment, but little is known about the role of force in outgrowth or its relationship to the mechanical organization of neurons. We used traction force microscopy to examine patterns of force in growth cones of regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons. We find that traction is highest in the peripheral actin-rich domain and internal stress reaches a plateau near the transition between peripheral and central microtubule-rich domains. Integrating stress over the area of the growth cone reveals that total scalar force increases with area but net tension on the neurite does not. Tensions fall within a limited range while a substantial fraction of the total force can be balanced locally within the growth cone. Although traction continuously redistributes during extension and retraction of the peripheral domain, tension is stable over time, suggesting that tension is a tightly regulated property of the neurite independent of growth cone dynamics. We observe that redistribution of traction in the peripheral domain can reorient the end of the neurite shaft. This suggests a role for off-axis force in growth cone turning and neuronal guidance.

  11. Dynamic peripheral traction forces balance stable neurite tension in regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Callen; Mertz, Aaron F.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Growth cones of elongating neurites exert force against the external environment, but little is known about the role of force in outgrowth or its relationship to the mechanical organization of neurons. We used traction force microscopy to examine patterns of force in growth cones of regenerating Aplysia bag cell neurons. We find that traction is highest in the peripheral actin-rich domain and internal stress reaches a plateau near the transition between peripheral and central microtubule-rich domains. Integrating stress over the area of the growth cone reveals that total scalar force increases with area but net tension on the neurite does not. Tensions fall within a limited range while a substantial fraction of the total force can be balanced locally within the growth cone. Although traction continuously redistributes during extension and retraction of the peripheral domain, tension is stable over time, suggesting that tension is a tightly regulated property of the neurite independent of growth cone dynamics. We observe that redistribution of traction in the peripheral domain can reorient the end of the neurite shaft. This suggests a role for off-axis force in growth cone turning and neuronal guidance. PMID:24825441

  12. Tropomodulins are negative regulators of neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Thomas; Fischer, Robert S.; Dehmelt, Leif; Halpain, Shelley; Fowler, Velia M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for neurite formation. Tropomodulins (Tmods) regulate polymerization at actin filament pointed ends. Previous experiments using a mouse model deficient for the neuron specific isoform Tmod2 suggested a role for Tmods in neuronal function by impacting processes underlying learning and memory. However, the role of Tmods in neuronal function on the cellular level remains unknown. Immunofluorescence localization of the neuronal isoforms Tmod1 and Tmod2 in cultured rat primary hippocampal neurons revealed that Tmod1 is enriched along the proximal part of F-actin bundles in lamellipodia of spreading cells and in growth cones of extending neurites, while Tmod2 appears largely cytoplasmic. Functional analysis of these Tmod isoforms in a mouse neuroblastoma N2a cell line showed that knockdown of Tmod2 resulted in a significant increase in number of neurite-forming cells and in neurite length. While N2a cells compensated for Tmod2 knockdown by increasing Tmod1 levels, over-expression of exogenous Tmod1 had no effect on neurite outgrowth. Moreover, knockdown of Tmod1 increased the number of neurites formed per cell, without effect on number of neurite-forming cells or neurite length. Taken together, these results indicate that Tmod1 and Tmod2 have mechanistically distinct inhibitory roles in neurite formation, likely mediated via different effects on F-actin dynamics and via differential localizations during early neuritogenesis. PMID:21146252

  13. SCG10, a microtubule destabilizing factor, stimulates the neurite outgrowth by modulating microtubule dynamics in rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Morii, Hiroshi; Shiraishi-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Mori, Nozomu

    2006-09-01

    Microtubule dynamics, one of the key elements in neurite outgrowth, is regulated by various regulatory factors to determine the behavior of the neuronal growth cone and to form the specialized neuronal shape. SCG10 is a neuron-specific stathmin protein with a potent microtubule destabilizing factor and is enriched in the growth cones of the developing neurons. We investigated the functional role of SCG10 in neurite outgrowth using rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons. Genetic manipulation of SCG10 using a short-interfering RNA duplex markedly decreased the SCG10 expression level and significantly suppressed neurite outgrowth. This result was confirmed by immunodepletion experiments. On the other hand, the protein transduction of SCG10 using a polyarginine tag stimulated neurite outgrowth. Such manipulation of the SCG10 expression level affected microtubule morphology within the growth cones. A decrease in the SCG10 level converted the morphology to a more stable state, while an increase converted the morphology to a more dynamic state. However, an excess of SCG10 induced neurite retraction due to an excess of microtubule disassembly. These results suggest that SCG10 serves as an important regulatory factor of growth cone motility by enhancing microtubule dynamics, possibly through increasing the catastrophe frequency.

  14. Ultrafast optical recording reveals distinct capsaicin-induced ion dynamics along single nociceptive neurite terminals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Robert H.; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya; Binshtok, Alexander M.

    2017-07-01

    Pain signals are detected by terminals of nociceptive peripheral fibers situated among the keratinocytes and epithelial cells. Despite being key structures for pain-related stimuli detection and transmission, little is known about the functional organization of terminals. This is mainly due to their minute size, rendering them largely inaccessible by conventional experimental approaches. Here, we report the implementation of an ultrafast optical recording approach for studying cultured neurite terminals, which are readily accessible for assay manipulations. Using this approach, we were able to study capsaicin-induced calcium and sodium dynamics in the nociceptive processes, at a near-action potential time resolution. The approach was sensitive enough to detect differences in latency, time-to-peak, and amplitude of capsaicin-induced ion transients along the terminal neurites. Using this approach, we found that capsaicin evokes distinctive calcium signals along the neurite. At the terminal, the signal was insensitive to voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, and showed slower kinetics and smaller signal amplitudes, compared with signals that were measured further up the neurite. These latter signals were mainly abolished by sodium channel blockers. We propose this ultrafast optical recording approach as a model for studying peripheral terminal signaling, forming a basis for studying pain mechanisms in normal and pathological states.

  15. NeuronGrowth, a software for automatic quantification of neurite and filopodial dynamics from time-lapse sequences of digital images.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Zian; Martinez-Perez, M Elena; De-Miguel, Francisco F

    2011-10-01

    We developed NeuronGrowth, a software for the automatic quantification of extension and retraction of neurites and filopodia, from time-lapse sequences of two-dimensional digital micrographs. NeuronGrowth requires a semiautomatic characterization of individual neurites in a reference frame, which is then used for automatic tracking and measurement of every neurite over the whole image sequence. Modules for sequence alignment, background subtraction, flat field correction, light normalization, and cropping have been integrated to improve the quality of the analysis. Moreover, NeuronGrowth incorporates a deconvolution filter that corrects the shadow-cast effect of differential interference contrast (DIC) images. NeuronGrowth was tested by analyzing the formation of outgrowth patterns by individual leech neurons cultured under two different conditions. Phase contrast images were obtained from neurons plated on CNS homogenates and DIC images were obtained from similar neurons plated on ganglion capsules as substrates. Filopodia were measured from fluorescent growth-cones of chick dorsal root ganglion cells. Quantitative data of neurite extension and retraction obtained by three different users applying NeuronGrowth and two other manually operated software packages were similar. However, NeuronGrowth required less user participation and had a better time performance when compared with the other software packages. NeuronGrowth may be used in general to quantify the dynamics of tubular structures such as blood vessels. NeuronGrowth is a free plug-in for the free software ImageJ and can be downloaded along with a user manual, a troubleshooting section and other information required for its use from http://www.ifc.unam.mx or http://www.ifc.unam.mx/ffm/index.html.

  16. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development.

  17. Sonic hedgehog promotes neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons under oxidative stress: Involving of mitochondria and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao; Chen, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to be involved in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders. Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, has been implicated in promoting several aspects of brain remodeling process. Mitochondria may play an important role in controlling fundamental processes in neuroplasticity. However, little evidence is available about the effect and the potential mechanism of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons under oxidative stress. Here, we revealed that Shh treatment significantly increased the viability of cortical neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which was damaged by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Shh alleviated the apoptosis rate of H2O2-induced neurons. Shh also increased neuritogenesis injuried by H2O2 in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased the activities of SOD and and decreased the productions of MDA. In addition, Shh protected mitochondrial functions, elevated the cellular ATP levels and amelioratesd the impairment of mitochondrial complex II activities of cortical neurons induced by H2O2. In conclusion, all these results suggest that Shh acts as a prosurvival factor playing an essential role to neurite outgrowth of cortical neuron under H2O2 -induced oxidative stress, possibly through counteracting ROS release and preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP as well as mitochondrial complex II activities against oxidative stress.

  18. Neurites outgrowth and amino acids levels in goldfish retina under hypo-osmotic or hyper-osmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cubillán, Lisbeth; Obregón, Francisco; Lima, Lucimey

    2012-02-01

    Amino acids are known to play relevant roles as osmolytes in various tissues, including the retina. Taurine is one of these active molecules. In addition, taurine stimulates outgrowth from the goldfish retina by mechanisms that include extracellular matrix, calcium fluxes and protein phosphorylation. The present report aims to explore the effect of medium osmolarity on goldfish retinal outgrowth and the possible modifications produced by changing eye osmolarity on amino acid levels in the retina. Goldfish retinal explants were obtained 10 days after crush of the optic nerve and cultured under iso-, hypo- or hyper-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic medium was prepared by diluting the solutions 10% twice, preserving fetal calf serum concentration. Hyper-osmotic medium was done by adding 50 or 100 mM urea or mannitol. Evaluation of length and density of neurites was performed 5 days after plating. Outgrowth was reduced in hypo- and in hyper-osmotic conditions. Taurine, 4 mM, increased length and density of neurites in iso-osmotic, and produced stimulatory effects under both hyper-osmotic conditions. The in vivo modification of osmolarity by intraocular injection of water or 100 mM urea modified levels of free amino acids in the retina. Taurine and aspartate retinal levels increased in a time-dependent manner after hypo- and hyper-osmotic solution injections. Serine, threonine, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, alanine and tyrosine were elevated in hyper-osmotic conditions. Outgrowth in vitro, after in vivo osmolarity changes, was higher in the absence of taurine, but did not increase in the presence of the amino acid. The fact that certain outgrowth took place in these conditions support that the impairment was not due to tissue damage. Rather, the effects might be related to the cascade of kinase events described during osmolarity variations. The time course under these conditions produced adjustments in ganglion cells probably related to taurine transporter, and

  19. Mathematical Relationships between Neuron Morphology and Neurite Growth Dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster Larva Class IV Sensory Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Liang, Xin; Grace, Michael; Lee, Daniel; Howard, Jonathon

    The morphology of neurons is diverse and reflects the diversity of neuronal functions, yet the principles that govern neuronal morphogenesis are unclear. In an effort to better understand neuronal morphogenesis we will be focusing on the development of the dendrites of class IV sensory neuron in Drosophila melanogaster. In particular we attempt to determine how the the total length, and the number of branches of dendrites are mathematically related to the dynamics of neurite growth and branching. By imaging class IV neurons during early embryogenesis we are able to measure the change in neurite length l (t) as a function of time v (t) = dl / dt . We found that the distribution of v (t) is well characterized by a hyperbolic secant distribution, and that the addition of new branches per unit time is well described by a Poisson process. Combining these measurements with the assumption that branching occurs with equal probability anywhere along the dendrite we were able to construct a mathematical model that provides reasonable agreement with the observed number of branches, and total length of the dendrites of the class IV sensory neuron.

  20. PAK–PIX interactions regulate adhesion dynamics and membrane protrusion to control neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, Miguel; Gregus, Kelly A.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The roles of P21-activated kinase (PAK) in the regulation of axon outgrowth downstream of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are poorly understood. Here we show that PAK1–3 and PIX are expressed in the developing spinal cord and differentially localize to point contacts and filopodial tips within motile growth cones. Using a specific interfering peptide called PAK18, we found that axon outgrowth is robustly stimulated on laminin by partial inhibition of PAK–PIX interactions and PAK function, whereas complete inhibition of PAK function stalls axon outgrowth. Furthermore, modest inhibition of PAK–PIX stimulates the assembly and turnover of growth cone point contacts, whereas strong inhibition over-stabilizes adhesions. Point mutations within PAK confirm the importance of PIX binding. Together our data suggest that regulation of PAK–PIX interactions in growth cones controls neurite outgrowth by influencing the activity of several important mediators of actin filament polymerization and retrograde flow, as well as integrin-dependent adhesion to laminin. PMID:23321640

  1. PAK-PIX interactions regulate adhesion dynamics and membrane protrusion to control neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Medina, Miguel; Gregus, Kelly A; Gomez, Timothy M

    2013-03-01

    The roles of P21-activated kinase (PAK) in the regulation of axon outgrowth downstream of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are poorly understood. Here we show that PAK1-3 and PIX are expressed in the developing spinal cord and differentially localize to point contacts and filopodial tips within motile growth cones. Using a specific interfering peptide called PAK18, we found that axon outgrowth is robustly stimulated on laminin by partial inhibition of PAK-PIX interactions and PAK function, whereas complete inhibition of PAK function stalls axon outgrowth. Furthermore, modest inhibition of PAK-PIX stimulates the assembly and turnover of growth cone point contacts, whereas strong inhibition over-stabilizes adhesions. Point mutations within PAK confirm the importance of PIX binding. Together our data suggest that regulation of PAK-PIX interactions in growth cones controls neurite outgrowth by influencing the activity of several important mediators of actin filament polymerization and retrograde flow, as well as integrin-dependent adhesion to laminin.

  2. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2015-11-16

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of neurite extension.

    PubMed Central

    Valtorta, F; Leoni, C

    1999-01-01

    The extension of neurites is a major task of developing neurons, requiring a significant metabolic effort to sustain the increase in molecular synthesis necessary for plasma membrane expansion. In addition, neurite extension involves changes in the subsets of expressed proteins and reorganization of the cytomatrix. These phenomena are driven by environmental cues which activate signal transduction processes as well as by the intrinsic genetic program of the cell. The present review summarizes some of the most recent progress made in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:10212488

  4. Novel inhibitory action of tunicamycin homologues suggests a role for dynamic protein fatty acylation in growth cone-mediated neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In neuronal growth cones, the advancing tips of elongating axons and dendrites, specific protein substrates appear to undergo cycles of posttranslational modification by covalent attachment and removal of long-chain fatty acids. We show here that ongoing fatty acylation can be inhibited selectively by long-chain homologues of the antibiotic tunicamycin, a known inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. Tunicamycin directly inhibits transfer of palmitate to protein in a cell-free system, indicating that tunicamycin inhibition of protein palmitoylation reflects an action of the drug separate from its previously established effects on glycosylation. Tunicamycin treatment of differentiated PC12 cells or dissociated rat sensory neurons, under conditions in which protein palmitoylation is inhibited, produces a prompt cessation of neurite elongation and induces a collapse of neuronal growth cones. These growth cone responses are rapidly reversed by washout of the antibiotic, even in the absence of protein synthesis, or by addition of serum. Two additional lines of evidence suggest that the effects of tunicamycin on growth cones arise from its ability to inhibit protein long-chain acylation, rather than its previously established effects on protein glycosylation and synthesis. (a) The abilities of different tunicamycin homologues to induce growth cone collapse very systematically with the length of the fatty acyl side- chain of tunicamycin, in a manner predicted and observed for the inhibition of protein palmitoylation. Homologues with fatty acyl moieties shorter than palmitic acid (16 hydrocarbons), including potent inhibitors of glycosylation, are poor inhibitors of growth cone function. (b) The tunicamycin-induced impairment of growth cone function can be reversed by the addition of excess exogenous fatty acid, which reverses the inhibition of protein palmitoylation but has no effect on the inhibition of protein glycosylation. These results suggest an important role for

  5. Bioluminescence imaging of mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics in soma and neurites of individual adult mouse sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Lucía; Senovilla, Laura; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Chamero, Pablo; Alonso, María T; Villalobos, Carlos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) are essential for triggering neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals. Calcium-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may amplify the [Ca2+]c signals and facilitate neurotransmitter release in sympathetic neurons. In adrenal chromaffin cells, functional triads are formed by voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCCs), CICR sites and mitochondria. In fact, mitochondria take up most of the Ca2+ load entering the cells and are essential for shaping [Ca2+]c signals and exocytosis. Here we have investigated the existence of such functional triads in sympathetic neurons. The mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) in soma and neurites of individual mouse superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was monitored by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorins. In soma, Ca2+ entry through VOCCs evoked rapid, near millimolar [Ca2+]m increases in a subpopulation of mitochondria containing about 40% of the aequorin. Caffeine evoked a similar [Ca2+]m increase in a mitochondrial pool containing about 30% of the aequorin and overlapping with the VOCC-sensitive pool. These observations suggest the existence of functional triads similar to the ones described in chromaffin cells. In neurites, mitochondria were able to buffer [Ca2+]c increases resulting from activation of VOCCs but not those mediated by caffeine-induced Ca2+ release from the ER. The weaker Ca2+ buffering by mitochondria in neurites could contribute to facilitate Ca2+-induced exocytosis at the presynaptic sites. PMID:17234693

  6. Synergistic Effects of 3D ECM and Chemogradients on Neurite Outgrowth and Guidance: A Simple Modeling and Microfluidic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2014-01-01

    During nervous system development, numerous cues within the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) guide the growing neurites along specific pathways to reach their intended targets. Neurite motility is controlled by extracellular signal sensing through the growth cone at the neurite tip, including chemoattractive and repulsive cues. However, it is difficult to regenerate and restore neurite tracts, lost or degraded due to an injury or disease, in the adult central nervous system. Thus, it is important to evaluate the dynamic interplay between ECM and the concentration gradients of these cues, which would elicit robust neuritogenesis. Such information is critical in understanding the processes involved in developmental biology, and in developing high-fidelity neurite regenerative strategies post-injury, and in drug discovery and targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we quantitatively investigated this relationship using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, and determined the synergistic role of guidance cues and ECM on neurite outgrowth and turning. Using a biomimetic microfluidic system, we have shown that cortical neurite outgrowth and turning under chemogradients (IGF-1 or BDNF) within 3D scaffolds is highly regulated by the source concentration of the guidance cue and the physical characteristics of the scaffold. A mechanistic-driven partial differential equation model of neurite outgrowth has been proposed, which could also be used prospectively as a predictive tool. The parameters for the chemotaxis term in the model are determined from the experimental data using our microfluidic assay. Resulting model simulations demonstrate how neurite outgrowth was critically influenced by the experimental variables, which was further supported by experimental data on cell-surface-receptor expressions. The model results are in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. This integrated approach represents a

  7. Solo/Trio8, a Membrane-Associated Short Isoform of Trio, Modulates Endosome Dynamics and Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying-Jie; Nishikawa, Kaori; Yuda, Hideki; Wang, Yu-Lai; Osaka, Hitoshi; Fukazawa, Nobuna; Naito, Akira; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Wada, Keiji; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2006-01-01

    With DNA microarrays, we identified a gene, termed Solo, that is downregulated in the cerebellum of Purkinje cell degeneration mutant mice. Solo is a mouse homologue of rat Trio8—one of multiple Trio isoforms recently identified in rat brain. Solo/Trio8 contains N-terminal sec14-like and spectrin-like repeat domains followed by a single guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) domain, but it lacks the C-terminal GEF2, immunoglobulin-like, and kinase domains that are typical of Trio. Solo/Trio8 is predominantly expressed in Purkinje neurons of the mouse brain, and expression begins following birth and increases during Purkinje neuron maturation. We identified a novel C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain in Solo/Trio8 that is required for enhanced green fluorescent protein-Solo/Trio8 localization to early endosomes (positive for both early-endosome antigen 1 [EEA1] and Rab5) in COS-7 cells and primary cultured neurons. Solo/Trio8 overexpression in COS-7 cells augmented the EEA1-positive early-endosome pool, and this effect was abolished via mutation and inactivation of the GEF domain or deletion of the C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain. Moreover, primary cultured neurons transfected with Solo/Trio8 showed increased neurite elongation that was dependent on these domains. These results suggest that Solo/Trio8 acts as an early-endosome-specific upstream activator of Rho family GTPases for neurite elongation of developing Purkinje neurons. PMID:16943433

  8. Solo/Trio8, a membrane-associated short isoform of Trio, modulates endosome dynamics and neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Jie; Nishikawa, Kaori; Yuda, Hideki; Wang, Yu-Lai; Osaka, Hitoshi; Fukazawa, Nobuna; Naito, Akira; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Wada, Keiji; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2006-09-01

    With DNA microarrays, we identified a gene, termed Solo, that is downregulated in the cerebellum of Purkinje cell degeneration mutant mice. Solo is a mouse homologue of rat Trio8-one of multiple Trio isoforms recently identified in rat brain. Solo/Trio8 contains N-terminal sec14-like and spectrin-like repeat domains followed by a single guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) domain, but it lacks the C-terminal GEF2, immunoglobulin-like, and kinase domains that are typical of Trio. Solo/Trio8 is predominantly expressed in Purkinje neurons of the mouse brain, and expression begins following birth and increases during Purkinje neuron maturation. We identified a novel C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain in Solo/Trio8 that is required for enhanced green fluorescent protein-Solo/Trio8 localization to early endosomes (positive for both early-endosome antigen 1 [EEA1] and Rab5) in COS-7 cells and primary cultured neurons. Solo/Trio8 overexpression in COS-7 cells augmented the EEA1-positive early-endosome pool, and this effect was abolished via mutation and inactivation of the GEF domain or deletion of the C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain. Moreover, primary cultured neurons transfected with Solo/Trio8 showed increased neurite elongation that was dependent on these domains. These results suggest that Solo/Trio8 acts as an early-endosome-specific upstream activator of Rho family GTPases for neurite elongation of developing Purkinje neurons.

  9. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-11-15

    There is a need for rapid, efficient and cost-effective alternatives to traditional in vivo developmental neurotoxicity testing. In vitro cell culture models can recapitulate many of the key cellular processes of nervous system development, including neurite outgrowth, and may be used as screening tools to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants. The present study compared primary rat cortical cultures and human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cultures in terms of: 1) reproducibility of high content image analysis based neurite outgrowth measurements, 2) dynamic range of neurite outgrowth measurements and 3) sensitivity to chemicals which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. There was a large increase in neurite outgrowth between 2 and 24 h in both rat and human cultures. Image analysis data collected across multiple cultures demonstrated that neurite outgrowth measurements in rat cortical cultures were more reproducible and had higher dynamic range as compared to human neural cultures. Human neural cultures were more sensitive than rat cortical cultures to chemicals previously shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth. Parallel analysis of morphological (neurite count, neurite length) and cytotoxicity (neurons per field) measurements were used to detect selective effects on neurite outgrowth. All chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in rat cortical cultures did so at concentrations which did not concurrently affect the number of neurons per field, indicating selective effects on neurite outgrowth. In contrast, more than half the chemicals which inhibited neurite outgrowth in human neural cultures did so at concentrations which concurrently decreased the number of neurons per field, indicating that effects on neurite outgrowth were secondary to cytotoxicity. Overall, these data demonstrate that the culture models performed differently in terms of reproducibility, dynamic range and sensitivity to neurite outgrowth inhibitors. While human neural

  10. Memory dynamics under stress.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-06-19

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  11. Saccharin enhances neurite extension by regulating organization of the microtubules.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroo; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ishii, Toshiaki

    2013-11-06

    In the present study, we found that saccharin, an artificial calorie-free sweetener, promotes neurite extension in the cultured neuronal cells. The purposes of this study are to characterize the effect of saccharine on neurite extension and to determine how saccharin enhances neurite extension. The analyses were performed using mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Neurite extension was evaluated by counting the cells bearing neurites and measuring the length of neurites. Formation, severing and transportation of the microtubules were evaluated by immunostaining and western blotting analysis. Deprivation of glucose increased the number of N1E-115 cells bearing long processes. And the effect was inhibited by addition of glucose. Saccharin increased the number of these cells bearing long processes in a dose-dependent manner and total neurite length and longest neurite length in each cell. Saccharin also had a similar effect on NGF-treated PC12 cells. Saccharin increased the amount of the microtubules reconstructed after treatment with nocodazole, a disruptor of microtubules. The effect of saccharin on microtubule reconstruction was not influenced by dihydrocytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, indicating that saccharin enhances microtubule formation without requiring actin dynamics. In the cells treated with vinblastine, an inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, after microtubule reorganization, filamentous microtubules were observed more distantly from the centrosome in saccharin-treated cells, indicating that saccharin enhances microtubule severing and/or transportation. These results suggest that saccharin enhances neurite extension by promoting microtubule organization. © 2013.

  12. Serum-induced neurite retraction in CAD cells--involvement of an ATP-actin retractile system and the lack of microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Chesta, María E; Carbajal, Agustín; Arce, Carlos A; Bisig, Carlos G

    2014-11-01

    Cultured catecholamine-differentiated cells [which lack the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs): MAP1B, MAP2, Tau, STOP, and Doublecortin] proliferate in the presence of fetal bovine serum, and, in its absence, cease dividing and generate processes similar to the neurites of normal neurons. The reintroduction of serum induces neurite retraction, and proliferation resumes. The neurite retraction process in catecholamine-differentiated cells was partially characterized in this study. Microtubules in the cells were found to be in a highly dynamic state, and tubulin in the microtubules consisted primarily of the tyrosinated and deacetylated isotypes. Increased levels of acetylated or Δ2-tubulin (which are normally absent) did not prevent serum-induced neurite retraction. Treatment of differentiated cells with lysophosphatidic acid or adenosine deaminase induced neurite retraction. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase, ATP depletion and microfilament disruption each (individually) blocked serum-induced neurite retraction, suggesting that an ATP-dependent actomyosin system underlies the mechanism of neurite retraction. Nocodazole treatment induced neurite retraction, but this effect was blocked by pretreatment with the microtubule-stabilizing drug paclitaxel (Taxol). Paclitaxel did not prevent serum-induced or lysophosphatidic acid-induced retraction, suggesting that integrity of microtubules (despite their dynamic state) is necessary to maintain neurite elongation, and that paclitaxel-induced stabilization alone is not sufficient to resist the retraction force induced by serum. Transfection with green fluorescent protein-Tau conferred resistance to retraction caused by serum. We hypothesize that, in normal neurons (cultured or in vivo), MAPs are necessary not only to stabilize microtubules, but also to establish interactions with other cytoskeletal or membrane components to form a stable structure capable of resisting the retraction force.

  13. Drag force as a tool to test the active mechanical response of PC12 neurites.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Roberto; Melo, Francisco; Pullarkat, Pramod A

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the mechanical response of PC12 neurites subjected to a drag force imposed by a laminar flow perpendicular to the neurite axis. The curvature of the catenary shape acquired by an initially straight neurite under the action of the drag force provides information on both elongation and tension of the neurite. This method allows us to measure the rest tension and viscoelastic parameters of PC12 neurites and active behavior of neurites. Measurement of oscillations in the strain rate of neurites at constant flow rate provides insight on the response of molecular motors and additional support for the presence of a negative strain-rate sensitivity region in the global mechanical response of PC12 neurites. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A clinico-pathological study of primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Pannikar, V K; Arunthathi, S; Chacko, C J; Fritschi, E P

    1983-04-01

    Normally neural involvement in leprosy is an ascending neuritis from the nerve involvement in the dermal lesions. However, in some cases neural involvement is seen in the absence of any dermal lesions. In some of these pure neuritic cases, dermal lesions appear sometime later. It is, therefore, more appropriate to designate such cases as 'primary neuritic' cases. This study is aimed at diagnosing primary neuritic leprosy among patients presenting with only neuritic symptoms. An attempt is also made to classify primary neuritic leprosy on a clinical and histopathological basis. During the period 1979-80, 30 patients reported to the out patient department of Schieffelin Leprosy Research and Training Centre, Karigiri with complaints of neuritic origin. In addition to clinical examination and routine skin smears, investigations such as skin, nerve and nasal biopsies, nerve conduction velocity and lepromin testing were carried out where feasible. 17 of these patients were diagnosed as primary neuritic leprosy and in 7 patients other neurological conditions were diagnosed. The remaining 6 patients were kept under observation and have not shown evidence of leprosy during a two year period of following-up. It is interesting that 4 of the 17 primary neuritic cases developed patches during follow-up period of two years. In the final analysis 7 patients (41.2%) were classified into the lepromatous group and 10 patients (58.8%) in the non-lepromatous group (Table-6). This classification will have a bearing on duration of treatment and for their subsequent release from control.

  15. Mycolactone-mediated neurite degeneration and functional effects in cultured human and rat DRG neurons: Mechanisms underlying hypoalgesia in Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Anand, U; Sinisi, M; Fox, M; MacQuillan, A; Quick, T; Korchev, Y; Bountra, C; McCarthy, T; Anand, P

    2016-01-01

    Mycolactone is a polyketide toxin secreted by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, responsible for the extensive hypoalgesic skin lesions characteristic of patients with Buruli ulcer. A recent pre-clinical study proposed that mycolactone may produce analgesia via activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R). In contrast, AT2R antagonist EMA401 has shown analgesic efficacy in animal models and clinical trials for neuropathic pain. We therefore investigated the morphological and functional effects of mycolactone in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and the role of AT2R using EMA401. Primary sensory neurons were prepared from avulsed cervical human DRG and rat DRG; 24 h after plating, neurons were incubated for 24 to 96 h with synthetic mycolactone A/B, followed by immunostaining with antibodies to PGP9.5, Gap43, β tubulin, or Mitotracker dye staining. Acute functional effects were examined by measuring capsaicin responses with calcium imaging in DRG neuronal cultures treated with mycolactone. Morphological effects: Mycolactone-treated cultures showed dramatically reduced numbers of surviving neurons and non-neuronal cells, reduced Gap43 and β tubulin expression, degenerating neurites and reduced cell body diameter, compared with controls. Dose-related reduction of neurite length was observed in mycolactone-treated cultures. Mitochondria were distributed throughout the length of neurites and soma of control neurons, but clustered in the neurites and soma of mycolactone-treated neurons. Functional effects: Mycolactone-treated human and rat DRG neurons showed dose-related inhibition of capsaicin responses, which were reversed by calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-Methylxanthine, indicating involvement of cAMP/ATP reduction. The morphological and functional effects of mycolactone were not altered by Angiotensin II or AT2R antagonist EMA401. Mycolactone induces toxic effects in DRG

  16. Neurite outgrowth is driven by actin polymerization even in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jonathan X.; Efimova, Nadia; Svitkina, Tatyana M.

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerization is a universal mechanism to drive plasma membrane protrusion in motile cells. One apparent exception to this rule is continuing or even accelerated outgrowth of neuronal processes in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors. This fact, together with the key role of microtubule dynamics in neurite outgrowth, led to the concept that microtubules directly drive plasma membrane protrusion either in the course of polymerization or by motor-driven sliding. The possibility that unextinguished actin polymerization drives neurite outgrowth in the presence of actin drugs was not explored. We show that cultured hippocampal neurons treated with cytochalasin D or latrunculin B contained dense accumulations of branched actin filaments at ∼50% of neurite tips at all tested drug concentrations (1–10 μM). Actin polymerization is required for neurite outgrowth because only low concentrations of either inhibitor increased the length and/or number of neurites, whereas high concentrations inhibited neurite outgrowth. Of importance, neurites undergoing active elongation invariably contained a bright F-actin patch at the tip, whereas actin-depleted neurites never elongated, even though they still contained dynamic microtubules. Stabilization of microtubules by Taxol treatment did not stop elongation of cytochalasin–treated neurites. We conclude that actin polymerization is indispensable for neurite elongation. PMID:27682586

  17. Polyester with Pendent Acetylcholine-Mimicking Functionalities Promotes Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaofei; Jeffries, Eric; Gao, Jin; Sun, Lijie; You, Zhengwei; Wang, Yadong

    2016-04-20

    Successful regeneration of nerves can benefit from biomaterials that provide a supportive biochemical and mechanical environment while also degrading with controlled inflammation and minimal scar formation. Herein, we report a neuroactive polymer functionalized by covalent attachment of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (Ach). The polymer was readily synthesized in two steps from poly(sebacoyl diglyceride) (PSeD), which previously demonstrated biocompatibility and biodegradation in vivo. Distinct from prior acetylcholine-biomimetic polymers, PSeD-Ach contains both quaternary ammonium and free acetyl moieties, closely resembling native acetylcholine structure. The polymer structure was confirmed via (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Hydrophilicity, charge, and thermal properties of PSeD-Ach were determined by tensiometer, zetasizer, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. PC12 cells exhibited the greatest proliferation and neurite outgrowth on PSeD-Ach and laminin substrates, with no significant difference between these groups. PSeD-Ach yielded much longer neurite outgrowth than the control polymer containing ammonium but no the acetyl group, confirming the importance of the entire acetylcholine-like moiety. Furthermore, PSeD-Ach supports adhesion of primary rat dorsal root ganglions and subsequent neurite sprouting and extension. The sprouting rate is comparable to the best conditions from previous report. Our findings are significant in that they were obtained with acetylcholine-like functionalities in 100% repeating units, a condition shown to yield significant toxicity in prior publications. Moreover, PSeD-Ach exhibited favorable mechanical and degradation properties for nerve tissue engineering application. Humidified PSeD-Ach had an elastic modulus of 76.9 kPa, close to native neural tissue, and could well recover from cyclic dynamic compression. PSeD-Ach showed a gradual in

  18. Growth cone-like waves transport actin and promote axonogenesis and neurite branching

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C.; Pak, Chi W.; Shaw, Alisa E.; Bradke, Frank; Bamburg, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Axonogenesis involves a shift from uniform delivery of materials to all neurites to preferential delivery to the putative axon, supporting its more rapid extension. Waves, growth cone-like structures that propagate down the length of neurites, were shown previously to correlate with neurite growth in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Waves are similar to growth cones in their structure, composition and dynamics. Here, we report that waves form in all undifferentiated neurites, but occur more frequently in the future axon during initial neuronal polarization. Moreover, wave frequency and their impact on neurite growth are altered in neurons treated with stimuli that enhance axonogenesis. Coincident with wave arrival, growth cones enlarge and undergo a marked increase in dynamics. Through their engorgement of filopodia along the neurite shaft, waves can induce de novo neurite branching. Actin in waves maintains much of its cohesiveness during transport whereas actin in non-wave regions of the neurite rapidly diffuses as measured by live cell imaging of photoactivated GFP-actin and photoconversion of Dendra-actin. Thus, waves represent an alternative axonal transport mechanism for actin. Waves also occur in neurons in organotypic hippocampal slices where they propagate along neurites in the dentate gyrus and the CA regions and induce branching. Taken together, our results indicate that waves are physiologically relevant and contribute to axon growth and branching via the transport of actin and by increasing growth cone dynamics. PMID:19513994

  19. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Induces Neurite Retraction in Differentiated Neuroblastoma Cells via GSK-3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuanjie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Haijie; Kim, Seung-Hyuk; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor that exerts diverse biological effects, including rapid neurite retraction and cell migration. Alterations in cell morphology, including neurite retraction, in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease involve hyperphosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein tau. Since LPA has been shown to induce neurite retraction in various cultured neural cells and the detailed underlying molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated, we investigated whether LPA induced neurite retraction through taumediated signaling pathways in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. When Neuro2a cells differentiated with retinoic acid (RA) were exposed to LPA, cells exhibited neurite retraction in a time-dependent manner. The retraction of neurites was accompanied by the phosphorylation of tau. The LPA-induced neurite retraction and tau phosphorylation in differentiated Neuro2a cells were significantly abolished by the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor lithium chloride. Interestingly, the LPA-stimulated tau phosphorylation and neurite retraction were markedly prevented by the administration of H89, an inhibitor of both cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cyclic- AMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Transfection of the dominant-negative CREBs, K-CREB and ACREB, failed to prevent LPA-induced tau phosphorylation and neurite retraction in differentiated Neuro2a cells. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3β and PKA, rather than CREB, play important roles in tau phosphorylation and neurite retraction in LPA-stimulated differentiated Neuro2a cells. PMID:21499833

  1. Calcineurin-dependent cofilin activation and increased retrograde actin flow drive 5-HT-dependent neurite outgrowth in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Hyland, Callen; Van Goor, David; Forscher, Paul

    2012-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth in response to soluble growth factors often involves changes in intracellular Ca(2+); however, mechanistic roles for Ca(2+) in controlling the underlying dynamic cytoskeletal processes have remained enigmatic. Bag cell neurons exposed to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) respond with a threefold increase in neurite outgrowth rates. Outgrowth depends on phospholipase C (PLC) → inositol trisphosphate → Ca(2+) → calcineurin signaling and is accompanied by increased rates of retrograde actin network flow in the growth cone P domain. Calcineurin inhibitors had no effect on Ca(2+) release or basal levels of retrograde actin flow; however, they completely suppressed 5-HT-dependent outgrowth and F-actin flow acceleration. 5-HT treatments were accompanied by calcineurin-dependent increases in cofilin activity in the growth cone P domain. 5-HT effects were mimicked by direct activation of PLC, suggesting that increased actin network treadmilling may be a widespread mechanism for promoting neurite outgrowth in response to neurotrophic factors.

  2. Laminin receptors for neurite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, H.K.; Ogle, R.C.; Cannon, F.B.; Little, C.D.; Sweeney, T.M.; Luckenbill-Edds, L.

    1988-02-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein promotes both cell attachment and neurite outgrowth. Separate domains on laminin elicit these responses, suggesting that distinct receptors occur on the surface of cells. NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma cells rapidly extend long processes in the presence of laminin. The authors report here that /sup 125/I-labeled laminin specifically binds to these cells and to three membrane proteins of 67, 110, and 180 kDa. These proteins were isolated by affinity chromatography on laminin-Sepharose. The 67-kDa protein reacted with antibody to the previously characterized receptor for cell attachment to laminin. Antibodies to the 110-kDa and 180-kDa bands demonstrated that the 110-kDa protein was found in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in brain, whereas the 180-kDa protein was neural specific. Antibodies prepared against the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins inhibited neurite outgrowth induced by the neurite-promoting domain of laminin, whereas antibodies to the 67-kDa laminin receptor had no effect on neurite outgrowth. They conclude that neuronal cells have multiple cell-surface laminin receptors and that the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins are involved in neurite formation.

  3. Mechanisms of developmental neurite pruning

    PubMed Central

    Schuldiner, Oren; Yaron, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    The precise wiring of the nervous system is a combined outcome of progressive and regressive events during development. Axon guidance and synapse formation intertwined with cell death and neurite pruning sculpt the mature circuitry. It is now well recognized that pruning of dendrites and axons as means to refine neuronal networks, is a wide spread phenomena required for the normal development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Here we will review the arising principles of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurite pruning. We will discuss these principles in light of studies in multiple neuronal systems, and speculate on potential explanations for the emergence of neurite pruning as a mechanism to sculpt the nervous system. PMID:25213356

  4. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  5. Staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth through ROS generation in HN33 hippocampal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Min, J Y; Park, M H; Park, M K; Park, K W; Lee, N W; Kim, T; Kim, H J; Lee, D H

    2006-11-01

    Staurosporin, a specific inhibitor of PKC, is widely used in studies of signal transduction pathways. Previous studies have shown that staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that staurosporin induces neurite outgrowth in HN33 hippocampal cells. Two other PKC inhibitors, Go 6976 (specific for alpha- and beta-isoforms) and rotterlin (a selective inhibitor of PKC delta), have no neuritogenic effect. In addition, staurosporin specifically increases ROS generation. NAC, which inhibits the generation of ROS, suppresses the staurosporin-induced neurite outgrowth in HN33 cells. Further, H(2)O(2) causes neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results confirm a neuritogenic effect of staurosporin and point to ROS as the signal mediator of staurosporin-induced neurite outgrowth in HN33 hippocampal cells. Theme: Development and regeneration Topic: Neurotrophic factors: receptors and cellular mechanisms.

  6. Quercetin promotes neurite growth through enhancing intracellular cAMP level and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of quercetin on neurite growth in N1E-115 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Quercetin was evaluated for its effects on cell numbers of neurites, neurite length, intracellular cAMP content, and Gap-43 expression in N1E-115 cells in vitro by use of microscopy, LANCE(tm) cAMP 384 kit, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that quercetin could increase the neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on the numbers of cells. Quercetin significantly increased the expression of cellular cAMP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The Gap-43 expression was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, quercetin could promote neurite growth through increasing the intracellular cAMP level and Gap-43 expression.

  7. Intracellular calcium and cyclic nucleotide levels modulate neurite guidance by microtopographical substrate features.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Tuft, Bradley; Xu, Linjing; Polacco, Marc; Clarke, Joseph C; Guymon, C Allan; Hansen, Marlan R

    2016-08-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface features have emerged as potential tools to direct neurite growth into close proximity with next generation neural prosthesis electrodes. However, the signaling events underlying the ability of growth cones to respond to topographical features remain largely unknown. Accordingly, this study probes the influence of [Ca(2+) ]i and cyclic nucleotide levels on the ability of neurites from spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) to precisely track topographical micropatterns. Photopolymerization and photomasking were used to generate micropatterned methacrylate polymer substrates. Dissociated SGN cultures were plated on the micropatterned surfaces. Calcium influx and release from internal stores were manipulated by elevating extracellular K(+) , maintenance in calcium-free media, or bath application of various calcium channel blockers. Cyclic nucleotide activity was increased by application of cpt-cAMP or 8-Br-cGMP. Elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i by treatment of cultures with elevated potassium reduced neurite alignment to physical microfeatures. Maintenance of cultures in Ca(2+) -free medium or treatment with the non-selective voltage-gated calcium channel blocker cadmium or L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine did not signficantly alter SGN neurite alignment. By contrast, ryanodine or xestospongin C, which block release of internal calcium stores via ryanodine-sensitive channels or inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors respectively, each significantly decreased neurite alignment. Cpt-cAMP significantly reduced neurite alignment while 8-Br-cGMP significantly enhanced neurite alignment. Manipulation of [Ca(2+) ]i or cAMP levels significantly disrupts neurite guidance while elevation of cGMP levels increases neurite alignment. The results suggest intracellular signaling pathways similar to those recruited by chemotactic cues are involved in neurite guidance by topographical features. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2037

  8. Long-term neurite orientation on astrocyte monolayers aligned by microtopography.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Annette; Alekseeva, Tijna; Katechia, Kashyap; Robertson, Mary; Riehle, Mathis O; Barnett, Susan C

    2007-12-01

    After spinal cord injury neuronal connections are not easily re-established. Success has been hampered by the lack of orientation of neurites inside scar tissue and a lack of neurites crossing out of the site of injury. Oriented scaffolds in biodegradable polymers could be an excellent way to support both the orientation of neurites within the injury site as well as aiding their crossing out of the lesion. To establish the validity of using grooved micro-topography in polycaprolactone in combination with glia we have studied the long-term (3 weeks) orientation of neuronal cells on monolayers of astrocytes on the top of grooved topographies of various dimensions. We find that neurites are significantly aligned by groove/ridge type topographies which are "buried" under a monolayer of astrocytes for up to 3 weeks. This alignment is significantly lower than that of neurites growing directly on the topography, but these neurons do not survive on the poly-l-lysine coated polymer for more than a week. The alignment of neurites on the astrocyte layer to the underlying topography decreases over time, and with groove width. Topographies with 12.5 or 25 microm lateral dimension appear optimal for the long-term alignment and can support myelination. We have shown for the first time that micro-topography can act through an overlaid astrocyte layer and results in aligned neurites in long-term culture and that these can be myelinated by endogenous oligodendrocytes.

  9. Neurite dispersion: a new marker of multiple sclerosis spinal cord pathology?

    PubMed

    Grussu, Francesco; Schneider, Torben; Tur, Carmen; Yates, Richard L; Tachrount, Mohamed; Ianuş, Andrada; Yiannakas, Marios C; Newcombe, Jia; Zhang, Hui; Alexander, Daniel C; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M

    2017-09-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the multiple sclerosis spinal cord is limited by low specificity regarding the underlying pathological processes, and new MRI metrics assessing microscopic damage are required. We aim to show for the first time that neurite orientation dispersion (i.e., variability in axon/dendrite orientations) is a new biomarker that uncovers previously undetected layers of complexity of multiple sclerosis spinal cord pathology. Also, we validate against histology a clinically viable MRI technique for dispersion measurement (neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, NODDI), to demonstrate the strong potential of the new marker. We related quantitative metrics from histology and MRI in four post mortem spinal cord specimens (two controls; two progressive multiple sclerosis cases). The samples were scanned at high field, obtaining maps of neurite density and orientation dispersion from NODDI and routine diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices. Histological procedures provided markers of astrocyte, microglia, myelin and neurofilament density, as well as neurite dispersion. We report from both NODDI and histology a trend toward lower neurite dispersion in demyelinated lesions, indicative of reduced neurite architecture complexity. Also, we provide unequivocal evidence that NODDI-derived dispersion matches its histological counterpart (P < 0.001), while DTI metrics are less specific and influenced by several biophysical substrates. Neurite orientation dispersion detects a previously undescribed and potentially relevant layer of microstructural complexity of multiple sclerosis spinal cord pathology. Clinically feasible techniques such as NODDI may play a key role in clinical trial and practice settings, as they provide histologically meaningful dispersion indices.

  10. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpyak, O. G. Galyautdinov, Z. R. Kokorin, D. N.

    2016-01-15

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  11. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  12. Characterization of BASP1-mediated neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Korshunova, Irina; Caroni, Pico; Kolkova, Kateryna; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Walmod, Peter S

    2008-08-01

    The brain acid-soluble protein BASP1 (CAP-23, NAP-22) belongs to the family of growth-associated proteins, which also includes GAP-43, a protein recently shown to regulate neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, the effects of BASP1 overexpression were investigated in PC12E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. BASP1 overexpression stimulated neurite outgrowth in both cell types. The effects of BASP1 and trans-homophilic NCAM interactions were additive, and BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth was not inhibited by ectopic expression of cytoplasmic NCAM domains. Furthermore, inhibition of signaling via the fibroblast growth factor receptor, Src-family nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or GSK3beta, and expression of constructs of the cytoskeletal proteins spectrin and tau inhibited NCAM- but not BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth. Expression of BASP1 mutated at the serine-5 phosphorylation site stimulated neurite outgrowth to a degree comparable to that observed in response to overexpression of wild-type BASP1, whereas expression of BASP1 mutated at the myristoylation site at glycine-1 completely abrogated the stimulatory effects of the protein on neurite outgrowth. Finally, coexpression experiments with dominant negative and wild-type versions of GAP-43 and BASP1 demonstrated that the two proteins could substitute for each other with respect to induction of NCAM-independent neurite outgrowth, whereas BASP1 was unable to replace the stimulatory effect of GAP-43 on NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. These observations demonstrate that BASP1 and GAP-43 have overlapping, but not identical, functions in relation to neurite outgrowth and indicate that the main function of BASP1 is to regulate the organization and morphology of the plasma membrane.

  13. Nonlinear network dynamics under perturbations of the underlying graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Anca; Verduzco-Flores, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Many natural systems are organized as networks, in which the nodes (be they cells, individuals or populations) interact in a time-dependent fashion. The dynamic behavior of these networks depends on how these nodes are connected, which can be understood in terms of an adjacency matrix and connection strengths. The object of our study is to relate connectivity to temporal behavior in networks of coupled nonlinear oscillators. We investigate the relationship between classes of system architectures and classes of their possible dynamics, when the nodes are coupled according to a connectivity scheme that obeys certain constrains, but also incorporates random aspects. We illustrate how the phase space dynamics and bifurcations of the system change when perturbing the underlying adjacency graph. We differentiate between the effects on dynamics of the following operations that directly modulate network connectivity: (1) increasing/decreasing edge weights, (2) increasing/decreasing edge density, (3) altering edge configuration by adding, deleting, or moving edges. We discuss the significance of our results in the context of real life networks. Some interpretations lead us to draw conclusions that may apply to brain networks, synaptic restructuring, and neural dynamics.

  14. Dynamical aspects of behavior generation under constraints

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Derek; Achunala, Srinivas

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic adaptation is a key feature of brains helping to maintain the quality of their performance in the face of increasingly difficult constraints. How to achieve high-quality performance under demanding real-time conditions is an important question in the study of cognitive behaviors. Animals and humans are embedded in and constrained by their environments. Our goal is to improve the understanding of the dynamics of the interacting brain–environment system by studying human behaviors when completing constrained tasks and by modeling the observed behavior. In this article we present results of experiments with humans performing tasks on the computer under variable time and resource constraints. We compare various models of behavior generation in order to describe the observed human performance. Finally we speculate on mechanisms how chaotic neurodynamics can contribute to the generation of flexible human behaviors under constraints. PMID:19003514

  15. Tension and compression in the cytoskeleton of PC-12 neurites. II: Quantitative measurements

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We assessed the mechanical properties of PC-12 neurites by applying a force with calibrated glass needles and measured resulting changes in neurite length and deflection of the needle. We observed a linear relationship between force and length change that was not affected by multiple distensions and were thus able to determine neurite spring constants and initial, nondistended, rest tensions. 81 out of 82 neurites showed positive rest tensions ranging over three orders of magnitude with most values clustering around 30-40 mu dynes. Treatment with cytochalasin D significantly reduced neurite rest tensions to an average compression equal to 14% of the former tension and spring constants to an average of 17% of resting values. Treatment with nocodazole increased neurite rest tensions to an average of 282% of resting values but produced no change in spring constant. These observations suggest a particular type of complementary force interaction underlying axonal shape; the neurite actin network under tension and neurite microtubules under compression. Thermodynamics suggests that microtubule (MT) assembly may be regulated by changes in compressive load. We tested this effect by releasing neurite attachment to a polylysine-coated surface with polyaspartate, thus shifting external compressive support onto internal elements, and measuring the relative change in MT polymerization using quantitative Western blotting. Neurons grown on polylysine or collagen without further treatment had a 1:2 ratio of soluble to polymerized tubulin. When neurites grown on polylysine were treated with 1% polyaspartate for 15- 30 min, 80% of neurites retracted, shifting the soluble: polymerized tubulin ratio to 1:1. Polyaspartate treatment of cells grown on collagen, or grown on polylysine but treated with cytochalasin to reduce tension, caused neither retraction nor a change in the soluble:polymerized tubulin ratio. We suggest that the release of adhesion to the dish shifted the compressive

  16. Wave Journal Bearings Under Dynamic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Dimofte, Florin

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of the wave journal bearing was determined by running a three-wave bearing with an eccentrically mounted shaft. A transient analysis was developed and used to predict numerical data for the experimental cases. The three-wave journal bearing ran stably under dynamic loads with orbits well inside the bearing clearance. The orbits were almost circular and nearly free of the influence of, but dynamically dependent on, bearing wave shape. Experimental observations for both the absolute bearing-housing-center orbits and the relative bearing-housing-center-to-shaft-center orbits agreed well with the predictions. Moreover, the subsynchronous whirl motion generated by the fluid film was found experimentally and predicted theoretically for certain speeds.

  17. Dynamic ionization of water under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Goldman, N; Fried, L E; Crowhurst, J C; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J; Zaug, J M

    2004-07-19

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study fluid water at approximately 1000 K and 2 to 60 GPa in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. First principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have also been employed to simulate water under similar conditions. The experimental Raman intensity of the O-H stretch mode was observed to decrease with pressure, and beyond 50 GPa this mode was no longer visible. At approximately the same pressure we inferred a change in the slope of the melting curve. Consistent with these experimental observations, the MD simulations show that water under these conditions forms a dynamically ionized liquid state, which is dominated by very short lived (<10 fs) H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}O{sup +} and O{sup 2-} species.

  18. Dynamics of DNA molecules under gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaka, Tadao, Adachi, Shiro; Shikata, Toshiyuki

    1993-12-31

    Electrophoretic mobilities {mu} of double stranded linear DNAs were examined in agarose gels subjected to a biased sinusoidal field (BSF) that utilizes a sinusoidal field of strength E{sub s} and frequency f superposed on a steady bias field of strength E{sub b}. Under BSF with E{sub s} {much_gt} E{sub b}. DNA fragments with the size M > 20 kbp exhibited peculiar behavior which the authors called a pin down phenomenon in that the {mu} shows a minimum {mu}{sub p} at a particular f{sub p} (pin down frequency) specific to M, C{sub gel} and the field strengths. The dynamics of DNA molecules under such pin-down conditions were examined by direct observation via fluorescence microscopy as well as dynamic electric birefringence.

  19. Dynamics of droplet motion under electrowetting actuation.

    PubMed

    Annapragada, S Ravi; Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V; Murthy, Jayathi Y

    2011-07-05

    The static shape of droplets under electrowetting actuation is well understood. The steady-state shape of the droplet is obtained on the basis of the balance of surface tension and electrowetting forces, and the change in the apparent contact angle is well characterized by the Young-Lippmann equation. However, the transient droplet shape behavior when a voltage is suddenly applied across a droplet has received less attention. Additional dynamic frictional forces are at play during this transient process. We present a model to predict this transient behavior of the droplet shape under electrowetting actuation. The droplet shape is modeled using the volume of fluid method. The electrowetting and dynamic frictional forces are included as an effective dynamic contact angle through a force balance at the contact line. The model is used to predict the transient behavior of water droplets on smooth hydrophobic surfaces under electrowetting actuation. The predictions of the transient behavior of droplet shape and contact radius are in excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The internal fluid motion is explained, and the droplet motion is shown to initiate from the contact line. An approximate mathematical model is also developed to understand the physics of the droplet motion and to describe the overall droplet motion and the contact line velocities.

  20. RNA localization is a key determinant of neurite-enriched proteome.

    PubMed

    Zappulo, Alessandra; van den Bruck, David; Ciolli Mattioli, Camilla; Franke, Vedran; Imami, Koshi; McShane, Erik; Moreno-Estelles, Mireia; Calviello, Lorenzo; Filipchyk, Andrei; Peguero-Sanchez, Esteban; Müller, Thomas; Woehler, Andrew; Birchmeier, Carmen; Merino, Enrique; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Ohler, Uwe; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Selbach, Matthias; Akalin, Altuna; Chekulaeva, Marina

    2017-09-19

    Protein subcellular localization is fundamental to the establishment of the body axis, cell migration, synaptic plasticity, and a vast range of other biological processes. Protein localization occurs through three mechanisms: protein transport, mRNA localization, and local translation. However, the relative contribution of each process to neuronal polarity remains unknown. Using neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells, we analyze protein and RNA expression and translation rates in isolated cell bodies and neurites genome-wide. We quantify 7323 proteins and the entire transcriptome, and identify hundreds of neurite-localized proteins and locally translated mRNAs. Our results demonstrate that mRNA localization is the primary mechanism for protein localization in neurites that may account for half of the neurite-localized proteome. Moreover, we identify multiple neurite-targeted non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins with potential regulatory roles. These results provide further insight into the mechanisms underlying the establishment of neuronal polarity.Subcellular localization of RNAs and proteins is important for polarized cells such as neurons. Here the authors differentiate mouse embryonic stem cells into neurons, and analyze the local transcriptome, proteome, and translated transcriptome in their cell bodies and neurites, providing a unique resource for future studies on neuronal polarity.

  1. Sonic hedgehog stimulates neurite outgrowth in a mechanical stretch model of reactive-astrogliosis.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Antonio; Gowing, Emma K; Jasoni, Christine L; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2016-02-23

    Although recovery following a stroke is limited, undamaged neurons under the right conditions can establish new connections and take on-board lost functions. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is integral for developmental axon growth, but its role after injury has not been fully examined. To investigate the effects of Shh on neuronal sprouting after injury, we used an in vitro model of glial scar, whereby cortical astrocytes were mechanically traumatized to mimic reactive astrogliosis observed after stroke. This mechanical trauma impaired neurite outgrowth from post-natal cortical neurons plated on top of reactive astrocytes. Addition of Shh to the media, however, resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth. This response was inhibited by cyclopamine and activated by oxysterol 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol, both of which modulate the activity of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), demonstrating that Shh-mediated neurite outgrowth is Smo-dependent. In addition, neurite outgrowth was not associated with an increase in Gli-1 transcription, but could be inhibited by PP2, a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases. These results demonstrate that neurons exposed to the neurite growth inhibitory environment associated with a glial scar can be stimulated by Shh, with signaling occurring through a non-canonical pathway, to overcome this suppression and stimulate neurite outgrowth.

  2. Self-aligned Schwann cell monolayers demonstrate an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggio, A. M.; Narayanaswamy, A.; Roysam, B.; Thompson, D. M.

    2010-08-01

    In vivo nerve guidance channel studies have identified Schwann cell (SC) presence as an integral factor in axonal number and extension in an injury site, and in vitro studies have provided evidence that oriented SCs can direct neurite outgrowth. However, traditional methods used to create oriented SC monolayers (e.g. micropatterns/microtopography) potentially introduce secondary guidance cues to the neurons that are difficult to de-couple. Although SCs expanded on uniform laminin-coated coverslips lack a global orientation, the monolayers contain naturally formed regions of locally oriented cells that can be used to investigate SC-mediated neurite guidance. In this work, novel image analysis techniques have been developed to quantitatively assess local neurite orientation with respect to the underlying regional orientation of the Schwann cell monolayer. Results confirm that, in the absence of any secondary guidance cues, a positive correlation exists between neurite outgrowth and regional orientation of the SC monolayer. Thus, SCs alone possess an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth, and expansion of the co-culture-based quantitative method described can be used to further deconstruct specific biomolecular mechanisms of neurite guidance.

  3. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  4. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  5. Chromatin Fiber Dynamics under Tension and Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Christophe; Victor, Jean-Marc; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information in eukaryotic cells is carried on chromosomes, basically consisting of large compact supercoiled chromatin fibers. Micromanipulations have recently led to great advances in the knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of DNA transaction events by nucleosome and chromatin structural changes. Indeed, magnetic and optical tweezers have allowed opportunities to handle single nucleosomal particles or nucleosomal arrays and measure their response to forces and torques, mimicking the molecular constraints imposed in vivo by various molecular motors acting on the DNA. These challenging technical approaches provide us with deeper understanding of the way chromatin dynamically packages our genome and participates in the regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:20480035

  6. Relativistic Newtonian Dynamics under a central force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov

    2016-10-01

    Planck's formula and General Relativity indicate that potential energy influences spacetime. Using Einstein's Equivalence Principle and an extension of his Clock Hypothesis, an explicit description of this influence is derived. We present a new relativity model by incorporating the influence of the potential energy on spacetime in Newton's dynamics for motion under a central force. This model extends the model used by Friedman and Steiner (EPL, 113 (2016) 39001) to obtain the exact precession of Mercury without curving spacetime. We also present a solution of this model for a hydrogen-like atom, which explains the reason for a probabilistic description.

  7. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients’ neurons

    PubMed Central

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W.; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H.; Winner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients. PMID:24381312

  8. Gene dosage-dependent rescue of HSP neurite defects in SPG4 patients' neurons.

    PubMed

    Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Mishra, Himanshu K; Prots, Iryna; Eberhardt, Esther; Denguir, Naime; Wend, Holger; Plötz, Sonja; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C N; Aigner, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Groemer, Teja W; Hehr, Ute; Lampert, Angelika; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H; Winner, Beate

    2014-05-15

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of motorneuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and paresis of the lower limbs. Mutations in Spastic Gait 4 (SPG4), encoding spastin, are the most frequent cause of HSP. To understand how mutations in SPG4 affect human neurons, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fibroblasts of two patients carrying a c.1684C>T nonsense mutation and from two controls. These SPG4 and control hiPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons and glia at comparable efficiency. All known spastin isoforms were reduced in SPG4 neuronal cells. The complexity of SPG4 neurites was decreased, which was paralleled by an imbalance of axonal transport with less retrograde movement. Prominent neurite swellings with disrupted microtubules were present in SPG4 neurons at an ultrastructural level. While some of these swellings contain acetylated and detyrosinated tubulin, these tubulin modifications were unchanged in total cell lysates of SPG4 neurons. Upregulation of another microtubule-severing protein, p60 katanin, may partially compensate for microtubuli dynamics in SPG4 neurons. Overexpression of the M1 or M87 spastin isoforms restored neurite length, branching, numbers of primary neurites and reduced swellings in SPG4 neuronal cells. We conclude that neurite complexity and maintenance in HSP patient-derived neurons are critically sensitive to spastin gene dosage. Our data show that elevation of single spastin isoform levels is sufficient to restore neurite complexity and reduce neurite swellings in patient cells. Furthermore, our human model offers an ideal platform for pharmacological screenings with the goal to restore physiological spastin levels in SPG4 patients.

  9. Aroma release from wines under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maroussa; Linforth, Robert S T; Taylor, Andrew J

    2009-08-12

    Aroma release from wines and model ethanolic solutions during dynamic headspace dilution was measured in real time using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Model ethanolic solutions maintained the headspace concentration of volatile compounds close to equilibrium values during gas phase dilution over 10 min. Wine samples (with the same ethanol content) did not maintain the headspace concentration of volatiles to the same extent. Wine components and acidity ((+)-catechin, glycerol; pH 3.6) in model ethanolic solutions (120 mL/L) had no effect on the volatile headspace concentration during dynamic headspace dilution. However, in the presence of certain proteins (beta-lactoglobulin, beta-casein, bovine serum albumin), the model ethanolic solutions failed to maintain their volatile headspace concentration upon headspace dilution, but other proteins (thaumatin, mucin, lysozyme) had no effect. Thermal imaging of the model ethanolic samples (with and without beta-casein) under dynamic headspace dilution conditions showed differences in surface temperatures. This observation suggested perturbation of the ethanol monolayer at the air-liquid interface and disruption of the Marangoni effect, which causes bulk convection within ethanolic solutions. Convection carries volatile compounds and warm liquid from the bulk phase to the air-liquid interface, thus replenishing the interfacial concentration and maintaining the gas phase concentration and interfacial surface temperature during headspace dilution. It is postulated that certain proteins may exert a similar effect in wine.

  10. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  11. Applied electric field enhances DRG neurite growth: influence of stimulation media, surface coating and growth supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Matthew D.; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2009-08-01

    Electrical therapies have been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. This enhanced neural growth existed even after the electric field (EF) or stimulation was removed, but the factors that may influence the enhanced growth, such as stimulation media or surface coating, have not been fully investigated. This study characterized neurite outgrowth and branching under various conditions: EF magnitude and application time, ECM surface coating, medium during EF application and growth supplements. A uniform, low-magnitude EF (24 or 44 V m-1) was applied to dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglia seeded on collagen or laminin-coated surfaces. During the growth period, cells were either exposed to NGF or N2, and during stimulation cells were exposed to either unsupplemented media (Ca2+) or PBS (no Ca2+). Parallel controls for each experiment included cells exposed to the chamber with no stimulation and cells remaining outside the chamber. After brief electrical stimulation (10 min), neurite length significantly increased 24 h after application for all conditions studied. Of particular interest, increased stimulation time (10-100 min) further enhanced neurite length on laminin but not on collagen surfaces. Neurite branching was not affected by stimulation on any surface, and no preferential growth of neurites was noted after stimulation. Overall, the results of this report suggest that short-duration electric stimulation is sufficient to enhance neurite length under a variety of conditions. While further data are needed to fully elucidate a mechanism for this increased growth, these data suggest that one focus of those investigations should be the interaction between the growth cone and the substrata.

  12. Modeling cell dynamics under mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Tullio Antonio; Balduzzo, Maurizio; Milone, Francesco Ferro; Nofrate, Valentina

    2007-04-01

    Perturbations by pulse-modulated microwave radiation from GSM mobile phones on neuron cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying activation of brain states and electroencephalographic epiphenomena. As the employ of UMTS phones seems to reveal other symptoms, a unified phenomenological framework is needed. In order to explain possible effects of mobile phone radiation on cell oscillations, GSM and UMTS low-frequency envelopes have been detected, recorded and used as input in cell models. Dynamical systems endowed with contiguous regular and chaotic regimes suitable to produce stochastic resonance can both account for the perturbation of the neuro-electrical activity and even for the low intensity of the signal perceived by high sensitive subjects. Neuron models of this kind can be employed as a reductionist hint for the mentioned phenomenology. The Hindmarsh-Rose model exhibits frequency enhancement and regularization phenomena induced by weak GSM and UMTS. More realistic simulations of cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been performed with the help of an adaptation of the Chay-Keizer dynamical system. This scheme can explain the suspected subjective sensitivity to mobile phone signals under the thermal threshold, in terms of cell calcium regularity mechanisms. Concerning the two kinds of emission, the stronger occupation of the ELF band of last generation UMTS phones is compensated by lower power emitted.

  13. Collapse dynamics of bubble raft under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alexander; Dennin, Michael; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Irvine Collaboration; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report on the collapse of bubble rafts under compression in a closed rectangular geometry. A bubble raft is a single layer of bubbles at the air-water interface. A collapse event occurs when bubbles submerge beneath the neighboring bubbles under applied compression causing the structure of the bubble raft to go from single-layer to multi-layer. We studied the collapse dynamics as a function of compression velocity. At higher compression velocity we observe a more uniform distribution of collapse events, whereas at lower compression velocities, the collapse events accumulate at the system boundaries. We will present results that compare the distribution of collapse probability in the experiments to simulations based on a one-dimensional Ising model with elastic coupling between spin elements. Both the experimental system and simulations are excellent models for collapse in a number of complex systems. By comparing the two systems, we can tune the simulation to better understand the role of the Ising and elastic couplings in determining the collapse dynamics. We acknowledge DMR-1309402.

  14. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  15. Synergistic effects of cyclic AMP and nerve growth factor on neurite outgrowth and microtubule stability of PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The outgrowth of neurites from rat PC12 cells stimulated by combined treatment of nerve growth factor (NGF) with cAMP is significantly more rapid and extensive than the outgrowth induced by either factor alone. We have compared the responses of PC12 cells under three different growth conditions, NGF alone, cAMP alone, and combined treatment, with respect to surface morphology, rapidity of neurite outgrowth, and stability of neurite microtubules, to understand the synergistic action of NGF and cAMP on PC12. Surface events at early times in these growth conditions varied, suggesting divergent pathways of action of NGF and cAMP. This suggestion is strongly supported by the finding that cells exposed to saturating levels of dibutyryl cAMP without substantial neurite outgrowth initiated neurites within 5 min of NGF. This response has been adopted as a convenient assay for NGF. Neurites that regenerated in the three growth conditions showed marked differences in stability to treatments that depolymerize microtubules. The results indicate that microtubules in cells treated with both NGF and cAMP are significantly more stable than in either growth factor alone. We suggest that a shift of the assembly equilibrium favoring tubulin assembly is a necessary prerequisite for the initiation of neurites by PC12. PMID:2982887

  16. Dynamic Strength of Tantalum under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glam, Benny; Werdiger, Meir; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2013-06-01

    Plane impact experiments of double shock and shock-rarefaction in Tantalum were carried out in a gas gun. VISAR diagnostics has been implemented to measure the particle velocity and the free surface velocity. The VISAR information was utilized to study the dynamic strength of Tantalum under compression and tension. The pressure in the experiments was below 35 GPa. In this pressure range the dominant mechanism is expected to be dislocation motion. A 1-d hydrodynamic code was used in order to match various strength models. As expected, both the Johnson-Cook and the Guinan-Steinberg models do not reproduce the experimental results. Therefore in this paper we compare the Zerilli-Armstrong model which has been recently calibrated at strain rate of 6 x 103 s-1 using the split Kowalsky-Hopkinson bar to our experimental results at strain rate of 106 s-1.

  17. Reliability of dynamic systems under limited information.

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Richard V., Jr.; Grigoriu, Mircea

    2006-09-01

    A method is developed for reliability analysis of dynamic systems under limited information. The available information includes one or more samples of the system output; any known information on features of the output can be used if available. The method is based on the theory of non-Gaussian translation processes and is shown to be particularly suitable for problems of practical interest. For illustration, we apply the proposed method to a series of simple example problems and compare with results given by traditional statistical estimators in order to establish the accuracy of the method. It is demonstrated that the method delivers accurate results for the case of linear and nonlinear dynamic systems, and can be applied to analyze experimental data and/or mathematical model outputs. Two complex applications of direct interest to Sandia are also considered. First, we apply the proposed method to assess design reliability of a MEMS inertial switch. Second, we consider re-entry body (RB) component vibration response during normal re-entry, where the objective is to estimate the time-dependent probability of component failure. This last application is directly relevant to re-entry random vibration analysis at Sandia, and may provide insights on test-based and/or model-based qualification of weapon components for random vibration environments.

  18. Polymer Statics and Dynamics Under Box Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, Joshua; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2007-03-01

    Current work on biological systems and glass forming polymers (JCP 106, 6176 (1997)) has led to an interest in the study of single polymer systems. The main questions concern relaxation phenomena and the shape adopted by single polymers under hard and soft boundaries. We are concerned with whether or not there is a critical length scale for a confined polymer system. Both structure and relaxation can be described using scaling arguments and tested with Monte Carlo simulations using the bond-fluctuation algorithm (Macromolecules 21,2819 (1988)), which uses a lattice representation of the polymer chain with excluded volume effects. We look at the effects of confinement on a single polymer chain confined to a box by measuring dynamical quantities such as the end-to-end vector and single monomer positions (JACS 124, 20 (2004)). A primary question is how spatial correlations between monomers, `blob's, influence the dynamics. Understanding how these quantities change with various confining geometries will lead to a deeper understanding of biological structures and glass formation. Work supported by NSF-DMR 0403997.

  19. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J. N.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  20. Acetylcholinesterase modulates neurite outgrowth on fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Giordano, C; Poiana, G; Augusti-Tocco, G; Biagioni, S

    2007-05-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been reported to be involved in the modulation of neurite outgrowth. To understand the role played by different domains, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with three constructs containing the invariant region of AChE, differing in the exon encoding the C-terminus and therefore in AChE cellular fate and localization. All isoforms increased neurite extension, suggesting the involvement of the invariant domain [A. De Jaco, G. Augusti-Tocco, S. Biagioni, Alternative AChE molecular forms exhibit similar ability to induce neurite outgrowth, J. Neurosci. Res. 70 (2002) 756-765]. The peripheral anionic site (PAS) is encoded by invariant exons and represents the domain involved in non-cholinergic functions of AChE. Masking of PAS with fasciculin results in a significant decrease of neurite outgrowth in all clones overexpressing AChE. A strong reduction was also observed when clones were cultured on fibronectin. Treatment of clones with fasciculin, therefore masking PAS, abolished the fibronectin-induced reduction. The inhibition of the catalytic site cannot revert the fibronectin effect. Finally, when clones were cultured on fibronectin in the presence of heparin, a ligand of fibronectin, the inhibitory effect was completely reversed. Our results indicate that PAS could directly or indirectly mediate AChE/fibronectin interactions.

  1. Differential intensity-dependent effects of magnetic stimulation on the longest neurites and shorter dendrites in neuroscreen-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. Approach. To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over the pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled via machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (∼5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (∼95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for three days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Main results. We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in bolstering longest neurite outgrowth, best seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. Significance. These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating its use into potential therapeutic strategies.

  2. NIF (neurite-inducing factor): a novel peptide inducing neurite formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A

    1986-01-01

    Neurite-inducing factor (NIF) is a novel protein that has been partially purified from mouse submaxillary glands. NIF induces neurite formation in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and the NIF-induced neurites are indistinguishable from NGF-induced neurites in both their morphology and the time course of their formation. Neurite-inducing activity can be recovered at a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 20,000 Da after fractionation of partially purified preparations via SDS-PAGE. Partially purified preparations of NIF are about half as potent as pure beta NGF, and since the neurite-inducing activity does not correspond to any of the major proteins in this fraction, specific activity of purified NIF will probably be significantly greater than the 60 ng/ml found for our partially purified material. NIF is distinct from beta NGF by four criteria: (1) antibodies to beta NGF can block the activity of beta NGF, but not the activity of NIF; (2) beta NGF can induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in PC12 cells at concentrations significantly below those required to induce neurites, while NIF induces ODC only at concentrations greatly in excess of those required to induce neurite formation; (3) by the criterion of SDS-PAGE, there is insufficient beta NGF in our partially purified preparations of NIF to explain the biological activity of this fraction; and (4) the biological activity of NIF has a molecular weight (20,000 Da) that is distinct from beta NGF (13,000 Da). We conclude that NIF is probably a novel peptide that is very active in promoting morphological differentiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Nanostructured Polyaniline Coating on ITO Glass Promotes the Neurite Outgrowth of PC 12 Cells by Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Huang, Qianwei; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2015-11-10

    A conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI) with nanostructure was synthesized on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass. The effect of electrical stimulation on the proliferation and the length of neurites of PC 12 cells was investigated. The dynamic protein adsorption on PANI and ITO surfaces in a cell culture medium was also compared with and without electrical stimulation. The adsorbed proteins were characterized using SDS-PAGE. A PANI coating on ITO surface was shown with 30-50 nm spherical nanostructure. The number of PC 12 cells was significantly greater on the PANI/ITO surface than on ITO and plate surfaces after cell seeding for 24 and 36 h. This result confirmed that the PANI coating is nontoxic to PC 12 cells. The electrical stimulation for 1, 2, and 4 h significantly enhanced the cell numbers for both PANI and ITO conducting surfaces. Moreover, the application of electrical stimulation also improved the neurite outgrowth of PC 12 cells, and the number of PC 12 cells with longer neurite lengths increased obviously under electrical stimulation for the PANI surface. From the mechanism, the adsorption of DMEM proteins was found to be enhanced by electrical stimulation for both PANI/ITO and ITO surfaces. A new band 2 (around 37 kDa) was observed from the collected adsorbed proteins when PC 12 cells were cultured on these surfaces, and culturing PC 12 cells also seemed to increase the amount of band 1 (around 90 kDa). When immersing PANI/ITO and ITO surfaces in a DMEM medium without a cell culture, the number of band 3 (around 70 kDa) and band 4 (around 45 kDa) proteins decreased compared to that of PC 12 cell cultured surfaces. These results are valuable for the design and improvement of the material performance for neural regeneration.

  4. Neurite outgrowth inhibitors in gliotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, M

    1999-01-01

    Gliotic tissue is the major obstacle to axon regeneration after CNS injury. We designed tissue culture assays to search for molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth inhibition in gliotic tissue. All the inhibitory activity in injured brain tissue was located in a plasma membrane heparan-sulphate and condroitin-sulphate type-proteoglycan of apparent molecular weight 200 kDalton. The proteoglycan core protein (apparent MW 48,000 kD) was biologically inactive, whereas the glycosamine-glycan (GAG) chains accounted for the inhibitory activity. Because of its cell location and mode of induction, the inhibitor was called injured membrane proteoglycan, IMP. IMP prevented neurite outgrowth initiation when attached to the culture substrate and caused growth cone collapse when added in solution to neurons with already growing neurites. We concluded that IMP was responsible for preventing injured CNS fibre regeneration. Double-staining immunohistochemistry of normal and gliotic tissue with anti-IMP monoclonal antibodies together with glial and neuronal markers, permitted the unequivocal definition of inhibitor presenting cells by confocal microscopy. IMP-immunostaining in normal CNS was observed exclusively on neurons. However, after a lesion, immunostaining occurred primarily on intensely GFAP-positive reactive astrocytes, but not on OX-42 positive microglia. The availability of antibodies permitted rapid affinity-purification of the neurite inhibitor and comparison with similar molecules possibly expressed during development. IMP itself or a highly related form, was expressed in embryonic brain, reaching maximal expression around postnatal day 3 and decreasing strongly in normal adult tissue. Perinatal rat brain proteoglycans inhibited neurite outgrowth similarly, though not identically, to IMP. Our data suggest that perinatal membrane and injured membrane proteoglycans may differ in GAG composition. IMP-like immunoreactivity was also found in developing brain

  5. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  6. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial-neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, a most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. PMID:24342266

  7. Stochastic game dynamics under demographic fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weini; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-dependent selection and demographic fluctuations play important roles in evolutionary and ecological processes. Under frequency-dependent selection, the average fitness of the population may increase or decrease based on interactions between individuals within the population. This should be reflected in fluctuations of the population size even in constant environments. Here, we propose a stochastic model that naturally combines these two evolutionary ingredients by assuming frequency-dependent competition between different types in an individual-based model. In contrast to previous game theoretic models, the carrying capacity of the population, and thus the population size, is determined by pairwise competition of individuals mediated by evolutionary games and demographic stochasticity. In the limit of infinite population size, the averaged stochastic dynamics is captured by deterministic competitive Lotka–Volterra equations. In small populations, demographic stochasticity may instead lead to the extinction of the entire population. Because the population size is driven by fitness in evolutionary games, a population of cooperators is less prone to go extinct than a population of defectors, whereas in the usual systems of fixed size the population would thrive regardless of its average payoff. PMID:26150518

  8. Notch activation induces neurite remodeling and functional modifications in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara Anna; Uberti, Daniela; Napolitano, Francesco; Stante, Maria; Santoro, Federica; Minopoli, Giuseppina; Zambrano, Nicola; Russo, Tommaso; Memo, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    Notch proteins are definitely recognized as key regulators of the neuronal fate during embryo development, but their function in the adult brain is still largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that Notch pathway stimulation increases microtubules stability followed by the remodeling of neuronal morphology with neurite varicosities loss, thicker neuritis, and enlarged growth cones. Here we show that the neurite remodeling is a dynamic event, dependent on transcription and translation, and with functional implications. Exposure of differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to the Notch ligand Jagged1 induces varicosities loss all along the neurites, accompanied by the redistribution of presynaptic vesicles and the decrease in neurotransmitters release. As evaluated by time lapse digital imaging, dynamic changes in neurite morphology were rapidly reversible and dependent on the activation of the Notch signaling pathway. In fact, it was prevented by the inhibition of the proteolytic gamma-secretase enzyme or the transcription machinery, and was mimicked by the transfection of the intracellular domain of Notch. One hour after treatment with Jagged1, several genes were downregulated. Many of these genes encode proteins that are known to be involved in protein synthesis. These data suggest that in adult neurons, Notch pathway activates a transcriptional program that regulates the equilibrium between varicosities formation and varicosities loss in the neuronal presynaptic compartment involving the expression and redistribution of both structural and functional proteins.

  9. An algorithm for neurite outgrowth reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Christina M.; Pinezich, John D.; Lindquist, W. Brent; Vazquez, Marcelo E.

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical method which provides the ability to analyze digitized microscope images of retinal explants and quantify neurite outgrowth. Few parameters are required as input and limited user interaction is necessary to process an entire experiment of images. This eliminates fatigue related errors and user-related bias common to manual analysis. The method does not rely on stained images and handles images of variable quality. The algorithm is used to determine time and dose dependent, in vitro, neurotoxic effects of 1 GeV per nucleon iron particles in retinal explants. No neurotoxic effects are detected until 72 h after exposure; at 72 h, significant reductions of neurite outgrowth occurred at doses higher than 10 cGy.

  10. Disequilibrium vegetation dynamics under future climate change.

    PubMed

    Svenning, Jens-Christian; Sandel, Brody

    2013-07-01

    Near-future climate changes are likely to elicit major vegetation changes. Disequilibrium dynamics, which occur when vegetation comes out of equilibrium with climate, are potentially a key facet of these. Understanding these dynamics is crucial for making accurate predictions, informing conservation planning, and understanding likely changes in ecosystem function on time scales relevant to society. However, many predictive studies have instead focused on equilibrium end-points with little consideration of the transient trajectories. We review what we should expect in terms of disequilibrium vegetation dynamics over the next 50-200 yr, covering a broad range of research fields including paleoecology, macroecology, landscape ecology, vegetation science, plant ecology, invasion biology, global change biology, and ecosystem ecology. The expected climate changes are likely to induce marked vegetation disequilibrium with climate at both leading and trailing edges, with leading-edge disequilibrium dynamics due to lags in migration at continental to landscape scales, in local population build-up and succession, in local evolutionary responses, and in ecosystem development, and trailing-edge disequilibrium dynamics involving delayed local extinctions and slow losses of ecosystem structural components. Interactions with habitat loss and invasive pests and pathogens are likely to further contribute to disequilibrium dynamics. Predictive modeling and climate-change experiments are increasingly representing disequilibrium dynamics, but with scope for improvement. The likely pervasiveness and complexity of vegetation disequilibrium is a major challenge for forecasting ecological dynamics and, combined with the high ecological importance of vegetation, also constitutes a major challenge for future nature conservation.

  11. Synchronous symmetry breaking in neurons with different neurite counts.

    PubMed

    Wissner-Gross, Zachary D; Scott, Mark A; Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    As neurons develop, several immature processes (i.e., neurites) grow out of the cell body. Over time, each neuron breaks symmetry when only one of its neurites grows much longer than the rest, becoming an axon. This symmetry breaking is an important step in neurodevelopment, and aberrant symmetry breaking is associated with several neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia and autism. However, the effects of neurite count in neuronal symmetry breaking have never been studied. Existing models for neuronal polarization disagree: some predict that neurons with more neurites polarize up to several days later than neurons with fewer neurites, while others predict that neurons with different neurite counts polarize synchronously. We experimentally find that neurons with different neurite counts polarize synchronously. We also show that despite the significant differences among the previously proposed models, they all agree with our experimental findings when the expression levels of the proteins responsible for symmetry breaking increase with neurite count. Consistent with these results, we observe that the expression levels of two of these proteins, HRas and shootin1, significantly correlate with neurite count. This coordinated symmetry breaking we observed among neurons with different neurite counts may be important for synchronized polarization of neurons in developing organisms.

  12. Synchronous Symmetry Breaking in Neurons with Different Neurite Counts

    PubMed Central

    Wissner-Gross, Zachary D.; Scott, Mark A.; Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    As neurons develop, several immature processes (i.e., neurites) grow out of the cell body. Over time, each neuron breaks symmetry when only one of its neurites grows much longer than the rest, becoming an axon. This symmetry breaking is an important step in neurodevelopment, and aberrant symmetry breaking is associated with several neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia and autism. However, the effects of neurite count in neuronal symmetry breaking have never been studied. Existing models for neuronal polarization disagree: some predict that neurons with more neurites polarize up to several days later than neurons with fewer neurites, while others predict that neurons with different neurite counts polarize synchronously. We experimentally find that neurons with different neurite counts polarize synchronously. We also show that despite the significant differences among the previously proposed models, they all agree with our experimental findings when the expression levels of the proteins responsible for symmetry breaking increase with neurite count. Consistent with these results, we observe that the expression levels of two of these proteins, HRas and shootin1, significantly correlate with neurite count. This coordinated symmetry breaking we observed among neurons with different neurite counts may be important for synchronized polarization of neurons in developing organisms. PMID:23408951

  13. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  14. Potential Mechanism of Neurite Outgrowth Enhanced by Electrical Stimulation: Involvement of MicroRNA-363-5p Targeting DCLK1 Expression in Rat.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xin; Huang, Liangliang; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Liu, Zhongyang; Ge, Jun; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2017-02-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) promotes neurite outgrowth and nerve regeneration, but the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated the role of micro RNAs (miRNAs) in ES-mediated neurite outgrowth. First, we performed microarray analyses to identify changes in the miRNAs profile of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) following ES. The expression of 16 known miRNAs was altered by ES. Bioinformatics showed that the potential targets of these differentially expressed miRNAs were involved in neurite outgrowth. We focused on miRNA-363-5p (miR-363-5p), because its expression was consistently altered by ES in the present study. Silencing miR-363-5p promoted neurite outgrowth, while miR-363-5p mimic reduced neurite outgrowth. Downregulation of miR-363-5p indicated that double cortin-like kinase (DCLK) 1, a major microtubule-associated protein, was a direct target of miR-363-5p in DRGNs. Knockdown of DCLK1 recapitulated the beneficial effect of a miR-363-5p inhibitor on DRG neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, our data has indicated that miR-363-5p is involved in ES-promoted neurite outgrowth by targeting DCLK1. These findings provide new insights into the roles of miRNAs in ES-enhanced neurite outgrowth and regeneration.

  15. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  16. Bcl-xL Is Necessary for Neurite Outgrowth in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han-A; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Shanabrough, Marya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) protects survival in dividing cells and developing neurons, but was not known to regulate growth. Growth and synapse formation are indispensable for neuronal survival in development, inextricably linking these processes. We have previously shown that, during synaptic plasticity, Bcl-xL produces changes in synapse number, size, activity, and mitochondrial metabolism. In this study, we determine whether Bcl-xL is required for healthy neurite outgrowth and whether neurite outgrowth is necessary for survival in developing neurons in the presence or absence of stress. Results: Depletion of endogenous Bcl-xL impairs neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons followed by delayed cell death which is dependent on upregulation of death receptor 6 (DR6), a molecule that regulates axonal pruning. Under hypoxic conditions, Bcl-xL-depleted neurons demonstrate increased vulnerability to neuronal process loss and to death compared with hypoxic controls. Endogenous DR6 expression and upregulation during hypoxia are associated with worsened neurite damage; depletion of DR6 partially rescues neuronal process loss, placing DR6 downstream of the effects of Bcl-xL on neuronal process outgrowth and protection. In vivo ischemia produces early increases in DR6, suggesting a role for DR6 in brain injury. Innovation: We suggest that DR6 levels are usually suppressed by Bcl-xL; Bcl-xL depletion leads to upregulation of DR6, failure of neuronal outgrowth in nonstressed cells, and exacerbation of hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. Conclusion: Bcl-xL regulates neuronal outgrowth during development and protects neurites from hypoxic insult, as opposed by DR6. Factors that enhance neurite formation may protect neurons against hypoxic injury or neurodegenerative stimuli. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 93–108. PMID:24787232

  17. Intact glycosaminoglycans from intervertebral disc-derived notochordal cell-conditioned media inhibit neurite growth while maintaining neuronal cell viability.

    PubMed

    Purmessur, Devina; Cornejo, Marisa C; Cho, Samuel K; Roughley, Peter J; Linhardt, Robert J; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2015-05-01

    Painful human intervertebral discs (IVDs) exhibit nerve growth deep into the IVD. Current treatments for discogenic back pain do not address the underlying mechanisms propagating pain and are often highly invasive or only offer temporary symptom relief. The notochord produces factors during development that pattern the spine and inhibit the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) axons into the IVD. We hypothesize that notochordal cell (NC)-conditioned medium (NCCM) includes soluble factors capable of inhibiting neurite growth and may represent a future therapeutic target. To test if NCCM can inhibit neurite growth and determine if NC-derived glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary candidates for this inhibition. Human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells and rat DRG cells were treated with NCCM in two-dimensional culture in vitro, and digestion and mechanistic studies determined if specific GAGs were responsible for inhibitory effects. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium was generated from porcine nucleus pulposus tissue that was cultured in Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium for 4 days. A dose study was performed using SH-SY5Y cells that were seeded in basal medium for 24 hours and neurite outgrowth and cell viability were assessed after treatment with basal media or NCCM (10% and 100%) for 48 hours. Glycosaminoglycans from NCCM were characterized using multiple digestions and liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Neurite growth was assessed on both SH-SY5Y and DRG cells after treatment with NCCM with and without GAG digestion. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium significantly inhibited the neurite outgrowth from SH-SY5Y cells compared with basal controls without dose or cytotoxic effects; % of neurite expressing cells were 39.0±2.9%, 27.3±3.6%, and 30.2±2.7% and mean neurite length was 60.3±3.5, 50.8±2.4, 53.2±3.7 μm for basal, 10% NCCM, and 100% NCCM, respectively. Digestions and LC-MS determined that chondroitin-6-sulfate was the major GAG chain in

  18. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  19. Mechanical stability of trees under dynamic loads.

    PubMed

    James, Kenneth R; Haritos, Nicholas; Ades, Peter K

    2006-10-01

    Tree stability in windstorms and tree failure are important issues in urban areas where there can be risks of damage to people and property and in forests where wind damage causes economic loss. Current methods of managing trees, including pruning and assessment of mechanical strength, are mainly based on visual assessment or the experience of people such as trained arborists. Only limited data are available to assess tree strength and stability in winds, and most recent methods have used a static approach to estimate loads. Recent research on the measurement of dynamic wind loads and the effect on tree stability is giving a better understanding of how different trees cope with winds. Dynamic loads have been measured on trees with different canopy shapes and branch structures including a palm (Washingtonia robusta), a slender Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) and trees with many branches and broad canopies including hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii) and two species of eucalypt (Eucalyptus grandis, E. teretecornus). Results indicate that sway is not a harmonic, but is very complex due to the dynamic interaction of branches. A new dynamic model of a tree is described, incorporating the dynamic structural properties of the trunk and branches. The branch mass contributes a dynamic damping, termed mass damping, which acts to reduce dangerous harmonic sway motion of the trunk and so minimizes loads and increases the mechanical stability of the tree. The results from 12 months of monitoring sway motion and wind loading forces are presented and discussed.

  20. Population dynamics under the Laplace assumption.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, André C; Kiebel, Stefan J; Daunizeau, Jean; Harrison, Lee M; Friston, Karl J

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a generic approach to modelling dynamics in neuronal populations. This approach models a full density on the states of neuronal populations but finesses this high-dimensional problem by re-formulating density dynamics in terms of ordinary differential equations on the sufficient statistics of the densities considered (c.f., the method of moments). The particular form for the population density we adopt is a Gaussian density (c.f., the Laplace assumption). This means population dynamics are described by equations governing the evolution of the population's mean and covariance. We derive these equations from the Fokker-Planck formalism and illustrate their application to a conductance-based model of neuronal exchanges. One interesting aspect of this formulation is that we can uncouple the mean and covariance to furnish a neural-mass model, which rests only on the populations mean. This enables us to compare equivalent mean-field and neural-mass models of the same populations and evaluate, quantitatively, the contribution of population variance to the expected dynamics. The mean-field model presented here will form the basis of a dynamic causal model of observed electromagnetic signals in future work.

  1. Dynamics of social balance under temporal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Ryosuke; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Real social contacts are often intermittent such that a link between a pair of nodes in a social network is only temporarily used. The effects of such temporal networks on social dynamics have been investigated for several phenomenological models such as epidemic spreading, linear diffusion processes, and nonlinear oscillations. Here, we numerically investigate nonlinear social balance dynamics in such a situation. Social balance is a classical psychological theory, which dictates that a triad is balanced if the three agents are mutual friends or if the two of them are the friends of each other and hostile to the other agent. We show that the social balance dynamics is slowed down on the temporal complete graph as compared to the corresponding static complete graph.

  2. Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-02

    Stochastic Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models This research aims to develop fundamental theories and practical algorithms for...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Online learning, multi-armed bandit, dynamic networks REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S... Online Learning in Dynamic Networks under Unknown Models Report Title This research aims to develop fundamental theories and practical algorithms for

  3. Dynamics Explorer twin spacecraft under evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites designed to explore the interactive processes occuring between the magnetosphere and Earth's ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and plasmasphere are described. Effects of these interactions, satellite orbits, data collecting antennas, solar power systems, axes, configurations, and Earth based command, control and data display systems are mentioned.

  4. Dynamic Ionization of Water under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Goldman, Nir; Fried, Laurence E.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Kuo, I-Feng W.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Zaug, Joseph M.

    2010-07-19

    Raman spectroscopy in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and first principles molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study water in the temperature range 300 to 1500 K and at pressures to 56 GPa. We find a substantial decrease in the intensity of the O-H stretch mode in the liquid phase with pressure, and a change in slope of the melting line at 47 GPa and 1000 K. Consistent with these observations, theoretical calculations show that water beyond 50 GPa is 'dynamically ionized' in that it consists of very short-lived (<10 fs) H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, and OH{sup -} species, and also that the mobility of the oxygen ions decreases abruptly with pressure, while hydrogen ions remain very mobile. We suggest that this regime corresponds to a superionic state.

  5. Dynamics of Hyperbranched Polymers under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulaki, Krystallenia; Chrissopoulou, Kiriaki; Anastasiadis, Spiros H.; Prevosto, Daniele; Labardi, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The effect of severe confinement on the dynamics of three different generations of hyperbranched polyesters (Boltorns) is investigated by Dielectric Spectroscopy. The polymers are intercalated within the galleries of natural Na+-MMT, thus, forming 1nm polymer films confined between solid walls. The Tg's of the polymers determined by DSC show a clear dependence on the generation whereas the transition is completely suppressed when all the polymer chains are intercalated. The dynamic investigation of the bulk polymers reveals two sub-Tg processes, with similar behavior for the three polymers with the segmental relaxation observed above the Tg of each. For the nanocomposites, where all polymers are severely confined, the dynamics show significant differences compared to that of the bulk polymers. The sub-Tg processes are similar for the three generations but significantly faster and with weaker temperature dependence than those in the bulk. The segmental process appears at temperatures below the bulk polymer Tg, it exhibits an Arrhenius temperature dependence and shows differences for the three generations. A slow process that appears at higher temperatures is due to interfacial polarization. Co-financed by the EU and Greek funds through the Operational Program ``Education and Lifelong Learning'' of the NSRF-Research Funding Program: THALES-Investing in knowledge society through the Eur. Social Fund (MIS 377278) and COST Action MP0902-COINAPO.

  6. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  7. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  8. Nerve growth factor-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells involves sigma-1 receptors: implications for antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Minoru; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2002-12-01

    One theory concerning the action of antidepressants relates to the drugs' ability to induce an adaptive plasticity in neurons such as neurite sprouting. Certain antidepressants are known to bind to sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R) with high affinity. Sig-1R are dynamic endoplasmic reticulum proteins that are highly concentrated at the tip of growth cones in cultured cells. We therefore tested the hypotheses that Sig-1R might participate in the neurite sprouting and that antidepressants with Sig-1R affinity may promote the neuronal sprouting via Sig-1R. The prototypic Sig-1R agonist (+)-pentazocine [(+)PTZ], as well as the Sig-1R-active antidepressants imipramine and fluvoxamine, although ineffective by themselves, were found to enhance the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite sprouting in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. A Sig-1R antagonist N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE100) blocked the enhancements caused by these Sig-1R agonists. In separate experiments, we found that NGF dose and time dependently increased Sig-1R in PC12 cells. Chronic treatment of cells with (+)PTZ, imipramine, or fluvoxamine also increased Sig-1R. These latter results suggested that NGF induces the neurite sprouting by increasing Sig-1R. Indeed, the overexpression of Sig-1R per se in PC12 cells enhanced the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Furthermore, antisense deoxyoligonucleotides directed against Sig-1R attenuated the NGF-induced neurite sprouting. Thus, when taken together, our results indicate that Sig-1R play an important role in the NGF-induced neurite sprouting and that certain antidepressants may facilitate neuronal sprouting in the brain via Sig-1R.

  9. Potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells by papaverine: role played by PLC-γ, IP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kanako; Ishima, Tamaki; Kehler, Jan; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-03-04

    Papaverine, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 10A, is gaining attention for its potential in the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the putative neuroprotective/neurotrophic actions of papaverine remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the effects of papaverine on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Papaverine potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10 had no effect on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. The potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by papaverine was blocked by the PLC-γ inhibitor U73122. Furthermore, papaverine's potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth was also blocked by the co-administration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonists (xestospongin C and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB)) and by reduced expression of IP(3) receptor gene (i.e., itpr1 and itpr3) by siRNA. Our findings suggest that papaverine could potentiate NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, and that activation of PLC-γ and IP(3) receptors might be involved in the mechanism underlying papaverine's potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

  10. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkoc, Veysi; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nelson, Tyler; Lannutti, John J.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2015-12-01

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies.

  11. Control of neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Tornieri, Karine; Welshhans, Kristy; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) has been reported to affect neurite outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro. Here we investigated the signaling pathways by which PI-3K affects neurite outgrowth and growth cone motility in identified snail neurons in vitro. Inhibition of PI-3K with wortmannin (2 microM) or LY 294002 (25 microM) resulted in a significant elongation of filopodia and in a slow-down of neurite outgrowth. Experiments using cytochalasin and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin polymerization and myosin II activity, respectively, demonstrated that filopodial elongation resulting from PI-3K inhibition was dependent on actin polymerization. Inhibition of strategic kinases located downstream of PI-3K, such as Akt, ROCK, and MEK, also caused significant filopodial elongation and a slow-down in neurite outgrowth. Another growth cone parameter, filopodial number, was not affected by inhibition of PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, or MEK. A detailed study of growth cone behavior showed that the filopodial elongation induced by inhibiting PI-3K, Akt, ROCK, and MEK was achieved by increasing two motility parameters: the rate with which filopodia extend (extension rate) and the time that filopodia spend elongating. Whereas the inhibition of ROCK or Akt (both activated by the lipid kinase activity of PI-3K) and MEK (activated by the protein kinase activity of PI-3K) had additive effects, simultaneous inhibition of Akt and ROCK showed no additive effect. We further demonstrate that the effects on filopodial dynamics investigated were calcium-independent. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of PI-3K signaling results in filopodial elongation and a slow-down of neurite advance, reminiscent of growth cone searching behavior.

  12. Dynamics of nanoconfined water under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Jażdżewska, M.; Palmer, J. C.; Mamontov, E.; Gubbins, K. E.; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of ˜16 Å. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220≤T≤260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from ˜1.92 kbar at temperature T=260 K to ˜1.85 kbar at T=220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q,E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of “caged” or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  13. Debris dynamics under evection and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Santos, M. T.; Celestino, C. C.; Winter, O. C.; Neto, E. V.; Cordeiro, R. R.

    The human activity in exploring the space has generated undesirable artificial debris Unfortunately the number of them is increasing so fast that a tremendous problem is arising The natural and artificial debris are distributed in a very large range of altitude and according to the semi major axis of the orbit the particle may survive for very long time For low altitude less than 200 km the life time of the particles is mostly dominated by the atmospheric drag while for more distant debris different disturbing forces should be considered and the dynamics is slight more complicated Although the maximum concentration of the debris is not at high altitude the problem at high altitudes is important since the mitigation mechanism to clean these regions is very slow Usually Poynting Robertson P-R effect and similar other forces are not efficient to remove rapidly the particles at high altitudes in opposition to human activities which are always feeding more rapidly almost any region of the space Therefore since the debris survive for very long time it is important to increase our theoretical knowledge on the dynamics of these regions In this work we show the existence of some important resonances which may give significant variations in the inclination and eccentricity of the particle In the case of the Earth they occur at about 10128 5 km and 12309 8 km and are related to a commensurability involving the mean longitude of the sun and

  14. Natural neural projection dynamics underlying social behavior.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Lisa A; Grosenick, Logan; Finkelstein, Joel C; Kauvar, Isaac V; Fenno, Lief E; Adhikari, Avishek; Lammel, Stephan; Mirzabekov, Julie J; Airan, Raag D; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Tye, Kay M; Anikeeva, Polina; Malenka, Robert C; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-06-19

    Social interaction is a complex behavior essential for many species and is impaired in major neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacological studies have implicated certain neurotransmitter systems in social behavior, but circuit-level understanding of endogenous neural activity during social interaction is lacking. We therefore developed and applied a new methodology, termed fiber photometry, to optically record natural neural activity in genetically and connectivity-defined projections to elucidate the real-time role of specified pathways in mammalian behavior. Fiber photometry revealed that activity dynamics of a ventral tegmental area (VTA)-to-nucleus accumbens (NAc) projection could encode and predict key features of social, but not novel object, interaction. Consistent with this observation, optogenetic control of cells specifically contributing to this projection was sufficient to modulate social behavior, which was mediated by type 1 dopamine receptor signaling downstream in the NAc. Direct observation of deep projection-specific activity in this way captures a fundamental and previously inaccessible dimension of mammalian circuit dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation under sinusoidal gravitational loading.

    PubMed

    Gisolf, J; Stok, W J; Oei, S I; Immink, R V; vanLieshout, J J; Karemaker, J M

    2002-07-01

    Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) has been studied previously using spectral analysis of oscillations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV). The dynamics of the CA can be modeled as a high-pass filter. The purpose of this study is to compare CA of blood pressure oscillations induced by gravitational loading to CA during resting conditions. We subjected twelve healthy subjects to repeated sinusoidal head-up (0 degrees - 60 degrees) tilts at several set frequencies (0.07 to 0.25 Hz) on a computer controlled tilt table while we recorded ABP (Finapres) and CBFV (transcranial Doppler ultrasound). We fitted the data sets to a high-pass filter model and computed an average time constant (T). Our results show similar phase leads of CBFV to ABPbrain in the rest recording and in sinusoidal tilting, in the studied frequency range. The transfer function gain of the resting spectra increased with increasing frequency, the gain of the tilting spectra did not. Fitting the phase responses of both data sets to a high pass filter model yielded similar time constants.

  16. Natural neural projection dynamics underlying social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Lisa A.; Grosenick, Logan; Finkelstein, Joel C.; Kauvar, Isaac V.; Fenno, Lief E.; Adhikari, Avishek; Lammel, Stephan; Mirzabekov, Julie J.; Airan, Raag D.; Zalocusky, Kelly A.; Tye, Kay M.; Anikeeva, Polina; Malenka, Robert C.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Social interaction is a complex behavior essential for many species, and is impaired in major neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacological studies have implicated certain neurotransmitter systems in social behavior, but circuit-level understanding of endogenous neural activity during social interaction is lacking. We therefore developed and applied a new methodology, termed fiber photometry, to optically record natural neural activity in genetically- and connectivity-defined projections to elucidate the real-time role of specified pathways in mammalian behavior. Fiber photometry revealed that activity dynamics of a ventral tegmental area (VTA)-to-nucleus accumbens (NAc) projection could encode and predict key features of social but not novel-object interaction. Consistent with this observation, optogenetic control of cells specifically contributing to this projection was sufficient to modulate social behavior, which was mediated by type-1 dopamine receptor signaling downstream in the NAc. Direct observation of projection-specific activity in this way captures a fundamental and previously inaccessible dimension of circuit dynamics. PMID:24949967

  17. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  18. A model for neurite growth and neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, G H; Qin, C D

    1996-02-01

    A model is presented for tensile regulation of neuritic growth. It is proposed that the neurite tension can be determined by Hooke's law and determines the growth rate of neurites. The growth of a neurite is defined as the change in its unstretched length. Neuritic growth rate is assumed to increase in proportion to tension magnitude over a certain threshold [Dennerll et al., J. Cell Biol. 107: 665-674 (1988)]. The movement of branch nodes also contributes to the neuronal morphogenesis. It is supposed that the rate of a branch-node displacement is in proportion to the resultant neuritic tension exerted on this node. To deal with the growth-cone movement, it is further supposed that the environment exerts a traction force on the growth cone and the rate of growth-cone displacement is determined by the vector sum of the neuritic tension and the traction force. A group of differential equations are used to describe the model. The key point of the model is that the traction force and the neuritic tension are in opposition to generate a temporal contrast-enhancing mechanism. Results of a simulation study suggest that the model can explain some phenomena related to neuronal morphogenesis.

  19. Lattice gas dynamics under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequences quantum systems. While this backaction has so far been discussed as being a limitation on the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful and versatile means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. Here, we show how spatially designed measurement landscapes can be used to realize entropy segregation in lattice gases. This presents an alternate path to the longstanding challenge of realizing lattice gases with sufficiently low entropy to access regimes of correlated quantum behavior such as Néel ordered states. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  20. Bacterial Adhesion under Static and Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rijnaarts, Huub H. M.; Norde, Willem; Bouwer, Edward J.; Lyklema, Johannes; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The deposition of various pseudomonads and coryneform bacteria with different hydrophobicities (water contact angles) and negative cell surface charges on negatively charged Teflon and glass surfaces was investigated. The levels of deposition varied between 5.0 × 104 and 1.6 × 107 cells cm-2 and between 5.0 × 104 and 3.6 × 107 cells cm-2 for dynamic column and static batch systems, respectively, indicating that there was a wide variation in physicochemical interactions. Batch and column results were compared in order to better distinguish between hydrodynamic and other system-dependent influences and method-independent physicochemical interactions. Despite the shorter suspension-solid contact time in columns (1 h) than in batch systems (4 h), the level of deposition (expressed as the number of cells that adhered) divided by the applied ambient cell concentration was 4.12 ± 1.63 times higher in columns than in batch sytems for 15 of 22 strain-surface combinations studied. This demonstrates that transport of microbial particles from bulk liquid to surfaces is more efficient in dynamic columns (transport dominated by convection and diffusion) than in static batch systems (transport by diffusion only). The relative constancy of this ratio for the 15 combinations shows that physicochemical interactions affect adhesion similarly in the two systems. The deviating deposition behavior of the other seven strain-surface combinations could be attributed to method-dependent effects resulting from specific cell characteristics (e.g., to the presence of capsular polymers, to an ability to aggregate, to large cell sizes, or to a tendency to desorb after passage through an air-liquid interface). Images PMID:16349063

  1. Quantum Entanglement Growth under Random Unitary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahum, Adam; Ruhman, Jonathan; Vijay, Sagar; Haah, Jeongwan

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing how entanglement grows with time in a many-body system, for example, after a quantum quench, is a key problem in nonequilibrium quantum physics. We study this problem for the case of random unitary dynamics, representing either Hamiltonian evolution with time-dependent noise or evolution by a random quantum circuit. Our results reveal a universal structure behind noisy entanglement growth, and also provide simple new heuristics for the "entanglement tsunami" in Hamiltonian systems without noise. In 1D, we show that noise causes the entanglement entropy across a cut to grow according to the celebrated Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation. The mean entanglement grows linearly in time, while fluctuations grow like (time )1/3 and are spatially correlated over a distance ∝(time )2/3. We derive KPZ universal behavior in three complementary ways, by mapping random entanglement growth to (i) a stochastic model of a growing surface, (ii) a "minimal cut" picture, reminiscent of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula in holography, and (iii) a hydrodynamic problem involving the dynamical spreading of operators. We demonstrate KPZ universality in 1D numerically using simulations of random unitary circuits. Importantly, the leading-order time dependence of the entropy is deterministic even in the presence of noise, allowing us to propose a simple coarse grained minimal cut picture for the entanglement growth of generic Hamiltonians, even without noise, in arbitrary dimensionality. We clarify the meaning of the "velocity" of entanglement growth in the 1D entanglement tsunami. We show that in higher dimensions, noisy entanglement evolution maps to the well-studied problem of pinning of a membrane or domain wall by disorder.

  2. Space Station flexible dynamics under plume impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of the Space Station requires numerous construction flights by the Space Shuttle. A particularly challenging problem is that of control of each intermediate station configuration when the shuttle orbiter is approaching it to deliver the next component. The necessary braking maneuvers cause orbiter thruster plumes to impinge on the station, especially its solar arrays. This in turn causes both overall attitude errors and excitation of flexible-body vibration modes. These plume loads are predicted to lead to CMG saturation during the approach of the orbiter to the SC-5 station configuration, necessitating the use of the station RCS jets for desaturation. They are also expected to lead to significant excitation of solar array vibrations. It is therefore of great practical importance to investigate the effects of plume loads on the flexible dynamics of station configuration SC-5 as accurately as possible. However, this system possesses a great many flexible modes (89 below 5 rad/s), making analysis time-consuming and complicated. Model reduction techniques can be used to overcome this problem, reducing the system model to one which retains only the significant dynamics, i.e. those which are strongly excited by the control inputs or plume disturbance forces and which strongly couple with the measured outputs. The particular technique to be used in this study is the subsystem balancing approach which was previously developed by the present investigator. This method is very efficient computationally. Furthermore, it gives accurate results even for the difficult case where the structure has many closed-spaced natural frequencies, when standard modal truncation can give misleading results. Station configuration SC-5 is a good example of such a structure.

  3. μ2-Dependent endocytosis of N-cadherin is regulated by β-catenin to facilitate neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Chin-Yin

    2017-02-22

    Circuit formation in the brain requires neurite outgrowth throughout development to establish synaptic contacts with target cells. Active endocytosis of several adhesion molecules facilitates the dynamic exchange of these molecules at the surface and promotes neurite outgrowth in developing neurons. The endocytosis of N-cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule, has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we identified that a fraction of N-cadherin internalizes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Two tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin recognized by the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor complex are responsible for CME of N-cadherin. Moreover, β-catenin, a core component of the N-cadherin adhesion complex, inhibits N-cadherin endocytosis by masking the 2 tyrosine-based motifs. Removal of β-catenin facilitates μ2 binding to N-cadherin, thereby increasing clathrin-mediated N-cadherin endocytosis and neurite outgrowth without affecting the steady-state level of surface N-cadherin. These results identify and characterize the mechanism controlling N-cadherin endocytosis through β-catenin-regulated μ2 binding to modulate neurite outgrowth.

  4. Real-time detection of neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Samhwan; Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    We developed a simple method for real-time detection of the neurite outgrowth using microfluidic device. Our microfluidic device contains three compartmentalized channels which are for cell seeding, hydrogel and growth factors. Collagen gel is filled in the middle channel and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are seeded in the left channel. To induce differentiation of PC12 cells, 50 ng/ml to1000 ng/ml of nerve growth factor (NGF) is introduced into the right channel. After three days of NGF treatment, PC12 cells begin to extend neurites and formed neurite network from sixth day. Quantification of neurite outgrowth is analyzed by measuring the total area of neurites. On sixth day, the area is doubled compared to the area on third day and increases by 20 times on ninth day.

  5. Experimental and computational models of neurite extension at a choice point in response to controlled diffusive gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catig, G. C.; Figueroa, S.; Moore, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Ojective. Axons are guided toward desired targets through a series of choice points that they navigate by sensing cues in the cellular environment. A better understanding of how microenvironmental factors influence neurite growth during development can inform strategies to address nerve injury. Therefore, there is a need for biomimetic models to systematically investigate the influence of guidance cues at such choice points. Approach. We ran an adapted in silico biased turning axon growth model under the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and compared the results to corresponding in vitro experiments. We examined if growth simulations were predictive of neurite population behavior at a choice point. We used a biphasic micropatterned hydrogel system consisting of an outer cell restrictive mold that enclosed a bifurcated cell permissive region and placed a well near a bifurcating end to allow proteins to diffuse and form a gradient. Experimental diffusion profiles in these constructs were used to validate a diffusion computational model that utilized experimentally measured diffusion coefficients in hydrogels. The computational diffusion model was then used to establish defined soluble gradients within the permissive region of the hydrogels and maintain the profiles in physiological ranges for an extended period of time. Computational diffusion profiles informed the neurite growth model, which was compared with neurite growth experiments in the bifurcating hydrogel constructs. Main results. Results indicated that when applied to the constrained choice point geometry, the biased turning model predicted experimental behavior closely. Results for both simulated and in vitro neurite growth studies showed a significant chemoattractive response toward the bifurcated end containing an NGF gradient compared to the control, though some neurites were found in the end with no NGF gradient. Significance. The integrated model of neurite growth we describe will allow

  6. Neural Dynamics Underlying Event-Related Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Bressler, Steven L.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Ding, Ming-Zhou; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, Istvan; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two opposing hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying sensory event-related potentials (ERPs). One holds that sensory ERPs are generated by phase resetting of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and the other that they result from signal averaging of stimulus-evoked neural responses. We tested several contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by direct intracortical analysis of neural activity in monkeys. Our findings clearly demonstrate evoked response contributions to the sensory ERP in the monkey, and they suggest the likelihood that a mixed (Evoked/Phase Resetting) model may account for the generation of scalp ERPs in humans.

  7. Dynamic diagnostic and decision procedures under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we consider uncertainty that arises when the true state x {element_of} E is not accessible to direct observation and remains unknown. Instead, we observe some features {theta} {element_of} {Theta} that carry a certain information about the true state. This information is described by the conditional distribution P({Theta}{vert_bar}E), which we call the linkage distribution. Regarding this distribution we assume that it exists but is unknown. This leads to uncertainty with respect to states from E and the linkage distribution P({Theta}{vert_bar}E), which we denote by NEP. The substantive problem can be stated as follows: from observations of the features {theta}{element_of}{Theta} made at each time instant n = 1,2,...,recognize the state x {element_of} E, identify the linkage distribution P, and use the results of recognition and identification to choose a decision y {element_of} Y so that the decision process is optimal in some sense. State recognition is the subject of diagnostics. The uncertainty NEP thus generates a problem of diagnostics and dynamic decision making.

  8. Dynamics of two phytoplankton populations under predation.

    PubMed

    Kengwoung-Keumo, Jean-Jacques

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the manner in which predation and single-nutrient competition affect the dynamics of a non-toxic and a toxic phytoplankton species in a homogeneous environment (such as a chemostat). We allow for the possibility that both species serve as prey for an herbivorous zooplankton species. We assume that the toxic phytoplankton species produces toxins that affect only its own growth (autotoxicity). The autotoxicity assumption is ecologically explained by the fact that the toxin-producing phytoplankton is not mature enough to produce toxins that will affect the growth of its nontoxic competitor. We show that, in the absence of phytotoxic interactions and nutrient recycling, our model exhibits uniform persistence. The removal rates are distinct and we use general response functions. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to show consistency with theoretical analysis. Our model has similarities with other food-chain models. As such, our results may be relevant to a wider spectrum of population models, not just those focused on plankton. Some open problems are discussed at the end of this paper.

  9. Decentralized Patrolling Under Constraints in Dynamic Environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaofei; Wu, Feng; Shen, Lincheng; Chen, Jing; Ramchurn, Sarvapali D

    2015-12-22

    We investigate a decentralized patrolling problem for dynamic environments where information is distributed alongside threats. In this problem, agents obtain information at a location, but may suffer attacks from the threat at that location. In a decentralized fashion, each agent patrols in a designated area of the environment and interacts with a limited number of agents. Therefore, the goal of these agents is to coordinate to gather as much information as possible while limiting the damage incurred. Hence, we model this class of problem as a transition-decoupled partially observable Markov decision process with health constraints. Furthermore, we propose scalable decentralized online algorithms based on Monte Carlo tree search and a factored belief vector. We empirically evaluate our algorithms on decentralized patrolling problems and benchmark them against the state-of-the-art online planning solver. The results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art by more than 56% for six agents patrolling problems and can scale up to 24 agents in reasonable time.

  10. Laminin promotes neuritic regeneration from cultured peripheral and central neurons

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The ability of axons to grow through tissue in vivo during development or regeneration may be regulated by the availability of specific neurite-promoting macromolecules located within the extracellular matrix. We have used tissue culture methods to examine the relative ability of various extracellular matrix components to elicit neurite outgrowth from dissociated chick embryo parasympathetic (ciliary ganglion) neurons in serum-free monolayer culture. Purified laminin from both mouse and rat sources, as well as a partially purified polyornithine-binding neurite promoting factor (PNPF-1) from rat Schwannoma cells all stimulate neurite production from these neurons. Laminin and PNPF-1 are also potent stimulators of neurite growth from cultured neurons obtained from other peripheral as well as central neural tissues, specifically avian sympathetic and sensory ganglia and spinal cord, optic tectum, neural retina, and telencephalon, as well as from sensory ganglia of the neonatal mouse and hippocampal, septal, and striatal tissues of the fetal rat. A quantitative in vitro bioassay method using ciliary neurons was used to (a) measure and compare the specific neurite-promoting activities of these agents, (b) confirm that during the purification of laminin, the neurite-promoting activity co- purifies with the laminin protein, and (c) compare the influences of antilaminin antibodies on the neurite-promoting activity of laminin and PNPF-1. We conclude that laminin and PNPF-1 are distinct macromolecules capable of expressing their neurite-promoting activities even when presented in nanogram amounts. This neurite-promoting bioassay currently represents the most sensitive test for the biological activity of laminin. PMID:6643580

  11. Dynamical evolution of sand ripples under water.

    PubMed

    Stegner, A; Wesfreid, J E

    1999-10-01

    We have performed an experimental study on the evolution of sand ripples formed under the action of an oscillatory flow. An annular sand-water cell was used in order to investigate a wide range of parameters. The sand ripples follow an irreversible condensation mechanism from small to large wavelength until a final state is reached. The wavelength and the shape of these stable sand patterns are mainly governed by the fluid displacement and the static angle of the granular media. A strong hysteresis affects the evolution of steep ripples. When the acceleration of the sand bed reaches a critical value, the final pattern is modified by the superficial fluidization of the sand layer.

  12. Effect of viscosity on neurite outgrowth and fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Caserta, F; Hausman, R E; Eldred, W D; Kimmel, C; Stanley, H E

    1992-03-02

    The growth mechanism by which neurons achieve their characteristic ramified morphology has long been of interest, but determining whether physical parameters, such as viscosity, are important has been difficult due to a lack of useful hypotheses and standard reproducible techniques. We have recently shown that neurons exhibit fractal behavior and that their fractal dimension (df) is consistent with a physical process called diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). We suggested that this DLA behavior might stem from viscosity differences, chemical gradients or electrical fields (Caserta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 64 (1990) 95-98). DLA is a model for a large family of growth processes. In order for a process to fit the DLA model, the growth rate must be proportional to the gradient of a field at a point on the growing structure (Feder, Plenum, New York, 1988, Ch. 4). Chemical, electrical, or fluid pressure fields can fit the model depending on the particular physical system under study. Here, we studied growth of retinal neurons from chick embryos in culture media of various fluid viscosities. Thus, we test whether DLA in this system was based on a fluid pressure field. As viscosity was increased from 1 to 4.3 cps, the number of neurite branches decreased 98%. However, there was no effect on df. Over this range of viscosities, total cellular protein synthesis decreased only 17%. The results indicate that, while differences in viscosity between the interior and exterior of the cell affect neurite outgrowth, they do not affect the fractal behavior of neurons. Thus, viscosity differences are not the basis for the DLA pattern of neuronal arborization.

  13. Stochastic population dynamics under resource constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavane, Ajinkya S.; Nigam, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the population growth of a certain species in which every generation reproduces thrice over a period of predefined time, under certain constraints of resources needed for survival of population. We study the survival period of a species by randomizing the reproduction probabilities within a window at same predefined ages and the resources are being produced by the working force of the population at a variable rate. This randomness in the reproduction rate makes the population growth stochastic in nature and one cannot predict the exact form of evolution. Hence we study the growth by running simulations for such a population and taking an ensemble averaged over 500 to 5000 such simulations as per the need. While the population reproduces in a stochastic manner, we have implemented a constraint on the amount of resources available for the population. This is important to make the simulations more realistic. The rate of resource production then is tuned to find the rate which suits the survival of the species. We also compute the mean life time of the species corresponding to different resource production rate. Study for these outcomes in the parameter space defined by the reproduction probabilities and rate of resource production is carried out.

  14. Stochastic population dynamics under resource constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gavane, Ajinkya S. Nigam, Rahul

    2016-06-02

    This paper investigates the population growth of a certain species in which every generation reproduces thrice over a period of predefined time, under certain constraints of resources needed for survival of population. We study the survival period of a species by randomizing the reproduction probabilities within a window at same predefined ages and the resources are being produced by the working force of the population at a variable rate. This randomness in the reproduction rate makes the population growth stochastic in nature and one cannot predict the exact form of evolution. Hence we study the growth by running simulations for such a population and taking an ensemble averaged over 500 to 5000 such simulations as per the need. While the population reproduces in a stochastic manner, we have implemented a constraint on the amount of resources available for the population. This is important to make the simulations more realistic. The rate of resource production then is tuned to find the rate which suits the survival of the species. We also compute the mean life time of the species corresponding to different resource production rate. Study for these outcomes in the parameter space defined by the reproduction probabilities and rate of resource production is carried out.

  15. Genetic dynamics underlying phenotypic development of biomass yield in triticale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Gowda, Manje; Reif, Jochen C; Hahn, Volker; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Weissmann, Elmar A; Maurer, Hans Peter; Würschum, Tobias

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dynamic traits with their phenotypic plasticity suggests that they are under the control of a dynamic genetic regulation. We employed a precision phenotyping platform to non-invasively assess biomass yield in a large mapping population of triticale at three developmental stages. Using multiple-line cross QTL mapping we identified QTL for each of these developmental stages which explained a considerable proportion of the genotypic variance. Some QTL were identified at each developmental stage and thus contribute to biomass yield throughout the studied developmental phases. Interestingly, we also observed QTL that were only identified for one or two of the developmental stages illustrating a temporal contribution of these QTL to the trait. In addition, epistatic QTL were detected and the epistatic interaction landscape was shown to dynamically change with developmental progression. In summary, our results reveal the temporal dynamics of the genetic architecture underlying biomass accumulation in triticale and emphasize the need for a temporal assessment of dynamic traits.

  16. Blurred Star Image Processing for Star Sensors under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Quan, Wei; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The precision of star point location is significant to identify the star map and to acquire the aircraft attitude for star sensors. Under dynamic conditions, star images are not only corrupted by various noises, but also blurred due to the angular rate of the star sensor. According to different angular rates under dynamic conditions, a novel method is proposed in this article, which includes a denoising method based on adaptive wavelet threshold and a restoration method based on the large angular rate. The adaptive threshold is adopted for denoising the star image when the angular rate is in the dynamic range. Then, the mathematical model of motion blur is deduced so as to restore the blurred star map due to large angular rate. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, which is suitable for blurred star image processing and practical for attitude determination of satellites under dynamic conditions. PMID:22778666

  17. Peculiarities of charged particle dynamics under cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, S. S.; Buts, V. A.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-08-15

    Peculiarities of the dynamics of charged particles interacting with electromagnetic radiation under nearly autoresonance conditions are analyzed. In particular, analysis of nonlinear cyclotron resonances shows that their widths increase when the autoresonance conditions are approached. In this case, however, the distance between nonlinear resonances increases even faster, due to which nonlinear resonances do not overlap and, accordingly, regimes with dynamic chaos do not occur. According to calculations, the dynamics of charged particles under the autoresonance conditions is very sensitive to fluctuations, the effect of which can be anomalously large and lead to superdiffusion. It is shown that, under the autoresonance conditions, particle dynamics on small time intervals can differ significantly from that on large time intervals. This effect is most pronounced in the presence of fluctuations in the system.

  18. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  19. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  20. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: I. Derivation and interpretation of neurite equations.

    PubMed

    Meffin, Hamish; Tahayori, Bahman; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N

    2012-12-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices, such as cochlear and retinal implants, work by directly stimulating neurons with extracellular electrodes. This is commonly modeled using the cable equation with an applied extracellular voltage. In this paper a framework for modeling extracellular electrical stimulation is presented. To this end, a cylindrical neurite with confined extracellular space in the subthreshold regime is modeled in three-dimensional space. Through cylindrical harmonic expansion of Laplace's equation, we derive the spatio-temporal equations governing different modes of stimulation, referred to as longitudinal and transverse modes, under types of boundary conditions. The longitudinal mode is described by the well-known cable equation, however, the transverse modes are described by a novel ordinary differential equation. For the longitudinal mode, we find that different electrotonic length constants apply under the two different boundary conditions. Equations connecting current density to voltage boundary conditions are derived that are used to calculate the trans-impedance of the neurite-plus-thin-extracellular-sheath. A detailed explanation on depolarization mechanisms and the dominant current pathway under different modes of stimulation is provided. The analytic results derived here enable the estimation of a neurite's membrane potential under extracellular stimulation, hence bypassing the heavy computational cost of using numerical methods.

  1. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  2. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6.

  3. Dynamic Probing for Intrusion Detection under Resource Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    performance measure of regret, defined as the performance loss compared to that of a genie who knows the entire attack processes a priori and probes...performance as that of the omniscient genie . Index Terms—Intrusion detection, dynamic probing, non- stochastic multi-armed bandit, regret. I...dynamic probing strategy under the performance measure of regret, de ned as the performance loss compared to that of a genie who knows the entire attack

  4. Dynamics of the Kitaev chain model under parametric pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    Dynamics of the Kitaev chain model under the effect of parametric pumping is studied. Two contributions to dynamical characteristics are considered: from the extended eigenstates and from the edge bound state (zero Majorana modes). It is shown that in the dynamical regime the frequencies of Rabi oscillations for zero Majorana modes are much larger than those related to gapped extended states. In the steady-state regime, the Rabi oscillations are blurred due to relaxation processes, and only oscillations of the characteristics of the model with the pumping frequency exist, producing absorption of the pumping power by extended states. Experimental realizations of the considered effect are discussed.

  5. Centrifugal experimental study of suction bucket foundations under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaobing; Wu, Yongren; Jiao, Bintian; Wang, Shuyun

    2007-12-01

    Centrifugal experiments were carried out to investigate the responses of suction bucket foundations under horizontal and vertical dynamic loading. It is shown that when the loading amplitude is over a critical value, the sand at the upper part around the bucket is softened or even liquefied. The excess pore pressure decreases from the upper part to the lower part of the sand layer in the vertical direction and decreases radially from the bucket’s side wall in the horizontal direction. Large settlements of the bucket and the sand layer around the bucket are induced by dynamic loading. The dynamic responses of the bucket with smaller height (the same diameter) are heavier.

  6. Serum- and substratum-dependent modulation of neuritic growth.

    PubMed

    Skaper, S D; Selak, I; Varon, S

    1983-01-01

    Explants of embryonic day 8 (E8) chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have been cultured with medium containing serum or the serum-free supplement N1 on one of three substrata: collagen, polyornithine (PORN), or PORN exposed to a polyornithine-binding neurite-promoting factor (PNPF-PORN). Replicate cultures were maintained with or without nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF elicited its classical neuritic outgrowth on all three substrata in serum-containing or serum-free medium. In the absence of NGF, however, a gradation of increasing neurite growth was seen with: PNPF-PORN greater than PORN greater than collagen. This response occurred in both media. In addition, the neuritic halo in each instance was markedly more developed in the absence of serum, especially on PNPF-PORN. Nonneuronal behaviors reflected both serum and substratum influences: thus, nonneuronal outgrowth consisted mainly of flat cells with serum and collagen, was nonexistent with serum and PORN or PNPF-PORN, and involved mostly Schwann-like scattered cells in the absence of serum on any one substratum. The serum-dependent behaviors of ganglionic neurites were examined further with explants from chicken E11 sympathetic ganglia. A single substratum was used (PORN), without exogenous trophic factor. Neurite outgrowth was depressed by the presence of fetal calf serum, thus supporting the generality of this phenomenon. Lastly, PC12 cells, a clonal line of rat pheochromocytoma, will grow neurites in the presence of NGF after 48 hr in serum-free, but not serum-containing media. Addition of serum to serum-free cultures at this time results in the rapid and complete retraction of neurites.

  7. Navigating neurites utilize cellular topography of Schwann cell somas and processes for optimal guidance

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Fagundo, Cristina; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Ramchal, Talisha D.; Dingle, Yu-Ting L.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The path created by aligned Schwann cells (SCs) after nerve injury underlies peripheral nerve regeneration. We developed geometric bioinspired substrates to extract key information needed for axon guidance by deconstructing the topographical cues presented by SCs. We have previously reported materials that directly replicate SC topography with micro- and nanoscale resolution, but a detailed explanation of the means of directed axon extension on SC topography has not yet been described. Here, using neurite tracing and time-lapse microscopy, we analyzed the SC features that influence axon guidance. Novel poly(dimethylsiloxane) materials, fabricated via photolithography, incorporated bioinspired topographical components with the shapes and sizes of aligned SCs, namely somas and processes, where the length of the processes were varied but the soma geometry and dimensions were kept constant. Rat dorsal root ganglia neurites aligned to all materials presenting bioinspired topography after a 5 days in culture and to bioinspired materials presenting soma and process features after only 17 hours in culture. Key findings of this study were: Neurite response to underlying bioinspired topographical features was time dependent, where at 5 days, neurites aligned most strongly to materials presenting combinations of soma and process features, with higher than average density of either process or soma features; but at 17 hours they aligned more strongly to materials presenting average densities of soma and process features and to materials presenting process features only. These studies elucidate the influence of SC topography on axon guidance in a time-dependent setting and have implications for the optimization of nerve regeneration strategies. PMID:23557939

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of ordering of polydimethylsiloxane under uniaxial extension

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N M; Gee, R H

    2005-03-11

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bulk melts of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are utilized to study chain conformation and ordering under constant uniaxial tension. We find that large extensions induce chain ordering in the direction of applied tension. We also find that voids are created via a cavitation mechanism. This study represents a validation of the current model for PDMS and benchmark for the future study of mechanical properties of PDMS melts enriched with fillers under tension.

  9. Dynamics of Deformable Active Particles under External Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, Mitsusuke

    2017-10-01

    In most practical situations, active particles are affected by their environment, for example, by a chemical concentration gradient, light intensity, gravity, or confinement. In particular, the effect of an external flow field is important for particles swimming in a solvent fluid. For deformable active particles such as self-propelled liquid droplets and active vesicles, as well as microorganisms such as euglenas and neutrophils, a general description has been developed by focusing on shape deformation. In this review, we present our recent studies concerning the dynamics of a single active deformable particle under an external flow field. First, a set of model equations of active deformable particles including the effect of a general external flow is introduced. Then, the dynamics under two specific flow profiles is discussed: a linear shear flow, as the simplest example, and a swirl flow. In the latter case, the scattering dynamics of the active deformable particles by the swirl flow is also considered.

  10. Forest forming process and dynamic vegetation models under global change

    Treesearch

    A. Shvidenko; E. Gustafson

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyzes mathematical models that are used to project the dynamics of forest ecosystems on different spatial and temporal scales. Landscape disturbance and succession models (LDSMs) are of a particular interest for studying the forest forming process in Northern Eurasia. They have a solid empirical background and are able to model ecological processes under...

  11. Neurite Outgrowth at the Biomimetic Interface

    PubMed Central

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Liu, Yu-Ting; López-Fagundo, Cristina Y.; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the cues that guide axons and how we can optimize these cues to achieve directed neuronal growth is imperative for neural tissue engineering. Cells in the local environment influence neurons with a rich combination of cues. This study deconstructs the complex mixture of guidance cues by working at the biomimetic interface - isolating the topographical information presented by cells and determining its capacity to guide neurons. We generated replica materials presenting topographies of oriented astrocytes (ACs), endothelial cells (ECs), and Schwann cells (SCs) as well as computer-aided design materials inspired by the contours of these cells (bioinspired-CAD). These materials presented distinct topographies and anisotropies and in all cases were sufficient to guide neurons. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells and neurites demonstrated the most directed response on bioinspired-CAD materials which presented anisotropic features with 90° edges. DRG alignment was strongest on SC bioinspired-CAD materials followed by AC bioinspired-CAD materials, with more uniform orientation to EC bioinspired-CAD materials. Alignment was strongest on SC replica materials followed by AC and EC replicas. These results suggest that the topographies of anisotropic tissue structures are sufficient for neuronal guidance. This work is discussed in the context of feature dimensions, morphology, and guidepost hypotheses. PMID:20440561

  12. Soil Moisture Dynamics under Corn, Soybean, and Perennial Kura Clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T.; Venterea, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Rising global food and energy consumption call for increased agricultural production, whereas rising concerns for environmental quality call for farming systems with more favorable environmental impacts. Improved understanding and management of plant-soil water interactions are central to meeting these twin challenges. The objective of this research was to compare the temporal dynamics of soil moisture under contrasting cropping systems suited for the Midwestern region of the United States. Precipitation, infiltration, drainage, evapotranspiration, soil water storage, and freeze/thaw processes were measured hourly for three years in field plots of continuous corn (Zea mays L.), corn/soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation, and perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) in southeastern Minnesota. The evapotranspiration from the perennial clover most closely followed the temporal dynamics of precipitation, resulting in deep drainage which was reduced up to 50% relative to the annual crops. Soil moisture utilization also continued later into the fall under the clover than under the annual crops. In the annual cropping systems, crop sequence influenced the soil moisture dynamics. Soybean following corn and continuous corn exhibited evapotranspiration which was 80 mm less than and deep drainage which was 80 mm greater than that of corn following soybean. These differences occurred primarily during the spring and were associated with differences in early season plant growth between the systems. In the summer, soil moisture depletion was up to 30 mm greater under corn than soybean. Crop residue also played an important role in the soil moisture dynamics. Higher amounts of residue were associated with reduced soil freezing. This presentation will highlight key aspects of the soil moisture dynamics for these contrasting cropping systems across temporal scales ranging from hours to years. The links between soil moisture dynamics, crop yields, and nutrient leaching

  13. Astroglial differentiation is required for support of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Baird, D H; Hatten, M E; Mason, C A

    1994-05-01

    Models of astrocyte differentiation stress a lineage program that involves a progressive loss of astroglial support of neuronal differentiation. These models predict that astroglial promotion of neurite extension declines with the "age" of the astrocyte. An alternative view is that astroglial support of neurite growth is regulated by epigenetic factors that induce the cells either to differentiate and support neuronal functions or to undergo cell proliferation and fail to support neurons. To compare the contribution of astroglial cell "age" to astroglial support of neurite extension, mouse cerebellar astroglia were maintained in vitro for 3-90 d, and assayed for their ability to support neurite formation. When cultured in isolation, astroglial support of neurite extension declined with time in vitro, as assayed by quantifying outgrowth from explants of pontine nuclei, falling from a robust level just after the astroglia were harvested to negligible levels 21-90 d later. Since previous studies have shown that neurons can change the state of astroglial cells (Hatten, 1985), we tested the neurite promoting activity of astroglia that were cultured for 21-90 d in vitro and subsequently induced to differentiate by the addition of neurons. When granule neurons were added to aged astroglia and pontine explants plated 2 d later, neurite growth from the explants was exuberant, regardless of the time astroglia spent in vitro prior to the addition of neurons. The state of astroglia that were growth promoting or growth inhibiting was examined by bromodeoxyuridine staining and with antisera to glial filament protein. Aged astroglia cultured alone and thus inhibitory to axon growth, proliferated at high rates and had polygonal shapes. In contrast, aged astroglia to which neurons had been added, proliferated at low rates and developed process-bearing stellate shapes. To test further whether proliferation levels related to the growth-supporting properties of astroglia, astroglia

  14. Particle engulfment dynamics under oscillating crystal growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yutao; Sorgenfrei, Tina; Jauß, Thomas; Cröll, Arne; Reimann, Christian; Friedrich, Jochen; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2017-06-01

    To better understand the physical mechanisms behind particle engulfment dynamics under fluctuating solidification velocities, transient simulations are performed for a SiC particle in a silicon solidification system with oscillating growth rates using a rigorous finite-element model developed previously. Simulations reveal complicated behaviors that require a re-examination of the classical notion of a steady-state, critical growth velocity, vc, for particle engulfment. Under sinusoidal growth variations at a frequency representative of turbulent fluctuations in a large-scale melt, stable pushing states featuring nonlinear particle-growth front oscillations can arise, even when the maximum growth velocity slightly exceeds vc. However, higher-amplitude growth oscillations at the same frequency are shown to result in particle engulfment. Significantly, engulfment under such dynamic conditions can occur at average solidification rates far below the steady-state critical velocity, a behavior consistent with many experimental observations.

  15. SH2B1 orchestrates signaling events to filopodium formation during neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis during development is fundamental to the differentiation of several cell types. As neurite outgrowth marks neuritogenesis, formation of filopodia precede the formation of dendrites and axons. While the structure of filopodia is well-known, the initiation of filopodia during neurite outgrowth is not clear. SH2B1 is known to promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells, hippocampal and cortical neurons. As a signaling adaptor protein, SH2B1 interacts with several neurotrophin receptors, and regulates signaling as well as gene expression. Our recent findings suggest that SH2B1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane and F-actin fractions by IRSp53. IRSp53 bends plasma membrane and facilitates actin bundling to set the stage for filopodium formation. We further demonstrate that SH2B1-IRSp53 complexes enhance the formation of filopodia, dendrites and dendritic branches of hippocampal and cortical neurons. While the molecular mechanism underlying filopodium initiation is not clear, we propose that SH2B1-neurotrophin interacting sites may mark the putative sites of filopodium initiation.

  16. SH2B1 orchestrates signaling events to filopodium formation during neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis during development is fundamental to the differentiation of several cell types. As neurite outgrowth marks neuritogenesis, formation of filopodia precede the formation of dendrites and axons. While the structure of filopodia is well-known, the initiation of filopodia during neurite outgrowth is not clear. SH2B1 is known to promote neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells, hippocampal and cortical neurons. As a signaling adaptor protein, SH2B1 interacts with several neurotrophin receptors, and regulates signaling as well as gene expression. Our recent findings suggest that SH2B1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane and F-actin fractions by IRSp53. IRSp53 bends plasma membrane and facilitates actin bundling to set the stage for filopodium formation. We further demonstrate that SH2B1-IRSp53 complexes enhance the formation of filopodia, dendrites and dendritic branches of hippocampal and cortical neurons. While the molecular mechanism underlying filopodium initiation is not clear, we propose that SH2B1-neurotrophin interacting sites may mark the putative sites of filopodium initiation. PMID:26479731

  17. Hearing development and spiral ganglion neurite growth in VASP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Schick, Bernhard; Hartensuer, Rene; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Hansen, Stefan; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa E; Eigenthaler, Martin; Walter, Ulrich; Ryan, Allen F; Brors, Dominik

    2007-10-31

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) has been found to be involved in intracellular signalling pathways and to play an important role in the actin associated organization and formation of the cytoskeleton. Since differential VASP expression was noted in inner ear tissues, the present study was performed to investigate the hearing development in VASP deficient mice. Hearing development in VASP-/- mice and wild type animals was investigated by auditory brain stem (ABR) measurements. In addition, inner ear tissues of wild type animals were tested for VASP expression using PCR, Western blot analysis, in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry. To compare spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth, SG explants from VASP-/- and wild type mice were analyzed under cell culture conditions. The electroacoustical results of the present study indicate that VASP deficient mice present with a later onset of hearing during postnatal development compared to wild type animals. Transient VASP expression was detected in neonatal SG of wild type mice. Tissue culture experiments with SG explants from VASP-/- animals revealed significant alterations in SG neurite extension compared to wild types. The present findings suggest a role for VASP during neonatal development of the mammalian cochlea and allow speculation on a possible delayed innervation of cochlear hair cells due to changes in SG neurite growth in VASP-deficient mice. Temporary VASP deficits in the neonatal inner ear may be compensated by related proteins like MENA leading to a delayed but complete development of hearing function in VASP-/- animals.

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic fields potentiate neurite outgrowth in the dopaminergic MN9D cell line.

    PubMed

    Lekhraj, Rukmani; Cynamon, Deborah E; DeLuca, Stephanie E; Taub, Eric S; Pilla, Arthur A; Casper, Diana

    2014-06-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) exert biological effects and are in clinical use to facilitate bone repair and wound healing. Research has demonstrated that PEMF can induce signaling molecules and growth factors, molecules that play important roles in neuronal differentiation. Here, we tested the effects of a low-amplitude, nonthermal, pulsed radiofrequency signal on morphological neuronal differentiation in MN9D, a dopaminergic cell line. Cells were plated in medium with 10% fetal calf serum. After 1 day, medium was replaced with serum-containing medium, serum-free medium, or medium supplemented with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (Bt2 cAMP), a cAMP analog known to induce neurite outgrowth. Cultures were divided into groups and treated with PEMF signals for either 30 min per day or continuously for 15 min every hour for 3 days. Both serum withdrawal and Bt2 cAMP significantly increased neurite length. PEMF treatment similarly increased neurite length under both serum-free and serum-supplemented conditions, although to a lesser degree in the presence of serum, when continuous treatments had greater effects. PEMF signals also increased cell body width, indicating neuronal maturation, and decreased protein content, suggesting that this treatment was antimitotic, an effect reversed by the inhibitor of cAMP formation dideoxyadenosine. Bt2 cAMP and PEMF effects were not additive, suggesting that neurite elongation was achieved through a common pathway. PEMF signals increased cAMP levels from 3 to 5 hr after treatment, supporting this mechanism of action. Although neuritogenesis is considered a developmental process, it may also represent the plasticity required to form and maintain synaptic connections throughout life. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The dynamic study of locomotives under saturated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yao; Hong-jun, Zhang; Ye-ming, Li; Shi-hui, Luo

    2011-08-01

    In order to study the dynamic behaviours of locomotives under saturated adhesion, the stability and characteristics of stick-slip vibration are analysed using the concepts of mean and dynamic slip rates. The longitudinal vibration phenomenon of the wheelset when stick-slip occurs is put forward and its formation mechanism is made clear innovatively. The stick-slip vibration is a dynamic process between the stick and the slip states. The decreasing of mean and dynamic slip rates is conducive to its stability, which depends on the W/R adhesion damping. The torsion vibration of the driving system and the longitudinal vibration of the wheelset are coupled through the longitudinal tangential force when the wheelset alternates between the stick and the slip states. The longitudinal oscillation frequencies of the wheelset are integral multiples of the natural frequency of torsion vibration of the driving system. A train dynamic model integrated with an electromechanical and a control system is established to simulate the stick-slip vibration phenomenon under saturated adhesion to verify the theoretical analysis. The results show that increases of the longitudinal axle guidance stiffness and the motor suspension stiffness are beneficial to the stick-slip vibration stability and the locomotive's traction ability. The optimised matching of the longitudinal axle guidance stiffness and the motor suspension stiffness are helpful to avoid longitudinal resonance when the stick-slip vibration occurs.

  20. Progressive failure of large deformation composites under dynamic tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Liqun

    The applications of polymer based composite materials in structural components under dynamic loading have increased dramatically. The accurate understanding and modeling of the material mechanical behavior is the basis for the composite structure design and analysis. This research was designed to investigate the progressive failure nature of woven polymer-based composites under dynamic tensile loading conditions. A plain-woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite was selected and a generalized anisotropic material characterization procedure was developed. Off-axial tensile dynamic loading experiments with different strain rates and temperature was conducted. A nonlinear and rate dependent constitutive model used for the polymer-based composites under tensile dynamic tensile loading was constructed. The comparison shows a good match with testing data and a good prediction of stress to failure values. A hybrid method that combined the classical laminate theory with material microstructure analysis was presented to model the large strain to failure phenomenon. A single material parameter failure criteria based on Monkman-Grant concept was built to represent the materials anisotropic and rate dependency natural for tensile loading. And the strength concept based on the material constitution relationship and failure criteria was established to for structure analyses.

  1. Thermomechanical behavior of EUV pellicle under dynamic exposure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Bloomfield, Max O.; Colburn, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of EUV pellicles as protective layers for EUV masks requires the use of refractory materials that can tolerate large temperature excursions due to the non-negligible absorption of EUV radiation during exposure. Additionally, the mechanical stress induced on the EUV pellicle by the thermal load is dependent on the thermal expansion of the material which can be responsible for transient wrinkling. In this study, an ultrathin (20 nm), free-standing membrane based on silicon nitride is utilized as a learning vehicle to understand the material requirements of EUV pellicles under dynamic exposure conditions that are typical of commercial EUV scanners. First, the nanoscale radiative properties (emissivity) and thermo-mechanical failure temperature of the dielectric film under vacuum conditions are experimentally investigated utilizing a pulsed ArF (193 nm) probing laser. The silicon nitride membrane is found to be marginally compatible with an equivalent 80W EUV source power under steady state illumination conditions. Next, the thermal behavior of the EUV pellicle under dynamic exposure conditions is simulated using a finite element solver. The transient temperature profile and stress distribution across the membrane under stationary state conditions are extracted for an equivalent 60W EUV power source and the pellicle wrinkling due to heating and consequent impact on CD uniformity is estimated. The present work provides a generalized methodology to anticipate the thermal response of a EUV pellicle under realistic exposure conditions.

  2. A method of measuring dynamic strain under electromagnetic forming conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinling; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Sijun; Lu, Jun; Guo, Chenglong; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Liu, Lin; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic strain measurement is rather important for the characterization of mechanical behaviors in electromagnetic forming process, but it has been hindered by high strain rate and serious electromagnetic interference for years. In this work, a simple and effective strain measuring technique for physical and mechanical behavior studies in the electromagnetic forming process has been developed. High resolution (∼5 ppm) of strain curves of a budging aluminum tube in pulsed electromagnetic field has been successfully measured using this technique. The measured strain rate is about 10(5) s(-1), which depends on the discharging conditions, nearly one order of magnitude of higher than that under conventional split Hopkins pressure bar loading conditions (∼10(4) s(-1)). It has been found that the dynamic fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy is significantly enhanced during the electromagnetic forming, which explains why the formability is much larger under electromagnetic forging conditions in comparison with conventional forging processes.

  3. Phase separated microstructure and dynamics of polyurethane elastomers under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Ciprian; Padsalgikar, Ajay; Runt, James

    The molecular mobility of polyurethane elastomers is of the utmost importance in establishing physical properties for uses ranging from automotive tires and shoe soles to more sophisticated aerospace and biomedical applications. In many of these applications, chain dynamics as well as mechanical properties under external stresses/strains are critical for determining ultimate performance. In order to develop a more complete understanding of their mechanical response, we explored the effect of uniaxial strain on the phase separated microstructure and molecular dynamics of the elastomers. We utilize X-ray scattering to investigate soft segment and hard domain orientation, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy for interrogation of the dynamics. Uniaxial deformation is found to significantly perturb the phase-separated microstructure and chain orientation, and results in a considerable slowing down of the dynamics of the elastomers. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements of the polyurethanes under uniaxial deformation are also employed and the results are quantitatively correlated with mechanical tensile tests and the degree of phase separation from small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

  4. CRMP-5 interacts with actin to regulate neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    GONG, XIAOBING; TAN, MINGHUI; GAO, YUAN; CHEN, KEEN; GUO, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    CRMP family proteins (CRMPs) are abundantly expressed in the developing nervous system mediating growth cone guidance, neuronal polarity and axon elongation. CRMP-5 has been indicated to serve a critical role in neurite outgrowth. However, the detailed mechanisms of how CRMP-5 regulates neurite outgrowth remain unclear. In the current study, co-immunoprecipitation was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 interacted with the actin and tubulin cytoskeleton networks in the growth cones of developing hippocampal neurons. CRMP-5 exhibited increased affinity towards actin when compared with microtubules. Immunocytochemistry was used to identify the fact that CRMP-5 colocalized with actin predominantly in the C-domain and T-zone in growth cones. In addition, genetic inhibition of CRMP-5 by siRNA suppressed the expression of actin, growth cone development and neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of CRMP-5 promoted the interaction with actin, growth cone development and hippocampal neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these data suggest that CRMP-5 is able to interact with the actin cytoskeleton network in the growth cone and affect growth cone development and neurite outgrowth via this interaction in developing hippocampal neurons. PMID:26677106

  5. The dynamic behaviors of complementary correlations under decoherence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ming-Ming; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Complementary correlations can reveal the genuine quantum correlations present in a composite quantum system. Here, we explore an effective method to identify the entangled Bell diagonal states by means of Pearson correlation, one of the complementary correlations. Then, we extend this method to expose the dynamic behavior of complementary correlations under various kinds of decoherence channels. The sudden death and revival of entanglement can be explained by the idea of Pearson correlation. The threshold that is used to identify entanglement is proposed. Furthermore, we put forward a new method to expound the underlying physical mechanisms for which classical and quantum correlations suffer a sudden change in the decoherence process.

  6. The dynamic behaviors of complementary correlations under decoherence channels

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ming-Ming; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Complementary correlations can reveal the genuine quantum correlations present in a composite quantum system. Here, we explore an effective method to identify the entangled Bell diagonal states by means of Pearson correlation, one of the complementary correlations. Then, we extend this method to expose the dynamic behavior of complementary correlations under various kinds of decoherence channels. The sudden death and revival of entanglement can be explained by the idea of Pearson correlation. The threshold that is used to identify entanglement is proposed. Furthermore, we put forward a new method to expound the underlying physical mechanisms for which classical and quantum correlations suffer a sudden change in the decoherence process. PMID:28134291

  7. Dynamic Buckling on Rectangular Plates under Axial Step Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Bin-Bin; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering the effects of shear deformation and stress wave, the dynamic buckling governing equations of rectangular plates under axial step load are established. Based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the expression of the critical load is got. The relation curve between the critical load and critical length is described by using MATLAB software. In this paper, the influences of thickness, first-order shear deformation (FSD), and the number of modes are discussed.

  8. Hidden structures of information transport underlying spiral wave dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; James, Ryan G.

    2017-01-01

    A spiral wave is a macroscopic dynamics of excitable media that plays an important role in several distinct systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, seizures in the brain, and lethal arrhythmia in the heart. Because the spiral wave dynamics can exhibit a wide spectrum of behaviors, its precise quantification can be challenging. Here we present a hybrid geometric and information-theoretic approach to quantifying the spiral wave dynamics. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by applying it to numerical simulations of a two-dimensional excitable medium with different numbers and spatial patterns of spiral waves. We show that, by defining the information flow over the excitable medium, hidden coherent structures emerge that effectively quantify the information transport underlying the spiral wave dynamics. Most importantly, we find that some coherent structures become more clearly defined over a longer observation period. These findings provide validity with our approach to quantitatively characterize the spiral wave dynamics by focusing on information transport. Our approach is computationally efficient and is applicable to many excitable media of interest in distinct physical, chemical, and biological systems. Our approach could ultimately contribute to an improved therapy of clinical conditions such as seizures and cardiac arrhythmia by identifying potential targets of interventional therapies.

  9. Dynamics of Deinococcus radiodurans under Controlled Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Sidhartha S.; Joshi, Hiren M.; Sabareesh, K. P. V.; Tata, B. V. R.; Rao, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a potent radiation resistant bacterium with immense potential in nuclear waste treatment. In this investigation, the translational and rotational dynamics of dilute suspensions of D. radiodurans cultured under controlled growth conditions was studied by the polarized and depolarized dynamic light-scattering (DLS) techniques. Additionally, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used for characterizing the cultured samples and also for identification of D. radiodurans dimer, tetramer, and multimer morphologies. The data obtained showed translational diffusion coefficients (DT) of 1.2 × 10−9, 1.97 × 10−9, and 2.12 × 10−9 cm2 /s, corresponding to an average size of 3.61, 2.22, and 2.06 μm, respectively, for live multimer, tetramer, and dimer forms of D. radiodurans. Depolarized DLS experiments showed very slow rotational diffusion coefficients (DR) of 0.182/s for dimer and 0.098/s for tetramer morphologies. No measurable rotational diffusion was observed for multimer form. Polarized DLS measurements on live D. radiodurans confirmed that the bacterium is nonmotile in nature. The dynamics of the dead dimer and tetramer D. radiodurans were also studied using polarized and depolarized DLS experiments and compared with the dynamics of live species. The dead cells were slightly smaller in size when compared to the live cells. However, no additional information could be obtained for dead cells from the polarized and depolarized dynamic light-scattering studies. PMID:16829564

  10. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  11. Shoc2/Sur8 Protein Regulates Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Gonzalo; Sanchez-Ruiloba, Lucia; Perez-Rodriguez, Andrea; Gragera, Teresa; Martinez, Natalia; Hernandez, Silvia; Anta, Berta; Calero, Olga; Garcia-Dominguez, Carlota A.; Dura, Lara M.; Peña-Jimenez, Daniel; Castro, Judit; Zarich, Natasha; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Calero, Miguel; Iglesias, Teresa; Oliva, Jose L.; Rojas, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth. PMID:25514808

  12. Shoc2/Sur8 protein regulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Leon, Gonzalo; Sanchez-Ruiloba, Lucia; Perez-Rodriguez, Andrea; Gragera, Teresa; Martinez, Natalia; Hernandez, Silvia; Anta, Berta; Calero, Olga; Garcia-Dominguez, Carlota A; Dura, Lara M; Peña-Jimenez, Daniel; Castro, Judit; Zarich, Natasha; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Calero, Miguel; Iglesias, Teresa; Oliva, Jose L; Rojas, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth.

  13. The transcription factor ATF-3 promotes neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Seijffers, Rhona; Allchorne, Andrew J; Woolf, Clifford J

    2006-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons regenerate after a peripheral nerve injury but not after injury to their axons in the spinal cord. A key question is which transcription factors drive the changes in gene expression that increase the intrinsic growth state of peripherally injured sensory neurons? A prime candidate is activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a transcription factor that we find is induced in all DRG neurons after peripheral, but not central axonal injury. Moreover, we show in adult DRG neurons that a preconditioning peripheral, but not central axonal injury, increases their growth, correlating closely with the pattern of ATF-3 induction. Using viral vectors, we delivered ATF-3 to cultured adult DRG neurons and find that ATF-3 enhances neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, ATF-3 promotes long sparsely branched neurites. ATF-3 overexpression did not increase c-Jun expression. ATF-3 may contribute, therefore, to neurite outgrowth by orchestrating the gene expression responses in injured neurons.

  14. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bipin; Pradhan, Anju

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection affecting mainly the skin and peripheral nerve. Pure neuritic form of this disease manifests by involvement of the nerve in the absence of skin lesions. Therefore, it can sometimes create a diagnostic problem. It often requires a nerve biopsy for diagnosis, which is an invasive procedure and may lead to neural deficit. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of an affected nerve can be a valuable and less invasive procedure for the diagnosis of such cases. We report five suspected cases of pure neuritic Hansen's disease involving the common and superficial peroneal, ulnar, and median nerve, who underwent FNAC. Smears revealed nerve fibers infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells in all cases, presence of epithelioid cells granulomas, and Langhans giant cells in three cases, and acid fast bacilli in two cases. In conclusion, FNAC is a safe, less invasive, and time saving procedure for the diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy. PMID:21660285

  15. Material Stiffness Effects on Neurite Alignment to Photopolymerized Micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to direct neurite growth into a close proximity of stimulating elements of a neural prosthesis, such as a retinal or cochlear implant (CI), may enhance device performance and overcome current spatial signal resolution barriers. In this work, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), which are the target neurons to be stimulated by CIs, were cultured on photopolymerized micropatterns with varied matrix stiffnesses to determine the effect of rigidity on neurite alignment to physical cues. Micropatterns were generated on methacrylate thin film surfaces in a simple, rapid photopolymerization step by photomasking the prepolymer formulation with parallel line–space gratings. Two methacrylate series, a nonpolar HMA-co-HDDMA series and a polar PEGDMA-co-EGDMA series, with significantly different surface wetting properties were evaluated. Equivalent pattern periodicity was maintained across each methacrylate series based on photomask band spacing, and the feature amplitude was tuned to a depth of 2 μm amplitude for all compositions using the temporal control afforded by the UV curing methodology. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. All micropatterned films adsorb similar amounts of laminin from solution, and no significant difference in SGN survival was observed when the substrate compositions were compared. SGN neurite alignment significantly increases with increasing material modulus for both methacrylate series. Interestingly, SGN neurites respond to material stiffness cues that are orders of magnitude higher (GPa) than what is typically ascribed to neural environments (kPa). The ability to understand neurite response to engineered physical cues and mechanical properties such as matrix stiffness will allow the development of advanced biomaterials that direct de novo neurite growth to address the spatial signal resolution limitations of current neural prosthetics. PMID:25211120

  16. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes promote neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Donnelly, Paul S; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, Cu(II)(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II)(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, Cu(II)(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II)(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II)(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between Cu(II)(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes.

  17. Neuroprotective Copper Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes Promote Neurite Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bica, Laura; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Volitakis, Irene; Paterson, Brett M.; Cappai, Roberto; Grubman, Alexandra; Camakaris, James; Crouch, Peter J.; White, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato)-copper complex, CuII(gtsm) on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes) in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that CuII(gtsm) induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex, CuII(atsm), but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by CuII(gtsm) was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75–99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM CuII(gtsm) treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that CuII(gtsm) inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor) resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM CuII(gtsm), suggesting a potential link between CuII(gtsm)-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes. PMID:24587210

  18. Dynamic failure behavior of ceramics under multiaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weinong

    An experimental technique has been developed that is capable of (1) dynamically loading the specimen in multiaxial compression; (2) controlling the stress state in the specimen in the range from uniaxial stress to uniaxial strain; and (3) allowing the recovery of the sample after loaded by a single, well defined pulse for the characterization of the failure mode. In this technique, cylindrical ceramic specimens were loaded in the axial direction using a split Hopkinson pressure bar modified to apply a single loading pulse, and were confined laterally either by shrink fit sleeves, or by eletro-magnetic force.Quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial compression experiments have been performed on a machinable glass ceramic, Macor, and a monolithic engineering ceramic, sintered aluminum nitride (A1N). The cylindrical ceramic specimens were confned laterally by shrink fit sleeves: the amount of confining pressure (0-230 MPa) was varied by using different sleeve materials. The quasi-static axial load was applied by a hydraulic driven Material Test System (MTS), whereas the dynamic axial load was provided by a modified split Hopkinson (Kolsky) pressure bar (SHPB). Under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions, the experimental results for both materials showed that the failure mode changed from fragmentation by axial splitting under conditions of uniaxial stress (without lateral confinement) to localized deformation on faults under moderate lateral confinement. The fault initiation process was studied experimentally in detail. Based on the experimental results, a compressive brittle failure process was summarized. A transition from brittle to ductile behavior was observed in Macor under high confinement pressure which was achieved using a second sleeve around the inner sleeve. The compressive failure strengths of both materials increased with increasing confinement pressure under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The highest dynamic compressive

  19. Automatic quantification of neurite outgrowth by means of image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wouwer, Gert; Nuydens, Rony; Meert, Theo; Weyn, Barbara

    2004-07-01

    A system for quantification of neurite outgrowth in in-vitro experiments is described. The system is developed for routine use in a high-throughput setting and is therefore needs fast, cheap, and robust. It relies on automated digital microscopical imaging of microtiter plates. Image analysis is applied to extract features for characterisation of neurite outgrowth. The system is tested in a dose-response experiment on PC12 cells + Taxol. The performance of the system and its ability to measure changes on neuronal morphology is studied.

  20. Alignment and Stiffening of Liquid Crystal Elastomers under Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Aditya; Patra, Prabir; Ajayan, Pulickel; Chapman, Walter; Verduzco, Rafael

    2013-03-01

    Biological tissues have the remarkable ability to remodel and repair in response to disease, injury, and mechanical stresses, a phenomenon known ``functional adaptation'' or ``remodeling''. Herein, we report similar behavior in polydomain liquid crystal elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers dramatically increase in stiffness by up to 90 % under low-amplitude, repetitive (dynamic) compression. By studying a systematic series of materials, we demonstrate that the stiffness increase is directly influenced by the liquid crystal content of the elastomers, the presence of a nematic liquid crystal phase and the use of a dynamic as opposed to static deformation. Through a combination of rheological measurements, polarizing optical microscopy and 2-D X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that self-stiffening arises due to rotations of the nematic director in response to dynamic compression, and show that the behavior is consistent with the theory for nematic rubber elasticity. Previous work with liquid crystal elastomers has focused primarily on `soft elastic' deformations at large strains, but our findings indicate rich behavior at previously overlooked low-strain, dynamic deformations.

  1. General polytropic dynamic cylinder under self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We explore self-similar hydrodynamics of general polytropic (GP) and isothermal cylinders of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry under self-gravity. Specific entropy conservation along streamlines serves as the dynamic equation of state. Together with possible axial flows, we construct classes of analytic and semi-analytic non-linear dynamic solutions for either cylindrical expansion or contraction radially by solving cylindrical Lane-Emden equations. By extensive numerical explorations and fitting trials in reference to asymptotes derived for large index n, we infer several convenient empirical formulae for characteristic solution properties of cylindrical Lane-Emden equations in terms of n values. A new type of asymptotic solutions for small x is also derived in the Appendix. These analyses offer hints for self-similar dynamic evolution of molecular filaments for forming protostars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets and of large-scale gaseous arms or starburst rings in (barred) spiral galaxies for forming young massive stars. Such dynamic solutions are necessary starting background for further three-dimensional (in)stability analysis of various modes. They may be used to initialize numerical simulations and serve as important benchmarks for testing numerical codes. Such GP formalism can be further generalized to include magnetic field for a GP magnetohydrodynamic analysis.

  2. Transmission dynamics of the monogenean Gyrodactylus salaris under seminatural conditions.

    PubMed

    Hendrichsen, D K; Kristoffersen, R; Gjelland, K Ø; Knudsen, R; Kusterle, S; Rikardsen, A H; Henriksen, E H; Smalås, A; Olstad, K

    2015-06-01

    Tracking individual variation in the dynamics of parasite infections in wild populations is often complicated by lack of knowledge of the epidemiological history of hosts. Whereas the dynamics and development of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, on Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., are known from laboratory studies, knowledge about infection development on individual wild fishes is currently sparse. In this study, the dynamics of an infection of G. salaris on individually marked Atlantic salmon parr was followed in a section of a natural stream. During the 6-week experiment, the prevalence increased from 3.3 to 60.0%, with an average increase in intensity of 4.1% day(-1) . Survival analyses showed an initially high probability (93.6%) of staying uninfected by G. salaris, decreasing significantly to 37% after 6 weeks. The results showed that even at subarctic water temperatures and with an initially low risk of infection, the parasite spread rapidly in the Atlantic salmon population, with the capacity to reach 100% prevalence within a short summer season. The study thus track individual infection trajectories of Atlantic salmon living under near-natural conditions, providing an integration of key population parameters from controlled experiments with the dynamics of the epizootic observed in free-living living populations.

  3. Dynamic compressive failure of a glass ceramic under lateral confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weinong; Ravichandran, G.

    1997-08-01

    An experimental technique has been developed for imposing controlled multi-axial loading on cylindrical ceramic specimens. The multi-axial loading is achieved by superposing passive lateral confinement upon axial compression. Descriptions of the experimental technique, as well as experimental results for a machinable glass ceramic, Macor, are presented. The axial compression was applied using a Kolsky (split Hopkinson) pressure bar modified to apply a single loading pulse. Experiments were also conducted under quasi-static conditions using a servo-hydraulic load frame. The specimens were confined laterally using shrink-fit metal sleeves. The confining pressure ranges from 10 to 230 MPa. Under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions, the experimental results showed that the failure mode changes from fragmentation by axial splitting without confinement to localized faulting under moderate lateral confinement (10-120 MPa). The process of fault initiation was characterized in detail for specimens under moderate confinement. Based on the experimental results, a compressive failure mechanism was proposed for brittle materials under moderate lateral confinement. The Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion was found to fit the experimental strength data. The failure criterion is shown to be consistent with the analytical results from a micromechanical model for brittle failure. Transition from brittle to ductile behavior was observed under high confinement (230 MPa).

  4. Arf6 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cytohesin-2 Binds to CCDC120 and Is Transported Along Neurites to Mediate Neurite Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tago, Kenji; Sango, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of neurite growth is complicated, involving continuous cytoskeletal rearrangement and vesicular trafficking. Cytohesin-2 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6, an Arf family molecular switch protein, controlling cell morphological changes such as neuritogenesis. Here, we show that cytohesin-2 binds to a protein with a previously unknown function, CCDC120, which contains three coiled-coil domains, and is transported along neurites in differentiating N1E-115 cells. Transfection of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for CCDC120 into cells inhibits neurite growth and Arf6 activation. When neurites start to extend, vesicles containing CCDC120 and cytohesin-2 are transported in an anterograde manner rather than a retrograde one. As neurites continue extension, anterograde vesicle transport decreases. CCDC120 knockdown inhibits cytohesin-2 localization into vesicles containing CCDC120 and diffuses cytohesin-2 in cytoplasmic regions, illustrating that CCDC120 determines cytohesin-2 localization in growing neurites. Reintroduction of the wild type CCDC120 construct into cells transfected with CCDC120 siRNA reverses blunted neurite growth and Arf6 activity, whereas the cytohesin-2-binding CC1 region-deficient CCDC120 construct does not. Thus, cytohesin-2 is transported along neurites by vesicles containing CCDC120, and it mediates neurite growth. These results suggest a mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6 is transported to mediate neurite growth. PMID:25326380

  5. The role of calsyntenin-3 in dystrophic neurite formation in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya

    2016-03-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) oligomers may play an important role in the early pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: cognitive impairment caused by synaptic dysfunction. Dystrophic neurites surrounding Aβ plaques, another pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease, are plaque-associated neuritic alterations preceding the appearance of synaptic loss. In the present review, we focus on the mechanism of dystrophic neurite formation by Aß oligomers, and discuss the neurotoxic role of Aβ-induced calsyntenin-3 in mediating dystrophic neurite formation.

  6. Modeling the Underlying Dynamics of the Spread of Crime

    PubMed Central

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P.; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters—patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars—we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy. PMID:24694545

  7. Control of articulated snake robot under dynamic active constraints.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Ka-Wai; Vitiello, Valentina; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Flexible, ergonomically enhanced surgical robots have important applications to transluminal endoscopic surgery, for which path-following and dynamic shape conformance are essential. In this paper, kinematic control of a snake robot for motion stabilisation under dynamic active constraints is addressed. The main objective is to enable the robot to track the visual target accurately and steadily on deforming tissue whilst conforming to pre-defined anatomical constraints. The motion tracking can also be augmented with manual control. By taking into account the physical limits in terms of maximum frequency response of the system (manifested as a delay between the input of the manipulator and the movement of the end-effector), we show the importance of visual-motor synchronisation for performing accurate smooth pursuit movements. Detailed user experiments are performed to demonstrate the practical value of the proposed control mechanism.

  8. Analytical model for a polymer optical fiber under dynamic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; Pontes, Maria José

    2017-08-01

    Advantages such as sensibility in bending, high fracture toughness, and high sensibility in strain enable the application of polymer optical fibers as sensors for strain, temperature, level, and for angle measurements. In order to enhance the sensor design, this paper presents an analytical model for a side polished polymer optical fiber under dynamic bending. Differently from analytical models that use only the geometrical optics approach with no correction for the stress-optical effects, here the refractive index is corrected at every bending angle to consider the stress-optical effects observed polymer optical fibers. Furthermore, the viscoelastic response of the polymer is also considered. The model is validated in quasi-static and dynamic tests for a polymer optical fiber curvature sensor. Results show good agreement between the model and the experiments.

  9. Modeling the underlying dynamics of the spread of crime.

    PubMed

    McMillon, David; Simon, Carl P; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The spread of crime is a complex, dynamic process that calls for a systems level approach. Here, we build and analyze a series of dynamical systems models of the spread of crime, imprisonment and recidivism, using only abstract transition parameters. To find the general patterns among these parameters--patterns that are independent of the underlying particulars--we compute analytic expressions for the equilibria and for the tipping points between high-crime and low-crime equilibria in these models. We use these expressions to examine, in particular, the effects of longer prison terms and of increased incarceration rates on the prevalence of crime, with a follow-up analysis on the effects of a Three-Strike Policy.

  10. Ferroelastic domain switching dynamics under electrical and mechanical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Nelson, Christopher T.; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Duan, Chen; Trassin, Morgan; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Guo, Hua; Li, Linze; Wang, Yiran; Chu, Ying-Hao; Minor, Andrew M.; Eom, Chang-Beom; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2014-05-01

    In thin film ferroelectric devices, switching of ferroelastic domains can significantly enhance electromechanical response. Previous studies have shown disagreement regarding the mobility or immobility of ferroelastic domain walls, indicating that switching behaviour strongly depends on specific microstructures in ferroelectric systems. Here we study the switching dynamics of individual ferroelastic domains in thin Pb(Zr0.2,Ti0.8)O3 films under electrical and mechanical excitations by using in situ transmission electron microscopy and phase-field modelling. We find that ferroelastic domains can be effectively and permanently stabilized by dislocations at the substrate interface while similar domains at free surfaces without pinning dislocations can be removed by either electric or stress fields. For both electrical and mechanical switching, ferroelastic switching is found to occur most readily at the highly active needle points in ferroelastic domains. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of polarization switching dynamics as well as the engineering of ferroelectric devices.

  11. Cracks dynamics under tensional stress - a DEM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debski, Wojciech; Klejment, Piotr; Kosmala, Alicja; Foltyn, Natalia; Szpindler, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Breaking and fragmentation of solid materials is an extremely complex process involving scales ranging from an atomic scale (breaking inter-atomic bounds) up to thousands of kilometers in case of catastrophic earthquakes (in energy scale it ranges from single eV up to 1024 J). Such a large scale span of breaking processes opens lot of questions like, for example, scaling of breaking processes, existence of factors controlling final size of broken area, existence of precursors, dynamics of fragmentation, to name a few. The classical approach to study breaking process at seismological scales, i.e., physical processes in earthquake foci, is essentially based on two factors: seismic data (mostly) and the continuum mechanics (including the linear fracture mechanics). Such approach has been gratefully successful in developing kinematic (first) and dynamic (recently) models of seismic rupture and explaining many of earthquake features observed all around the globe. However, such approach will sooner or latter face a limitation due to a limited information content of seismic data and inherit limitations of the fracture mechanics principles. A way of avoiding this expected limitation is turning an attention towards a well established in physics method of computational simulations - a powerful branch of contemporary physics. In this presentation we discuss preliminary results of analysis of fracturing dynamics under external tensional forces using the Discrete Element Method approach. We demonstrate that even under a very simplified tensional conditions, the fragmentation dynamics is a very complex process, including multi-fracturing, spontaneous fracture generation and healing, etc. We also emphasis a role of material heterogeneity on the fragmentation process.

  12. Organic Photovoltaics and Bioelectrodes Providing Electrical Stimulation for PC12 Cell Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Sheng; Liao, Yan-Hao; Chen, Huan-Lin; Chen, Peilin; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2016-04-13

    Current bioelectronic medicines for neurological therapies generally involve treatment with a bioelectronic system comprising a power supply unit and a bioelectrode device. Further integration of wireless and self-powered units is of practical importance for implantable bioelectronics. In this study, we developed biocompatible organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for serving as wireless electrical power supply units that can be operated under illumination with near-infrared (NIR) light, and organic bioelectronic interface (OBEI) electrode devices as neural stimulation electrodes. The OPV/OBEI integrated system is capable to provide electrical stimulation (ES) as a means of enhancing neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. For the OPV design, we prepared devices incorporating two photoactive material systems--β-carotene/N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (β-carotene/PTCDI-C8) and poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM)--that exhibited open circuit voltages of 0.11 and 0.49 V, respectively, under NIR light LED (NLED) illumination. Then, we connected OBEI devices with different electrode gaps, incorporating biocompatible poly(hydroxymethylated-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), to OPVs to precisely tailor the direct current electric field conditions during the culturing of PC12 cells. This NIR light-driven OPV/OBEI system could be engineered to provide tunable control over the electric field (from 220 to 980 mV mm(-1)) to promote 64% enhancement in the neurite length, direct the neurite orientation on chips, or both. The OPV/OBEI integrated systems under NIR illumination appear to function as effective power delivery platforms that should meet the requirements for wirelessly offering medical ES to a portion of the nervous system; they might also be a key technology for the development of next-generation implantable bioelectronics.

  13. Transthyretin provides trophic support via megalin by promoting neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, J R; Nogueira, RS; Vieira, M; Santos, SD; Ferraz-Nogueira, J P; Relvas, J B; Saraiva, M J

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a protein whose function has been associated to binding and distribution of thyroid hormones in the body and brain. However, little is known regarding the downstream signaling pathways triggered by wild-type TTR in the CNS either in neuroprotection of cerebral ischemia or in physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated how TTR affects hippocampal neurons in physiologic/pathologic conditions. Recombinant TTR significantly boosted neurite outgrowth in mice hippocampal neurons, both in number and length, independently of its ligands. This TTR neuritogenic activity is mediated by the megalin receptor and is lost in megalin-deficient neurons. We also found that TTR activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways (ERK1/2) and Akt through Src, leading to the phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB. In addition, TTR promoted a transient rise in intracellular calcium through NMDA receptors, in a Src/megalin-dependent manner. Moreover, under excitotoxic conditions, TTR stimulation rescued cell death and neurite loss in TTR KO hippocampal neurons, which are more sensitive to excitotoxic degeneration than WT neurons, in a megalin-dependent manner. CREB was also activated by TTR under excitotoxic conditions, contributing to changes in the balance between Bcl2 protein family members, toward anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2/BclXL versus Bax). Finally, we clarify that TTR KO mice subjected to pMCAO have larger infarcts than WT mice, because of TTR and megalin neuronal downregulation. Our results indicate that TTR might be regarded as a neurotrophic factor, because it stimulates neurite outgrowth under physiological conditions, and promotes neuroprotection in ischemic conditions. PMID:27518433

  14. Dynamic failure of borosilicate glass under various loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xu

    Threats from Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and other small arms such as armor piecing bullets posed significant challenges to light-weight vehicle armor protection, especially the window armor protection, since the windows are one of the most critical but yet vulnerable parts in an armor vehicle. However, existing knowledge of the dynamic behavior of glasses, which is of key importance to understand the penetration process and thus to optimize the effective armor design, is unsatisfactory due to the lack of reliable experimental techniques to characterize the response of glass armor materials under impact loading conditions. In this thesis, a series of experimental methods based on the Kolsky bar technique were established to study the stress state and temperature dependence of dynamic failure and fracture for a borosilicate glass with a variety of surface conditions. The purpose of each experimental method is to evaluate one or several loading conditions that the armor target could have involved during the penetration process. Quantitative compressive strength values are obtained as a function of stress states through the specimen geometry design. Shear stress is introduced and its effect on the equivalent failure strength was investigated by a "hybrid" experimental and numerical method. The crack propagation under the proposed compression/shear stress state is found to follow the maximum compressive principal stress direction. The dynamic flexural strength of borosilicate glass is studied via both four-point bending and ring-on-ring equibiaxial bending techniques. Variation in the flexural strength of more than an order of magnitude is achieved through proper surface treatments, and the mechanisms are explained on the basis of surface defects morphology. In the last part of this research, the temperature effects on the dynamic response of both intact and damaged borosilicate glass are investigated. The surface defect and the dynamic flexural strength of

  15. Laminar stream of detergents for subcellular neurite damage in a microfluidic device: a simple tool for the study of neuroregeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Young; Romanova, Elena V.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The regeneration and repair of damaged neuronal networks is a difficult process to study in vivo, leading to the development of multiple in vitro models and techniques for studying nerve injury. Here we describe an approach for generating a well-defined subcellular neurite injury in a microfluidic device. Approach. A defined laminar stream of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to damage selected portions of neurites of individual neurons. The somata and neurites unaffected by the SDS stream remained viable, thereby enabling the study of neuronal regeneration. Main results. By using well-characterized neurons from Aplysia californica cultured in vitro, we demonstrate that our approach is useful in creating neurite damage, investigating neurotrophic factors, and monitoring somata migration during regeneration. Supplementing the culture medium with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or Aplysia hemolymph facilitated the regeneration of the peptidergic Aplysia neurons within 72 h, with longer (p < 0.05) and more branched (p < 0.05) neurites than in the control medium. After the neurons were transected, their somata migrated; intriguingly, for the control cultures, the migration direction was always away from the injury site (7/7). In the supplemented cultures, the number decreased to 6/8 in AChE and 4/8 in hemolymph, with reduced migration distances in both cases. Significance. The SDS transection approach is simple and inexpensive, yet provides flexibility in studying neuroregeneration, particularly when it is important to make sure there are no retrograde signals from the distal segments affecting regeneration. Neurons are known to not only be under tension but also balanced in terms of force, and the balance is obviously disrupted by transection. Our experimental platform, verified with Aplysia, can be extended to mammalian systems, and help us gain insight into the role that neurotrophic factors and mechanical tension play during neuronal regeneration.

  16. Inhibitory effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus extracts on amyloid beta(25-35)-induced neuritic atrophy and synaptic loss.

    PubMed

    Tohda, Chihiro; Ichimura, Mahoko; Bai, Yanjing; Tanaka, Ken; Zhu, Shu; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2008-07-01

    Neurons with atrophic neurites may remain alive and therefore may have the potential to regenerate even when neuronal death has occurred in some parts of the brain. This study aimed to explore effects of drugs that can facilitate the regeneration of neurites and the reconstruction of synapses even in severely damaged neurons. We investigated the effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus extracts on the regeneration of neurites and the reconstruction of synapses in rat cultured cortical neurons damaged by amyloid beta (Abeta)(25-35). Treatment with Abeta(25-35) (10 microM) induced axonal and dendritic atrophies and synaptic loss in cortical neurons. Subsequent treatment with the methanol extract and the water extract of E. senticosus (10 - 1000 ng/ml) resulted in significant axonal and dendritic regenerations and reconstruction of neuronal synapses. Co-application of the extract and Abeta(25-35) attenuated Abeta(25-35)-induced neuronal death. We investigated neurite outgrowth activities of eleutherosides B and E and isoflaxidin, which are known as major compounds in E. senticosus. Although eleutheroside B protected against Abeta(25-35)-induced dendritic and axonal atrophies, the activities of eleutheroside E and isofraxidin were less than that of eleutheroside B. Although the contents of these three compounds in the water extract were less than in the methanol extract, restoring activities against neuronal damages were not different between the two extracts. In conclusion, extracts of E. senticosus protect against neuritic atrophy and cell death under Abeta treatment, and one of active constituents may be eleutheroside B.

  17. Dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Favi, Pelagie M; Zhang, Qiu; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Mamontov, Eugene; Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Palmer, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The effects of static electric field on the dynamics of lysozyme and its hydration water have been investigated by means of incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS). Measurements were performed on lysozyme samples, hydrated respectively with heavy water (D2O) to capture the protein dynamics, and with light water (H2O), to probe the dynamics of the hydration shell, in the temperature range from 210 < T < 260 K. The hydration fraction in both cases was about 0.38 gram of water per gram of dry protein. The field strengths investigated were respectively 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm ( 2 106 V/m) for the protein hydrated with D2O and 0 kV and 1 kV/mm for the H2O-hydrated counterpart. While the overall internal protons dynamics of the protein appears to be unaffected by the application of electric field up to 2 kV/mm, likely due to the stronger intra-molecular interactions, there is also no appreciable quantitative enhancement of the diffusive dynamics of the hydration water, as would be anticipated based on our recent observations in water confined in silica pores under field values of 2.5 kV/mm. This may be due to the difference in surface interactions between water and the two adsorption hosts (silica and protein), or to the existence of a critical threshold field value Ec 2 3 kV/mm for increased molecular diffusion, for which electrical breakdown is a limitation for our sample.

  18. Dynamic performance of slender suspension footbridges under eccentric walking dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Hui; Thambiratnam, David P.; Perera, Nimal J.

    2007-06-01

    This paper treats the vibration of slender suspension footbridges caused by eccentrically distributed walking dynamic loads. A suspension footbridge model with reverse profiled cables in both the vertical and horizontal planes was used in this conceptual study, while SAP2000 package is adopted in the numerical analysis. The dynamic behaviour of slender footbridges under walking dynamic loads is simulated by resonant vibration caused by synchronous excitations. It is found that slender suspension footbridges with shallow cable profiles often have coupled vibration modes such as coupled lateral-torsional or coupled torsional-lateral modes. When these coupled vibration modes are excited by walking pedestrians, excessive lateral vibration can be induced. Results also show that the effects of the reverse profiled cables on the dynamic performance in different vibration modes are complex. Reverse profiled cables in the horizontal plane can significantly suppress the lateral vibration in coupled lateral-torsional modes, but slightly increase the lateral vibration in coupled torsional-lateral modes.

  19. Dynamical structure underlying inverse stochastic resonance and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntarla, Muhammet; Cressman, John R.; Ozer, Mahmut; Barreto, Ernest

    2013-10-01

    We investigate inverse stochastic resonance (ISR), a recently reported phenomenon in which the spiking activity of a Hodgkin-Huxley model neuron subject to external noise exhibits a pronounced minimum as the noise intensity increases. We clarify the mechanism that underlies ISR and show that its most surprising features are a consequence of the dynamical structure of the model. Furthermore, we show that the ISR effect depends strongly on the procedures used to measure it. Our results are important for the experimentalist who seeks to observe the ISR phenomenon.

  20. Dynamics of a Complete Wetting Liquid Under Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C.-T.; Lequeux, F.; Limat, L.

    We describe a simple model of a contact line under purely diffusive evaporation and complete wetting condition taking into account the divergent nature of evaporative flux near the contact line as proposed by Deegan et al. [Nature 389:827, 1997] by using electrostatic analogy. We show the existence of a precursor film at the edge of the liquid and generalize Tanner's law accounting for evaporative effects. We apply this model to the problem of evaporation of a liquid droplet and partly recover the dynamics of spreading and retraction found in experiments [Poulard et al., Langmuir 21:8226-8233, 2005].

  1. Force distribution in a granular medium under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylenko, Vyacheslav A.; Mykulyak, Sergiy V.; Polyakovskyi, Volodymyr O.; Kulich, Vasyl V.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2017-07-01

    Force distribution in a granular medium subjected to an impulse loading is investigated in experiment and computer simulations. An experimental technique is developed to measure forces acting on individual grains at the bottom of the granular sample consisting of steel balls. Discrete element method simulation also is performed under conditions mimicking those in experiment. Both theory and experiment display exponentially decaying maximum force distributions at the bottom of the sample in the range of large forces. In addition, the simulations also reveal exponential force distribution throughout the sample and uncover correlation properties of the interparticle forces during dynamic loading of the granular samples. Simulated time dependence of coordination number, orientational order parameter, correlation radius, and force distribution clearly demonstrates the nonequilibrium character of the deformation process in a granular medium under impulse loading.

  2. Angular-compliant hydrodynamic bearing performance under dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnoy, A.; Rachoor, H.

    1993-07-01

    The study is focused on a dynamically loaded composite bearing, consisting of a hydrodynamic journal bearing inside the internal race of a rolling-element bearing. In this combination, the hydrodynamic bearing has an angular-compliant sleeve with a restricted freedom of rotation around its axis. Under static loads, the improvement is primarily in a significant reduction of friction and wear during the starting and stopping. Under periodical loads, our analysis shows that the performance depends on two dimensionless design parameters. Below particular critical values of these parameters, the results show a considerable improvement, demonstrated by a reduction of the maximum eccentricity. However, above the critical values, the bearing becomes unstable. These results indicate the significance of incorporating this computer assisted computation for each design.

  3. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.; Anastasiadis, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (Hybrane® S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-Tg motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, Tg. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- Tg beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na+-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer Tg, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  4. Protein Under Pressure: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Arc Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Trzesniak, Daniel Rodrigo F.; Lins, Roberto D.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogenbonding pattern of the intermolecular -sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the -sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  5. Dynamic Myofibrillar Remodeling in Live Cardiomyocytes under Static Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huaxiao; Schmidt, Lucas P.; Wang, Zhonghai; Yang, Xiaoqi; Shao, Yonghong; Borg, Thomas K.; Markwald, Roger; Runyan, Raymond; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2016-01-01

    An increase in mechanical load in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy, either physiologically (heart development, exercise and pregnancy) or pathologically (high blood pressure and heart-valve regurgitation). Understanding cardiac hypertrophy is critical to comprehending the mechanisms of heart development and treatment of heart disease. However, the major molecular event that occurs during physiological or pathological hypertrophy is the dynamic process of sarcomeric addition, and it has not been observed. In this study, a custom-built second harmonic generation (SHG) confocal microscope was used to study dynamic sarcomeric addition in single neonatal CMs in a 3D culture system under acute, uniaxial, static, sustained stretch. Here we report, for the first time, live-cell observations of various modes of dynamic sarcomeric addition (and how these real-time images compare to static images from hypertrophic hearts reported in the literature): 1) Insertion in the mid-region or addition at the end of a myofibril; 2) Sequential addition with an existing myofibril as a template; and 3) Longitudinal splitting of an existing myofibril. The 3D cell culture system developed on a deformable substrate affixed to a stretcher and the SHG live-cell imaging technique are unique tools for real-time analysis of cultured models of hypertrophy. PMID:26861590

  6. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adherence to Collagen under Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Nehal; Teeters, Mark A.; Patti, Joseph M.; Höök, Magnus; Ross, Julia M.

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common etiological agent of bacterial arthritis and acute osteomyelitis and has been shown to bind to type II collagen under static and dynamic conditions. We have previously reported the effect of shear on the adhesion of S. aureus Phillips to collagen and found that this process is shear dependent (Z. Li, M. Höök, J. M. Patti, and J. M. Ross, Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24[Suppl. 1]:S–55). In this study, we used recombinant collagen adhesin fragments as well as polyclonal antibodies generated against adhesin fragments in attempts to inhibit bacterial adhesion. A parallel-plate flow chamber was used in a dynamic adhesion assay, and quantification of adhesion was accomplished by phase contrast video microscopy coupled with digital image processing. We report that both recombinant fragments studied, M19 and M55, and both polyclonal antibodies studied, α-M17 and α-M55, inhibit adhesion to varying degrees and that these processes are shear dependent. The M55 peptide and α-M55 cause much higher levels of inhibition than M19 and α-M17, respectively, at all wall shear rates studied. Our results demonstrate the importance of using a dynamic system in the assessment of inhibitory strategies and suggest the possible use of M55 and α-M55 in clinical applications to prevent infections caused by S. aureus adhesion to collagen. PMID:9916063

  7. Synchrony dynamics underlying effective connectivity reconstruction of neuronal circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Qin, Qing; Deng, Yun; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jing; Cao, Yibin

    2017-04-01

    Reconstruction of effective connectivity between neurons is essential for neural systems with function-related significance, characterizing directionally causal influences among neurons. In this work, causal interactions between neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglion, activated by manual acupuncture at Zusanli acupoint of experimental rats, are estimated using Granger causality (GC) method. Different patterns of effective connectivity are obtained for different frequencies and types of acupuncture. Combined with synchrony analysis between neurons, we show a dependence of effective connection on the synchronization dynamics. Based on the experimental findings, a neuronal circuit model with synaptic connections is constructed. The variation of neuronal effective connectivity with respect to its structural connectivity and synchronization dynamics is further explored. Simulation results show that reciprocally causal interactions with statistically significant are formed between well-synchronized neurons. The effective connectivity may be not necessarily equivalent to synaptic connections, but rather depend on the synchrony relationship. Furthermore, transitions of effective interaction between neurons are observed following the synchronization transitions induced by conduction delay and synaptic conductance. These findings are helpful to further investigate the dynamical mechanisms underlying the reconstruction of effective connectivity of neuronal population.

  8. Protein under pressure: molecular dynamics simulation of the arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Trzesniak, Daniel; Lins, Roberto D; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the intermolecular beta-sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the beta-sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  9. Complex population dynamics and the coalescent under neutrality.

    PubMed

    Volz, Erik M

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the coalescent effective population size N(e) can be poorly correlated with the true population size. The relationship between N(e) and the population size is sensitive to the way in which birth and death rates vary over time. The problem of inference is exacerbated when the mechanisms underlying population dynamics are complex and depend on many parameters. In instances where nonparametric estimators of N(e) such as the skyline struggle to reproduce the correct demographic history, model-based estimators that can draw on prior information about population size and growth rates may be more efficient. A coalescent model is developed for a large class of populations such that the demographic history is described by a deterministic nonlinear dynamical system of arbitrary dimension. This class of demographic model differs from those typically used in population genetics. Birth and death rates are not fixed, and no assumptions are made regarding the fraction of the population sampled. Furthermore, the population may be structured in such a way that gene copies reproduce both within and across demes. For this large class of models, it is shown how to derive the rate of coalescence, as well as the likelihood of a gene genealogy with heterochronous sampling and labeled taxa, and how to simulate a coalescent tree conditional on a complex demographic history. This theoretical framework encapsulates many of the models used by ecologists and epidemiologists and should facilitate the integration of population genetics with the study of mathematical population dynamics.

  10. Dynamics of dendritic polymers in the bulk and under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Fotiadou, S.; Androulaki, K.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Tanis, I.; Karatasos, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Frick, B.

    2014-05-15

    The structure and dynamics of a hyperbranched polyesteramide (Hybrane® S 1200) polymer and its nanocomposites with natural montmorillonite (Na{sup +}-MMT) are investigated by XRD, DSC, QENS, DS and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In bulk, the energy-resolved elastically scattered intensity from the polymer exhibits two relaxation steps, one attributed to sub-T{sub g} motions and one observed at temperatures above the glass transition, T{sub g}. The QENS spectra measured over the complete temperature range are consistent with the elastic measurements and can be correlated to the results emerging from the detailed description afforded by the atomistic simulations, which predict the existence of three relaxation processes. Moreover, dielectric spectroscopy shows the sub- T{sub g} beta process as well as the segmental relaxation. For the nanocomposites, XRD reveals an intercalated structure for all hybrids with distinct interlayer distances due to polymer chains residing within the galleries of the Na{sup +}-MMT. The polymer chains confined within the galleries show similarities in the behavior with that of the polymer in the bulk for temperatures below the bulk polymer T{sub g}, whereas they exhibit frozen dynamics under confinement at temperatures higher than that.

  11. Deterministic nature of the underlying dynamics of surface wind fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreelekshmi, R. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2012-10-01

    Modelling the fluctuations of the Earth's surface wind has a significant role in understanding the dynamics of atmosphere besides its impact on various fields ranging from agriculture to structural engineering. Most of the studies on the modelling and prediction of wind speed and power reported in the literature are based on statistical methods or the probabilistic distribution of the wind speed data. In this paper we investigate the suitability of a deterministic model to represent the wind speed fluctuations by employing tools of nonlinear dynamics. We have carried out a detailed nonlinear time series analysis of the daily mean wind speed data measured at Thiruvananthapuram (8.483° N,76.950° E) from 2000 to 2010. The results of the analysis strongly suggest that the underlying dynamics is deterministic, low-dimensional and chaotic suggesting the possibility of accurate short-term prediction. As most of the chaotic systems are confined to laboratories, this is another example of a naturally occurring time series showing chaotic behaviour.

  12. Stock price dynamics and option valuations under volatility feedback effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniainen, Juho; Piché, Robert

    2013-02-01

    According to the volatility feedback effect, an unexpected increase in squared volatility leads to an immediate decline in the price-dividend ratio. In this paper, we consider the properties of stock price dynamics and option valuations under the volatility feedback effect by modeling the joint dynamics of stock price, dividends, and volatility in continuous time. Most importantly, our model predicts the negative effect of an increase in squared return volatility on the value of deep-in-the-money call options and, furthermore, attempts to explain the volatility puzzle. We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism by which the market price of diffusion return risk, or an equity risk-premium, affects option prices and empirically illustrate how to identify that mechanism using forward-looking information on option contracts. Our theoretical and empirical results support the relevance of the volatility feedback effect. Overall, the results indicate that the prevailing practice of ignoring the time-varying dividend yield in option pricing can lead to oversimplification of the stock market dynamics.

  13. Dynamics of a polyelectrolyte under a constant electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Pyeong Jun

    2015-11-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics simulation of a polyelectrolyte in a viscous fluid under an external electric field to study the dynamics of gel-free electrophoresis. To incorporate the hydrodynamic effects, we employ a coarse-grained description of water by using multiparticle collision dynamics. We use a screened Coulomb interaction among the monomers and explicit monovalent counterions to model the electrostatic interactions in an ionic solution. The mobility of the polyelectrolyte µ is obtained as a function of the molecular weight N, the electric field strength E,and the Debye screening length of the solvent λ. The mobility is found to be independent of N for large N and to exhibit a maximum at a certain N for a large λ, which are in agreement with experimental results. The dependence of µ on E is also examined and discussed by considering the effects of an electric field on counterion condensation. The dependence of µ on λ shows a discrepancy between our simulation and experiments, which implies that the added salts not only screen out the Coulomb interaction but also participate in the counterion condensation significantly.

  14. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  15. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation. PMID:28084420

  16. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation.

  17. Structure of Molybdenum Under Dynamic Compression to 1 TPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Thomas; Wang, Jue; Coppari, Federica; Smith, Raymond; Eggert, Jon; Lazicki, Amy; Fratanduono, Dayne; Rygg, Ryan; Boehly, Thomas; Collins, Gilbert

    2015-06-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a refractory 4d transition metal that is widely used as a standard in static and dynamic high-pressure experiments. However, there are significant unanswered questions and unresolved discrepancies about the melting curve and high-pressure phase stability of this fundamental material. Similar questions surround the melting curve and phase stabilities of other transition metals including Ta and Fe, and so a better understanding of Mo has broad implications for high-pressure science and geophysics. Here we use x-ray diffraction to determine the crystal structure of molybdenum under both shock and ramp compression to pressures as high as 1 TPa. Under shock loading, we find that Mo remains in body centered cubic (BCC) structure until melting begins at near 390 GPa. Our results are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations and recent re-measurement of sound speeds along the Hugoniot. We also carried out x-ray diffraction measurements of ramp-loaded molybdenum up to 1050 GPa. Our x-ray diffraction patterns are consistent with the persistence of the BCC phase up to the highest pressure achieved. The measured densities under ramp loading are intermediate between those achieved under shock compression and those expected from extrapolation of room-temperature data. We do not observe evidence for the theoretically predicted transition to face centered cubic or double hexagonal close packed phases above 600 GPa.

  18. Three dimensional dynamics of rotating structures under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bediz, Bekir; Romero, L. A.; Ozdoganlar, O. Burak

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the spectral-Tchebychev (ST) technique for solution of three dimensional (3D) dynamics of rotating structures. In particular, structures that exhibit coupled dynamic response require a 3D modeling approach to capture their dynamic behavior. Rotational motions further complicate this behavior, inducing coriolis, centrifugal softening, and (nonlinear) stress-stiffening effects. Therefore, a 3D solution approach is needed to accurately capture the rotational dynamics. The presented 3D-ST technique provides a fast-converging and precise solution approach for rotational dynamics of structures with complex geometries and mixed boundary conditions. Specifically, unlike finite elements techniques, the presented technique uses a series expansion approach considering distributed-parameter system equations: The integral boundary value problem for rotating structures is discretized using the spectral-Tchebychev approach. To simplify the domain of the structures, cross-sectional and rotational transformations are applied to problems with curved cross-section and pretwisted geometry. The nonlinear terms included in the integral boundary value problem are linearized around an equilibrium solution using the quasi-static method. As a result, mass, damping, and stiffness matrices, as well as a forcing vector, are obtained for a given rotating structure. Several case studies are then performed to demonstrate the application and effectiveness of the 3D-ST solution. For each problem, the natural frequencies and modes shapes from the 3D-ST solution are compared to those from the literature (when available) and to those from a commercial finite elements software. The case studies include rotating/spinning parallelepipeds under free and mixed boundary conditions, and a cantilevered pretwisted beam (i.e., rotating blade) with an airfoil geometry rotating on a hub. It is seen that the natural frequencies and mode shapes from the 3D-ST technique differ from those from the

  19. cAMP response element-binding protein and Yes-associated protein form a feedback loop that promotes neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Peimin; Peng, Anjiao; Qiu, Xiangmiao; Zhu, Xi; He, Shixu; Zhou, Dong

    2017-08-31

    The cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein is a member of the CREB/activating transcription factor family that is activated by various extracellular stimuli. It has been shown that CREB-dependent transcription stimulation plays a key role in neuronal differentiation and plasticity, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we show that Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a direct target induced by CREB upon retinoic acid (RA)-induced neurite outgrowth stimuli in N2a cells. Interestingly, YAP knockout using the CRISPR/Cas9 system inhibits neuronal differentiation and reduced neurite length. We further show that YAP could directly bind to CREB via its N-terminal region, and loss of YAP results in instability of phosphorylated CREB upon neurite outgrowth stimuli. Transient expression of YAP could largely restore CREB expression and neurite outgrowth in YAP knockout cells. Together, our results suggest that CREB and YAP form a positive feedback loop that is critical to maintain the stability of phosphorylated CREB and promote neurite outgrowth. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  20. Increasing tPA Activity in Astrocytes Induced by Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Facilitate Neurite Outgrowth after Stroke in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongqi; Li, Yi; Shen, Li Hong; Liu, Xianshuang; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Jing; Pourabdollah-Nejad D, Siamak; Zhang, Chunling; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitors contribute to neurite outgrowth in the central nervous system (CNS) after treatment of stroke with multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In vivo, administration of MSCs to mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) significantly increased activation of tPA and downregulated PAI-1 levels in the ischemic boundary zone (IBZ) compared with control PBS treated mice, concurrently with increases of myelinated axons and synaptophysin. In vitro, MSCs significantly increased tPA levels and concomitantly reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) expression in astrocytes under normal and oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions. ELISA analysis of conditioned medium revealed that MSCs stimulated astrocytes to secrete tPA. When primary cortical neurons were cultured in the conditioned medium from MSC co-cultured astrocytes, these neurons exhibited a significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared to conditioned medium from astrocytes alone. Blockage of tPA with a neutralizing antibody or knock-down of tPA with siRNA significantly attenuated the effect of the conditioned medium on neurite outgrowth. Addition of recombinant human tPA into cortical neuronal cultures also substantially enhanced neurite outgrowth. Collectively, these in vivo and in vitro data suggest that the MSC mediated increased activation of tPA in astrocytes promotes neurite outgrowth after stroke. PMID:20140248

  1. c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase is Involved in Valproic Acid-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic NSCs and Neurite Outgrowth of NSC-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhou, Hengxing; Pan, Bin; Li, Xueying; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Chu, Tianci; Wei, Zhijian; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, can induce neuronal differentiation, promote neurite extension and exert a neuroprotective effect in central nervous system (CNS) injuries; however, comparatively little is known regarding its action on mouse embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism. Recent studies suggested that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is required for neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation during neuronal development. In the present study, we cultured mouse embryonic NSCs and treated the cells with 1 mM VPA for up to 7 days. The results indicate that VPA promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons; moreover, VPA induces the phosphorylation of c-Jun by JNK. In contrast, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 decreased the VPA-stimulated increase in neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that VPA promotes neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, JNK activation is involved in the effects of VPA stimulation.

  2. Long non-coding RNA Malat1 promotes neurite outgrowth through activation of ERK/MAPK signalling pathway in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Peimin; Zhu, Xi; He, Shixu; Duan, Jialan; Zhou, Dong

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are playing critical roles in neurogenesis, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. Neurite outgrowth is an early step in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Using in vitro differentiation of neuroblastoma-derived Neuro-2a (N2a) cell as a model, we performed expression profiling to identify lncRNAs putatively relevant for neurite outgrowth. We identified that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1) was one of the most significantly up-regulated lncRNAs during N2a cell differentiation. Malat1 knockdown resulted in defects in neurite outgrowth as well as enhanced cell death. To pinpoint signalling pathways perturbed by Malat1 depletion, we then performed a reporter-based screening to examine the activities of 50 signalling pathways in Malat1 knockdown cells. We found that Malat1 knockdown resulted in conspicuous inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway as well as abnormal activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and P53 signalling pathway. Inhibition of ERK/MAPK pathway with PD98059 potently blocked N2a cell neurite outgrowth, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced ERK activation rescued defects in neurite outgrowth and cell death induced by Malat1 depletion. Together, our results established a critical role of Malat1 in the early step of neuronal differentiation through activating ERK/MAPK signalling pathway.

  3. Dynamic Brazilian Tests of Granite Under Coupled Static and Dynamic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Li, Xibing; Zou, Yang; Jiang, Yihui; Li, Guonan

    2014-03-01

    Rocks in underground projects at great depth, which are under high static stresses, may be subjected to dynamic disturbance at the same time. In our previous work (Li et al. Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 45(5):739-748, 2008), the dynamic compressive behaviour of pre-stressed rocks was investigated using coupled-load equipment. The current work is devoted to the investigation of the dynamic tensile behaviour of granite rocks under coupled loads using the Brazilian disc (BD) method with the aid of a high-speed camera. Through wave analyses, stress measurements and crack photography, the fundamental problems of BD tests, such as stress equilibrium and crack initiation, were investigated by the consideration of different loading stresses with abruptly or slowly rising stress waves. The specially shaped striker method was used for the coupled-load test; this generates a slowly rising stress wave, which allows gradual stress accumulation in the specimen, whilst maintaining the load at both ends of the specimen in an equilibrium state. The test results showed that the tensile strength of the granite under coupled loads decreases with increases in the static pre-stresses, which might lead to modifications of the blasting design or support design in deep underground projects. Furthermore, the failure patterns of specimens under coupled loads have been investigated.

  4. Mechanical response of cardiovascular stents under vascular dynamic bending.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang; Yang, Jie; Huang, Nan; Uhl, Christopher; Zhou, Yihua; Liu, Yaling

    2016-02-20

    Currently, the effect of vascular dynamic bending (VDB) has not been fully considered when studying cardiovascular stents' long-term mechanical properties, as the previous studies about stent's mechanical properties mostly focus on the effect of vascular pulsation (VP). More and more clinical reports suggested that the effect of VDB have a significant impact on stent. In this paper, an explicit-implicit coupling simulation method was applied to analyze the mechanical responses of cardiovascular stents considering the effect of VDB. The effect of VP on stent mechanical properties was also studied and compared to the effect of VDB. The results showed that the dynamic bending deformation occurred in stents due to the effect of VDB. The effects of VDB and VP resulted in alternating stress states of the stent, while the VDB alternate stresses effective on the stent were almost three times larger than that of the VP. The stress concentration under VDB mainly occurred in bridge struts and the maximal stress was located in the middle loops of the stent. However, the stress distributed uniformly in the stents under the effect of VP. Stent fracture occurred more frequently as a result of VDB with the predicted fracture position located in the bridging struts of the stent. These results are consistent with the reported data in clinical literatures. The stress of the vessel under VDB was higher, than that caused by VP. The results showed that the effect of VDB has a significant impact on the stent's stress distribution, fatigue performance and overall stress on the vessel, thus it is necessary to be considered when analyzing stent's long-term mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the results showed that the explicit-implicit coupling simulation can be applied to analyze stent mechanical properties.

  5. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  6. Dynamics and Resilience of Desert Ecosystems under Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Wainwright, J.; Parsons, A. J.; Okin, G. S.; Bestelmeyer, B.; Fredrickson, E. L.; Schlesinger, W. H.

    2008-12-01

    Ecological models have been used to probe the causes of spatial complexity and predict specific responses of desert ecosystems. However, many models have been limited in their focus: models of dynamics have been developed with no consideration of the inherent patchiness or patterns in the vegetation, or else models have been developed to generate patterns with no consideration of the dynamics. Models that attempt to address both pattern and dynamics have been qualitative and descriptive. Furthermore, if, as is commonly believed, both dynamics and patterns/patchiness are a function of resource (specifically water) limitation, then there has been little integration of this relationship into such models. Consequently, these models have limited utility for understanding resilience of desert ecosystems. Here we present an integrated approach to the observed patchiness and dynamics in desert vegetation that is based on a sound process-based understanding and is formulated to accommodate previous conceptual models within an overarching framework. This framework is implemented as a mathematical model. Our contribution represents an advance over previous work in that we propose a general model framework for the analysis of ecosystem change in deserts that explicitly considers spatial interactions among multiple vegetation types and multiple resources, and predict specific responses to a variety of endogenous and exogenous disturbances. We present an application of this model to investigate conditions the conditions that would result in observed desert vegetation patterns in south-western desert systems of North America. In particular, we investigate the encroachment of shrubs (Larrea tridentata) into formerly pure stands of grass (Bouteloua eriopoda). We present the results of simulations that rest on rainfall data that was reconstructed for the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico, USA based on 300-year tree- ring records. The results

  7. Reactive oxygen species induce neurite degeneration before induction of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce neuronal cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of cultured cells with a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide induces neurite degeneration, but not cell death. Neurites (axons and dendrites) are vulnerable to ROS. Neurite degeneration (shrinkage, accumulation, and fragmentation) has been found in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. However, the mechanism of ROS-related neurite degeneration is not fully understood. Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and microtubule destabilization. These dysfunctions are deeply related to changes in calcium homeostasis and ROS production in neurites. Treatment with antioxidant substances, such as vitamin E, prevents neurite degeneration in cultured cells. This review describes the possibility that ROS induces neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. PMID:27895381

  8. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Cortical Neurons Through Up-Regulating BDNF Expression.

    PubMed

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, can activate the Shh pathway, which has been implicated in neuronal polarization involving neurite outgrowth. However, little evidence is available about the effect of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons and its potential mechanism. Here, we revealed that Shh increased neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons, while the Shh pathway inhibitor (cyclopamine, CPM) partially suppressed Shh-induced neurite outgrowth. Similar results were found for the expressions of Shh and Patched genes in Shh-induced primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh increased the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) not only in lysates and in culture medium but also in the longest neurites of primary cortical neurons, which was partially blocked by CPM. In addition, blocking of BDNF action suppressed Shh-mediated neurite elongation in primary cortical neurons. In conclusion, these findings suggest that Shh promotes neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons at least partially through modulating BDNF expression.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins under asymmetric ionic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Ziervogel, Brigitte; Gumbart, James C; Roux, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    A computational method is developed to allow molecular dynamics simulations of biomembrane systems under realistic ionic gradients and asymmetric salt concentrations while maintaining the conventional periodic boundary conditions required to minimize finite-size effects in an all-atom explicit solvent representation. The method, which consists of introducing a nonperiodic energy step acting on the ionic species at the edge of the simulation cell, is first tested with illustrative applications to a simple membrane slab model and a phospholipid membrane bilayer. The nonperiodic energy-step method is then used to calculate the reversal potential of the bacterial porin OmpF, a large cation-specific β-barrel channel, by simulating the I-V curve under an asymmetric 10:1 KCl concentration gradient. The calculated reversal potential of 28.6 mV is found to be in excellent agreement with the values of 26-27 mV measured from lipid bilayer experiments, thereby demonstrating that the method allows realistic simulations of nonequilibrium membrane transport with quantitative accuracy. As a final example, the pore domain of Kv1.2, a highly selective voltage-activated K(+) channel, is simulated in a lipid bilayer under conditions that recreate, for the first time, the physiological K(+) and Na(+) concentration gradients and the electrostatic potential difference of living cells.

  10. Induction of Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells Treated with Temperature-Controlled Repeated Thermal Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Tada-aki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Tominami, Kanako; Nunome, Shoko; Abe, Genji; Kosukegawa, Hiroyuki; Abe, Toshihiko; Mori, Hitoshi; Mori, Kazumi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Izumi, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    To promote the functional restoration of the nervous system following injury, it is necessary to provide optimal extracellular signals that can induce neuronal regenerative activities, particularly neurite formation. This study aimed to examine the regulation of neuritogenesis by temperature-controlled repeated thermal stimulation (TRTS) in rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, which can be induced by neurotrophic factors to differentiate into neuron-like cells with elongated neurites. A heating plate was used to apply thermal stimulation, and the correlation of culture medium temperature with varying surface temperature of the heating plate was monitored. Plated PC12 cells were exposed to TRTS at two different temperatures via heating plate (preset surface temperature of the heating plate, 39.5°C or 42°C) in growth or differentiating medium for up to 18 h per day. We then measured the extent of growth, neuritogenesis, or acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity (a neuronal marker). To analyze the mechanisms underlying the effects of TRTS on these cells, we examined changes in intracellular signaling using the following: tropomyosin-related kinase A inhibitor GW441756; p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB203580; and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 with its inactive analog, U0124, as a control. While a TRTS of 39.5°C did not decrease the growth rate of cells in the cell growth assay, it did increase the number of neurite-bearing PC12 cells and AChE activity without the addition of other neuritogenesis inducers. Furthermore, U0126, and SB203580, but not U0124 and GW441756, considerably inhibited TRTS-induced neuritogenesis. These results suggest that TRTS can induce neuritogenesis and that participation of both the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways is required for TRTS-dependent neuritogenesis in PC12 cells. Thus, TRTS may be an effective technique for regenerative neuromedicine. PMID:25879210

  11. Prevention of posttraumatic axon sprouting by blocking CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth and tubulin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Xiong, Wenhui; Wang, Yuying; Ping, Xingjie; Head, Jessica D.; Brittain, Joel M.; Gagare, Pravin D.; Ramachandran, P. Veeraraghavan; Jin, Xiaoming; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Epileptogenesis following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is likely due to a combination of increased excitability, disinhibition, and increased excitatory connectivity via aberrant axon sprouting. Targeting these pathways could be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of posttraumatic epilepsy. Here, we tested this possibility using the novel anticonvulsant (R)-N-benzyl 2-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-lacosamide (LCM) which acts on both voltage-gated sodium channels and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), an axonal growth/guidance protein. LCM inhibited CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth, an effect phenocopied by CRMP2 knockdown. Mutation of LCM binding sites in CRMP2 reduced the neurite inhibitory effect of LCM by ~8-fold. LCM also reduced CRMP2-mediated tubulin polymerization. Thus, LCM selectively impairs CRMP2-mediated microtubule polymerization which underlies its neurite outgrowth and branching. To determine whether LCM inhibits axon sprouting in vivo, LCM was injected into rats subjected to partial cortical isolation, an animal model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis that exhibits axon sprouting in cortical pyramidal neurons. Two weeks following injury, excitatory synaptic connectivity of cortical layer V pyramidal neurons was mapped using patch clamp recordings and laser scanning photostimulation of caged glutamate. In comparison to injured control animals, there was a significant decrease in the map size of excitatory synaptic connectivity in LCM-treated rats, suggesting that LCM treatment prevented enhanced excitatory synaptic connectivity due to posttraumatic axon sprouting. These findings suggest, for the first time, that LCM’s mode of action involves interactions with CRMP2 to inhibit posttraumatic axon sprouting. PMID:22433297

  12. Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

    2005-09-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  13. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  14. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  15. Dynamic malware containment under an epidemic model with alert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianrui; Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan; Wu, Yingbo; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2017-03-01

    Alerting at the early stage of malware invasion turns out to be an important complement to malware detection and elimination. This paper addresses the issue of how to dynamically contain the prevalence of malware at a lower cost, provided alerting is feasible. A controlled epidemic model with alert is established, and an optimal control problem based on the epidemic model is formulated. The optimality system for the optimal control problem is derived. The structure of an optimal control for the proposed optimal control problem is characterized under some conditions. Numerical examples show that the cost-efficiency of an optimal control strategy can be enhanced by adjusting the upper and lower bounds on admissible controls.

  16. Dynamic response of axonal microtubules under suddenly applied end forces.

    PubMed

    Manuchehrfar, Farid; Shamloo, Amir; Mehboudi, Nastaran

    2014-01-01

    Axon is a filament in neuronal system and axonal microtubules are bundles in axons. In axons, microtubules are coated with microtubule-associated protein tau, a natively unfolded profuse filamentous protein in the central nervous system. These proteins are responsible for the cross-linked structure of the axonal microtubule bundles. Through complimentary dimerization with other tau proteins, bridges are formed to nearby microtubules to create bundles. The transverse reinforcement of microtubules by cross-linking to the cytoskeleton has been shown to enhance their ability to bear compressive loads. Though microtubules are conventionally regarded as bearing compressive loads, in certain circumstances such as in traumatic stretch injury, they are placed in tension. We employ Standard Linear Solid, a viscoelastic model, to computationally simulate microtubules. This study investigates the dynamic response of two dimensional axonal microtubules under suddenly applied end forces. We obtain the results for steady state behavior of axonal microtubule for different forces.

  17. Dynamic Group Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange under standard assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bresson, Emmanuel; Chevassut, Olivier; Pointcheval, David

    2002-02-14

    Authenticated Diffie-Hellman key exchange allows two principals communicating over a public network, and each holding public-private keys, to agree on a shared secret value. In this paper we study the natural extension of this cryptographic problem to a group of principals. We begin from existing formal security models and refine them to incorporate major missing details (e.g., strong-corruption and concurrent sessions). Within this model we define the execution of a protocol for authenticated dynamic group Diffie-Hellman and show that it is provably secure under the decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption. Our security result holds in the standard model and thus provides better security guarantees than previously published results in the random oracle model.

  18. Dynamically Jammed Fronts under impact in shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopdhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Korpas, Lucia; Brown, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Shear thickening fluids such as cornstarch and water show remarkable impact response allowing, for example, a person to run on the surface but sinking at lower velocities. We perform constant velocity impact experiments and imaging in shear thickening fluids at velocities lower than 500 mm/s and suspension heights of a few cm. In this regime where inertial effects are insignificant, we discover the existence of two dynamically jammed fronts which reach the opposite boundary to support large stresses like a solid. These stresses are large enough to support the weight of a running person. We also find a shear thickening transition under impact which is due to collision of the fronts with the boundary. The jammed front show similarities to granular materials like localization of stress. There is a critical velocity required to generate these impact activated fronts.

  19. Dynamic characteristics of gas-water interfacial plasma under water

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, Y. C.; Ke, B.; Ding, F.; Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Zhu, X. D.

    2012-06-15

    Gas-water interfacial plasmas under water were generated in a compact space in a tube with a sandglass-like structure, where two metal wires were employed as electrodes with an applied 35 kHz ac power source. The dynamic behaviors of voltage/current were investigated for the powered electrode with/without water cover to understand the effect of the gas-water interface. It is found that the discharge exhibits periodic pulsed currents after breakdown as the powered electrode is covered with water, whereas the electrical current reveals a damped oscillation with time with a frequency about 10{sup 6} Hz as the powered electrode is in a vapor bubble. By increasing water conductivity, a discharge current waveform transition from pulse to oscillation presents in the water covering case. These suggest that the gas-water interface has a significant influence on the discharge property.

  20. Dynamical regimes and hydrodynamic lift of viscous vesicles under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meßlinger, Sebastian; Schmidt, Benjamin; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional viscous vesicles in shear flow, with different fluid viscosities ηin and ηout inside and outside, respectively, is studied using mesoscale simulation techniques. Besides the well-known tank-treading and tumbling motions, an oscillatory swinging motion is observed in the simulations for large shear rate. The existence of this swinging motion requires the excitation of higher-order undulation modes (beyond elliptical deformations) in two dimensions. Keller-Skalak theory is extended to deformable two-dimensional vesicles, such that a dynamical phase diagram can be predicted for the reduced shear rate and the viscosity contrast ηin/ηout . The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, when thermal fluctuations are incorporated in the theory. Moreover, the hydrodynamic lift force, acting on vesicles under shear close to a wall, is determined from simulations for various viscosity contrasts. For comparison, the lift force is calculated numerically in the absence of thermal fluctuations using the boundary-integral method for equal inside and outside viscosities. Both methods show that the dependence of the lift force on the distance ycm of the vesicle center of mass from the wall is well described by an effective power law ycm-2 for intermediate distances 0.8Rp≲ycm≲3Rp with vesicle radius Rp . The boundary-integral calculation indicates that the lift force decays asymptotically as 1/[ycmln(ycm)] far from the wall.

  1. Quasi-3D cytoskeletal dynamics of osteocytes under fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Baik, Andrew D; Lu, X Lucas; Qiu, Jun; Huo, Bo; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X Edward

    2010-11-03

    Osteocytes respond to dynamic fluid shear loading by activating various biochemical pathways, mediating a dynamic process of bone formation and resorption. Whole-cell deformation and regional deformation of the cytoskeleton may be able to directly regulate this process. Attempts to image cellular deformation by conventional microscopy techniques have been hindered by low temporal or spatial resolution. In this study, we developed a quasi-three-dimensional microscopy technique that enabled us to simultaneously visualize an osteocyte's traditional bottom-view profile and a side-view profile at high temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane and either the intracellular actin or microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks provided characterization of their deformations over time. Although no volumetric dilatation of the whole cell was observed under flow, both the actin and MT networks experienced primarily tensile strains in all measured strain components. Regional heterogeneity in the strain field of normal strains was observed in the actin networks, especially in the leading edge to flow, but not in the MT networks. In contrast, side-view shear strains exhibited similar subcellular distribution patterns in both networks. Disruption of MT networks caused actin normal strains to decrease, whereas actin disruption had little effect on the MT network strains, highlighting the networks' mechanical interactions in osteocytes. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic contact angles and hysteresis under electrowetting-on-dielectric.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wyatt C; Sen, Prosenjit; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2011-08-16

    By designing and implementing a new experimental method, we have measured the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles and the resulting hysteresis of droplets under electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). Measurements were obtained over wide ranges of applied EWOD voltages, or electrowetting numbers (0 ≤ Ew ≤ 0.9), and droplet sliding speeds, or capillary numbers (1.4 × 10(-5) ≤ Ca ≤ 6.9 × 10(-3)). If Ew or Ca is low, dynamic contact angle hysteresis is not affected much by the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed; that is, the hysteresis increases by less than 50% with a 2 order-of-magnitude increase in sliding speed when Ca < 10(-3). If both Ew and Ca are high, however, the hysteresis increases with either the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed. Stick-slip oscillations were observed at Ew > 0.4. Data are interpreted with simplified hydrodynamic (Cox-Voinov) and molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) models; the Cox-Voinov model captures the trend of the data, but it yields unreasonable fitting parameters. MKT fitting parameters associated with the advancing contact line are reasonable, but a lack of symmetry indicates that a more intricate model is required.

  3. Dynamics of breaking arches under a constant vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Bruno; Lozano, Celia; Zuriguel, Iker; Garcimartín, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Granular flow through an orifice can be suddenly halted by the formation of arches in the vicinity of the outlet, which are stable under the action of gravity. They may be broken when an external driving (for instance, vibration) is applied. With the aim of shedding light on the dynamics of arch destruction, we built an experiment consisting of a vertical two-dimensional silo filled with monodisperse beads, to which a constant vibration is applied. It was previously found that an important parameter to predict the robustness of the arch is the angle between consecutive beads. We focus on long-enduring arches and study the angles among the beads along time. We have found that in many cases the dynamics of the largest angle determines the breaking of the arch; it does not only determine where the "weakest link" is, but also the process that leads to the final destabilization. This is interesting because it can provide information about whether the flow will resume in a well-defined time or not, which is especially useful for industrial processes that have to constantly deal with the possible emergence of clogs.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Study of Polyethylene under Extreme Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritikos, G.; Sgouros, A.; Vogiatzis, G. G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    We present results concerning the dynamics and the structure of adsorbed layers of molten polyethylene (PE) between two graphite surfaces. The molecular weight of the monodisperse PE chains reaches the entanglement regime. We study three cases of interwall distances, equal to two, three and four times the unperturbed radius of gyration (Rg ) of PE chains. The confined system is equilibrated by use of efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms. Conducting molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we reveal the distribution of relaxation times as a function of distance from the graphite walls at the temperature of 450 K. From the atomic-level stresses we calculate a realistic estimate of the adhesion tension, which is not affected significantly by the width of the pore. Although the distance between the two walls is comparable to the width of the adsorbed layer, we do not record the formation of ‘glassy bridges’ under the studied conditions. The diffusion of polymer chains in the middle layer is not inhibited by the existence of the two adsorbed layers. Extreme confinement conditions imposed by the long range wall potentials bring about an increase in both the adsorption and desorption rates of chains. The presented results seem to cohere with a reduction in the calorimetric (heat capacity step) glass transition temperature (Tg ).

  5. Evolutionary games on networks and payoff invariance under replicator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Leslie; Tomassini, Marco; Pestelacci, Enea

    2009-06-01

    The commonly used accumulated payoff scheme is not invariant with respect to shifts of payoff values when applied locally in degree-inhomogeneous population structures. We propose a suitably modified payoff scheme and we show both formally and by numerical simulation, that it leaves the replicator dynamics invariant with respect to affine transformations of the game payoff matrix. We then show empirically that, using the modified payoff scheme, an interesting amount of cooperation can be reached in three paradigmatic non-cooperative two-person games in populations that are structured according to graphs that have a marked degree inhomogeneity, similar to actual graphs found in society. The three games are the Prisoner's Dilemma, the Hawks-Doves and the Stag-Hunt. This confirms previous important observations that, under certain conditions, cooperation may emerge in such network-structured populations, even though standard replicator dynamics for mixing populations prescribes equilibria in which cooperation is totally absent in the Prisoner's Dilemma, and it is less widespread in the other two games.

  6. Quasi-3D Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Osteocytes under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qiu, Jun; Huo, Bo; Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Osteocytes respond to dynamic fluid shear loading by activating various biochemical pathways, mediating a dynamic process of bone formation and resorption. Whole-cell deformation and regional deformation of the cytoskeleton may be able to directly regulate this process. Attempts to image cellular deformation by conventional microscopy techniques have been hindered by low temporal or spatial resolution. In this study, we developed a quasi-three-dimensional microscopy technique that enabled us to simultaneously visualize an osteocyte's traditional bottom-view profile and a side-view profile at high temporal resolution. Quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane and either the intracellular actin or microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks provided characterization of their deformations over time. Although no volumetric dilatation of the whole cell was observed under flow, both the actin and MT networks experienced primarily tensile strains in all measured strain components. Regional heterogeneity in the strain field of normal strains was observed in the actin networks, especially in the leading edge to flow, but not in the MT networks. In contrast, side-view shear strains exhibited similar subcellular distribution patterns in both networks. Disruption of MT networks caused actin normal strains to decrease, whereas actin disruption had little effect on the MT network strains, highlighting the networks' mechanical interactions in osteocytes. PMID:21044578

  7. Optically triggering spatiotemporally confined GPCR activity in a cell and programming neurite initiation and extension

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; Giri, Lopamudra; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2013-01-01

    G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) activity gradients evoke important cell behavior but there is a dearth of methods to induce such asymmetric signaling in a cell. Here we achieved reversible, rapidly switchable patterns of spatiotemporally restricted GPCR activity in a single cell. We recruited properties of nonrhodopsin opsins—rapid deactivation, distinct spectral tuning, and resistance to bleaching—to activate native Gi, Gq, or Gs signaling in selected regions of a cell. Optical inputs were designed to spatiotemporally control levels of second messengers, IP3, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, and cAMP in a cell. Spectrally selective imaging was accomplished to simultaneously monitor optically evoked molecular and cellular response dynamics. We show that localized optical activation of an opsin-based trigger can induce neurite initiation, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate increase, and actin remodeling. Serial optical inputs to neurite tips can refashion early neuron differentiation. Methods here can be widely applied to program GPCR-mediated cell behaviors. PMID:23479634

  8. Optically triggering spatiotemporally confined GPCR activity in a cell and programming neurite initiation and extension.

    PubMed

    Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Giri, Lopamudra; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N

    2013-04-23

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activity gradients evoke important cell behavior but there is a dearth of methods to induce such asymmetric signaling in a cell. Here we achieved reversible, rapidly switchable patterns of spatiotemporally restricted GPCR activity in a single cell. We recruited properties of nonrhodopsin opsins--rapid deactivation, distinct spectral tuning, and resistance to bleaching--to activate native Gi, Gq, or Gs signaling in selected regions of a cell. Optical inputs were designed to spatiotemporally control levels of second messengers, IP3, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, and cAMP in a cell. Spectrally selective imaging was accomplished to simultaneously monitor optically evoked molecular and cellular response dynamics. We show that localized optical activation of an opsin-based trigger can induce neurite initiation, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate increase, and actin remodeling. Serial optical inputs to neurite tips can refashion early neuron differentiation. Methods here can be widely applied to program GPCR-mediated cell behaviors.

  9. Spatial gene's (Tbata) implication in neurite outgrowth and dendrite patterning in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Miriam; Saade, Murielle; Chauvet, Sophie; Nguyen, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    The unique architecture of neurons requires the establishment and maintenance of polarity, which relies in part on microtubule-based kinesin motor transport to deliver essential cargo into axons and dendrites. In developing neurons, kinesin trafficking is essential for delivering organelles and molecules that are crucial for elongation and guidance of the growing axonal and dendritic termini. In mature neurons, kinesin cargo delivery is essential for neuron dynamic physiological functions which are critical in brain development. In this work, we followed Spatial (Tbata) gene expression during primary hippocampal neuron development and showed that it is highly expressed during dendrite formation. Spatial protein exhibits a somatodendritic distribution and we show that the kinesin motor Kif17, among other dendrite specific kinesins, is crucial for Spatial localization to dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, Spatial down regulation in primary hippocampal cells revealed a role for Spatial in maintaining neurons' polarity by ensuring proper neurite outgrowth. This polarity is specified by intrinsic and extracellular signals that allow neurons to determine axon and dendrite fate during development. Neurotrophic factors, such as the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), are candidate extracellular polarity-regulating cues which are proposed to accelerate neuronal polarization by enhancing dendrite growth. Here, we show that NGF treatment increases Spatial expression in hippocampal neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that Spatial, in response to NGF and through its transport by Kif17, is crucial for neuronal polarization and can be a key regulator of neurite outgrowth.

  10. Study of laser uncaging induced morphological alteration of rat cortical neurites using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Tu, Chunlong; Liang, Yitao; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-09-30

    Activity-dependent structural remodeling is an important aspect of neuronal plasticity. In the previous researches, neuronal structure variations resulting from external interventions were detected by the imaging instruments such as the fluorescence microscopy, the scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and the laser confocal microscopy. In this article, a new platform which combined the photochemical stimulation with atomic force microscopy (AFM) was set up to detect the activity-dependent structural remodeling. In the experiments, the cortical neurites on the glass coverslips were stimulated by locally uncaged glutamate under the ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, and a calcium-related structural collapse of neurites (about 250 nm height decrease) was observed by an AFM. This was the first attempt to combine the laser uncaging with AFM in living cell researches. With the advantages of highly localized stimulation (<5 μm), super resolution imaging (<3.8 nm), and convenient platform building, this system was suitable for the quantitative observation of the neuron mechanical property variations and morphological alterations modified by neural activities under different photochemical stimulations, which would be helpful for studying physiological and pathological mechanisms of structural and functional changes induced by the biomolecule acting.

  11. Sustainable infrastructure system modeling under uncertainties and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongxi

    Infrastructure systems support human activities in transportation, communication, water use, and energy supply. The dissertation research focuses on critical transportation infrastructure and renewable energy infrastructure systems. The goal of the research efforts is to improve the sustainability of the infrastructure systems, with an emphasis on economic viability, system reliability and robustness, and environmental impacts. The research efforts in critical transportation infrastructure concern the development of strategic robust resource allocation strategies in an uncertain decision-making environment, considering both uncertain service availability and accessibility. The study explores the performances of different modeling approaches (i.e., deterministic, stochastic programming, and robust optimization) to reflect various risk preferences. The models are evaluated in a case study of Singapore and results demonstrate that stochastic modeling methods in general offers more robust allocation strategies compared to deterministic approaches in achieving high coverage to critical infrastructures under risks. This general modeling framework can be applied to other emergency service applications, such as, locating medical emergency services. The development of renewable energy infrastructure system development aims to answer the following key research questions: (1) is the renewable energy an economically viable solution? (2) what are the energy distribution and infrastructure system requirements to support such energy supply systems in hedging against potential risks? (3) how does the energy system adapt the dynamics from evolving technology and societal needs in the transition into a renewable energy based society? The study of Renewable Energy System Planning with Risk Management incorporates risk management into its strategic planning of the supply chains. The physical design and operational management are integrated as a whole in seeking mitigations against the

  12. Berberine, a natural antidiabetes drug, attenuates glucose neurotoxicity and promotes Nrf2-related neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ya-Yun; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2013-11-01

    production and neuronal cell death. • BBR activates IGF-1/Akt/GSK-3β signaling under normal and high glucose conditions. • BBR enhances HO-1 and NGF expression through stimulating Nrf2 translocation. • BBR promotes neurite outgrowth through Nrf2-dependent pathway.

  13. Bubble dynamics under acoustic excitation with multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Li, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its magnificent mechanical and chemical effects, acoustic cavitation plays an important role in a broad range of biomedical, chemical and mechanical engineering problems. Particularly, irradiation of the multiple frequency acoustic wave could enhance the effects of cavitation. The advantages of employment of multi-frequency ultrasonic field include decreasing the cavitation thresholds, promoting cavitation nuclei generation, increasing the mass transfer and improving energy efficiency. Therefore, multi-frequency ultrasonic systems are employed in a variety of applications, e.g., to enhance the intensity of sonoluminenscence, to increase efficiency of sonochemical reaction, to improve the accuracy of ultrasound imaging and the efficiency of tissue ablation. Compared to single-frequency systems, a lot of new features of bubble dynamics exist in multi-frequency systems, such as special properties of oscillating bubbles, unique resonances in the bubble response curves, and unusual chaotic behaviours. In present paper, the underlying mechanisms of the cavitation effects under multi-frequency acoustical excitation are also briefly introduced.

  14. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  15. Thermographic measurement of thermal bridges in buildings under dynamic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; De Carli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accurate knowledge of the thermal performance could reduce significantly the impact of buildings on global energy consumption. Infrared thermography is widely recognized as one of the key technologies for building surveys, thanks to its ability to acquire at a glance thermal images of the building envelope. However, a spot measurement could be misleading when the building is under dynamic thermal conditions. In this case data should be acquired for hours or days, depending on the thermal properties of the walls. Long term thermographic monitoring are possible but imply strong challenges from a practical standpoint. This work investigates the possibilities and limitations of spot thermographic surveys coupled with contact probes, that are able to acquire continuously the thermal signal for days, to investigate the thermal bridges of a building. The goal is the estimation of the reliability and accuracy of the measurement under realistic environmental conditions. Firstly, numerical simulations are performed to determine the reference value of an experimental case. Then a long term thermographic survey is performed and integrated with the contact probe measurement, assessing the feasibility of the method.

  16. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, H. Damon; Weaver, Andrew J.; Meissner, Katrin J.

    2005-05-01

    The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When forced by historical emissions of CO2 from fossil fuels and land-use change, the coupled climate-carbon cycle model accurately reproduces historical atmospheric CO2 trends, as well as terrestrial and oceanic uptake for the past two decades. Under six twenty-first-century CO2 emissions scenarios, both terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks continue to increase, though terrestrial uptake slows in the latter half of the century. Climate-carbon cycle feedbacks are isolated by comparing a coupled model run with a run where climate and the carbon cycle are uncoupled. The modeled positive feedback between the carbon cycle and climate is found to be relatively small, resulting in an increase in simulated CO2 of 60 ppmv at the year 2100. Including non-CO2 greenhouse gas forcing and increasing the model's climate sensitivity increase the effect of this feedback to 140 ppmv. The UVic model does not, however, simulate a switch from a terrestrial carbon sink to a source during the twenty-first century, as earlier studies have suggested. This can be explained by a lack of substantial reductions in simulated vegetation productivity due to climate changes.

  17. Dynamic jamming under impact in shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek

    2015-03-01

    Shear thickening fluids such as cornstarch and water show remarkable impact response allowing, for example, a person to run on the surface. We perform constant velocity impact experiments and imaging in shear thickening fluids at velocities lower than 500 mm/s and suspension heights of a few cm. In this regime where inertial effects are insignificant, we find that fronts with a dynamically jammed (DJ) region behind it are generated under impact. When this front and the DJ region reaches the opposite boundary it is able to support large stresses like a solid. These stresses are sufficient to support the weight of a running person. In addition we find a shear thickening transition under impact due to collision of the fronts with the boundary. There is a critical velocity required to generate these impact activated fronts. Using the observations on fronts, DJ region and using energy balance arguments we construct a model to explain the phenomena of running on the surface of cornstarch suspensions. The model shows quantitative agreement with our measurements using high-speed video of running on cornstarch and water suspensions. Supported by NSF DMR 1410157.

  18. Dynamic optimization of biological networks under parametric uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Nimmegeers, Philippe; Telen, Dries; Logist, Filip; Impe, Jan Van

    2016-08-31

    Micro-organisms play an important role in various industrial sectors (including biochemical, food and pharmaceutical industries). A profound insight in the biochemical reactions inside micro-organisms enables an improved biochemical process control. Biological networks are an important tool in systems biology for incorporating microscopic level knowledge. Biochemical processes are typically dynamic and the cells have often more than one objective which are typically conflicting, e.g., minimizing the energy consumption while maximizing the production of a specific metabolite. Therefore multi-objective optimization is needed to compute trade-offs between those conflicting objectives. In model-based optimization, one of the inherent problems is the presence of uncertainty. In biological processes, this uncertainty can be present due to, e.g., inherent biological variability. Not taking this uncertainty into account, possibly leads to the violation of constraints and erroneous estimates of the actual objective function(s). To account for the variance in model predictions and compute a prediction interval, this uncertainty should be taken into account during process optimization. This leads to a challenging optimization problem under uncertainty, which requires a robustified solution. Three techniques for uncertainty propagation: linearization, sigma points and polynomial chaos expansion, are compared for the dynamic optimization of biological networks under parametric uncertainty. These approaches are compared in two case studies: (i) a three-step linear pathway model in which the accumulation of intermediate metabolites has to be minimized and (ii) a glycolysis inspired network model in which a multi-objective optimization problem is considered, being the minimization of the enzymatic cost and the minimization of the end time before reaching a minimum extracellular metabolite concentration. A Monte Carlo simulation procedure has been applied for the assessment of the

  19. A Sonic hedgehog coreceptor, BOC regulates neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth via interaction with ABL and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Tuan Anh; Leem, Young-Eun; Kim, Bok-Geon; Cho, Hana; Lee, Sang-Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a critical step for neurogenesis and remodeling synaptic circuitry during neuronal development and regeneration. An immunoglobulin superfamily member, BOC functions as Sonic hedgehog (Shh) coreceptor in canonical and noncanonical Shh signaling in neuronal development and axon outgrowth/guidance. However signaling mechanisms responsible for BOC action during these processes remain unknown. In our previous studies, a multiprotein complex containing BOC and a closely related protein CDO promotes myogenic differentiation through activation of multiple signaling pathways, including non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL. Given that ABL and Jun. N-terminal kinase (JNK) are implicated in actin cytoskeletal dynamics required for neurogenesis, we investigated the relationship between BOC, ABL and JNK during neuronal differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that BOC and ABL are induced in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells and cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs) during neuronal differentiation. BOC-depleted EC cells or Boc(-/-) NPCs exhibit impaired neuronal differentiation with shorter neurite formation. BOC interacts with ABL through its putative SH2 binding domain and seems to be phosphorylated in an ABL activity-dependent manner. Unlike wildtype BOC, ABL-binding defective BOC mutants exhibit impaired JNK activation and neuronal differentiation. Finally, Shh treatment enhances JNK activation which is diminished by BOC depletion. These data suggest that BOC interacts with ABL and activates JNK thereby promoting neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular matrix allows PC12 neurite elongation in the absence of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, P; Steel, V L; Regal, C; Adgate, L; Buxbaum, R E; Heidemann, S R

    1990-01-01

    Several groups have shown that PC12 will extend microtubule-containing neurites on extracellular matrix (ECM) with no lag period in the absence of nerve growth factor. This is in contrast to nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth that occurs with a lag period of several days. During this lag period, increased synthesis or activation of assembly-promoting microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) occurs and is apparently required for neurite extension. We investigated the growth and microtubule (MT) content of PC12 neurites grown on ECM in the presence or absence of inhibitors of neurite outgrowth. On ECM, neurites of cells with or without prior exposure to NGF contain a normal density of MTs, but frequently contain unusual loops of MTs in their termini that may indicate increased MT assembly. On ECM, neurites extend from PC12 cells in the presence of 10 microM LiCl at significantly higher frequency than on polylysine. On other substrates, LiCl inhibits neurite outgrowth, apparently by inhibiting phosphorylation of particular MAPs (Burstein, D. E., P. J. Seeley, and L. A. Greene. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:862-870). Although 35-45% of 60 Li(+)-neurites examined were found to contain a normal array of MTs, 25-30% were found to have a MT density approximately 15% of normal. The remaining 30% of these neurites were found to be nearly devoid of MTs, containing only occasional, ambiguous, short tubular elements. We also found that neurites would extend on ECM in the presence of the microtubule depolymerizing drug, nocodazole. At 0.1 micrograms/ml nocodazole, cells on ECM produce neurites that contain a normal density of MTs. This is in contrast to the lack of neurite outgrowth and retraction of extant neurites that this dose produces in cells grown on polylysine. At 0.2 microgram/ml nocodazole, neurites again grew out in substantial number and four of five neurites examined ultrastructurally were found to be completely devoid of microtubules. We interpret these

  1. Nanomaterials under extreme environments: A study of structural and dynamic properties using reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh

    Nanotechnology is becoming increasingly important with the continuing advances in experimental techniques. As researchers around the world are trying to expand the current understanding of the behavior of materials at the atomistic scale, the limited resolution of equipment, both in terms of time and space, act as roadblocks to a comprehensive study. Numerical methods, in general and molecular dynamics, in particular act as able compliment to the experiments in our quest for understanding material behavior. In this research work, large scale molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechano-chemical behavior under extreme conditions of a variety of systems with many real world applications. The body of this work is divided into three parts, each covering a particular system: 1) Aggregates of aluminum nanoparticles are good solid fuel due to high flame propagation rates. Multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the mechanism underlying higher reaction rate in a chain of aluminum nanoparticles as compared to an isolated nanoparticle. This is due to the penetration of hot atoms from reacting nanoparticles to an adjacent, unreacted nanoparticle, which brings in external heat and initiates exothermic oxidation reactions. 2) Cavitation bubbles readily occur in fluids subjected to rapid changes in pressure. We use billion-atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations on a 163,840-processor BlueGene/P supercomputer to investigate chemical and mechanical damages caused by shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water near amorphous silica. Collapse of an empty nanobubble generates high-speed nanojet, resulting in the formation of a pit on the surface. The pit contains a large number of silanol groups and its volume is found to be directly proportional to the volume of the nanobubble. The gas-filled bubbles undergo partial collapse and consequently the damage on the silica surface is mitigated. 3) The structure and dynamics of water confined in

  2. Automated quantification of neurite outgrowth orientation distributions on patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Matthew; Wang, Dadong; Sinclair, Catriona M.; Kapsa, Robert M. I.; Quigley, Anita F.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Razal, Joselito M.; Baughman, Ray H.; Münch, Gerald; Vallotton, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Objective. We have developed an image analysis methodology for quantifying the anisotropy of neuronal projections on patterned substrates. Approach. Our method is based on the fitting of smoothing splines to the digital traces produced using a non-maximum suppression technique. This enables precise estimates of the local tangents uniformly along the neurite length, and leads to unbiased orientation distributions suitable for objectively assessing the anisotropy induced by tailored surfaces. Main results. In our application, we demonstrate that carbon nanotubes arrayed in parallel bundles over gold surfaces induce a considerable neurite anisotropy; a result which is relevant for regenerative medicine. Significance. Our pipeline is generally applicable to the study of fibrous materials on 2D surfaces and should also find applications in the study of DNA, microtubules, and other polymeric materials.

  3. Androgen regulation of axon growth and neurite extension in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Foecking, Eileen M.; Poletti, Angelo; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens act on the CNS to affect motor function through interaction with a widespread distribution of intracellular androgen receptors (AR). This review highlights our work on androgens and process outgrowth in motoneurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The actions of androgens on motoneurons involve the generation of novel neuronal interactions that are mediated by the induction of androgen-dependent neurite or axonal outgrowth. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for the androgenic regulation of the extension and regeneration of motoneuron neurites in vitro using cultured immortalized motoneurons, and axons in vivo using the hamster facial nerve crush paradigm. We place particular emphasis on the relevance of these effects to SBMA and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:18387610

  4. Cable dynamics under non-ideal support excitations: Nonlinear dynamic interactions and asymptotic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tieding; Kang, Houjun; Wang, Lianhua; Zhao, Yueyu

    2016-12-01

    Cable dynamics under ideal longitudinal support motions/excitations assumes that the support's mass, stiffness and mechanical energy are infinite. However, for many long/slender support structures, their finite mass and stiffness should be taken into account and the cable-support dynamic interactions should be modelled and evaluated. These moving supports are non-ideal support excitations, deserving a proper coupling analysis. For systems with a large support/cable mass ratio, using the multiple scale method and asymptotic approximations, a cable-support coupled reduced model, with both cable's geometric nonlinearity and cable-support coupling nonlinearity included, is established asymptotically and validated numerically in this paper. Based upon the reduced model, cable's nonlinear responses under non-ideal support excitations(and also the coupled responses) are found, with stability and bifurcation characteristics determined. By finding the modifications caused by the support/cable mass ratio, boundary damping, and internal detuning, full investigations into coupling-induced dynamic effects on the cable are conducted. Finally, the approximate analytical results based on the reduced model are verified by numerical results from the original full model.

  5. Rho kinase regulates neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via calcium dependent cytoskeleton regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhisheng; Cai, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Nannuan; Chen, Jing; Tan, Minghui; Lin, Hongsheng; Guo, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether calcium is involved in downstream signal transduction in neurite outgrowth regulated by Rho kinase. Methods: In vitro primary hippocampal neurons were cultured and treated with Rho kinase agonist (LPA) or antagonist (Y-27632). Then, the cytoskeleton and neurite outgrowth were observed. After addition of calcium antagonist BAPTA/AM to reduce intracellular calcium, the cytoskeleton distribution and neurite outgrowth were observed. Results: The activation or inhibition of Rho kinase could significantly alter the number and length of neurites of hippocampal neurons. Rho kinase regulated the cytoskeleton to regulate the neurite outgrowth, and LPA could significantly increase intracellular calcium. After BAPTA/AM treatment, the length and branch number of neurites of neurons reduced markedly. BAPTA/AM was able to reduce intracellular calcium and decrease neuronal cytoskeleton. Treatment with both BAPTA/AM and LPA could stop the retraction of neurites, but the length and branch number of neurites remained unchanged after treatment with Y-27632 and LPA. Conclusion: Calcium may affect the cytoskeleton arrangement to regulate neurite outgrowth, and calcium is involved in the downstream signal transduction of Rho kinase regulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:28337305

  6. Studies of Schwann cell proliferation. III. Evidence for the surface localization of the neurite mitogen

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Salzer et al., 1980, J. Cell Biol. 84:753-- 766), evidence was presented that a neurite membrane fraction could be used to stimulate Schwann cell proliferation in culture. In this study, we present evidence that the mitogenic signal by which intact neurites or neurite membranes stimulate Schwann cell proliferation is located at the neurite surface. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (a) stimulation of Schwann cell proliferation by neurons requires direct contact between neurites and Schwann cells, separation of the two cells by a permeable collagen diaphragm 6 microns thick prevents Schwann cell proliferation; (b) treatment of intact neurites with trypsin before preparation of neurite membranes abolishes the ability of these membranes to be mitogenic for Schwann cells; and (c) the mitogenic activity of neurite homogenates is exclusively localized in the particulate rather than the soluble fraction of the homogenate. The mitogenic component on the neurite surface is heat labile, and is inactivated by aldehyde fixation. Preliminary data suggest that the mitogenic effect of neurite on Schwann cells is not mediated by 3',5'- cyclic AMP. PMID:6153659

  7. Dynamic stiffness method for space frames under distributed harmonic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumir, P. C.; Saha, D. C.; Sengupta, S.

    1992-10-01

    An exact dynamic equivalent load vector for space frames subjected to harmonic distributed loads has been derived using the dynamic stiffness approach. The Taylor's series expansion of the dynamic equivalent load vector has revealed that the static consistent equivalent load vector used in a 12 degree of freedom two-noded finite element for a space frame is just the first term of the series. The dynamic stiffness approach using the exact dynamic equivalent load vector requires discretization of a member subjected to distributed loads into only one element. The results of the dynamic stiffness method are compared with those of the finite element method for illustrative problems.

  8. Dynamics of transitions between capillary stable states under weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, Praveen

    The study of two phase systems with one of the phases obstructing the other is of importance in a lot of fields. Liquid droplets in airways and air bubbles in the blood stream both fall under this category of problems. Helium bubbles in hydrazine fuel lines of satellites also have been found to cause frequent thruster shutdown and also seriously affect spacecraft control. Studies have been carried out until now to look at static equilibrium topologies and stability of such two phase systems in straight, bent and laterally compressed capillaries. In this investigation we look at the dynamics of the transitions between the stable topologies identified for a straight cylindrical capillary. The break up of the interface could adversely affect system performance. OpenFOAM is used to compute transitions from a stable droplet to a plug or the reverse by suitably adding or removing the obstructing phase through inlet patches on the wall of the cylinder. The main parameters presented are the non-dimensional energy, non-dimensional transition times, non-dimensional transition volumes and the general dynamics of the transitions itself. Before computing transitions the static equilibrium topologies computed by OpenFOAM are compared with those predicted by Surface Evolver and are found to be within acceptable deviations. The grid dependence of these transitions has also been studied. Transitions are computed for contact angles in the range of 10° to 170°. Different modes of transitions are observed depending on the contact angle of the case for both the types of transitions. The transition volumes are compared to the volume of existence limits for the corresponding initial topology at a particular contact angle for both the transitions.

  9. Extreme value laws in dynamical systems under physical observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Mark P.; Vitolo, Renato; Rabassa, Pau; Sterk, Alef E.; Broer, Henk W.

    2012-03-01

    Extreme value theory for chaotic deterministic dynamical systems is a rapidly expanding area of research. Given a system and a real function (observable) defined on its phase space, extreme value theory studies the limit probabilistic laws obeyed by large values attained by the observable along orbits of the system. Based on this theory, the so-called block maximum method is often used in applications for statistical prediction of large value occurrences. In this method, one performs statistical inference for the parameters of the Generalised Extreme Value (GEV) distribution, using maxima over blocks of regularly sampled observable values along an orbit of the system. The observables studied so far in the theory are expressed as functions of the distance with respect to a point, which is assumed to be a density point of the system’s invariant measure. However, at least with respect to the ambient (usually Euclidean) metric, this is not the structure of the observables typically encountered in physical applications, such as windspeed or vorticity in atmospheric models. In this paper we consider extreme value limit laws for observables which are not expressed as functions of the distance (in the ambient metric) from a density point of the dynamical system. In such cases, the limit laws are no longer determined by the functional form of the observable and the dimension of the invariant measure: they also depend on the specific geometry of the underlying attractor and of the observable’s level sets. We present a collection of analytical and numerical results, starting with a toral hyperbolic automorphism as a simple template to illustrate the main ideas. We then formulate our main results for a uniformly hyperbolic system, the solenoid map. We also discuss non-uniformly hyperbolic examples of maps (Hénon and Lozi maps) and of flows (the Lorenz63 and Lorenz84 models). Our purpose is to outline the main ideas and to highlight several serious problems found in the

  10. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell cultureThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T. Shafer , and W. Mundy. Comparison of Human Induced PluripotentStem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth. Applied In vitro Toxicology. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY, USA, 2(1): 26-36, (2016).

  11. Integrating multiple aspects of mitochondrial dynamics in neurons: Age-related differences and dynamic changes in a chronic rotenone model

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Beth; Cassady, Steven J.; Van Laar, Victor S.; Berman, Sarah B.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in dynamic properties of mitochondria are increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s disease (PD). Static changes in mitochondrial morphology, often under acutely toxic conditions, are commonly utilized as indicators of changes in mitochondrial fission and fusion. However, in neurons, mitochondrial fission and fusion occur in a dynamic system of axonal/dendritic transport, biogenesis and degradation, and thus, likely interact and change over time. We sought to explore this using a chronic neuronal model (nonlethal low-concentration rotenone over several weeks), examining distal neurites, which may give insight into the earliest changes occurring in PD. Using this model, in live primary neurons, we directly quantified mitochondrial fission, fusion, and transport over time and integrated multiple aspects of mitochondrial dynamics, including morphology and growth/mitophagy. We found that rates of mitochondrial fission and fusion change as neurons age. In addition, we found that chronic rotenone exposure initially increased the ratio of fusion to fission, but later, this was reversed. Surprisingly, despite changes in rates of fission and fusion, mitochondrial morphology was minimally affected, demonstrating that morphology can be an inaccurate indicator of fission/fusion changes. In addition, we found evidence of subcellular compartmentalization of compensatory changes, as mitochondrial density increased in distal neurites first, which may be important in PD, where pathology may begin distally. We propose that rotenone-induced early changes such as in mitochondrial fusion are compensatory, accompanied later by detrimental fission. As evidence, in a dopaminergic neuronal model, in which chronic rotenone caused loss of neurites before cell death (like PD pathology), inhibiting fission protected against the neurite loss. This suggests that aberrant mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to the earliest neuropathologic

  12. Neurite outgrowth on cultured spiral ganglion neurons induced by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Berkingali, Nurdanat; Warnecke, Athanasia; Gomes, Priya; Paasche, Gerrit; Tack, Jan; Lenarz, Thomas; Stöver, Timo

    2008-09-01

    The morphological correlate of deafness is the loss of hair cells with subsequent degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). Neurotrophic factors have a neuroprotective effect, and especially brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been demonstrated to protect SGN in vitro and after ototoxic trauma in vivo. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates hair cell loss in rat cochlea explants that were treated with gentamycin. Recently, it has also been shown that EPO reduces the apoptose rate in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the effects of EPO on SGN in vitro. Spiral ganglion cells were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium supplemented with EPO and/or BDNF. Results showed that survival rates of SGN were not significantly improved when cultivated with EPO alone. Also, EPO did not further increase BDNF-induced survival of SGN. However, significant elongation of neurites was determined when SGN were cultivated with EPO alone. Even though a less than additive effect was observed, combined treatment with BDNF and EPO led to a significant elongation of neurites when compared to individual treatment with BDNF or EPO. It can be concluded that EPO induces neurite outgrowth rather than promoting survival. Thus, EPO presents as an interesting candidate to enhance and modulate the regenerative effect of BDNF on SGN.

  13. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  14. Oriented Schwann cell monolayers for directed neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanna M; Buettner, Helen M

    2004-08-01

    Schwann cells are an important component of the peripheral nervous system and participate in peripheral nerve regeneration. They create a supportive environment for neurite outgrowth by releasing trophic factors and up-regulating permissive molecules on their surface. In addition, Schwann cells are able to self-organize into linear arrays in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a possible role in neurite guidance. Previously, we showed that Schwann cell placement and orientation in subconfluent cultures can be controlled using microlithographically patterned laminin substrates (Thompson, D. M., and H. M. Buettner. Tissue Eng. 7(3):247-266, 2001). In the current study, these substrates were used to create oriented Schwann cell monolayers. Both Schwann cell orientation and coverage were quantified in response to seeding density, culture medium, and micropattern dimensions. In serum-free medium, increasing the seeding density yielded a linear increase in coverage of the substrate area but decreased cell alignment. In an alternate approach, Schwann cells were first seeded in serum-free medium at moderate seeding density, allowed to align, then expanded in serum-containing growth medium. This produced complete coverage without large seeding densities while preserving alignment to the micropattern. Alignment and coverage were unaffected by micropattern dimensions. This work provides a useful methodology for investigating Schwann cell guidance effects on growing neurites.

  15. Can hippocampal neurites and growth cones climb over obstacles?

    PubMed

    Lien, Thuy Linh; Ban, Jelena; Tormen, Massimo; Migliorini, Elisa; Grenci, Gianluca; Pozzato, Alessandro; Torre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Guidance molecules, such as Sema3A or Netrin-1, can induce growth cone (GC) repulsion or attraction in the presence of a flat surface, but very little is known of the action of guidance molecules in the presence of obstacles. Therefore we combined chemical and mechanical cues by applying a steady Netrin-1 stream to the GCs of dissociated hippocampal neurons plated on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces patterned with lines 2 µm wide, with 4 µm period and with a height varying from 100 to 600 nm. GC turning experiments performed 24 hours after plating showed that filopodia crawl over these lines within minutes. These filopodia do not show staining for the adhesion marker Paxillin. GCs and neurites crawl over lines 100 nm high, but less frequently and on a longer time scale over lines higher than 300 nm; neurites never crawl over lines 600 nm high. When neurons are grown for 3 days over patterned surfaces, also neurites can cross lines 300 nm and 600 nm high, grow parallel to and on top of these lines and express Paxillin. Axons - selectively stained with SMI 312 - do not differ from dendrites in their ability to cross these lines. Our results show that highly motile structures such as filopodia climb over high obstacle in response to chemical cues, but larger neuronal structures are less prompt and require hours or days to climb similar obstacles.

  16. Sediment phosphorus speciation and mobility under dynamic redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Chris T.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; O'Connell, David W.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment has caused phosphorus (P) accumulation in many freshwater sediments, raising concerns that internal loading from legacy P may delay the recovery of aquatic ecosystems suffering from eutrophication. Benthic recycling of P strongly depends on the redox regime within surficial sediment. In many shallow environments, redox conditions tend to be highly dynamic as a result of, among others, bioturbation by macrofauna, root activity, sediment resuspension and seasonal variations in bottom-water oxygen (O2) concentrations. To gain insight into the mobility and biogeochemistry of P under fluctuating redox conditions, a suspension of sediment from a hypereutrophic freshwater marsh was exposed to alternating 7-day periods of purging with air and nitrogen gas (N2), for a total duration of 74 days, in a bioreactor system. We present comprehensive data time series of bulk aqueous- and solid-phase chemistry, solid-phase phosphorus speciation and hydrolytic enzyme activities demonstrating the mass balanced redistribution of P in sediment during redox cycling. Aqueous phosphate concentrations remained low ( ˜ 2.5 µM) under oxic conditions due to sorption to iron(III) oxyhydroxides. During anoxic periods, once nitrate was depleted, the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides released P. However, only 4.5 % of the released P accumulated in solution while the rest was redistributed between the MgCl2 and NaHCO3 extractable fractions of the solid phase. Thus, under the short redox fluctuations imposed in the experiments, P remobilization to the aqueous phase remained relatively limited. Orthophosphate predominated at all times during the experiment in both the solid and aqueous phase. Combined P monoesters and diesters accounted for between 9 and 16 % of sediment particulate P. Phosphatase activities up to 2.4 mmol h-1 kg-1 indicated the potential for rapid mineralization of organic P (Po), in particular during periods of aeration when the

  17. Extensive neurite outgrowth and active synapse formation on self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holmes, T C; de Lacalle, S; Su, X; Liu, G; Rich, A; Zhang, S

    2000-06-06

    A new type of self-assembling peptide (sapeptide) scaffolds that serve as substrates for neurite outgrowth and synapse formation is described. These peptide-based scaffolds are amenable to molecular design by using chemical or biotechnological syntheses. They can be tailored to a variety of applications. The sapeptide scaffolds are formed through the spontaneous assembly of ionic self-complementary beta-sheet oligopeptides under physiological conditions, producing a hydrogel material. The scaffolds can support neuronal cell attachment and differentiation as well as extensive neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, they are permissive substrates for functional synapse formation between the attached neurons. That primary rat neurons form active synapses on such scaffold surfaces in situ suggests these scaffolds could be useful for tissue engineering applications. The buoyant sapeptide scaffolds with attached cells in culture can be transported readily from one environment to another. Furthermore, these peptides did not elicit a measurable immune response or tissue inflammation when introduced into animals. These biological materials created through molecular design and self assembly may be developed as a biologically compatible scaffold for tissue repair and tissue engineering.

  18. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  19. Behavior of sodium borosilicate glasses under compression using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kilymis, D. A.; Ispas, S.; Delaye, J.-M.

    2015-09-07

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to study the changes under compression in the local and medium range structural properties of three sodium borosilicate glasses with varying sodium content. These glasses have been isostatically compressed up to 20 GPa and then decompressed in order to analyze the different mechanisms that affect densification, alongside with the permanent modifications of the structure after a full compression/decompression cycle. The results show that the atomic packing is the prominent characteristic that governs the amount of densification in the glass, as well as the setup of the permanent densification. During compression, the bulk modulus increases linearly up to approximately 15 GPa and more rapidly for higher pressures, a behavior which is reflected on the rate of increase of the average coordination for B and Na. Radial distribution functions at different pressures during the cycle help to quantify the amount of distortions in the elementary structural units, with a pronounced shortening of the Na–Na and Na–O bond lengths during compression. A subsequent decomposition of the glassy matrix into elementary Voronoi volumes verifies the high compressibility of Na-rich regions.

  20. Modeling dynamic behavior of superconducting maglev systems under external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Xue, Cun; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2017-08-01

    For a maglev system, vertical and lateral displacements of the levitation body may simultaneously occur under external disturbances, which often results in changes in the levitation and guidance forces and even causes some serious malfunctions. To fully understand the effect of external disturbances on the levitation performance, in this work, we build a two-dimensional numerical model on the basis of Newton's second law of motion and a mathematical formulation derived from magnetoquasistatic Maxwell's equations together with a nonlinear constitutive relation between the electric field and the current density. By using this model, we present an analysis of dynamic behavior for two typical maglev systems consisting of an infinitely long superconductor and a guideway of different arrangements of infinitely long parallel permanent magnets. The results show that during the vertical movement, the levitation force is closely associated with the flux motion and the moving velocity of the superconductor. After being disturbed at the working position, the superconductor has a disturbance-induced initial velocity and then starts to periodically vibrate in both lateral and vertical directions. Meanwhile, the lateral and vertical vibration centers gradually drift along their vibration directions. The larger the initial velocity, the faster their vibration centers drift. However, the vertical drift of the vertical vibration center seems to be independent of the direction of the initial velocity. In addition, due to the lateral and vertical drifts, the equilibrium position of the superconductor in the maglev systems is not a space point but a continuous range.

  1. Behavior of sodium borosilicate glasses under compression using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilymis, D. A.; Delaye, J.-M.; Ispas, S.

    2015-09-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to study the changes under compression in the local and medium range structural properties of three sodium borosilicate glasses with varying sodium content. These glasses have been isostatically compressed up to 20 GPa and then decompressed in order to analyze the different mechanisms that affect densification, alongside with the permanent modifications of the structure after a full compression/decompression cycle. The results show that the atomic packing is the prominent characteristic that governs the amount of densification in the glass, as well as the setup of the permanent densification. During compression, the bulk modulus increases linearly up to approximately 15 GPa and more rapidly for higher pressures, a behavior which is reflected on the rate of increase of the average coordination for B and Na. Radial distribution functions at different pressures during the cycle help to quantify the amount of distortions in the elementary structural units, with a pronounced shortening of the Na-Na and Na-O bond lengths during compression. A subsequent decomposition of the glassy matrix into elementary Voronoi volumes verifies the high compressibility of Na-rich regions.

  2. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-07-28

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations.

  3. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  4. Continuous Opinion Dynamics Under Bounded Confidence:. a Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Jan

    Models of continuous opinion dynamics under bounded confidence have been presented independently by Krause and Hegselmann and by Deffuant et al. in 2000. They have raised a fair amount of attention in the communities of social simulation, sociophysics and complexity science. The researchers working on it come from disciplines such as physics, mathematics, computer science, social psychology and philosophy. In these models agents hold continuous opinions which they can gradually adjust if they hear the opinions of others. The idea of bounded confidence is that agents only interact if they are close in opinion to each other. Usually, the models are analyzed with agent-based simulations in a Monte Carlo style, but they can also be reformulated on the agent's density in the opinion space in a master equation style. The contribution of this survey is fourfold. First, it will present the agent-based and density-based modeling frameworks including the cases of multidimensional opinions and heterogeneous bounds of confidence. Second, it will give the bifurcation diagrams of cluster configuration in the homogeneous model with uniformly distributed initial opinions. Third, it will review the several extensions and the evolving phenomena which have been studied so far, and fourth it will state some open questions.

  5. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under dynamically applied axial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulk, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the buckling characteristics of perfect and imperfect circular cylindrical shells subjected to dynamic axial loading. Experimental data included dynamic buckling loads (124 data points), high speed photographs of buckling mode shapes and observations of the dynamic stability of shells subjected to rapidly applied sub-critical loads. A mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamic behavior of perfect and imperfect shells. This model was based on the Donnell-Von Karman compatibility and equilibrium equations and had a wall deflection function incorporating five separate modes of deflection. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found for both dynamic buckling strength and buckling mode shapes.

  6. C dynamics in Amazonian podzols under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, Naoise; Soro, Andre; Potard, Kevin; Pouteau, Valerie; Montes, Celia; Melphi, Adolpho; Lucas, Yves; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been shown that the C stocks in Amazonian podzols are very large. They are much larger than was previously thought, particularly in the Bh horizon, which has been estimated to contain in excess of 13Pg C for Amazonia alone. It is predicted that the changes in regional climate will result in a drier soil water regime which may affect the C dynamics in these soils that are usually saturated. In order to determine the vulnerability to change of the organic C contained in the Amazonian podzols, a series of incubation experiments were established in which the effects of a number of different factors on microbial decomposition were measured. The direct effect of drier soil water regimes was tested by incubating undisturbed cores from the Bh horizon at a range of matric potentials (saturation to wilting point). Contrary to what is usually found in soils, no significant difference in mineralisation was found among matric potentials, suggesting that other factors control microbial mineralisation of this organic C. The effect of nitrogen additions, of anaerobic conditions and of the addition labile C substrate were also tested on undisturbed cores of the Bh horizon of the podzols. Samples incubated under aerobic conditions produced 3 times more CO2 than samples incubated under anaerobic conditions, whilst samples incubated under aerobic conditions with the addition of N mineralised 6.7 times more CO2 than the anaerobic samples. The addition of labile C did not have a significant effect on C mineralisation, i.e. there was no priming effect. The combined addition of labile C and mineral N did not stimulate C mineralisation more than N additions alone. By extrapolating the differences obtained here to the whole of the Amazonian podzols, it is estimated that changes in conditions which result in an increase in O2 and in N (i.e. changes in vegetation due to increases in dry periods with the establishment of a savanna for example) in the soil will cause the release

  7. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibitors inhibit neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toru; Kume, Toshiaki; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Sugmimoto, Hachiro; Akaike, Akinori

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the role of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in neurite outgrowth, we investigated the effects of NCX inhibitors on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. KB-R7943 and 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil, NCX inhibitors, inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by nerve growth factor (NGF). NCX inhibitors inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by dibutylyl cAMP, which rapidly reorganizes the cytoskeleton. KB-R7943 inhibited the neurite outgrowth caused by Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase (ROCK) that regulates actin. However, NCX inhibitors did not inhibit NGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. These results suggest that NCX inhibitor affects downstream of the Rho-ROCK signal transduction pathways in neurite outgrowth.

  8. Studying plastic shear localization in aluminum alloys under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalov, D. A.; Sokovikov, M. A.; Chudinov, V. V.; Oborin, V. A.; Bayandin, Yu. V.; Terekhina, A. I.; Naimark, O. B.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of plastic shear localization mechanisms observed under dynamic deformation using the shear-compression scheme on a Hopkinson-Kolsky bar has been carried out using specimens of AMg6 alloy. The mechanisms of plastic shear instability are associated with collective effects in the microshear ensemble in spatially localized areas. The lateral surface of the specimens was photographed in the real-time mode using a CEDIP Silver 450M high-speed infrared camera. The temperature distribution obtained at different times allowed us to trace the evolution of the localization of the plastic strain. Based on the equations that describe the effect of nonequilibrium transitions on the mechanisms of structural relaxation and plastic flow, numerical simulation of plastic shear localization has been performed. A numerical experiment relevant to the specimen-loading scheme was carried out using a system of constitutive equations that reflect the part of the structural relaxation mechanisms caused by the collective behavior of microshears with the autowave modes of the evolution of the localized plastic flow. Upon completion of the experiment, the specimens were subjected to microstructure analysis using a New View-5010 optical microscope-interferometer. After the dynamic deformation, the constancy of the Hurst exponent, which reflects the relationship between the behavior of defects and roughness induced by the defects on the surfaces of the specimens is observed in a wider range of spatial scales. These investigations revealed the distinctive features in the localization of the deformation followed by destruction to the script of the adiabatic shear. These features may be caused by the collective multiscale behavior of defects, which leads to a sharp decrease in the stress-relaxation time and, consequently, a localized plastic flow and generation of fracture nuclei in the form of adiabatic shear. Infrared scanning of the localization zone of the

  9. Neurites from PC12 cells are connected to each other by synapse-like structures.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Young; Jin, Jae-Kwang; Koh, Young-Ho; Chun, Wook; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kown, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Yong-Sun; Park, Jae-Bong

    2010-10-01

    PC12 cells have been used as a model of sympathetic neurons. Nerve growth factor (NGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and cAMP induce neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells. cAMP induced a greater number of neurites than did NGF. In particular, we attempted to elucidate whether PC12 cell neurites, induced by several factors including NGF, bFGF, and cAMP, form synapses, and whether each neurite has presynaptic and postsynaptic properties. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we observed that neurites are connected to each other. The connected regions presented dense core vesicles and a clathrin-coated membrane invagination. In addition, typical maker proteins for axon and dendrite were identified by an immuno-staining method. Tau-1, an axonal marker in neurons, was localized at a high concentration in the terminal tips of neurites from PC12 cells, which were connected to neurite processes containing MAP-2, a dendritic marker in neurons. Furthermore, neurites containing SV2 and synaptotagmin, markers of synaptic vesicles, were in contact with neurites harboring drebrin, a marker of the postsynaptic membrane, suggesting that neurites from PC12 cells induced by NGF, bFGF, and cAMP may form synapse-like structures. Tat-C3 toxin, a Rho inhibitor, augmented neurite outgrowth induced by NGF, bFGF, and cAMP. Tat-C3 toxin together with neurotrophins also exhibited synapse-like structures between neurites. However, it remains to be studied whether RhoA inhibition plays a role in the formation of synapse-like structures in PC12 cells. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  11. Organic and inorganic lead inhibit neurite growth in vertebrate and invertebrate neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Shugarts, D; Nelson, G; Przekwas, J

    1989-12-01

    Neurons from brains of chick embryos and pond snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) were cultured for 3 to 4 d in the presence of no toxins, inorganic lead (PbCl2), or organic lead (triethyl lead chloride). In chick neurons, inorganic lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 270 microM total lead, approximately 70 nM free Pb2+) but did not reduce the number of neurites per cell or the mean neurite length. Triethyl lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 0.24 microM) and the mean neurite length (extrapolated IC50 = 3.6 microM) but did not reduce the number of neurites per cell. In Lymnaea neurons, inorganic lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 13 microM total lead; approximately 10 nM free Pb2+). Triethyl lead reduced the percentage of cells that grew neurites (IC50 = 0.4 microM) and exerted significant toxicity at 0.2 microM. The two forms of lead affected neurite growth in qualitatively different ways, which suggests that their mechanisms of action are different.

  12. Micropatterned Methacrylate Polymers Direct Spiral Ganglion Neurite and Schwann Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Joseph C.; Tuft, Bradley W.; Clinger, John D.; Levine, Rachel; Figueroa, Lucas Sievens; Guymon, C. Allan; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2011-01-01

    Significant advances in the functional outcomes achieved with cochlear implantation will likely require tissue-engineering approaches to improve the neural prosthesis interface. One strategy is to direct spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) axon growth in a highly organized fashion to approximate or contact stimulating electrodes. Here we assessed the ability of micropatterns induced by photopolymerization in methacrylate (MA) polymer systems to direct cultured neonatal rat SGN neurite growth and alignment of SG Schwann cells (SGSCs). SGN survival and neurite length were comparable among various polymer compositions. Remarkably, there was no significant difference in SGN survival or neurite length between laminin and non-laminin coated MA polymer substrates, suggesting high biocompatibility with SG tissue. Micropatterning with photopolymerization generated microchannels with a ridge periodicity of 50 µm and channel depths of 0.6–1.0 µm. SGN neurites grew within the grooves of the microchannels. These topographies strongly induced alignment of dissociated SGN neurites and SGSCs to parallel the pattern. By contrast, fibroblasts failed to align with the micropattern suggesting cell specific responses to topographical cues. SGN neurites extending from explants turned to parallel the pattern as they encountered the microchannels. The extent of turning was significantly correlated with angle at which the neurite initially encountered the pattern. These results indicate that SGN neurites respond to microtopographical features and that these features can be used to direct neurite growth in a highly organized fashion. PMID:21616131

  13. IPP5 inhibits neurite growth in primary sensory neurons by maintaining TGF-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing-Jian; Gao, Nan-Nan; Guo-QiangMa; Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Yu, Wen-Hui; Pan, Jing; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2013-01-15

    During nerve regeneration, neurite growth is regulated by both intrinsic molecules and extracellular factors. Here, we found that inhibitor 5 of protein phosphatase 1 (IPP5), a newly identified inhibitory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), inhibited neurite growth in primary sensory neurons as an intrinsic regulator. IPP5 was highly expressed in the primary sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and was downregulated after sciatic nerve axotomy. Knocking down IPP5 with specific shRNA increased the length of the longest neurite, the total neurite length and the number of neurite ends in cultured rat DRG neurons. Mutation of the PP1-docking motif K(8)IQF(11) or the PP1-inhibiting motif at Thr(34) eliminated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Furthermore, biochemical experiments showed that IPP5 interacted with type I transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRI) and PP1 and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling in a PP1-dependent manner. Overexpressing IPP5 in DRG neurons aggravated TGF-β-induced inhibition of neurite growth, which was abolished by blocking PP1 or IPP5 binding to PP1. Blockage of TGF-β signaling with the TβRI inhibitor SB431542 or Smad2 shRNA attenuated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Thus, these data indicate that selectively expressed IPP5 inhibits neurite growth by maintaining TGF-β signaling in primary sensory neurons.

  14. Dynamic behaviour of multilamellar vesicles under Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Pommella, A; Donnarumma, D; Caserta, S; Guido, S

    2017-09-27

    Surfactant solutions exhibit multilamellar surfactant vesicles (MLVs) under flow conditions and in concentration ranges which are found in a large number of industrial applications. MLVs are typically formed from a lamellar phase and play an important role in determining the rheological properties of surfactant solutions. Despite the wide literature on the collective dynamics of flowing MLVs, investigations into the flow behavior of single MLVs are scarce. In this work, we investigate a concentrated aqueous solution of linear alkylbenzene sulfonic acid (HLAS), characterized by MLVs dispersed in an isotropic micellar phase. Rheological tests show that the HLAS solution is a shear-thinning fluid with a power law index dependent on the shear rate. Pressure-driven shear flow of the HLAS solution in glass capillaries is investigated using high-speed video microscopy and image analysis. The so obtained velocity profiles provide evidence for a power-law fluid behaviour of the HLAS solution and images show a flow-focusing effect of the lamellar phase in the central core of the capillary. The flow behavior of individual MLVs shows analogies with that of unilamellar vesicles and emulsion droplets. Deformed MLVs exhibit typical shapes of unilamellar vesicles, such as parachute and bullet-like. Furthermore, MLV velocity follows the classical Hetsroni theory for droplets provided that the power law shear dependent viscosity of the HLAS solution is taken into account. The results of this work are relevant for the processing of surfactant-based systems in which the final properties depend on the flow-induced morphology, such as cosmetic formulations and food products.

  15. Pn anisotropic tomography and dynamics under eastern Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe; Li, Yuan; Xie, Furen; Teng, Jiwen; Zhang, Guangwei; Sun, Changqing; Zha, Xiaohui

    2014-03-01

    We present a new anisotropic tomographic model of the uppermost mantle around eastern Tibet using Pn traveltime data from a newly deployed temporary seismic array and recent observation bulletins of Chinese provincial networks. Our results are generally consistent with previous results but provide new insights into the dynamics of Tibetan plateau. Prominent high-velocity (high-V) anomalies are visible under Alashan block and Qaidam and Sichuan basins, which clearly outline their tectonic margins. A distinct high-V zone representing the double-sided subduction of Indo-Eurasian plates is imaged from Lhasa block to the south of Qaidam basin. A pronounced low-velocity (low-V) zone is observed from Songpan-Ganzi block to southern Chuan-Dian diamond block, suggesting the existence of hot material upwelling there. Crustal strong earthquakes frequently occurred around high-V anomalies or transition zones from high-V to low-V anomalies, suggesting that these earthquakes could be related to lateral heterogeneities in the mantle. The Pn fast direction approximately rotates around Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis, and it is tangential to the margins of Sichuan basin, suggesting that the mantle material flow of Tibetan plateau may have affected east China. In the Yunnan region to the south of 26°N, the Pn fast direction is different from SKS splitting results, indicating that the mantle lithosphere could be mechanically decoupled at certain depth below the uppermost mantle, which might be attributable to the subduction of Indian (or Burma) slab. Although the correlation between anisotropy and velocity is complicated, anisotropy strength could be associated with the pattern of velocity anomalies in the region.

  16. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  17. Stimulation of neurite outgrowth using an electrically conducting polymer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer—oxidized polypyrrole (PP)—has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(l-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μm (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μm (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). PMID:9256415

  18. Stimulation of Neurite Outgrowth Using an Electrically Conducting Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-08-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer--oxidized polypyrrole (PP)--has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μ m (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μ m (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid).

  19. Critical dynamics of classical systems under slow quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-10-01

    We study the slow quench dynamics of a one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice gas model which exhibits a phase transition in the stationary state between a fluid phase with homogeneously distributed particles and a jammed phase with a macroscopic hole cluster. Our main result is that in the critical region (i.e., at the critical point and in its vicinity) where the dynamics are assumed to be frozen in the standard Kibble-Zurek argument, the defect density exhibits an algebraic decay in the inverse annealing rate with an exponent that can be understood using critical coarsening dynamics. However, in a part of the critical region in the fluid phase, the standard Kibble-Zurek scaling holds. We also find that when the slow quench occurs deep into the jammed phase, the defect density behavior is explained by the rapid quench dynamics in this phase.

  20. Modeling of Network Dynamics under Markovian and Structural Perturbations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-04

    U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Markov Dynamics, Networks, Structural...Models by Using Stock Price Data and Basic Statistics, Neural, Parallel & Scientific Computations, Vol. 18(2010), pp. 269-282. 8...Large Deviations with Applications to Exit Times for switched Markov Processes 3. G. S. Ladde and Arnut Paothong, Dynamic Modeling and

  1. Single Polymer Dynamics under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extensional (LAOE) Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    Over the past two decades, advances in fluorescence imaging and particle manipulation have enabled the direct observation of single polymer dynamics in model flows such as shear flow and planar extensional flow. The vast majority of single polymer studies, however, has focused on chain dynamics using simple transient step forcing functions. In order to study single polymer dynamics in non-idealized model flows, there is a clear need to implement more complicated transient flow forcing functions. In bulk rheology, large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was widely used to study the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of materials, but not yet been applied to molecular rheology. In this work, we directly probe single polymer dynamics using oscillatory extensional flow in precisely controlled microfluidic devices. We are able to generate large and small amplitude sinusoidal oscillatory extensional flow in a cross-slot microfluidic device while imaging the conformational dynamics of a single polymer trapped at the stagnation point. In this flow, polymer chains are stretched, squeezed, and rotated between extensional/compressional axes in a highly dynamic and transient manner. Using this technique, we studied the dynamics and coil-stretch transition of a single λ-DNA as a function of the Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number (De). Moreover, we use Brownian dynamics simulation to map a wide range of Pipkin space for polymers from linear steady-state conditions to non-linear unsteady-states. Our results reveal a critical Wi at the coil-stretch transition that is function of the De in LAOE flow. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  2. Unusual predator-prey dynamics under reciprocal phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko

    2012-07-21

    Recent theories and experiments have shown that plasticity, such as an inducible defense or an inducible offense in predator-prey interactions, strongly influences the stability of the population dynamics. However, such plastic adaptation has not been expected to cause unusual dynamics such as antiphase cycles, which occur in experimental predator-prey systems with evolutionary adaptation in the defensive trait of prey. Here I show that antiphase cycles and cryptic cycles (a large population fluctuation in one species with almost no change in the population of the other species) can occur in a predator-prey system when both member species can change their phenotypes through adaptive plasticity (inducible defenses and offenses). I consider a familiar type of predator-prey system in which both species can change their morphology or behavior through phenotypic plasticity. The plasticity, that is, the ability to change between distinct phenotypes, is assumed to occur so as to maximize their fitness. I examined how the reciprocal adaptive plasticity influences the population dynamics. The results show that unusual dynamics such as antiphase population cycles and cryptic cycles can occur when both species show inducible plasticity. The unusual dynamics are particularly likely to occur when the carrying capacity of the prey is small (the density dependence of the prey's growth is strong). The unusual predator-prey dynamics may be induced by phenotypic plasticity as long as the phenotypic change occurs to maximize fitness.

  3. Effect of Testosterone on Neuronal Morphology and Neuritic Growth of Fetal Lamb Hypothalamus-Preoptic Area and Cerebral Cortex in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Radhika C.; Amodei, Rebecka; Estill, Charles T.; Stormshak, Fred; Meaker, Mary; Roselli, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone plays an essential role in sexual differentiation of the male sheep brain. The ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN), is 2 to 3 times larger in males than in females, and this sex difference is under the control of testosterone. The effect of testosterone on oSDN volume may result from enhanced expansion of soma areas and/or dendritic fields. To test this hypothesis, cells derived from the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) and cerebral cortex (CTX) of lamb fetuses were grown in primary culture to examine the direct morphological effects of testosterone on these cellular components. We found that within two days of plating, neurons derived from both the HPOA and CTX extend neuritic processes and express androgen receptors and aromatase immunoreactivity. Both treated and control neurites continue to grow and branch with increasing time in culture. Treatment with testosterone (10 nM) for 3 days significantly (P < 0.05) increased both total neurite outgrowth (35%) and soma size (8%) in the HPOA and outgrowth (21%) and number of branch points (33%) in the CTX. These findings indicate that testosterone-induced somal enlargement and neurite outgrowth in fetal lamb neurons may contribute to the development of a fully masculine sheep brain. PMID:26053052

  4. Impaired neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth in an HIV-gp120 transgenic model is reversed by exercise via BDNF production and Cdk5 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Amin, Niranjana D.; Venkatesan, Arun; Wang, Tongguang; Tyagi, Richa; Pant, Harish C.; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is accompanied with brain atrophy. In these patients, impairment of adult neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth in the hippocampus may contribute to the cognitive dysfunction. Although running exercises can enhance neurogenesis and normalize neurite outgrowth, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The HIV envelope protein, gp120, has been shown to impair neurogenesis. Using a gp120 transgenic mouse model, we demonstrate that exercise stimulated neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and increased the survival rate and generation of newborn cells. However sustained exercise activity was necessary since the effects were reversed by detraining. Exercise also normalized dendritic outgrowth of neurons. Furthermore, it also increased the expression of hippocampal brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and normalized hyperactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). Hyper-activated Cdk5 or gp120 treatment led to aberrant neurite outgrowth and BDNF treatment normalized the neurite outgrowth in NPC cultures. These results suggest that sustained exercise has trophic activity on the neuronal lineage which is mediated by Cdk5 modulation of the BDNF pathway. PMID:23982957

  5. Single polymer dynamics under large amplitude oscillatory extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the conformational dynamics of polymers in time-dependent flows is of key importance for controlling materials properties during processing. Despite this importance, however, it has been challenging to study polymer dynamics in controlled time-dependent or oscillatory extensional flows. In this work, we study the dynamics of single polymers in large-amplitude oscillatory extension (LAOE) using a combination of experiments and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. Two-dimensional LAOE flow is generated using a feedback-controlled stagnation point device known as the Stokes trap, thereby generating an oscillatory planar extensional flow with alternating principal axes of extension and compression. Our results show that polymers experience periodic cycles of compression, reorientation, and extension in LAOE, and dynamics are generally governed by a dimensionless flow strength (Weissenberg number Wi) and dimensionless frequency (Deborah number De). Single molecule experiments are compared to BD simulations with and without intramolecular hydrodynamic interactions (HI) and excluded volume (EV) interactions, and good agreement is obtained across a range of parameters. Moreover, transient bulk stress in LAOE is determined from simulations using the Kramers relation, which reveals interesting and unique rheological signatures for this time-dependent flow. We further construct a series of single polymer stretch-flow rate curves (defined as single molecule Lissajous curves) as a function of Wi and De, and we observe qualitatively different dynamic signatures (butterfly, bow tie, arch, and line shapes) across the two-dimensional Pipkin space defined by Wi and De. Finally, polymer dynamics spanning from the linear to nonlinear response regimes are interpreted in the context of accumulated fluid strain in LAOE.

  6. Axonal shearing in mature cortical neurons induces attempted regeneration and the reestablishment of neurite polarity.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Catherine A; King, Anna E; Haas, Matilda A; O'Toole, David A; Vickers, James C; Dickson, Tracey C

    2009-12-01

    While functional recovery after injury is limited, it has become evident that the mature central nervous system does retain some ability to regenerate. This study investigated the intrinsic capacity of relatively mature cortical neurons (21 days in vitro) to respond to axonal loss. Neurons, growing as clusters on poly-L-lysine, were completely sheared of axons through chemical and mechanical disruption and transferred to either an intact astrocyte monolayer or a substrate of poly-L-lysine. Injured neurons exhibited a regenerative sprouting response that was independent of neuronal cell division or neural progenitors, as demonstrated by negative bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and the neuronal precursor intermediate filament nestin, labeling. At 24 h after injury, neurons had extended appropriately polarized neurites, demonstrated by compartmentalized microtubule-associated proteins MAP2 and tau immunolabeling. Newly sprouting axons were tipped by growth cones; however, growth cones on the tips of sprouting axons (mean area, 26.32 +/- 2.20 microm) were significantly (p<0.05) smaller than their developmental counterparts (mean area, 48.64 +/- 5.9 microm), independent of substrate. Furthermore, live imaging indicated that regenerating neurons exhibited distinct axonal dynamics, with a significant (p<0.05) reduction (70%) in pausing, considered vital for interstitial branching and pathfinding, relative to developmental growth cones. This study indicates that mature cultured cortical pyramidal and interneurons have the intrinsic potential to survive, extend processes, and reestablish neurite polarity following significant physical damage. These results may aid in defining the cellular basis of neuronal structural plasticity and defining the role of astrocyte reactivity in the response to trauma.

  7. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  8. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  9. Pseudo generators for under-resolved molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittracher, A.; Hartmann, C.; Junge, O.; Koltai, P.

    2015-09-01

    Many features of a molecule which are of physical interest (e.g. molecular conformations, reaction rates) are described in terms of its dynamics in configuration space. This article deals with the projection of molecular dynamics in phase space onto configuration space. Specifically, we study the situation that the phase space dynamics is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation and study its relation with the configurational Smoluchowski equation in the three different scaling regimes: Firstly, the Smoluchowski equations in non-Cartesian geometries are derived from the overdamped limit of the Langevin equation. Secondly, transfer operator methods are used to describe the metastable behaviour of the system at hand, and an explicit small-time asymptotics is derived on which the Smoluchowski equation turns out to govern the dynamics of the position coordinate (without any assumptions on the damping). By using an adequate reduction technique, these considerations are then extended to one-dimensional reaction coordinates. Thirdly, we sketch three different approaches to approximate the metastable dynamics based on time-local information only.

  10. Dynamics of range margins for metapopulations under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B.J.; Akçakaya, H.R.; Araújo, M.B.; Fordham, D.A.; Martinez-Meyer, E.; Thuiller, W.; Brook, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribution patterns, shifts at the edge of the range were more pronounced than shifts in the overall metapopulation. For Romerolagus diazi (volcano rabbit), the lower elevation range limit shifted upslope by approximately 700 m. This reduced the area occupied by the metapopulation, as the mountain peak currently lacks suitable vegetation. For Lepus timidus (European mountain hare), we modelled the British metapopulation. Increasing the dispersive estimate caused the metapopulation to shift faster on the northern range margin (leading edge). By contrast, it caused the metapopulation to respond to climate change slower, rather than faster, on the southern range margin (trailing edge). The differential responses of the leading and trailing range margins and the relative sensitivity of range limits to climate change compared with that of the metapopulation centroid have important implications for where conservation monitoring should be targeted. Our study demonstrates the importance and possibility of moving from simple bioclimatic envelope models to second-generation models that incorporate both dynamic climate change and metapopulation dynamics. PMID:19324811

  11. Dynamics of range margins for metapopulations under climate change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Akçakaya, H R; Araújo, M B; Fordham, D A; Martinez-Meyer, E; Thuiller, W; Brook, B W

    2009-04-22

    We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribution patterns, shifts at the edge of the range were more pronounced than shifts in the overall metapopulation. For Romerolagus diazi (volcano rabbit), the lower elevation range limit shifted upslope by approximately 700 m. This reduced the area occupied by the metapopulation, as the mountain peak currently lacks suitable vegetation. For Lepus timidus (European mountain hare), we modelled the British metapopulation. Increasing the dispersive estimate caused the metapopulation to shift faster on the northern range margin (leading edge). By contrast, it caused the metapopulation to respond to climate change slower, rather than faster, on the southern range margin (trailing edge). The differential responses of the leading and trailing range margins and the relative sensitivity of range limits to climate change compared with that of the metapopulation centroid have important implications for where conservation monitoring should be targeted. Our study demonstrates the importance and possibility of moving from simple bioclimatic envelope models to second-generation models that incorporate both dynamic climate change and metapopulation dynamics.

  12. Repeated, intermittent treatment with amphetamine induces neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells).

    PubMed

    Park, Yang Hae; Kantor, Lana; Wang, Kevin K W; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2002-09-27

    Repeated, intermittent treatment with amphetamine (AMPH) leads to long-term neurobiological adaptations in rat brain including an increased number and branching of dendritic spines. This effect depends upon several different cell types in the intact brain. Here we demonstrate that repeated, intermittent AMPH treatment induces neurite outgrowth in cultured PC12 cells without the requirement for integrated synaptic pathways. PC12 cells were treated with 1 micro M AMPH for 5 min a day, for 5 days. After 10 days of withdrawal, there was an increase in the percentage of cells with neurites ( approximately 30%) and the length of neurites as well as an increase in the level of GAP-43 and neurofilament-M. Neurite outgrowth was enhanced as withdrawal time was increased. Neurite outgrowth was much greater following repeated, intermittent treatment with AMPH compared to continuous or single treatment with AMPH. Pretreatment with cocaine, a monoamine transporter blocker, inhibited the AMPH-mediated increase in neurite outgrowth. Neither NGF antibody nor DA receptor antagonists blocked AMPH-induced neurite outgrowth, demonstrating that AMPH-induced neurite outgrowth is not dependent on endogenous NGF release or DA receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that repeated, intermittent treatment with AMPH has a neurotrophic effect in PC12 cells. The effect requires the action of AMPH on the norepinephrine transporter, and shares characteristics in its development with other forms of sensitization but does not require an intact neuroanatomy.

  13. Altered dynamics of forest recovery under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Miller, Adam D; Mohan, Jacqueline E; Hudiburg, Tara W; Duval, Benjamin D; Delucia, Evan H

    2013-07-01

    Forest regeneration following disturbance is a key ecological process, influencing forest structure and function, species assemblages, and ecosystem-climate interactions. Climate change may alter forest recovery dynamics or even prevent recovery, triggering feedbacks to the climate system, altering regional biodiversity, and affecting the ecosystem services provided by forests. Multiple lines of evidence - including global-scale patterns in forest recovery dynamics; forest responses to experimental manipulation of CO2 , temperature, and precipitation; forest responses to the climate change that has already occurred; ecological theory; and ecosystem and earth system models - all indicate that the dynamics of forest recovery are sensitive to climate. However, synthetic understanding of how atmospheric CO2 and climate shape trajectories of forest recovery is lacking. Here, we review these separate lines of evidence, which together demonstrate that the dynamics of forest recovery are being impacted by increasing atmospheric CO2 and changing climate. Rates of forest recovery generally increase with CO2 , temperature, and water availability. Drought reduces growth and live biomass in forests of all ages, having a particularly strong effect on seedling recruitment and survival. Responses of individual trees and whole-forest ecosystems to CO2 and climate manipulations often vary by age, implying that forests of different ages will respond differently to climate change. Furthermore, species within a community typically exhibit differential responses to CO2 and climate, and altered community dynamics can have important consequences for ecosystem function. Age- and species-dependent responses provide a mechanism by which climate change may push some forests past critical thresholds such that they fail to recover to their previous state following disturbance. Altered dynamics of forest recovery will result in positive and negative feedbacks to climate change. Future research

  14. Nanocluster dynamics in fast rate epitaxy under mesoplasma condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Shibuta, Y.; Kambara, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of Si nano-clusters during epitaxial growth has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulation using the Tersoff potential. Several nm sized Si cluster formed during rapid cooling was found to deform instantaneously upon impingement on a Si(1 0 0) substrate at the same time with the spontaneous ordering of the atomic structure to that of the substrate. Due to the increased fraction of high-energy atoms at the surface, smaller clusters (˜1 nm) are favorable for such a deformation even at lower temperatures. This is the advantage of loosely-bound cluster as growth precursor to attain epitaxy with reduced impact energies.

  15. Munc18 and Munc13 regulate early neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Broeke, Jurjen H.P.; Roelandse, Martijn; Luteijn, Maartje J.; Boiko, Tatiana; Matus, Andrew; Toonen, Ruud F.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Background information. During development, growth cones of outgrowing neurons express proteins involved in vesicular secretion, such as SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) proteins, Munc13 and Munc18. Vesicles are known to fuse in growth cones prior to synapse formation, which may contribute to outgrowth. Results. We tested this possibility in dissociated cell cultures and organotypic slice cultures of two release-deficient mice (Munc18-1 null and Munc13-1/2 double null). Both types of release-deficient neurons have a decreased outgrowth speed and therefore have a smaller total neurite length during early development [DIV1–4 (day in vitro 1–4)]. In addition, more filopodia per growth cone were observed in Munc18-1 null, but not WT (wild-type) or Munc13-1/2 double null neurons. The smaller total neurite length during early development was no longer observed after synaptogenesis (DIV14–23). Conclusion. These data suggest that the inability of vesicle fusion in the growth cone affects outgrowth during the initial phases when outgrowth speed is high, but not during/after synaptogenesis. Overall, the outgrowth speed is probably not rate-limiting during neuronal network formation, at least in vitro. In addition, Munc18, but not Munc13, regulates growth cone filopodia, potentially via its previously observed effect on filamentous actin. PMID:20497124

  16. Soil phosphorus dynamics under sprinkler and furrow irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Furrow irrigation detaches and transports soil particles and subsequently nutrients such as phosphorus. To reduce the risk of erosion and offsite phosphorus movement, producers can convert from furrow to sprinkler irrigation. We completed research on soil phosphorus dynamics in furrow versus sprin...

  17. Functional coordination of muscles underlying changes in behavioural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vernooij, Carlijn A.; Rao, Guillaume; Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical systems approach addresses Bernstein’s degrees of freedom problem by assuming that the neuro-musculo-skeletal system transiently assembles and dismantles its components into functional units (or synergies) to meet task demands. Strikingly, little is known from a dynamical point of view about the functioning of the muscular sub-system in this process. To investigate the interaction between the dynamical organisation at muscular and behavioural levels, we searched for specific signatures of a phase transition in muscular coordination when a transition is displayed at the behavioural level. Our results provide evidence that, during Fitts’ task when behaviour switches to a different dynamical regime, muscular activation displays typical signatures of a phase transition; a reorganisation in muscular coordination patterns accompanied by a peak in the variability of muscle activation. This suggests that consistent changes occur in coordination processes across the different levels of description (i.e., behaviour and muscles). Specifically, in Fitts’ task, target size acts as a control parameter that induces a destabilisation and a reorganisation of coordination patterns at different levels of the neuro-musculo-skeletal system. PMID:27282349

  18. Growth, collapse, and stalling in a mechanical model for neurite motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Jerusalem, Antoine; Goriely, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Neurites, the long cellular protrusions that form the routes of the neuronal network, are capable of actively extending during early morphogenesis or regenerating after trauma. To perform this task, they rely on their cytoskeleton for mechanical support. In this paper, we present a three-component active gel model that describes neurites in the three robust mechanical states observed experimentally: collapsed, static, and motile. These states arise from an interplay between the physical forces driven by growth of the microtubule-rich inner core of the neurite and the acto-myosin contractility of its surrounding cortical membrane. In particular, static states appear as a mechanical traction or compression balance of these two parallel structures. The model predicts how the response of a neurite to a towing force depends on the force magnitude and recovers the response of neurites to several drug treatments that modulate the cytoskeleton active and passive properties.

  19. Neurite outgrowth of NG108-15 cells induced by heat shock protein 90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Erika; Sano, Mamoru

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that radicicol (Rad) and geldanamycin (Geld), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, potentiate neurite growth of cultured sensory neurons from chick embryo. We now show that the antibiotics induce neurite growth in NG108-15 cells. Treatment of the cells with these drugs caused transient decrease in protein levels of Raf1, ERK1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, Akt1, and CDK4. The neurite growth of NG108-15 induced by the inhibitors was blocked by actynomycin D, but the neurite growth stimulated by dbcAMP in the cells was not affected. The neurite growth could be due to a change in the synthesis of some specific protein(s) and is speculated to be due to the transient downregulation of particular-signaling molecules stabilized by Hsp90.

  20. Potentiation of Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth by Fluvoxamine: Role of Sigma-1 Receptors, IP3 Receptors and Cellular Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Tomoko; Ishima, Tamaki; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been widely used and are a major therapeutic advance in psychopharmacology. However, their pharmacology is quite heterogeneous. The SSRI fluvoxamine, with sigma-1 receptor agonism, is shown to potentiate nerve-growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC 12 cells. However, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying potentiation by fluvoxamine are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the roles of cellular signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by fluvoxamine and sigma-1 receptor agonists. Methods and Findings The effects of three SSRIs (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine) and three sigma-1 receptor agonists (SA4503, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)-sulfate) on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were examined. Also examined were the effects of the sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, and specific inhibitors of signaling pathways in the potentiation of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth by selective sigma-1 receptor agonist SA4503. Fluvoxamine (but not sertraline or paroxetine) and the sigma-1 receptor agonists SA4503, PPBP, and DHEA-sulfate significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The potentiation by fluvoxamine and the three sigma-1 receptor agonists was blocked by co-administration of the selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist NE-100, suggesting that sigma-1 receptors play a role in blocking the enhancement of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, the potentiation by SA4503 was blocked by co-administration of the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C. In addition, the specific inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC-γ), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), p38MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways

  1. Behavior of Deep Eutectic Solvents under External Electric Fields: A Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2017-01-12

    The properties of selected deep eutectic solvents (DESs) comprising choline chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor and several types of hydrogen bond donors under static and dynamic external electric fields (EEFs) have been studied in this work using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of field intensities under static conditions and of field frequencies under dynamic conditions were simulated. The response of the fluids to the external fields was analyzed from the changes in dipolar arrangements, intermolecular interaction energies, nanoscopic arrangements, and molecular diffusion. These results show for the very first time the nonequilibrium behavior of DESs under EEFs.

  2. Mechanisms controlling neurite outgrowth in a pheochromocytoma cell line: the role of TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chakraborty, Saikat; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2012-04-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Canonical (TRPC) channels are implicated in modulating neurite outgrowth. The expression pattern of TRPCs changes significantly during brain development, suggesting that fine-tuning TRPC expression may be important for orchestrating neuritogenesis. To study how alterations in the TRPC expression pattern affect neurite outgrowth, we used nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a model system for neuritogenesis. In PC12 cells, NGF markedly up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression, but down-regulated TRPC5 expression while promoting neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of TRPC1 augmented, whereas TRPC5 overexpression decelerated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPC1 decreased, whereas shRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPC5 increased NGF-induced neurite extension. Endogenous TRPC1 attenuated the anti-neuritogenic effect of overexpressed TRPC5 in part by forming the heteromeric TRPC1-TRPC5 channels. Previous reports suggested that TRPC6 may facilitate neurite outgrowth. However, we found that TRPC6 overexpression slowed down neuritogenesis, whereas dominant negative TRPC6 (DN-TRPC6) facilitated neurite outgrowth in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Consistent with these findings, hyperforin, a neurite outgrowth promoting factor, decreased TRPC6 expression in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Using pharmacological and molecular biological approaches, we determined that NGF up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression via a p75(NTR)-IKK(2)-dependent pathway that did not involve TrkA receptor signaling in PC12 cells. Similarly, NGF up-regulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 via an IKK(2) dependent pathway in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, our data suggest that a balance of TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPC6 expression determines neurite extension rate in neural cells, with TRPC6 emerging as an NGF-dependent "molecular damper" maintaining a submaximal velocity of neurite extension.

  3. The Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated protein RSK2 regulates neurite outgrowth through phosphorylation of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) and synthesis of phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet; Humeau, Yann; Hanauer, André; Nieswandt, Bernard; Bader, Marie-France; Vitale, Nicolas

    2013-12-11

    More than 80 human X-linked genes have been associated with mental retardation and deficits in learning and memory. However, most of the identified mutations induce limited morphological alterations in brain organization and the molecular bases underlying neuronal clinical features remain elusive. We show here that neurons cultured from mice lacking ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (Rsk2), a model for the Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS), exhibit a significant delay in growth in a similar way to that shown by neurons cultured from phospholipase D1 (Pld1) knock-out mice. We found that gene silencing of Pld1 or Rsk2 as well as acute pharmacological inhibition of PLD1 or RSK2 in PC12 cells strongly impaired neuronal growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Expression of a phosphomimetic PLD1 mutant rescued the inhibition of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells silenced for RSK2, revealing that PLD1 is a major target for RSK2 in neurite formation. NGF-triggered RSK2-dependent phosphorylation of PLD1 led to its activation and the synthesis of phosphatidic acid at sites of neurite growth. Additionally, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that RSK2 and PLD1 positively control fusion of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TiVAMP)/VAMP-7 vesicles at sites of neurite outgrowth. We propose that the loss of function mutations in RSK2 that leads to CLS and neuronal deficits are related to defects in neuronal growth due to impaired RSK2-dependent PLD1 activity resulting in a reduced vesicle fusion rate and membrane supply.

  4. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Upregulation and Activation Mediates Neurite Extension in IL-1β-treated Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Troy S.; Thebeau, Christina N.; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M.; Woods, Lucas T.; Wood, W. Gibson; Petris, Michael J; Sun, Grace Y.; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), whose levels are elevated in the brain in Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, has been shown to have both detrimental and beneficial effects on disease progression. In this paper, we demonstrate that incubation of mouse primary cortical neurons (mPCNs) with IL-1β increases the expression of the P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) and that activation of the upregulated receptor with UTP, a relatively selective agonist of the P2Y2R, increases neurite outgrowth. Consistent with the accepted role of cofilin in the regulation of neurite extension, results indicate that incubation of IL-1β-treated mPCNs with UTP increases the phosphorylation of cofilin, a response absent in PCNs isolated from P2Y2R−/− mice. Other findings indicate that function blocking anti-αvβ3/5 integrin antibodies prevent UTP-induced cofilin activation in IL-1β-treated mPCNs, suggesting that established P2Y2R/αvβ3/5 interactions that promote G12-dependent Rho activation lead to cofilin phosphorylation involved in neurite extension. Cofilin phosphorylation induced by UTP in IL-1β-treated mPCNs is also decreased by inhibitors of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), suggesting a role for P2Y2R-mediated and Gq-dependent calcium mobilization in neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these studies indicate that upregulation of P2Y2Rs in mPCNs under proinflammatory conditions can promote cofilin-dependent neurite outgrowth, a neuroprotective response that may be a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23550835

  5. Up-regulation and activation of the P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor mediate neurite extension in IL-1β-treated mouse primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Troy S; Thebeau, Christina N; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Woods, Lucas T; Wood, W Gibson; Petris, Michael J; Sun, Grace Y; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2013-06-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), whose levels are elevated in the brain in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases, has been shown to have both detrimental and beneficial effects on disease progression. In this article, we demonstrate that incubation of mouse primary cortical neurons (mPCNs) with IL-1β increases the expression of the P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) and that activation of the up-regulated receptor with UTP, a relatively selective agonist of the P2Y2R, increases neurite outgrowth. Consistent with the accepted role of cofilin in the regulation of neurite extension, results indicate that incubation of IL-1β-treated mPCNs with UTP increases the phosphorylation of cofilin, a response absent in PCNs isolated from P2Y2R(-/-) mice. Other findings indicate that function-blocking anti-αv β3/5 integrin antibodies prevent UTP-induced cofilin activation in IL-1β-treated mPCNs, suggesting that established P2Y2R/αv β3/5 interactions that promote G12 -dependent Rho activation lead to cofilin phosphorylation involved in neurite extension. Cofilin phosphorylation induced by UTP in IL-1β-treated mPCNs is also decreased by inhibitors of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), suggesting a role for P2Y2R-mediated and Gq-dependent calcium mobilization in neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these studies indicate that up-regulation of P2Y2Rs in mPCNs under pro-inflammatory conditions can promote cofilin-dependent neurite outgrowth, a neuroprotective response that may be a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. A three-dimensional image processing program for accurate, rapid, and semi-automated segmentation of neuronal somata with dense neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James D.; Cullen, D. Kacy; Harris, James P.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) image analysis techniques provide a powerful means to rapidly and accurately assess complex morphological and functional interactions between neural cells. Current software-based identification methods of neural cells generally fall into two applications: (1) segmentation of cell nuclei in high-density constructs or (2) tracing of cell neurites in single cell investigations. We have developed novel methodologies to permit the systematic identification of populations of neuronal somata possessing rich morphological detail and dense neurite arborization throughout thick tissue or 3-D in vitro constructs. The image analysis incorporates several novel automated features for the discrimination of neurites and somata by initially classifying features in 2-D and merging these classifications into 3-D objects; the 3-D reconstructions automatically identify and adjust for over and under segmentation errors. Additionally, the platform provides for software-assisted error corrections to further minimize error. These features attain very accurate cell boundary identifications to handle a wide range of morphological complexities. We validated these tools using confocal z-stacks from thick 3-D neural constructs where neuronal somata had varying degrees of neurite arborization and complexity, achieving an accuracy of ≥95%. We demonstrated the robustness of these algorithms in a more complex arena through the automated segmentation of neural cells in ex vivo brain slices. These novel methods surpass previous techniques by improving the robustness and accuracy by: (1) the ability to process neurites and somata, (2) bidirectional segmentation correction, and (3) validation via software-assisted user input. This 3-D image analysis platform provides valuable tools for the unbiased analysis of neural tissue or tissue surrogates within a 3-D context, appropriate for the study of multi-dimensional cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. PMID

  7. Heterogeneity in deformation of granular ceramics under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. Y.; Lu, L.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xu, S. L.; Zhu, M. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic compression experiments are conducted on micron-sized SiC powders of different initial densities with a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Digital image correlation is applied to images from high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging to map dynamic strain fields. The X-ray imaging and strain field mapping demonstrate the degree of heterogeneity in deformation depends on the initial powder density; mesoscale strain field evolution is consistent with softening or hardening manifested by bulk-scale loading curves. Statistical analysis of the strain probability distributions exhibits exponential decay tail similar to those of contact forces, which are supposed to lead to the grain-scale heterogeneity of granular materials.

  8. Minimum Wind Dynamic Soaring Trajectories under Boundary Layer Thickness Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic soaring is the flight technique where a glider, either avian or manmade, extracts its propulsive energy from the non-uniformity of horizontal winds. Albatrosses have been recorded to fly an impressive 5000 km/week at no energy cost of their own. In the sharp boundary layer limit, we show that the popular image, where the glider travels in a succession of half turns, is suboptimal for travel speed, airspeed, and soaring ability. Instead, we show that the strategy that maximizes the three criteria simultaneously is a succession of infinitely small arc-circles connecting transitions between the calm and windy layers. The model is consistent with the recordings of albatross flight patterns. This lowers the required wind speed for dynamic soaring by over 50% compared to previous beliefs. In the thick boundary layer limit, energetic considerations allow us to predict a minimum wind gradient necessary for sustained soaring consistent with numerical models.

  9. Dynamic strength of armature materials under pulsed current conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Duane C.; Noel, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for generating tensile-strength-versus electrical-action curves for armature materials under pulsed current conditions is presented. This technique is capable of imposing high strain rates (above 1000/sec) under pulse current conditions by electromagnetically expanding a wire formed from a candidate armature material. The strain rate is derived by determining the change in mutual inductance between the expanding test wire and a fixed reference wire. The experimental technique and results obtained for aluminum and copper armature materials are described. The results indicate that aluminum and copper armature materials maintain a high percentage of room-temperature tensile strength under actual railgun conditions.

  10. Forward dynamics simulation of human body under tilting perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, D.; Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2012-02-01

    Human body uses different strategies to maintain its stability and these strategies vary from fixed-foot strategies to strategies which foot is moved in order to increase the support base. Tilting movement of foot is one type of the perturbations usually is exposed to human body. In the presence of such perturbations human body must employ appropriate reactions to prevent threats like falling. But it is not clear that how human body maintains its stability by central nervous system (CNS). At present study it is tried that by presenting a musculoskeletal model of human lower extremity with four links, three degrees of freedom (DOF) and eight skeletal muscles, the level of muscle activations causes the maintenance of stability, be investigated. Using forward dynamics solution, leads to a more general problem, rather than inverse dynamics. Hence, forward dynamics solution by forward optimization has been used for solving this highly nonlinear problem. To this end, first the system's equations of motion has been derived using lagrangian dynamics. Eight Hill-type muscles as actuators of the system were modeled. Because determination of muscle forces considering their number is an undetermined problem, optimization of an appropriate goal function should be practiced. For optimization problem, the characteristics of genetic algorithms as a method based on direct search, and the direct collocation method, has been profited. Also by considering requirements of problem, some constraints such as conservation of model stability are entered into optimization procedure. Finally to investigate validation of model, the results from optimization and experimental data are compared and good agreements are obtained.

  11. Analysis of vehicle dynamics under sadden cross wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the way of calculating aerodynamic forces acting on a vehicle passing in the region of sadden cross wind was presented. The CarDyn, a vehicle dynamics simulation program, developed by the author was used. The effects of the cross wind were studied with a fixed steering wheel simulation. On the base of computer simulations the car cross wind sensitivity were determined, and vehicle responses such as lateral offset, side acceleration and yaw angular velocity are presented.

  12. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress

    DOE PAGES

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; ...

    2017-06-02

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power opticalmore » laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of Embedded Image ~2 × 108 to 3.5 × 108 s-1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.« less

  13. Markovian evolution of quantum coherence under symmetric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Korzekwa, Kamil; Milne, Antony

    2017-09-01

    Both conservation laws and practical restrictions impose symmetry constraints on the dynamics of open quantum systems. In the case of time-translation symmetry, which arises naturally in many physically relevant scenarios, the quantum coherence between energy eigenstates becomes a valuable resource for quantum information processing. In this work, we identify the minimum amount of decoherence compatible with this symmetry for a given population dynamics. This yields a generalization to higher-dimensional systems of the relation T2≤2 T1 for qubit decoherence and relaxation times. It also enables us to witness and assess the role of non-Markovianity as a resource for coherence preservation and transfer. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between ergodicity and the ability of Markovian dynamics to indefinitely sustain a superposition of different energy states. Finally, we establish a formal connection between the resource-theoretic and the master equation approaches to thermodynamics, with the former being a non-Markovian generalization of the latter. Our work thus brings the abstract study of quantum coherence as a resource towards the realm of actual physical applications.

  14. Preventing formation of Reticulon 3 Immunoreactive Dystrophic Neurites improves cognitive function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Prior, Marguerite; Zhou, Xiangdong; Tang, Xiaoying; He, Wanxia; Hu, Xiangyou; Yan, Riqiang

    2013-01-01

    Neuritic dystrophy is one of the important pathological features associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and age-dependent neuronal dysfunctions. We have previously reported that reticulon-3 (RTN3) immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs) are abundantly present in the hippocampus of AD patients, in AD mouse models and in aged wild-type mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing the human RTN3 transgene spontaneously develop RIDNs in their hippocampi and the formation of RIDNs correlates with the appearance of RTN3 aggregation. To further elucidate whether the formation of RIDNs is reversible, we generated transgenic mice expressing wild-type human RTN3 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. Treatment with doxycycline for two months effectively turned off expression of the human RTN3 transgene, confirming the inducible nature of the system. However, the formation of hippocampal RIDNs was dependent on whether the transgene was turned off before or after the formation of RTN3 aggregates. When transgenic human RTN3 expression was turned off at young age, formation of RIDNs was largely eliminated compared to the vehicle-treated transgenic mice. More importantly, a fear conditioning study demonstrated that contextual associative learning and memory in inducible transgenic mice was improved if the density of RIDNs was lowered. Further mechanistic study suggested that a reduction in BDNF levels in transgenic mice might contribute to the reduced learning and memory in transgenic mice overexpressing RTN3. Hence, we conclude that age-dependent RIDNs cannot be effectively cleared once they have formed and we postulate that successful prevention of RIDN formation should be initiated prior to RTN3 aggregation. PMID:23407961

  15. Dynamical Models for Sloshing Dynamics of Helium 2 Under Low-G Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1997-01-01

    Coupling of sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 with spacecraft dynamics are investigated in response to the realistic environmental disturbance forces and torques acting on the spacecraft during normal operation. This study investigates: (1) the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacting to combined environmental disturbances, including gravity gradient, aerodynamic, and magnetic forces and torques; (2) characteristics of slosh reaction forces and torques coupling with spacecraft dynamics; (3) the contribution of slosh dynamics to over-all spacecraft dynamics; and (4) activating of attitude and translation control system. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the rotational frame, while the spacecraft dynamics is associated with non-rotational frame. Results show that the contributions of spacecraft dynamics are driven by the environmental disturbances coupling with slosh dynamics. Without considering the effects of environmental disturbances-driven slosh dynamics acting on spacecraft coupling with the spacecraft dynamics may lead to the wrong results for the development of spacecraft system guidance and attitude control techniques.

  16. Respective roles of neurofilaments, microtubules, MAP1B, and tau in neurite outgrowth and stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, T B; Beermann, M L

    1994-01-01

    The respective roles of neurofilaments (NFs), microtubules (MTs), and the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) MAP 1B and tau on neurite outgrowth and stabilization were probed by the intracellular delivery of specific antisera into transiently permeabilized NB2a/d1 cells during treatment with dbcAMP. Intracellular delivery of antisera specific for the low (NF-L), middle (NF-M), or extensively phosphorylated high (NF-H) molecular weight subunits did not prevent initial neurite elaboration, nor did it induce retraction of existing neurites elaborated by cells that had been previously treated for 1 d with dbcAMP. By contrast, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against tubulin reduced the percentage of cells with neurites at both these time points. Intracellular delivery of anti-NF-L and anti-NF-M antisera did not induce retraction in cells treated with dbcAMP for 3 d. However, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, tau, or tubulin induced similar levels of neurite retraction at this time. Intracellular delivery of monoclonal antibodies (RT97 or SMI-31) directed against phosphorylated NF-H induced neurite retraction in cell treated with dbcAMP for 3 d; a monoclonal antibody (SMI-32) directed against nonphosphorylated NF-H did not induce neurite retraction at this time. By contrast, none of the above antisera induced retraction of neurites in cells treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. Neurites develop resistance to retraction by colchicine, first detectable in some neurites after 3 d and in the majority of neurites after 7 d of dbcAMP treatment. We therefore examined whether or not colchicine resistance was compromised by intracellular delivery of the above antisera. Colchicine treatment resulted in rapid neurite retraction after intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, or tau into cells that had previously been treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. By contrast, colchicine

  17. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Slimane; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and formulate analytical models for the evolution of learning rules. We consider a population of individuals repeatedly interacting during their lifespan, and where the stage game faced by the individuals fluctuates according to an environmental stochastic process. Individuals adjust their behavioral actions according to learning rules belonging to the class of experience-weighted attraction learning mechanisms, which includes standard reinforcement and Bayesian learning as special cases. We use stochastic approximation theory in order to derive differential equations governing action play probabilities, which turn out to have qualitative features of mutator-selection equations. We then perform agent-based simulations to find the conditions where the deterministic approximation is closest to the original stochastic learning process for standard 2-action 2-player fluctuating games, where interaction between learning rules and preference reversal may occur. Finally, we analyze a simplified model for the evolution of learning in a producer-scrounger game, which shows that the exploration rate can interact in a non-intuitive way with other features of co-evolving learning rules. Overall, our analyses illustrate the usefulness of applying stochastic approximation theory in the study of animal learning.

  18. Prey dynamics under generalist predator culling in stage structured models.

    PubMed

    Costa, Michel Iskin da S; Esteves, Pedro V; Faria, Lucas Del Bianco; Dos Anjos, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, by means of mathematical dynamical models we investigate the impacts of predator culling on a prey population structured in two stage classes, juveniles and adults, assuming stage specific predation by two generalist predators with functional responses types 2 and 3 in all possible combinations. According to the chosen set of parameter values, these impacts can manifest through possible demographic Allee effects, sustained population oscillations, alternative stable states (e.g., predator-pit-like behavior) and Hydra effect, which are all discussed, in turn, in terms of species conservation, harvest yield and pest biological control.

  19. FGF-2 deficiency causes dysregulation of Arhgef6 and downstream targets in the cerebral cortex accompanied by altered neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Baum, Philip; Vogt, Miriam A; Gass, Peter; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is an abundant growth factor in the brain and exerts multiple functions on neural cells ranging from cell division, cell fate determination to differentiation. However, many details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diverse functions of FGF-2 are poorly understood. In a comparative microarray analysis of motor sensory cortex (MSC) tissue of adult knockout (FGF-2(-/-)) and control (FGF-2(+/+)) mice, we found a substantial number of regulated genes, which are implicated in cytoskeletal machinery dynamics. Specifically, we found a prominent downregulation of Arhgef6. Arhgef6 mRNA was significantly reduced in the FGF-2(-/-) cortex, and Arhgef6 protein virtually absent, while RhoA protein levels were massively increased and Cdc42 protein levels were reduced. Since Arhgef6 is localized to dendritic spines, we next analyzed dendritic spines of adult FGF2(-/-) and control mouse cortices. Spine densities were significantly increased, whereas mean length of spines on dendrites of layer V of MSC neurons in adult FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly decreased as compared to respective controls. Furthermore, neurite length in dissociated cortical cultures from E18 FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly reduced at DIV7 as compared to wildtype neurons. Despite the fact that altered neuronal morphology and alterations in dendritic spines were observed, FGF-2(-/-) mice behave relatively unsuspicious in several behavioral tasks. However, FGF-2(-/-) mice exhibited decreased thermal pain sensitivity in the hotplate-test.

  20. Reelin immunoreactivity in neuritic varicosities in the human hippocampal formation of non-demented subjects and Alzheimer’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reelin and its downstream signaling members are important modulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics, a fundamental prerequisite for proper neurodevelopment and adult neuronal functions. Reductions in Reelin levels have been suggested to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathophysiology. We have previously reported an age-related reduction in Reelin levels and its accumulation in neuritic varicosities along the olfactory-limbic tracts, which correlated with cognitive impairments in aged mice. Here, we aimed to investigate whether a similar Reelin-associated neuropathology is observed in the aged human hippocampus and whether it correlated with dementia status. Results Our immunohistochemical stainings revealed the presence of N- and C-terminus-containing Reelin fragments in corpora amylacea (CAm), aging-associated spherical deposits. The density of these deposits was increased in the molecular layer of the subiculum of AD compared to non-demented individuals. Despite the limitation of a small sample size, our evaluation of several neuronal and glial markers indicates that the presence of Reelin in CAm might be related to aging-associated impairments in neuronal transport leading to accumulation of organelles and protein metabolites in neuritic varicosities, as previously suggested by the findings and discussions in rodents and primates. Conclusions Our results indicate that aging- and disease-associated changes in Reelin levels and proteolytic processing might play a role in the formation of CAm by altering cytoskeletal dynamics. However, its presence may also be an indicator of a degenerative state of neuritic compartments. PMID:24252415

  1. Direct observation of the dynamic process underlying allosteric signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Schanda, Paul; Kloiber, Karin; Brutscher, Bernhard; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    2009-03-04

    Allosteric regulation is an effective mechanism of control in biological processes. In allosteric proteins a signal originating at one site in the molecule is communicated through the protein structure to trigger a specific response at a remote site. Using NMR relaxation dispersion techniques we directly observe the dynamic process through which the KIX domain of CREB binding protein communicates allosteric information between binding sites. KIX mediates cooperativity between pairs of transcription factors through binding to two distinct interaction surfaces in an allosteric manner. We show that binding the activation domain of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) transcription factor to KIX induces a redistribution of the relative populations of KIX conformations toward a high-energy state in which the allosterically activated second binding site is already preformed, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (WMC) model of allostery. The structural rearrangement process that links the two conformers and by which allosteric information is communicated occurs with a time constant of 3 ms at 27 degrees C. Our dynamic NMR data reveal that an evolutionarily conserved network of hydrophobic amino acids constitutes the pathway through which information is transmitted.

  2. Binary dynamics on star networks under external perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Carolina A.; Schneider, David M.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study a binary dynamical process that is a representation of the voter model with two candidates and opinion makers. The voters are represented by nodes of a network of social contacts with internal states labeled 0 or 1 and nodes that are connected can influence each other. The network is also perturbed by opinion makers, a set of external nodes whose states are frozen in 0 or 1 and that can influence all nodes of the network. The quantity of interest is the probability of finding m nodes in state 1 at time t . Here we study this process on star networks, which are simple representations of hubs found in complex systems, and compare the results with those obtained for networks that are fully connected. In both cases a transition from disordered to ordered equilibrium states is observed as the number of external nodes becomes small. For fully connected networks the probability distribution becomes uniform at the critical point. For star networks, on the other hand, we show that the equilibrium distribution splits in two peaks, reflecting the two possible states of the central node. We obtain approximate analytical solutions for the equilibrium distribution that clarify the role of the central node in the process. We show that the network topology also affects the time scale of oscillations in single realizations of the dynamics, which are much faster for the star network. Finally, extending the analysis to two stars we compare our results with simulations in simple scale-free networks.

  3. Dynamics of Motorized Vehicle Flow under Mixed Traffic Circumstance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Wei; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei; Xie, Dong-Fan

    2011-04-01

    To study the dynamics of mixed traffic flow consisting of motorized and non-motorized vehicles, a car-following model based on the principle of collision free and cautious driving is proposed. Lateral friction and overlapping driving are introduced to describe the interactions between motorized vehicles and non-motorized vehicles. By numerical simulations, the flux-density relation, the temporal-spatial dynamics, and the velocity evolution are investigated in detail. The results indicate non-motorized vehicles have a significant impact on the motorized vehicle flow and cause the maximum flux to decline by about 13%. Non-motorized vehicles can decrease the motorized vehicle velocity and cause velocity oscillation when the motorized vehicle density is low. Moreover, non-motorized vehicles show a significant damping effect on the oscillating velocity when the density is medium and high, and such an effect weakens as motorized vehicle density increases. The results also stress the necessity for separating motorized vehicles from non-motorized vehicles.

  4. Dynamics of sex ratio and female unmatedness under haplodiploidy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andy

    2014-05-01

    Haplodiploid sex determination allows unmated females to produce sons. Consequently, a scarcity of males may lead to a significant proportion of females remaining unmated, which may in turn give rise to a surfeit of males in the following generation. Stable oscillation of the sex ratio has been predicted by classic models, and it remains a puzzle as to why this is not observed in natural populations. Here, I investigate the dynamics of sex allocation over ecological and evolutionary timescales to assess the potential for sustained oscillation. I find that, whilst stable oscillation of the sex ratio is possible, the scope for such dynamical behavior is reduced if sex allocation strategies are evolutionary labile, especially if mated females may facultatively adjust their sex allocation according to the present availability of mating partners. My model, taken together with empirical estimates of female unmatedness in haplodiploid taxa, suggests that sustained oscillation of the sex ratio is implausible in natural populations. However, this phenomenon may be relevant to artificially introduced biological control agents.

  5. Dynamical Response of Networks Under External Perturbations: Exact Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinellato, David D.; Epstein, Irving R.; Braha, Dan; Bar-Yam, Yaneer; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We give exact statistical distributions for the dynamic response of influence networks subjected to external perturbations. We consider networks whose nodes have two internal states labeled 0 and 1. We let nodes be frozen in state 0, in state 1, and the remaining nodes change by adopting the state of a connected node with a fixed probability per time step. The frozen nodes can be interpreted as external perturbations to the subnetwork of free nodes. Analytically extending and to be smaller than 1 enables modeling the case of weak coupling. We solve the dynamical equations exactly for fully connected networks, obtaining the equilibrium distribution, transition probabilities between any two states and the characteristic time to equilibration. Our exact results are excellent approximations for other topologies, including random, regular lattice, scale-free and small world networks, when the numbers of fixed nodes are adjusted to take account of the effect of topology on coupling to the environment. This model can describe a variety of complex systems, from magnetic spins to social networks to population genetics, and was recently applied as a framework for early warning signals for real-world self-organized economic market crises.

  6. Dynamics of public opinion under the influence of epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhui; Ni, Shunjiang; Shen, Shifei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model with dynamically adjusted confidence level of others to investigate the propagation of public opinion on whether to buy chicken in the case of avian influenza infection in humans. We study how people adjust their confidence level in other people’s opinions according to their perceived infection risk and how the opinion evolution and epidemic spreading affect each other on different complex networks by taking into account the spreading feature of avian influenza, that is, only people who buy chicken are possible to be infected. The simulation results show that in a closed system, people who support buying chicken and people who are infected can achieve a dynamic balance after a few time-steps, and the final stable state is mainly dependent on the level of people’s risk perception, rather than the initial distribution of the different opinions. Our results imply that in the course of the epidemic spread, transparent and timely announcement of the number of infections and the risk of infection can help people take the right self-protection actions, and thus help control the spread of avian influenza.

  7. Dynamics of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) under external force.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2013-03-01

    During DNA synthesis, high-fidelity DNA polymerase (DNAP) translocates processively along the template by utilizing the chemical energy from nucleotide incorporation. Thus, understanding the chemomechanical coupling mechanism and the effect of external mechanical force on replication velocity are the most fundamental issues for high-fidelity DNAP. Here, based on our proposed model, we take Klenow fragment as an example to study theoretically the dynamics of high-fidelity DNAPs such as the replication velocity versus different types of external force, i.e., a stretching force on the template, a backward force on the enzyme and a forward force on the enzyme. Replication velocity as a function of the template tension with only one adjustable parameter is in good agreement with the available experimental data. The replication velocity is nearly independent of the forward force, even at very low dNTP concentration. By contrast, the backward force has a large effect on the replication velocity, especially at high dNTP concentration. A small backward force can increase the replication velocity and an optimal backward force exists at which the replication velocity has maximum value; with any further increase in the backward force the velocity decreases rapidly. These results can be tested easily by future experiments and are aid our understanding of the chemomechanical coupling mechanism and polymerization dynamics of high-fidelity DNAP.

  8. Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Jazdzewska, Monika; Palmer, Jeremy; Mamontov, Eugene; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  9. Dynamics of Circular Contact Lines: Spin Coating under Marangoni forces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Behringer, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Spin Coating remains one of the most important industrial applications of fluid dynamics, where understanding and controlling the instabilities is very important. The basic configuration consists of a fluid drop that is initially centrally located on a flat horizontal rotating surface. In this work we report on experiments on thin liquid films and fingering instabilities of a liquid drop, over a large range of angular speeds (from 10 mHz to 10Hz) of completely wetting PDMS oils on oxidized silicon wafers. Using a novel experimental setup, we will look at the effect of applying a radial temperature gradient (as opposed to a vertical gradient) on the dynamics of both the drop and the thin liquid film. In this case, the Marangoni forces oppose the centrifugal body forces. Depending on the relative strength of the driving force (angular speeds of 1 to 10 Hz and temparature gradients of 10 K/cm) and the drop size (volume of the drop varies from 1 microlitre to 100 microlitre) nontrivial wave structures and patterns arise. These results will be analyzed in the framework of the lubrication approximation.

  10. Ionospheric Plasma Outflow Under High Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Bouhram, M.; Dubouloz, N.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Berthomier, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    The polar cusp is well-known to be one of the most intense source regions of iono- spheric outflow. Since this region is of direct access for solar wind plasma, changes in the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind dynamic pressure are expected to influence the ion outflow. We report combined observations from the Interball- Auroral in the high-altitude range (10,000-20,000km) and the FAST satellite in the mid-altitude range (4000 km) revealing enhanced ion outflows in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock and CME. Several case studies based on the anal- ysis of ion data recorded from several orbits before and after the pressure impulse are made to investigate how the dynamic pressure affects the amount of outflowing ions. We found a clear relationship between the ion outflow variations and the dy- namic pressure changes when choosing average ion flux and average ion energy flux, inferred from global conservation laws, as parameters to characterize the ion outflow.

  11. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Exploring Dynamics of Land surface-Subsurface Coupling Under Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, Hoori; McCabe, Matthew F.; Evans, Jason P.

    2013-04-01

    The degree of land surface-subsurface coupling is controlled by complex interactions between the atmosphere, land surface condition and subsurface hydrologic characteristics. Global climate models project increases in temperature and changes in precipitation rates and patterns which in turn alter terrestrial water and energy budgets impacting water resources. However, the degree of land surface-subsurface coupling under scenarios of land cover and climate change has not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated groundwater-surface water-land surface model (ParFlow.CLM) across a semi-arid catchment located in the central west New South Wales, Australia to assess variability in water and energy fluxes under historic condition and scenarios of climate and land cover change. The Baldry hydrological observatory situated in a topographically flat terrain has the area of 2 km2 and contains two distinct land cover types of pasture and a regenerated Eucalyptus forest. High resolution groundwater level measurements in the site reveal differences in groundwater connectivity in wet versus dry periods in pasture and Eucalyptus forest for the historic condition. Using downscaled climate forcing obtained from a regional climate model for eastern Australia, the degree of land surface-subsurface coupling within the catchment was examined under various scenarios of climate and changes in land cover types. It is expected that a fully integrated hydrologic model like ParFlow.CLM improve predictions in land-atmospheric feedback processes under changes in hydrologic conditions.

  13. Spatial competition dynamics between reef corals under ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Rael; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Fine, Maoz

    2017-01-09

    Climate change, including ocean acidification (OA), represents a major threat to coral-reef ecosystems. Although previous experiments have shown that OA can negatively affect the fitness of reef corals, these have not included the long-term effects of competition for space on coral growth rates. Our multispecies year-long study subjected reef-building corals from the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea) to competitive interactions under present-day ocean pH (pH 8.1) and predicted end-of-century ocean pH (pH 7.6). Results showed coral growth is significantly impeded by OA under intraspecific competition for five out of six study species. Reduced growth from OA, however, is negligible when growth is already suppressed in the presence of interspecific competition. Using a spatial competition model, our analysis indicates shifts in the competitive hierarchy and a decrease in overall coral cover under lowered pH. Collectively, our case study demonstrates how modified competitive performance under increasing OA will in all likelihood change the composition, structure and functionality of reef coral communities.

  14. Cupula dynamics under caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A. V.; Sirenko, S. P.

    Caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal SC is widely applied in studies of vestibular impairments Barany 1906 suggested that caloric response of SC results from mechanism of endolymph convection due to density changes of endolymph and therefore depends on the action of gravity forces However the Skylab experiments 1983 showed that the caloric reaction of SC can take place even under microgravity The studies of Scherer Clarke 1985 Harada Ariki 1985 Baumgarten et al 1985 considered the thermal expansion of endolymph to be a concurrent mechanism The model of caloric response based on the buoyancy force due to density change in the endolymph induced by thermal stimulation was proposed by Gentine et al 1990 1991 It should be noted that the first qualitative model that took into account the effect of endolymph thermal expansion under local heating to analyze the properties of primary afferents was proposed by Gusev Orlov 1977 However these models failed to answer the question which of the mentioned effects will be dominant under certain conditions The purpose of present study was to account for the expansion and convection of endolymph and to determine under which conditions one mechanism dominates over the other The consideration is based on the following model of SC Kondrachuk Sirenko 1990 an isolated torus filled by a compressible viscous Newton liquid endolymph the torus interior is plugged by an elastic body cupula the cupula surface in contact with endolymph is supposed to be stretched along the

  15. Spatial competition dynamics between reef corals under ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Rael; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Fine, Maoz

    2017-01-01

    Climate change, including ocean acidification (OA), represents a major threat to coral-reef ecosystems. Although previous experiments have shown that OA can negatively affect the fitness of reef corals, these have not included the long-term effects of competition for space on coral growth rates. Our multispecies year-long study subjected reef-building corals from the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea) to competitive interactions under present-day ocean pH (pH 8.1) and predicted end-of-century ocean pH (pH 7.6). Results showed coral growth is significantly impeded by OA under intraspecific competition for five out of six study species. Reduced growth from OA, however, is negligible when growth is already suppressed in the presence of interspecific competition. Using a spatial competition model, our analysis indicates shifts in the competitive hierarchy and a decrease in overall coral cover under lowered pH. Collectively, our case study demonstrates how modified competitive performance under increasing OA will in all likelihood change the composition, structure and functionality of reef coral communities. PMID:28067281

  16. Water use dynamics of peach trees under postharvest deficit irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postharvest deficit irrigation is a potential strategy for conserving valuable fresh water for production of early season tree fruit crops such as peaches. However, behaviors of evapotranspiration characteristics and crop coefficient (Kc) under deficit irrigation conditions are largely unknown. A th...

  17. Mathematical modeling of steel fiber concrete under dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. N.; Yugov, N. T.; Kopanitsa, D. G.; Kopanitsa, G. D.; Yugov, A. A.; Shashkov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a continuum mechanics mathematical model that describes the processes of deformation and destruction of steel-fiber-concrete under a shock wave impact. A computer modeling method was applied to study the processes of shock wave impact of a steel cylindrical rod and concrete and steel fiber concrete plates. The impact speeds were within 100-500 m/s.

  18. Optimal Dynamic Advertising Strategy Under Age-Specific Market Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastev, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    We consider the model proposed by Faggian and Grosset for determining the advertising efforts and goodwill in the long run of a company under age segmentation of consumers. Reducing this model to optimal control sub problems we find the optimal advertising strategy and goodwill.

  19. Spatial competition dynamics between reef corals under ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Rael; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Fine, Maoz

    2017-01-01

    Climate change, including ocean acidification (OA), represents a major threat to coral-reef ecosystems. Although previous experiments have shown that OA can negatively affect the fitness of reef corals, these have not included the long-term effects of competition for space on coral growth rates. Our multispecies year-long study subjected reef-building corals from the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea) to competitive interactions under present-day ocean pH (pH 8.1) and predicted end-of-century ocean pH (pH 7.6). Results showed coral growth is significantly impeded by OA under intraspecific competition for five out of six study species. Reduced growth from OA, however, is negligible when growth is already suppressed in the presence of interspecific competition. Using a spatial competition model, our analysis indicates shifts in the competitive hierarchy and a decrease in overall coral cover under lowered pH. Collectively, our case study demonstrates how modified competitive performance under increasing OA will in all likelihood change the composition, structure and functionality of reef coral communities.

  20. Dynamics of drop coalescence on under-liquid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of drop coalescence on under-liquid substrates is a challenging problem due to the presence of a surrounding viscous medium. Though, most work till date have focused on coalescence in air medium, the presence of a surrounding viscous medium is a significant extension to this classical coalescence problem. Such instances are often found in physical systems such as oil-spills, wetting of marine ecosystem, etc. In the present work, a modified one-dimensional lubrication equation has been developed to describe the early coalescence behavior of two symmetric sessile drops for under-liquid substrates, which takes into account the viscosities of both the drop and the surrounding medium. We found a new time scale which governs the process and there exist a cross-over time between the universal scaling of the bridge height growth \\hcirc ~ \\tcirc (valid for both under-liquid and air) and a much slower bridge growth \\hcirc ~\\tcirc 0 . 24 occurring at a later time. It is also found that the evolving bridge profile has a self-similarity, which breaks up much earlier for under-liquid substrates as opposed to symmetric coalescence in air.

  1. Micropatterning of Neurite Outgrowth in vitro Using Micropipette Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miho; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    To understand the relationship between neuronal-network functions and single-neuron activity, construction of artificial neuronal network is one of the promising approaches. Cell patterning is a useful technique to get single-neuron-based networks in vitro. Here in this work, we propose a simple method to get simple neuronal networks, based on neurite-outgrowth guidance. Our method, referred to as “micropipette drawing” is a quite simple photomask-free technique. Growth-guiding patterns are drawn with a micropipette containing cell-adhesive solution on non-adhesive substrates. Guiding structures of approximately 10 μm width were successfully drawn and rat hippocampal neurons were cultured on the patterns. The patterned neuronal networks could be maintained for more than a week.

  2. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, F; Cox, J H; Meyer, S; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peripheral nerve involved. While, in this model, fatal encephalopathogenic rabies develops only after depletion of the CD4 subset of T lymphocytes and without contribution of the CD8 subset, RVNP is identified as an immunopathological process in which both the CD4 and CD8 subsets of T lymphocytes are critically implicated. Images PMID:1629964

  3. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  4. Neurite outgrowth at the interface of 2D and 3D growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Fong, Vivian J.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Growing neurons navigate complex environments, but in vitro systems for studying neuronal growth typically limit the cues to flat surfaces or a single type of cue, thereby limiting the resulting growth. Here we examined the growth of neurons presented with two-dimensional (2D) substrate-bound cues when these cues were presented in conjunction with a more complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants were cultured at the interface between a collagen I matrix and a glass coverslip. Laminin (LN) or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) were uniformly coated on the surface of the glass coverslip or patterned in 50 µm tracks by microcontact printing. Quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth with a novel grid system at multiple depths in the gel revealed several interesting trends. Most of the neurites extended at the surface of the gel when LN was presented whereas more neurites extended into the gel when CSPG was presented. Patterning of cues did not affect neurite density or depth of growth. However, neurite outgrowth near the surface of the gel aligned with LN patterns, and these extensions were significantly longer than neurites extended in other cultures. In interface cultures, DRG growth patterns varied with the type of cue where neurite density was higher in cultures presenting LN than in cultures presenting CSPG. These results represent an important step toward understanding how neurons integrate local structural and chemical cues to make net growth decisions.

  5. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Zhong, Fachun; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  6. Entanglement dynamics of nonidentical oscillators under decohering environments

    SciTech Connect

    Galve, Fernando; Giorgi, Gian Luca; Zambrini, Roberta

    2010-06-15

    We study the evolution of entanglement for a pair of coupled nonidentical harmonic oscillators in contact with an environment. For both cases of a common bath and of two separate baths for each of the oscillators, a full master equation is provided without rotating-wave approximation. The entanglement dynamics is analyzed as a function of the diversity between the oscillators' frequencies and their positive or negative mutual coupling and also the correlation between the occupation numbers. The singular effect of the resonance condition (identical oscillators) and its relationship with the possibility of preserving asymptotic entanglement are discussed. The importance of the bath's memory properties is investigated by comparing Markovian and non-Markovian evolutions.

  7. DYNAMICS OF CHROMOSPHERIC UPFLOWS AND UNDERLYING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P.

    2013-04-10

    We used H{alpha}-0.1 nm and magnetic field (at 1.56{mu}) data obtained with the New Solar Telescope to study the origin of the disk counterparts to type II spicules, so-called rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs). The high time cadence of our chromospheric (10 s) and magnetic field (45 s) data allowed us to generate x-t plots using slits parallel to the spines of the RBEs. These plots, along with potential field extrapolation, led us to suggest that the occurrence of RBEs is generally correlated with the appearance of new, mixed, or unipolar fields in close proximity to network fields. RBEs show a tendency to occur at the interface between large-scale fields and small-scale dynamic magnetic loops and thus are likely to be associated with the existence of a magnetic canopy. Detection of kinked and/or inverse {sup Y-}shaped RBEs further confirm this conclusion.

  8. The unique dynamical system underlying RR Lyrae pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic models of RR Lyrae pulsation display a very rich behaviour. Contrary to earlier expectations, high order resonances play a crucial role in the nonlinear dynamics representing the interacting modes. Chaotic attractors can be found at different time scales: both in the pulsation itself and in the amplitude equations shaping the possible modulation of the oscillations. Although there is no one-to-one connection between the nonlinear features found in the numerical models and the observed behaviour, the richness of the found phenomena suggests that the interaction of modes should be taken seriously in the study of the still unsolved puzzle of Blazhko effect. One of the main lessons of this complex system is that we should rethink the simple interpretation of the observed effect of resonances.

  9. Dynamic behavior of variable speed wind turbines under stochastic wind

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, S.A.; Papadopoulos, M.P.

    1999-12-01

    It is recognized that the most important advantage of the variable speed wind turbines (VS WTs) over the conventional constant speed (CS) machines are the improved dynamic characteristics, resulting in the reduction of the drive train mechanical stresses and output power fluctuations. In this paper alternative configurations of the electrical part of a VS WT are considered, using a squirrel cage induction generator and voltage or current source converters, as well as a double output induction generator with a rotor converter cascade. The WT operation is simulated for typical wind speed time series and the examined schemes are comparatively assessed. It is shown that, using suitable converters and controls, a great reduction of the mechanical stresses and output power fluctuations can be achieved, compared to the CS mode of operation of the WT.

  10. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  11. Enhanced Translational Dynamics of Water under Electric Field

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Wada, Nobuo; Inagaki, S; Fukushima, Y

    2012-01-01

    High resolution quasielastic neutron scattering measurements have been used to study the effects of applied electric field on the dynamics of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica sheet material FSM-12 with an average pore diameter (apd) of 16 Angstroms. In the absence of field, there is a significant slowing down of the water molecule diffusion as the temperature is lowered, in agreement with previous observations. The application of a moderate electric field of 2.5 kV/mm remarkably enhances the translational diffusion of water molecules. We interpret this as being due to a disruption of the hydrogen bonding by the electric field. This new observation suggests that existing theories valid at large electric field strengths may have to be corrected at moderate fields.

  12. Non-Markovian Dynamics of Spin Squeezing Under Detuning Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Wu, Jia-Ju; Zhong, Wo-Jun; Li, Yan-Ling

    The dynamics of spin squeezing of an ensemble of N separate spin-1/2 particles, each coupled to a zero-temperature non-Markovian reservoir have been investigated. We show that the initial spin squeezing could be prolonged for a long time by utilizing detuning modification. We further explore that the spin squeezing sudden death (SSSD) could be circumvented with the increasing of detuning. By comparison with the results in Markovian regime with detuning and those in non-Markovian regime without detuning, we conclude that the disappearance of SSSD and the robust preservation of spin squeezing should be attributed to the combination of detuning and non-Markovian effect. The present results may be of direct importance for quantum metrology in open systems.

  13. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Signaling adaptor protein SH2B1 enhances neurite outgrowth and accelerates the maturation of human induced neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Su-Liang; Wang, Ya-Jean; Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wang, Dan-Yen; Chen, Linyi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in somatic cell reprogramming have highlighted the plasticity of the somatic epigenome, particularly through demonstrations of direct lineage reprogramming of adult mouse and human fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neurons (iNs) under defined conditions. However, human cells appear to be less plastic and have a higher epigenetic hurdle for reprogramming to both iPSCs and iNs. Here, we show that SH2B adaptor protein 1β (SH2B1) can enhance neurite outgrowth of iNs reprogrammed from human fibroblasts as early as day 14, when combined with miR124 and transcription factors BRN2 and MYT1L (IBM) under defined conditions. These SH2B1-enhanced iNs (S-IBM) showed canonical neuronal morphology, and expressed multiple neuronal markers, such as TuJ1, NeuN, and synapsin, and functional proteins for neurotransmitter release, such as GABA, vGluT2, and tyrosine hydroxylase. Importantly, SH2B1 accelerated mature process of functional neurons and exhibited action potentials as early as day 14; without SH2B1, the IBM iNs do not exhibit action potentials until day 21. Our data demonstrate that SH2B1 can enhance neurite outgrowth and accelerate the maturation of human iNs under defined conditions. This approach will facilitate the application of iNs in regenerative medicine and in vitro disease modeling.

  15. Signaling Adaptor Protein SH2B1 Enhances Neurite Outgrowth and Accelerates the Maturation of Human Induced Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Su-Liang; Wang, Ya-Jean; Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wang, Dan-Yen; Chen, Linyi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in somatic cell reprogramming have highlighted the plasticity of the somatic epigenome, particularly through demonstrations of direct lineage reprogramming of adult mouse and human fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neurons (iNs) under defined conditions. However, human cells appear to be less plastic and have a higher epigenetic hurdle for reprogramming to both iPSCs and iNs. Here, we show that SH2B adaptor protein 1β (SH2B1) can enhance neurite outgrowth of iNs reprogrammed from human fibroblasts as early as day 14, when combined with miR124 and transcription factors BRN2 and MYT1L (IBM) under defined conditions. These SH2B1-enhanced iNs (S-IBM) showed canonical neuronal morphology, and expressed multiple neuronal markers, such as TuJ1, NeuN, and synapsin, and functional proteins for neurotransmitter release, such as GABA, vGluT2, and tyrosine hydroxylase. Importantly, SH2B1 accelerated mature process of functional neurons and exhibited action potentials as early as day 14; without SH2B1, the IBM iNs do not exhibit action potentials until day 21. Our data demonstrate that SH2B1 can enhance neurite outgrowth and accelerate the maturation of human iNs under defined conditions. This approach will facilitate the application of iNs in regenerative medicine and in vitro disease modeling. PMID:24736401

  16. Soap film dynamics and topological jumps under continuous deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Consider the dynamics of a soap-film bounded by a flexible wire (or wires) which can be continuously and slowly deformed. At each instant the soap-film relaxes in quasi-static manner to a minimum-area (i.e. minimum-energy) state compatible with the boundary configuration. This can however pass through a critical configuration at which a topological jump is inevitable. We have studied an interesting example of this behaviour: the jump of a one-sided (Möbius strip) soap-film to a two-sided film as the boundary is unfolded and untwisted from the double cover of a circle. The nature of this jump will be demonstrated and explained. More generally, dynamical systems have a natural tendency to relax through dissipative processes to a minimum-energy state, subject to any relevant constraints. An example is provided by the relaxation of a magnetic field in a perfectly conducting but viscous fluid, subject to the constraint that the magnetic field lines are frozen in the fluid. One may infer the existence of magnetostatic equilibria (and analogous steady Euler flows) of arbitrary field-line topology. In general, discontinuities (current sheets) appear during this relaxation process, and this is where reconnection of field-lines (with associated change of topology) can occur. Just as for the soap film, slow change of boundary conditions can lead to critical conditions in which such topological jumps are inevitable. (Work in collaboration with Ray Goldstein, Adriana Pesci, Renzo Ricca and Gareth Alexander.) This work was supported by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant EP/I036060/1.

  17. Movement stability under uncertain internal models of dynamics.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, F; McIntyre, J; Thonnard, J-L; Lefèvre, P

    2010-09-01

    Sensory noise and feedback delay are potential sources of instability and variability for the on-line control of movement. It is commonly assumed that predictions based on internal models allow the CNS to anticipate the consequences of motor actions and protect the movements from uncertainty and instability. However, during motor learning and exposure to unknown dynamics, these predictions can be inaccurate. Therefore a distinct strategy is necessary to preserve movement stability. This study tests the hypothesis that in such situations, subjects adapt the speed and accuracy constraints on the movement, yielding a control policy that is less prone to undesirable variability in the outcome. This hypothesis was tested by asking subjects to hold a manipulandum in precision grip and to perform single-joint, discrete arm rotations during short-term exposure to weightlessness (0 g), where the internal models of the limb dynamics must be updated. Measurements of grip force adjustments indicated that the internal predictions were altered during early exposure to the 0 g condition. Indeed, the grip force/load force coupling reflected that the grip force was less finely tuned to the load-force variations at the beginning of the exposure to the novel gravitational condition. During this learning period, movements were slower with asymmetric velocity profiles and target undershooting. This effect was compared with theoretical results obtained in the context of optimal feedback control, where changing the movement objective can be directly tested by adjusting the cost parameters. The effect on the simulated movements quantitatively supported the hypothesis of a change in cost function during early exposure to a novel environment. The modified optimization criterion reduces the trial-to-trial variability in spite of the fact that noise affects the internal prediction. These observations support the idea that the CNS adjusts the movement objective to stabilize the movement when

  18. Mouse Acetylcholinesterase Enhances Neurite Outgrowth of Rat R28 Cells Through Interaction With Laminin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Laura E.; Klaczinski, Janine; Schütz, Corina; Rudolph, Lydia; Layer, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) terminates synaptic transmission at cholinergic synapses by hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, but can also exert ‘non-classical’, morpho-regulatory effects on developing neurons such as stimulation of neurite outgrowth. Here, we investigated the role of AChE binding to laminin-1 on the regulation of neurite outgrowth by using cell culture, immunocytochemistry, and molecular biological approaches. To explore the role of AChE, we examined fiber growth of cells overexpressing different forms of AChE, and/or during their growth on laminin-1. A significant increase of neuritic growth as compared with controls was observed for neurons over-expressing AChE. Accordingly, addition of globular AChE to the medium increased total length of neurites. Co-transfection with PRIMA, a membrane anchor of AChE, led to an increase in fiber length similar to AChE overexpressing cells. Transfection with an AChE mutant that leads to the retention of AChE within cells had no stimulatory effect on neurite length. Noticeably, the longest neurites were produced by neurons overexpressing AChE and growing on laminin-1, suggesting that the AChE/laminin interaction is involved in regulating neurite outgrowth. Our findings demonstrate that binding of AChE to laminin-1 alters AChE activity and leads to increased neurite growth in culture. A possible mechanism of the AChE effect on neurite outgrowth is proposed due to the interaction of AChE with laminin-1. PMID:22570738

  19. Retrograde degeneration of neurite membrane structural integrity of nerve growth cones following in vitro exposure to mercury.

    PubMed

    Leong, C C; Syed, N I; Lorscheider, F L

    2001-03-26

    Inhalation of mercury vapor (Hg0) inhibits binding of GTP to rat brain tubulin, thereby inhibiting tubulin polymerization into microtubules. A similar molecular lesion has also been observed in 80% of brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls. However the precise site and mode of action of Hg ions remain illusive. Therefore, the present study examined whether Hg ions could affect membrane dynamics of neurite growth cone morphology and behavior. Since tubulin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein in both vertebrates and invertebrates, we hypothesized that growth cones from animal species could be highly susceptible to Hg ions. To test this possibility, the identified, large Pedal A (PeA) neurons from the central ring ganglia of the snail Lymnoea stagnalis were cultured for 48 h in 2 ml brain conditioned medium (CM). Following neurite outgrowth, metal chloride solution (2 microl) of Hg, Al, Pb, Cd, or Mn (10(-7) M) was pressure applied directly onto individual growth cones. Time-lapse images with inverted microscopy were acquired prior to, during, and after the metal ion exposure. We demonstrate that Hg ions markedly disrupted membrane structure and linear growth rates of imaged neurites in 77% of all nerve growth cones. When growth cones were stained with antibodies specific for both tubulin and actin, it was the tubulin/microtubule structure that disintegrated following Hg exposure. Moreover, some denuded neurites were also observed to form neurofibrillary aggregates. In contrast, growth cone exposure to other metal ions did not effect growth cone morphology, nor was their motility rate compromised. To determine the growth suppressive effects of Hg ions on neuronal sprouting, cells were cultured either in the presence or absence of Hg ions. We found that in the presence of Hg ions, neuronal somata failed to sprout, whereas other metalic ions did not effect growth patterns of cultured PeA cells. We conclude that this

  20. Concrete Behavior under Dynamic Tensile-Compressive Load.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    be reviewed as well. Although structural concrete does not possess the thermal cracking problems during curing to the extent that mass concrete does...3 Hil H1 2 H13 H0 - OUTSIDE SURFACE OF CONCRETE CYLINDER Hl - INSIDE SURFACE OF CONCRETE CYLINDER Figure 2.4 Location of strain gages. CHAPTER 3...34 Fatigue Failure of Concrete Under Periodic Compressive Load," Trans Japanese Soc Civil Engrs, Vol 3, Part 1, pp 106-107. Kirillov, A. P. 1977. "Strength

  1. Optimum Dynamic Design of Nonlinear Plates under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    1978 PLATES UNDER BLAST LOADING 6. PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(.) J. M. Ferritto 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...coordinate unit vectors q =q1,,2, M Fiur 5 Lgc iara frminimizato of 4- +(X). 4- (ELX + Os’) compute initial I F I ’- F(O) 1:4- F(I)TT-, - 1• I2 1: 1

  2. Motion and Stability of Saturated Soil Systems under Dynamic Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-04

    A 174 902 RF Project 763420/716894 Approvpn f or" ipilic release -, Report dL~rbutIonunlimited. MOTION AND STABILITY OF SATURATED SOIL SYSTEMS UNDER...no relative motion between the constituents . Liquefaction of soil is primarily associated with relative motion of soil and water. The so-called...was that the notion of the mixture as a continuum in motion is inadmissible except in the case of no relative motion between the constituents

  3. The release of shear stress in metals under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Bourne, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Metals under shock loading relieve shear stress by slip after. This work focuses on the types of loading where a metal initially responds entirely elastically and plasticity with deformation mechanisms developing over time and determined by the material's state and microstructure. Finite kinetics in shock is mirrored in several commonly observed responses including elastic precursor decay and the measurement of shear stress histories during load. FCC and BCC metals have different kinetics, with those of BCC metals slower. A model, under development, is implemented here to depict the behaviour observed by assigning a finite time to the return of the state point from the quasi equilibrium yield surface to the equilibrium yield surface. This delays the softening of the material and reproduces observed response in the weak shock regime. The model is based on the assumption that formation and self-organisation of dislocation structures at various scales maximises dissipation rate (minimize the free energy) in the material. Initial validation of the model is performed on tantalum by comparing stress histories under shock and shock-less loading with experimental data in order to assess its ability to reproduce experimentally observed features.

  4. Targeted Learning of the Mean Outcome under an Optimal Dynamic Treatment Rule.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Mark J; Luedtke, Alexander R

    2015-03-01

    We consider estimation of and inference for the mean outcome under the optimal dynamic two time-point treatment rule defined as the rule that maximizes the mean outcome under the dynamic treatment, where the candidate rules are restricted to depend only on a user-supplied subset of the baseline and intermediate covariates. This estimation problem is addressed in a statistical model for the data distribution that is nonparametric beyond possible knowledge about the treatment and censoring mechanism. This contrasts from the current literature that relies on parametric assumptions. We establish that the mean of the counterfactual outcome under the optimal dynamic treatment is a pathwise differentiable parameter under conditions, and develop a targeted minimum loss-based estimator (TMLE) of this target parameter. We establish asymptotic linearity and statistical inference for this estimator under specified conditions. In a sequentially randomized trial the statistical inference relies upon a second-order difference between the estimator of the optimal dynamic treatment and the optimal dynamic treatment to be asymptotically negligible, which may be a problematic condition when the rule is based on multivariate time-dependent covariates. To avoid this condition, we also develop TMLEs and statistical inference for data adaptive target parameters that are defined in terms of the mean outcome under the estimate of the optimal dynamic treatment. In particular, we develop a novel cross-validated TMLE approach that provides asymptotic inference under minimal conditions, avoiding the need for any empirical process conditions. We offer simulation results to support our theoretical findings.

  5. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes.

    PubMed

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. 'Mombaça' (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day(-1)) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day(-1)) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change.

  6. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. ‘Mombaça’ (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day-1) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day-1) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change. PMID:26894932

  7. Holographic otoscope for nanodisplacement measurements of surfaces under dynamic excitation.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, J M; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J; Harrington, Ellery; Cheng, Jeffrey T; Scarpino, C; Santoyo, F Mendoza

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel holographic otoscope system for measuring nanodisplacements of objects subjected to dynamic excitation. Such measurements are necessary to quantify the mechanical deformation of surfaces in mechanics, acoustics, electronics, biology, and many other fields. In particular, we are interested in measuring the sound-induced motion of biological samples, such as an eardrum. Our holographic otoscope system consists of laser illumination delivery (IS), optical head (OH), and image processing computer (IP) systems. The IS delivers the object beam (OB) and the reference beam (RB) to the OH. The backscattered light coming from the object illuminated by the OB interferes with the RB at the camera sensor plane to be digitally recorded as a hologram. The hologram is processed by the IP using the Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm, where the focal plane can be selected freely. Our holographic otoscope system is currently deployed in a clinic, and is packaged in a custom design. It is mounted in a mechatronic positioning system to increase its maneuverability degrees to be conveniently positioned in front of the object to be measured. We present representative results highlighting the versatility of our system to measure deformations of complex elastic surfaces in the wavelength scale including a copper foil membrane and postmortem tympanic membrane. SCANNING 33: 342-352, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. PLASTIC DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF STEELS UNDER DYNAMIC BIAXIAL LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C; Moreno, J; Goto, D M; Belak, J; Grady, D

    2004-07-08

    Dynamic equi-biaxial bulging of thin AerMet 100 alloy plates was studied. The plates were deformed using a gas-gun driven flyer plate test set-up at impact velocities between 1.0 and 2.0 km/sec. The results indicate that in addition to biaxial stretching (and thinning) of the plate, internal cavitation (spallation fracture) results from the complex wave interactions within the plate. No outward evidence of damage was observed at the lower velocities, in the range of 1.0-1.2 km/sec. Fine scale cracking of the plates was observed at impact velocity above approximately 1.4 km/sec. Complete specimen fracture, in the form of multiple petals and pie-shaped fragments, was observed at impact velocity above 1.6 km/sec. Hydrodynamic computer code simulations were performed, prior to and in conjunction with the experiments, to aid in experiment design and interpretation of the experimental data.

  9. Peru-Chile upwelling dynamics under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerder, Véra; Colas, Francois; Echevin, Vincent; Codron, Francis; Tam, Jorge; Belmadani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The consequences of global warming on the Peru-Chile Current System (PCCS) ocean circulation are examined with a high-resolution, eddy-resolving regional oceanic model. We performed a dynamical downscaling of climate scenarios from the IPSL-CM4 Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM), corresponding to various levels of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. High-resolution atmospheric forcing for the regional ocean model are obtained from the IPSL atmospheric model run on a stretched grid with increased horizontal resolution in the PCCS region. When comparing future scenarios to preindustrial (PI) conditions, the circulation along the Peru and Chile coasts is strongly modified by changes in surface winds and increased stratification caused by the regional warming. While the coastal poleward undercurrent is intensified, the surface equatorial coastal jet shoals and the nearshore mesoscale activity are reinforced. Reduction in alongshore wind stress and nearshore wind stress curl drive a year-round reduction in upwelling intensity off Peru. Modifications in geostrophic circulation mitigate this upwelling decrease in late austral summer. The depth of the upwelling source waters becomes shallower in warmer conditions, which may have a major impact on the system's biological productivity.

  10. A multiscale model for nanoparticle binding dynamics under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Tan, Jifu; Nguyen, Kytai

    2011-03-01

    Nanomedicine poses a new frontier in medical technology with the advantages of targeted delivery and patient specific design. In applications of nanoparticle targeted drug delivery, the delivery efficiency is controlled by the physical properties of the nanoparticle such as its size, shape, ligand density, as well as external environmental conditions such as blood flow rate, blood vessel diameter. Proper drug dosage choice relies on determination of the attachment and detachment rates of the nanoparticles at the active region and the understanding of the complex process of targeted drug delivery. A few particulate models have been proposed to study the adhesion probability of individual spherical or non-spherical nanoparticles. Meanwhile, continuum convection-diffusion-reaction models have been widely used to calculate the drug concentration, which usually assumes specific binding and de-binding constants. However, there has not been any study that links the particulate level nanoparticle size and shape information to the system level bounded particle concentration. A hybrid particle binding dynamics and continuum convection-diffusion-reaction model is presented to study the effect of shear flow rate and particle size on binding efficiency. The simulated concentration of bounded nanoparticles agrees well with experimental results in flow chamber studies.

  11. Dynamic relaxation of a liquid cavity under amorphous boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Andrea; Grigera, Tomás S; Verrocchio, Paolo

    2012-05-28

    The growth of cooperatively rearranging regions was invoked long ago by Adam and Gibbs to explain the slowing down of glass-forming liquids. The lack of knowledge about the nature of the growing order, though, complicates the definition of an appropriate correlation function. One option is the point-to-set (PTS) correlation function, which measures the spatial span of the influence of amorphous boundary conditions on a confined system. By using a swap Monte Carlo algorithm we measure the equilibration time of a liquid droplet bounded by amorphous boundary conditions in a model glass-former at low temperature, and we show that the cavity relaxation time increases with the size of the droplet, saturating to the bulk value when the droplet outgrows the point-to-set correlation length. This fact supports the idea that the point-to-set correlation length is the natural size of the cooperatively rearranging regions. On the other hand, the cavity relaxation time computed by a standard, nonswap dynamics, has the opposite behavior, showing a very steep increase when the cavity size is decreased. We try to reconcile this difference by discussing the possible hybridization between mode-coupling theory and activated processes, and by introducing a new kind of amorphous boundary conditions, inspired by the concept of frozen external state as an alternative to the commonly used frozen external configuration.

  12. Dynamics of offshore structures under sea waves and earthquake forces

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    The analysis and design of Offshore Structures is a complicated process and requires several assumptions and approximations. The structures have to resist a hostile environment and the loads acting on them in a typical ocean environment are many such as wind, waves, tides, currents, ice, earthquakes, temperature loads, operational loads and so on. It is necessary to design an offshore structure such that it can respond to moderate severe environmental loads without damage and be capable of resisting severe environmental loads without seriously endangering the occupants. In this paper, a study of the dynamic analysis of offshore structures in random seas to inputs of earthquake ground motions is presented. P-M spectrum is used for sea wave representation and the Morison equation defines the wave forcing function. Kanai-Tajimi`s PSDF is used for the ground acceleration due to earthquakes. Response analysis is carried out using the time domain random vibration approach. It has been observed that the hydrodynamic damping is higher in random seas than in still water and sea waves induce a reducing effect on the seismic response.

  13. Adsorbed polymers under flow. A stochastic dynamical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Robert; Jhon, Myung S.

    1985-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that porous filters preadsorbed with polymer molecules exhibit an anomalously high pressure drop at high rates of flow. We have modeled the adsorbed polymers as dynamical systems and have found that the introduction of hydrodynamic interaction between molecules destabilizes at a high applied shear. As a direct result this instability will cause the molecules to unravel and stretch far into the cross section of the pore, and thus by inference, cause the observed anomalously high pressure drop. Although much of this paper is devoted to the stability characteristics of the deterministic system, Brownian motion is also considered, and an account of the statistics of the Brownian system when the deterministic system becomes unstable is given. The examples revealed in this paper are not of sufficient complexity to calculate with any accuracy the magnitude of this anomalous pressure drop. We simply present a procedure by which a large variety of more complex models could be undertaken and their ultimate effect clearly understood.

  14. Motor Coordination Dynamics Underlying Graphic Motion in 7- to 11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danna, Jeremy; Enderli, Fabienne; Athenes, Sylvie; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Using concepts and tools of a dynamical system approach in order to understand motor coordination underlying graphomotor skills, the aim of the current study was to establish whether the basic coordination dynamics found in adults is already established in children at elementary school, when handwriting is trained and eventually acquired. In the…

  15. [Soil moisture dynamics under artificial Caragana microphylla shrub].

    PubMed

    Alamusa; Jiang, Deming; Fan, Shixiang; Luo, Yongming

    2002-12-01

    Applying the methods of deducing time series from vegetation space alignment, we analyzed the spatial and temporal variation features of soil moisture under artificial Caragana microphylla shrubs built in 1984, 1987, 1995, 1999. The results showed that affected by mechanical composition of mobile sandy dunes, the soil of sandy land was mainly composed of sandy particle, and the particles of > 0.01 mm were accounted for 97%. The withered moisture was 1.55%. The field waterhold capacity was 5.5%, and the available moisture storage was 3.95%. With the increase of the dominance of fix-sand vegetation, the moisture content of soil under artificial Caragana microphylla shrubs was decreased. The soil moisture of vegetation built in 1984 was lower than that built in 1999. The soil moisture conditions of four stages vegetation were continued depressing from April to June in a year, the lowest point presenced in June, and then gradually increased from July to October. The vertical change of soil moisture showed the tendency of increasing with soil depth. The soil moisture decreased by the degrees of early built vegetation (1984, 1987). Especially in 70 cm soil depth, the moisture content of soil decreased obviously. Caragana microphylla shrubs absorbed water and aggravated the shortage of soil moisture content near the root system, which affected the component of vegetation in Caragana microphylla shrubs. The species of herbaceous plants and annual plants increased during the growth of Caragana microphylla shrub.

  16. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-08

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals.

  17. Nonlinear friction dynamics on polymer surface under accelerated movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, Yuuki; Asanuma, Natsumi; Takahashi, Akira; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear phenomena on the soft material surface are one of the most exciting topics of chemical physics. However, only a few reports exist on the friction phenomena under accelerated movement, because friction between two solid surfaces is considered a linear phenomenon in many cases. We aim to investigate how nonlinear accelerated motion affects friction on solid surfaces. In the present study, we evaluate the frictional forces between two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resins using an advanced friction evaluation system. On PTFE surfaces, the normalized delay time δ, which is the time lag in the response of the friction force to the accelerated movement, is observed in the pre-sliding friction process. Under high-velocity conditions, kinetic friction increases with velocity. Based on these experimental results, we propose a two-phase nonlinear model including a pre-sliding process (from the beginning of sliding of a contact probe to the establishment of static friction) and a kinetic friction process. The present model consists of several factors including velocity, acceleration, stiffness, viscosity, and vertical force. The findings reflecting the viscoelastic properties of soft material is useful for various fields such as in the fabrication of clothes, cosmetics, automotive materials, and virtual reality systems as well as for understanding friction phenomena on soft material surfaces.

  18. Experiments on Low Aspect Ratio Hydroplanes to Measure Lift under Static and Dynamic Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    ON LOW ASPECT RATIO HYDROPLANES TO MEASURE LIFT UNDER STATIC AND DYNAMIC CONDITIONS By B Ward A R J M Lloyd Summary This Technical Memorandum...describes experiments in the Circulating Water Channel to measure lift forces on low aspect ratio hydroplanes under static and dynamic conditions. Empirical...6 11. Conclusions 6 References 7 Figure 1. Three NACA 0020 Hydroplanes Figure 2. Hydroplane on Servo Figures 3 and 4. Experiment in Circulating Water

  19. Upregulated Expression of TRIM32 Is Involved in Schwann Cell Differentiation, Migration and Neurite Outgrowth After Sciatic Nerve Crush.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghua; Wu, Weijie; Yang, Huiguang; Zhou, Zhengming; Zhu, Xiaojian; Sun, Chi; Liu, Yuxi; Yu, Zhaohui; Chen, Yuyan; Wang, Youhua

    2017-04-01

    Tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, plays an indispensable role in myoblast proliferation. It also regulates neuron and skeletal muscle stem cell differentiation. Although it is of great importance, we know little about the roles of TRIM32 during peripheral nervous system injury. Here, we examined the dynamic changes of TRIM32 in acute sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model. After crush, TRIM32 rapidly increased and reached the climax at 1 week but then gradually declined to the normal level at 4 weeks post-injury. Meanwhile, we observed similar changes of Oct-6. What is more, we found co-localization of TRIM32 with S100 and Oct-6 in 1-week-injured tissues using double immunofluorescent staining. In further vitro experiments, enhancive expression of TRIM32 was detected during the process of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-induced Schwann cell differentiation and nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth. More interestingly, specific si-TRIM32-transfected RSC96 cells exhibited obvious reduction in the ability of migration. Taken together, we inferred that upregulated TRIM32 was not only involved in the differentiation and migration of Schwann cells but the neurite elongation after SNC.

  20. Barchan dunes morphology dynamics under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzewski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to emphasize significance of diversified dynamics of barchans dune morphology. We analyzed and compared barchans found in two dune fields: Kharga (S Egypt) and Tarfaya-Laâyoune (S-Morocco). These dune fields are characterized by significantly different factors responsible for dunes development e.g. textural and mineralogical composition of dune sand, dune sand moisture, air humidity, inter dune vegetation cover. For each investigated dune filed and study period (2008, 2010, 2012 for Kharga and 2007, 2011, 2012 for Tarfaya-Laâyoune dune fields) detailed shape measurement of 20 simple isolated barchans of different dune sizes was made. The ± 10-2 m horizontal and ± 1,5 10-2m vertical accuracy was obtained (1 measuring point per 1m2 on average).In order to compare barchan dunes morphology and to determine depositional and erosional patterns, the 3D models were created. For better understanding of this processes, sand bulk density of barchan surface was measured (1 measuring point per 2m2 on average). The velocity of dunes in relation to dune shape was also analyzed. The results show that the relationship between typically correlated parameters change during movement of the barchans. Most values change by a few percent per year (slip face height, dune base area and dune volume) or by a dozen or so percent per year (windward side length, horns length and width). We obtain good linear relationship (with 0,05 significant level) between slip face height and the dune base area (0,77 < R2 < 0,83), dune volume (0,66 < R2 < 0,72), windward side length (0,58 < R2 < 0,87), horns length (0,71 < R2 < 0,90) or horns width (0,79 < R2 < 0,93). The linear relationship between displacement rate and the morphological parameters is not strong (0,54< R2 < 0,81) for Kharga dune field and (0,41< R2 < 0,66) for Tarfaya-Laâyoune dune field. We noted also good linear relationship between displacement rate and the angle of span of the horns (R2=0,73 on Tarfaya

  1. Vertebral stress of a cervical spine model under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, A M; Tchako, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop cervical spine models that predict the stresses in each vertebra by taking account of the biodynamic characteristics of the neck. The loads and the moments at the head point (Occipital Condyle) used for the models were determined by the rigid body dynamic response of the head due to G-z acceleration. The experimental data used were collected from the biodynamic responses of human volunteers during an acceleration in the z direction on the drop tower facility at Armstrong Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). Three finite element models were developed: an elastic local model, viscoelastic local model and complete viscoelastic model. I-DEAS software was used to create the solid models, the loadings and the boundary conditions. Then, ABAQUS finite element software was employed to solve the models, and thus the stresses on each vertebral level were determined. Beam elements with different properties were employed to simulate the ligaments, articular facets and muscles. The complete viscoelastic model was subjected to 11 cases of loadings ranging from 8 G-z to 20 G-z accelerations. The von Mises and Maximum Principal stress fields, which are good indicators of bone failure, were calculated for all the cases. The results indicated that the maximum stress in all cases increased as the magnitude of the acceleration increased. The stresses in the 10 to 12 G-z cases were comfortably below the injury threshold level. The majority of the maximum stresses occurred in C6 and C4 regions.

  2. Bistable Dynamics Underlying Excitability of Ion Homeostasis in Neuron Models

    PubMed Central

    Hübel, Niklas; Schöll, Eckehard; Dahlem, Markus A.

    2014-01-01

    When neurons fire action potentials, dissipation of free energy is usually not directly considered, because the change in free energy is often negligible compared to the immense reservoir stored in neural transmembrane ion gradients and the long–term energy requirements are met through chemical energy, i.e., metabolism. However, these gradients can temporarily nearly vanish in neurological diseases, such as migraine and stroke, and in traumatic brain injury from concussions to severe injuries. We study biophysical neuron models based on the Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) formalism extended to include time–dependent ion concentrations inside and outside the cell and metabolic energy–driven pumps. We reveal the basic mechanism of a state of free energy–starvation (FES) with bifurcation analyses showing that ion dynamics is for a large range of pump rates bistable without contact to an ion bath. This is interpreted as a threshold reduction of a new fundamental mechanism of ionic excitability that causes a long–lasting but transient FES as observed in pathological states. We can in particular conclude that a coupling of extracellular ion concentrations to a large glial–vascular bath can take a role as an inhibitory mechanism crucial in ion homeostasis, while the pumps alone are insufficient to recover from FES. Our results provide the missing link between the HH formalism and activator–inhibitor models that have been successfully used for modeling migraine phenotypes, and therefore will allow us to validate the hypothesis that migraine symptoms are explained by disturbed function in ion channel subunits, pumps, and other proteins that regulate ion homeostasis. PMID:24784149

  3. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Robert F.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of Vo/(kBT /e ) , where Vo is the amplitude of the driving voltage and kBT /e is the thermal voltage with kB as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D /λDL , where D is the ion diffusivity, λD is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O (Vo3) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in Vo. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing Vo. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer.

  4. Moderately nonlinear diffuse-charge dynamics under an ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Stout, Robert F; Khair, Aditya S

    2015-09-01

    The response of a symmetric binary electrolyte between two parallel, blocking electrodes to a moderate amplitude ac voltage is quantified. The diffuse charge dynamics are modeled via the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for a dilute solution of point-like ions. The solution to these equations is expressed as a Fourier series with a voltage perturbation expansion for arbitrary Debye layer thickness and ac frequency. Here, the perturbation expansion in voltage proceeds in powers of V_{o}/(k_{B}T/e), where V_{o} is the amplitude of the driving voltage and k_{B}T/e is the thermal voltage with k_{B} as Boltzmann's constant, T as the temperature, and e as the fundamental charge. We show that the response of the electrolyte remains essentially linear in voltage amplitude at frequencies greater than the RC frequency of Debye layer charging, D/λ_{D}L, where D is the ion diffusivity, λ_{D} is the Debye layer thickness, and L is half the cell width. In contrast, nonlinear response is predicted at frequencies below the RC frequency. We find that the ion densities exhibit symmetric deviations from the (uniform) equilibrium density at even orders of the voltage amplitude. This leads to the voltage dependence of the current in the external circuit arising from the odd orders of voltage. For instance, the first nonlinear contribution to the current is O(V_{o}^{3}) which contains the expected third harmonic but also a component oscillating at the applied frequency. We use this to compute a generalized impedance for moderate voltages, the first nonlinear contribution to which is quadratic in V_{o}. This contribution predicts a decrease in the imaginary part of the impedance at low frequency, which is due to the increase in Debye layer capacitance with increasing V_{o}. In contrast, the real part of the impedance increases at low frequency, due to adsorption of neutral salt from the bulk to the Debye layer.

  5. Dynamic shear jamming in dense granular suspensions under extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Peters, Ivo R.; Han, Endao; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2017-01-01

    Unlike dry granular materials, a dense granular suspension like cornstarch in water can strongly resist extensional flows. At low extension rates, such a suspension behaves like a viscous fluid, but rapid extension results in a response where stresses far exceed the predictions of lubrication hydrodynamics and capillarity. To understand this remarkable mechanical response, we experimentally measure the normal force imparted by a large bulk of the suspension on a plate moving vertically upward at a controlled velocity. We observe that, above a velocity threshold, the peak force increases by orders of magnitude. Using fast ultrasound imaging we map out the local velocity profiles inside the suspension, which reveal the formation of a growing jammed region under rapid extension. This region interacts with the rigid boundaries of the container through strong velocity gradients, suggesting a direct connection to the recently proposed shear-jamming mechanism.

  6. Dynamics of magnetic domain walls under their own inertia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Luc; Moriya, Rai; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2010-12-24

    The motion of magnetic domain walls induced by spin-polarized current has considerable potential for use in magnetic memory and logic devices. Key to the success of these devices is the precise positioning of individual domain walls along magnetic nanowires, using current pulses. We show that domain walls move surprisingly long distances of several micrometers and relax over several tens of nanoseconds, under their own inertia, when the current stimulus is removed. We also show that the net distance traveled by the domain wall is exactly proportional to the current pulse length because of the lag derived from its acceleration at the onset of the pulse. Thus, independent of its inertia, a domain wall can be accurately positioned using properly timed current pulses.

  7. Dynamics of Dark-Fly Genome Under Environmental Selections

    PubMed Central

    Izutsu, Minako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu; Fuse, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Environmental adaptation is one of the most fundamental features of organisms. Modern genome science has identified some genes associated with adaptive traits of organisms, and has provided insights into environmental adaptation and evolution. However, how genes contribute to adaptive traits and how traits are selected under an environment in the course of evolution remain mostly unclear. To approach these issues, we utilize “Dark-fly”, a Drosophila melanogaster line maintained in constant dark conditions for more than 60 years. Our previous analysis identified 220,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Dark-fly genome, but did not clarify which SNPs of Dark-fly are truly adaptive for living in the dark. We found here that Dark-fly dominated over the wild-type fly in a mixed population under dark conditions, and based on this domination we designed an experiment for genome reselection to identify adaptive genes of Dark-fly. For this experiment, large mixed populations of Dark-fly and the wild-type fly were maintained in light conditions or in dark conditions, and the frequencies of Dark-fly SNPs were compared between these populations across the whole genome. We thereby detected condition-dependent selections toward approximately 6% of the genome. In addition, we observed the time-course trajectory of SNP frequency in the mixed populations through generations 0, 22, and 49, which resulted in notable categorization of the selected SNPs into three types with different combinations of positive and negative selections. Our data provided a list of about 100 strong candidate genes associated with the adaptive traits of Dark-fly. PMID:26637434

  8. Dynamics of Dark-Fly Genome Under Environmental Selections.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Minako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Agata, Kiyokazu; Fuse, Naoyuki

    2015-12-04

    Environmental adaptation is one of the most fundamental features of organisms. Modern genome science has identified some genes associated with adaptive traits of organisms, and has provided insights into environmental adaptation and evolution. However, how genes contribute to adaptive traits and how traits are selected under an environment in the course of evolution remain mostly unclear. To approach these issues, we utilize "Dark-fly", a Drosophila melanogaster line maintained in constant dark conditions for more than 60 years. Our previous analysis identified 220,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Dark-fly genome, but did not clarify which SNPs of Dark-fly are truly adaptive for living in the dark. We found here that Dark-fly dominated over the wild-type fly in a mixed population under dark conditions, and based on this domination we designed an experiment for genome reselection to identify adaptive genes of Dark-fly. For this experiment, large mixed populations of Dark-fly and the wild-type fly were maintained in light conditions or in dark conditions, and the frequencies of Dark-fly SNPs were compared between these populations across the whole genome. We thereby detected condition-dependent selections toward approximately 6% of the genome. In addition, we observed the time-course trajectory of SNP frequency in the mixed populations through generations 0, 22, and 49, which resulted in notable categorization of the selected SNPs into three types with different combinations of positive and negative selections. Our data provided a list of about 100 strong candidate genes associated with the adaptive traits of Dark-fly.

  9. Venom Down Under: Dynamic Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Koludarov, Ivan; Chan, Angelo H. C.; Sanders, Kate; Ali, Syed A.; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Fry, Bryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the unparalleled diversity of venomous snakes in Australia, research has concentrated on a handful of medically significant species and even of these very few toxins have been fully sequenced. In this study, venom gland transcriptomes were sequenced from eleven species of small Australian elapid snakes, from eleven genera, spanning a broad phylogenetic range. The particularly large number of sequences obtained for three-finger toxin (3FTx) peptides allowed for robust reconstructions of their dynamic molecular evolutionary histories. We demonstrated that each species preferentially favoured different types of α-neurotoxic 3FTx, probably as a result of differing feeding ecologies. The three forms of α-neurotoxin [Type I (also known as (aka): short-chain), Type II (aka: long-chain) and Type III] not only adopted differential rates of evolution, but have also conserved a diversity of residues, presumably to potentiate prey-specific toxicity. Despite these differences, the different α-neurotoxin types were shown to accumulate mutations in similar regions of the protein, largely in the loops and structurally unimportant regions, highlighting the significant role of focal mutagenesis. We theorize that this phenomenon not only affects toxin potency or specificity, but also generates necessary variation for preventing/delaying prey animals from acquiring venom-resistance. This study also recovered the first full-length sequences for multimeric phospholipase A2 (PLA2) ‘taipoxin/paradoxin’ subunits from non-Oxyuranus species, confirming the early recruitment of this extremely potent neurotoxin complex to the venom arsenal of Australian elapid snakes. We also recovered the first natriuretic peptides from an elapid that lack the derived C-terminal tail and resemble the plesiotypic form (ancestral character state) found in viper venoms. This provides supporting evidence for a single early recruitment of natriuretic peptides into snake venoms. Novel forms of kunitz

  10. Venom down under: dynamic evolution of Australian elapid snake toxins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Timothy N W; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A B; Koludarov, Ivan; Chan, Angelo H C; Sanders, Kate; Ali, Syed A; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-12-18

    Despite the unparalleled diversity of venomous snakes in Australia, research has concentrated on a handful of medically significant species and even of these very few toxins have been fully sequenced. In this study, venom gland transcriptomes were sequenced from eleven species of small Australian elapid snakes, from eleven genera, spanning a broad phylogenetic range. The particularly large number of sequences obtained for three-finger toxin (3FTx) peptides allowed for robust reconstructions of their dynamic molecular evolutionary histories. We demonstrated that each species preferentially favoured different types of α-neurotoxic 3FTx, probably as a result of differing feeding ecologies. The three forms of α-neurotoxin [Type I (also known as (aka): short-chain), Type II (aka: long-chain) and Type III] not only adopted differential rates of evolution, but have also conserved a diversity of residues, presumably to potentiate prey-specific toxicity. Despite these differences, the different α-neurotoxin types were shown to accumulate mutations in similar regions of the protein, largely in the loops and structurally unimportant regions, highlighting the significant role of focal mutagenesis. We theorize that this phenomenon not only affects toxin potency or specificity, but also generates necessary variation for preventing/delaying prey animals from acquiring venom-resistance. This study also recovered the first full-length sequences for multimeric phospholipase A2 (PLA2) 'taipoxin/paradoxin' subunits from non-Oxyuranus species, confirming the early recruitment of this extremely potent neurotoxin complex to the venom arsenal of Australian elapid snakes. We also recovered the first natriuretic peptides from an elapid that lack the derived C-terminal tail and resemble the plesiotypic form (ancestral character state) found in viper venoms. This provides supporting evidence for a single early recruitment of natriuretic peptides into snake venoms. Novel forms of kunitz and

  11. Are Merkel cell-neurite reciprocal synapses involved in the initiation of tactile responses in salamander skin?

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, J; Holmes, M; Nurse, C A

    1986-01-01

    In salamander skin the Merkel cell-neurite complexes located near the base of the epidermis are the morphological correlates of the rapidly adapting touch receptors (Parducz, Leslie, Cooper, Turner & Diamond, 1977). The present electron microscopic studies revealed that these complexes contain reciprocal synapses polarized in the direction Merkel cell to neurite, and in the opposite direction, neurite to Merkel cell. The possible involvement of chemical transmission in the initiation of the mechanosensory response, was studied in vitro with the aid of a stable skin-nerve preparation in which single mechanoreceptors were activated under controlled conditions. Mechanosensitivity was measured with a calibrated prodder (tip diameter 10-30 micron) applied to random or selected points on the surface of the skin while the afferent impulse was recorded in the attached nerve twig. In some experiments the (tungsten) prodder was also used as a surface electrode, allowing the same mechanosensory axon to be excited mechanically (i.e. physiologically), and/or electrically. When applied at a single 'touch spot', suitably timed subthreshold mechanical and subthreshold electrical stimuli could summate to produce a single action potential. The temperature coefficient (Q10) between 5 and 15 degrees C for the latency of the afferent spike was small, in the range 1.3-2, whether it was evoked by mechanical or electrical stimulation. The latency following the mechanical stimulus, which included the transduction step, was longer than that following the electrical stimulus by 0.5-2.5 ms, and this additional delay was also relatively insensitive to temperature. In several cases removal of the epidermis with its Merkel cells (and presumably the most distal portions of the afferent nerve terminations) did not render the remaining skin totally insensitive to mechanical stimulation; however, the remaining receptive elements, though still rapidly adapting, generally had increased mechanosensory

  12. Electronic dynamics and plasmons of sodium under compression

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ding, Yang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Lebègue, Sébastien; Lazicki, Amy; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Sodium, which has long been regarded as one of the simplest metals, displays a great deal of structural, optical, and electronic complexities under compression. We compressed pure Na in the body-centered cubic structure to 52 GPa and in the face-centered cubic structure from 64 to 97 GPa, and studied the plasmon excitations of both structures using the momentum-dependent inelastic X-ray scattering technique. The plasmon dispersion curves as a function of pressure were extrapolated to zero momentum with a quadratic approximation. As predicted by the simple free-electron model, the square of the zero-momentum plasmon energy increases linearly with densification of the body-centered cubic Na up to 1.5-fold. At further compressions and in face-centered cubic Na above 64 GPa, the linear relation curves progressively toward the density axis up to 3.7-fold densification at 97 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate that the deviation is an expected behavior of Na remaining a simple metal. PMID:22143758

  13. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  14. Interfacial dynamics of two liquids under an oscillating gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Jacqmin, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of two miscible liquids meeting at an initially sharp interface inside a cavity under microgravity g-jitter conditions is studied numerically. The response of the interface and kinematics of the flowfield to various g-jitter accelerations and aspect ratio variations is shown. The interface region acts like a vortex source sheet, and it can be unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The vortices produced along the interface can serve as a stirring mechanism to promote local mixing. Below the critical Stokes-Reynolds number, the destabilization of the interface results in deformation into wavy structures. In some parameter regions, these structures oscillate in time; in others, they are quasi-steady. Above the critical Stokes-Reynolds number, 'chaotic' instability results, and the interface breaks into concentration pockets. The morphology of the initial breakup is similar to observed Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Subsequent mixing of the two fluids after the breakup of the interface is then very rapid.

  15. Dynamic Testing of an Inflatable Structure Under Thermal Vacuum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engberg, Robert; Lassiter, John

    1999-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Transportation Programs Office is responsible for the development and demonstration of advanced launch vehicle and propulsion technologies. One of these advanced propulsion concepts being pursued is solar thermal propulsion. This concept employs a concentrated beam of sunlight to heat a working fluid within a solar thermal engine. Expansion of the fluid would provide thrust at an increased specific impulse. One way to concentrate the sun's light to a specific point in the engine cavity is to use a fresnel lens that is supported by an inflatable structure. Such propulsion systems could provide an inexpensive way of transferring and maintaining satellites to upper stage orbit trajectories. This paper describes the test hardware, procedures, and non-contacting measurement methodologies used to determine the modal characteristics of an inflatable concentrator under the thermal-vacuum conditions of space. These characteristics were necessary to identify for validation of a finite element model to be used for developing the spacecraft's pointing and control system.

  16. Volatile release from aqueous solutions under dynamic headspace dilution conditions.

    PubMed

    Marin, M; Baek, I; Taylor, A J

    1999-11-01

    Static equilibrium was established between the gas phase (headspace) and an unstirred aqueous phase in a sealed vessel. The headspace was then diluted with air to mimic the situation when a container of food is opened and the volatiles are diluted by the surrounding air. Because this first volatile signal can influence overall flavor perception, the parameters controlling volatile release under these conditions are of interest. A mechanistic model was developed and validated experimentally. Release of compounds depended on the air-water partition coefficient (K(aw)) and the mass transport in both phases. For compounds with K(aw) values <10(-)(3), K(aw) was the factor determining release rate. When K(aw) was >10(-)(3), mass transport in the gas phase became significant and the Reynolds number played a role. Because release from packaged foods occurs at low Reynolds numbers, whereas most experiments are conducted at medium to high Reynolds numbers, the experimentally defined profile may not reflect the real situation.

  17. A global perspective on belowground carbon dynamics under nitrogen enrichment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingli; Greaver, Tara L

    2010-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) effects on ecosystem carbon (C) budgets are critical to understand as C sequestration is considered as a mechanism to offset anthropogenic CO(2) emissions. Interactions between aboveground C and N cycling are more clearly characterized than belowground processes. Through synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the responses of belowground C cycling under N addition. We found that N addition increased litter input from aboveground (+20%) but not from fine root. N addition inhibited microbial activity as indicated by a reduction in microbial respiration (-8%) and microbial biomass carbon (-20%). Although soil respiration was not altered by N addition, dissolved organic carbon concentration was increased by 18%, suggesting C leaching loss may increase. N addition increased the C content of the organic layer (+17%) but not the mineral soil layer. Overall, our meta-analysis indicates that N addition will increase short term belowground C storage by increasing C content of organic layer. However, it is difficult to predict the response of long term C sequestration since there is no significant change in mineral soil C content.

  18. Electronic dynamics and plasmons of sodium under compression.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ho-Kwang; Ding, Yang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Lebègue, Sébastien; Lazicki, Amy; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-12-20

    Sodium, which has long been regarded as one of the simplest metals, displays a great deal of structural, optical, and electronic complexities under compression. We compressed pure Na in the body-centered cubic structure to 52 GPa and in the face-centered cubic structure from 64 to 97 GPa, and studied the plasmon excitations of both structures using the momentum-dependent inelastic X-ray scattering technique. The plasmon dispersion curves as a function of pressure were extrapolated to zero momentum with a quadratic approximation. As predicted by the simple free-electron model, the square of the zero-momentum plasmon energy increases linearly with densification of the body-centered cubic Na up to 1.5-fold. At further compressions and in face-centered cubic Na above 64 GPa, the linear relation curves progressively toward the density axis up to 3.7-fold densification at 97 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate that the deviation is an expected behavior of Na remaining a simple metal.

  19. Numerical SHPB Tests of Rocks Under Combined Static and Dynamic Loading Conditions with Application to Dynamic Behavior of Rocks Under In Situ Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. B.; Liao, Z. Y.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) numerical testing system is established to study the characteristics of rocks under simultaneous static and dynamic loading conditions following verification of the capability of the SHPB numerical system through comparison with laboratory measurements (Liao et al. in Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00603-016-0954-8). Three different methods are employed in this numerical testing system to address the contact problem between a rock specimen and bars. The effects of stand-alone static axial pressure, stand-alone lateral confining pressures, and a combination of them are analyzed. It is determined that the rock total strength and the dynamic strength are greatly dependent on the static axial and confining pressures. Moreover, the friction along the interfaces between the rock specimen and bars cannot be ignored, particularly for high axial pressure conditions. Subsequently, the findings are applied to determine the dynamic behavior of rocks with in situ stresses. The effects of the magnitude of horizontal and vertical initial stresses at varied depths and their ratios are investigated. It is observed that the dynamic strength of deep rocks increases with increasing depth or the ratio of horizontal-to-vertical initial stresses ( K). The dynamic behavior of deeper rocks is more sensitive to K, and the rock dynamic strength increases faster with depth in areas with higher K.

  20. Non-axisymmetric Dynamic Buckling of Cylindrical Shells under Axial Step Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hao; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering the effects of first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and stress wave, the dynamic buckling governing equations of cylindrical shells under axial step load are derived. Based on the Ritz method and Variable Separation method, the analytical solution of the critical load on the dynamic buckling can be obtained. The influences of first-order shear deformation effect, boundary conditions, the number of circumferential waves, etc. on dynamic buckling load are discussed by using MATLAB software and the results show that dynamic buckling of cylindrical shells occuresmore easily when considering shear effect.

  1. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 aids survival of neurites on neurons derived from pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Shinji; Imatoh, Takuya; Ochiai, Takashi; Koyanagi, Satoru; Shimeno, Hiroshi

    2004-04-09

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a serpin that regulates the activities of plasminogen activators. However, its physiological roles in the CNS are incompletely understood. We have found that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 has a novel biological function in the CNS: the contribution to survival of neurites on neurons. PC-12 cells treated with nerve growth factor differentiated into neurons and formed a network of neurites. In a serum-free culture medium, these neurites disappeared within 24 h. The addition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevented the disintegration of the neuronal networks, while the addition of the serpin inhibitors aprotinin and antipain did not. The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 maintained or promoted the phosphorylated state of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not of protein kinase B (Akt). These results are the first evidence that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the CNS acts to maintain the morphology of neurites via activation of the ERK-related pathway in the neurons.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  3. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  4. Tiam1 as a signaling mediator of nerve growth factor-dependent neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; Kele, Julianna; Vilar, Marçal; Paratcha, Gustavo; Ledda, Fernanda

    2010-03-19

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation requires the activation of members of the Rho family of small GTPases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which NGF regulates cytoskeletal changes and neurite outgrowth are not totally understood. In this work, we identify the Rac1-specific guanine exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 as a novel mediator of NGF/TrkA-dependent neurite elongation. In particular, we report that knockdown of Tiam1 causes a significant reduction in Rac1 activity and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. Physical interaction between Tiam1 and active Ras (Ras-GTP), but not tyrosine phosphorylation of Tiam1, plays a central role in Rac1 activation by NGF. In addition, our findings indicate that Ras is required to associate Tiam1 with Rac1 and promote Rac1 activation upon NGF stimulation. Taken together, these findings define a novel molecular mechanism through which Tiam1 mediates TrkA signaling and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  6. Downstream Amazon river dynamics under oceanic tide influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuth, P.; Larque, A.; Soussa da Silva, M.; Filizola, N.

    2003-04-01

    Effect of oceanic tide over downstream Amazon river dynamics has been monitored between 1999 and 2001. River topography and bathymetry has been determined, tide induced water levels fluctuations have been monitored at eleven gauging stations along a 1100 km long fluvial reach, water discharges fluctuations along a tide cycle have been measured at 9 sections during low, medium and high river stages measurement campaigns. Specific measurement campaigns have been organised on northern and southern branch of Amazon river near Macapa at various river stages, including suspended sediment determination along a tide cycle. Hydrodynamic modelling has been initiated along this downstream reach. Results show an upwards propagation of oceanic tide waves along Amazon river, semi-diurnal water level fluctuations being eventually observed 1100 km from the estuary at low river stage and 530 km from the estuary at high river stage. At low river stage (November 1997) river water level at Parintins, 1100 km from the estuary, was 3.13m above mean sea level, revealing a 3 mm/km mean slope along the downstream reach of Amazon river. Mean upwards celerity of semi-diurnal tide waves is 40 km/hour with an amplitude damping and wave profile modification : as the wave moves upwards falling phase gets longer and rising phase shorter. Inversion of water discharge during a tide cycle (i.e. negative water discharge) has been observed along the Northern branch up to its divergence with Canal do Gurupa (Southern branch), 444 km from the estuary. In front of Macapa, 200 km from the estuary, Amazon water discharge during a tide cycle (16/03/2000) fluctuated from 580 000 m3/s to - 290 000 m3/s with an average 209 000 m3/s, representative of the Amazon river mean flow. Suspended sediments concentration during a tide cycle stays constant at river surface while it shows a low tide pulse at the lower part of the profile, when water velocity increase generates a sediment re-suspension. Tributaries of the

  7. Neurite Aggregation and Calcium Dysfunction in iPSC-Derived Sensory Neurons with Parkinson’s Disease-Related LRRK2 G2019S Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Andrew J.; Ebert, Allison D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most-common genetic determinants of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The G2019S mutation is detected most frequently and is associated with increased kinase activity. Whereas G2019S mutant dopamine neurons exhibit neurite elongation deficits, the effect of G2019S on other neuronal subtypes is unknown. As PD patients also suffer from non-motor symptoms that may be unrelated to dopamine neuron loss, we used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to assess morphological and functional properties of peripheral sensory neurons. LRRK2 G2019S iPSC-derived sensory neurons exhibited normal neurite length but had large microtubule-containing neurite aggregations. Additionally, LRRK2 G2019S iPSC-derived sensory neurons displayed altered calcium dynamics. Treatment with LRRK2 kinase inhibitors resulted in significant, but not complete, morphological and functional rescue. These data indicate a role for LRRK2 kinase activity in sensory neuron structure and function, which when disrupted, may lead to sensory neuron deficits in PD. PMID:26651604

  8. Platelet reactions to modified surfaces under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, N P; Shortland, A P; Rattray, A; Williams, D F

    1998-12-01

    The influence of surfaces on the reactions of platelets in whole blood under laminar flow was investigated in a cone and plate viscometer. Citrated whole blood was exposed to steel, PMMA and PMMA modified with PEO at low (500 s(-1)) and high (4000 s(-1)) wall shear rates at room temperature for a period of 100 s. Treated blood samples were fixed with paraformaldehyde, stained with a monoclonal antibody for CD41 (platelet GPIIb/IIIa) conjugated with phycoerythrin and analyzed by flow cytometry. The reactions of platelets (microparticle generation and formation of platelet-platelet, platelet-red blood cell and red blood cell-microparticle aggregates) to these environments were quantified. Additionally, the size of platelet-platelet aggregates was assessed. The percentage platelet aggregation and numbers of microparticles generated were independent of surface type at any shear rate. The composition of the aggregates formed was influenced by the surface: at low and high shear rates PMMA caused the generation of platelet-platelet aggregates of the greatest size. The numbers of red blood cell-platelet and red blood cell-microparticle aggregates also varied depending on the surface. Fewer red blood cell-platelet aggregates were formed at higher shear rates, whereas the reverse was true for red blood cell-microparticle aggregates. It is concluded that these variations may help to explain the differential effects of surfaces to the induction of distant thrombotic events: microparticles may be protected from loss from the blood stream by their association with red blood cells at high shear rates.

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics underlying thermal plasticity of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) hearts.

    PubMed

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans O; Mark, Felix C

    2012-09-01

    In the eurythermal cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, performance depends on hearts that ensure systemic oxygen supply over a broad range of temperatures. We therefore aimed to identify adjustments in energetic cardiac capacity and underlying mitochondrial function supporting thermal acclimation and adaptation that could be crucial for the cuttlefish's competitive success in variable environments. Two genetically distinct cuttlefish populations were acclimated to 11, 16 and 21°C. Subsequently, skinned and permeabilised heart fibres were used to assess mitochondrial functioning by means of high-resolution respirometry and a substrate-inhibitor protocol, followed by measurements of cardiac citrate synthase and cytosolic enzyme activities. Temperate English Channel cuttlefish had lower mitochondrial capacities but larger hearts than subtropical Adriatic cuttlefish. Warm acclimation to 21°C decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in Adriatic cuttlefish and increased complex IV activity in English Channel cuttlefish. However, compensation of mitochondrial capacities did not occur during cold acclimation to 11°C. In systemic hearts, the thermal sensitivity of mitochondrial substrate oxidation was high for proline and pyruvate but low for succinate. Oxygen efficiency of catabolism rose as temperature changed from 11 to 21°C via shifts to oxygen-conserving oxidation of proline and pyruvate and via reduced relative proton leak. The changes observed for substrate oxidation, mitochondrial complexes, relative proton leak and heart mass improve energetic efficiency and essentially seem to extend tolerance to high temperatures and reduce associated tissue hypoxia. We conclude that cuttlefish sustain cardiac performance and, thus, systemic oxygen delivery over short- and long-term changes of temperature and environmental conditions by multiple adjustments in cellular and mitochondrial energetics.

  10. Mycorrhizal dynamics under CO2 and nitrogen enrichment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. O.; Ovasapyan, T.; Finzi, A.; Treseder, K.

    2006-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that elevated atmospheric CO2 would increase the prevalence of mycorrhizal fungi, because plant investment in mycorrhizal fungi should increase if soil nutrients become limiting. Likewise, mycorrhizal abundance should decline under N fertilization. At four dates between December 2004 and November 2005, soil was collected from fertilized and unfertilized sectors within replicate rings of the Duke FACE experiment. CO2 fumigation began in summer of 1996, and N fertilization in spring of 2005. CO2 enrichment significantly increased colonization of roots by ectomycorrhizal fungi, from 31+/-4% root length in ambient plots to 39+/-4% in enriched plots (P=.036). We found no effect of CO2 or nitrogen fertilization on root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (average:43% root length), hyphal length of AM fungi (average: 1.2 m g-1 soil), or glomalin (average: 7.7 mg g-1 soil). Radiocarbon signatures indicated that glomalin residence times were approximately 7 years in this site, (Δ14C=107+/- 5.1), so this glycoprotein could constitute a longlived sink of nutrients. Neither elevated CO2 nor nitrogen fertilization altered ECM production of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) or glycine aminopeptidase (GAP), which break down chitin and proteins, respectively. Moreover, ECM produced enzymes might only contribute to a small fraction (0 to 1.5%) of chitin and protein degradation in the soil. Our CO2 hypothesis was supported with respect to ECM fungi, but not AM fungi. The general lack of response to nitrogen may be due to the short duration of the fertilization treatment at the time of sample collection.

  11. Brain network dynamics underlying visuospatial judgment: an FMRI connectivity study.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Tom A; Roebroeck, Alard; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2010-09-01

    Previous functional imaging research has consistently indicated involvement of bilateral fronto-parietal networks during the execution of visuospatial tasks. Studies with TMS have suggested that the right hemispheric network, but not the left, is functionally relevant for visuospatial judgments. However, very little is still known about the interactions within these fronto-parietal networks underlying visuospatial processing. In the current study, we investigated task modulation of functional connectivity (instantaneous correlations of regional time courses), and task-specific effective connectivity (direction of influences), within the right fronto-parietal network activated during visuospatial judgments. Ten healthy volunteers performed a behaviorally controlled visuospatial judgment task (ANGLE) or a control task (COLOR) in an fMRI experiment. Visuospatial task-specific activations were found in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and middle/inferior frontal gyrus (MFG). Functional connectivity within this network was task-modulated, with significantly higher connectivity between PPC and MFG during ANGLE than during COLOR. Effective connectivity analysis for directed influence revealed that visuospatial task-specific projections within this network were predominantly in a frontal-to-parietal direction. Moreover, ANGLE-specific influences from thalamic nuclei to PPC were identified. Exploratory effective connectivity analysis revealed that closely neighboring clusters, within visuospatial regions, were differentially involved in the network. These neighboring clusters had opposite effective connectivity patterns to other nodes of the fronto-parietal network. Our data thus reveal that visuospatial judgments are supported by massive fronto-parietal backprojections, thalamo-parietal influence, and multiple stages, or loops, of information flow within the visuospatial network. We speculate on possible functional contributions of the various network nodes and

  12. Dynamically triggered slip leading to sustained fault gouge weakening under laboratory shear conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul Allan

    2016-02-28

    We investigate dynamic wave-triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is composed of a three-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a biaxial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at a normal load of 4 MPa, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a dynamic wave, corresponding to material weakening and softening if the system is in a critical shear stress state (near failure). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in a perturbed state over multiple slip cycles as evidenced by the recovery of the material strength, shear modulus, and slip recurrence time. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  13. Dynamically triggered slip leading to sustained fault gouge weakening under laboratory shear conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Paul Allan

    2016-02-28

    We investigate dynamic wave-triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is composed of a three-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a biaxial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at a normal load of 4 MPa, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a dynamic wave, corresponding to material weakening and softening if the system is in a critical shear stress state (near failure). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in a perturbed state over multiple slip cycles as evidencedmore » by the recovery of the material strength, shear modulus, and slip recurrence time. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.« less

  14. Design of 3D engineered protein hydrogels for tailored control of neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Kyle J.; Antaris, Alexander L.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    The design of bioactive materials allows for tailored studies probing cell-biomaterial interactions; however, relatively few studies have examined effects of ligand density and material stiffness on neurite growth in 3D. Elastin-like proteins (ELPs) have been designed with modular bioactive and structural regions to enable the systematic characterization of design parameters within 3D materials. To promote neurite outgrowth and better understand the effects of common biomaterial design parameters on neuronal cultures, we here focused on cell-adhesive ligand density and hydrogel stiffness as design variables for ELP hydrogels. With the inherent design freedom of engineered proteins, these 3D ELP hydrogels enabled decoupled investigation into the effects of biomechanics and biochemistry on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Increasing the cell-adhesive RGD ligand density from 0 to 1.9 × 107 ligands/μm3 led to a significant increase in the rate, length, and density of neurite outgrowth, as quantified by a high-throughput algorithm developed for dense neurite analysis. An approximately two-fold improvement in total neurite outgrowth was observed in materials with the higher ligand density at all time-points through 7 days. ELP hydrogels with initial elastic moduli of 0.5, 1.5, or 2.1 kPa and identical RGD ligand densities revealed that the most compliant materials led to the greatest outgrowth, with some neurites extending over 1800 μm by day 7. Given the ability of ELP hydrogels to efficiently promote neurite outgrowth within defined and tunable 3D microenvironments, these materials may be useful in developing therapeutic nerve guides and the further study of basic neuron-biomaterial interactions. PMID:23128159

  15. CB1 cannabinoid receptor-mediated neurite remodeling in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Song, Z H

    2001-08-15

    The morphological remodeling of neuronal cells influences neurogenesis and brain functions. We hypothesize that psychoactive and neurotoxic effects of cannabinoids may be mediated, at least in part, by their morphoregulatory activities. In the present study, mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were used as an in vitro model to investigate cannabinoid-induced neurite remodeling effects and to identify the involvement of cannabinoid receptors in this neurite remodeling process. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence microscopy, the endogenously expressed CB1, but not CB2, cannabinoid receptors were detected in morphologically differentiated N1E-115 cells. Activation of these natively expressed CB1 cannabinoid receptors by cannabinoid agonist HU-210 led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. Importantly, HU-210 treatment induced neurite retraction in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of N1E-115 cells with a CB1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) suppressed HU-210-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, indicating that the knocking down of functional CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression was achieved. Antisense ODN pretreatment also abolished HU-210-induced neurite retraction, demonstrating the involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in mediating the neurite remodeling effects of HU-210. In addition, reversing HU-210-induced intracellular cAMP declination by 8-Br-cAMP partially prevented HU-210-induced neurite retraction, indicating the involvement of cAMP-dependent signaling pathways in mediating the neurite remodeling function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in N1E-115 cells. These data demonstrate that neurite remodeling is a newly discovered function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. This morphoregulatory function of CB1 cannabinoid receptors might be a new mechanism that mediates the psychoactive and neurotoxic effects of cannabinoids in developing and adult brain.

  16. Dynamic Response Assessment for the MEMS Accelerometer Under Severe Shock Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Shaw, Harry C.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has evaluated the dynamic response of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device made by Analog Device, Inc. The device is designated as ADXL250 and is designed mainly for sensing dynamic acceleration. It is also used to measure the tilting angle of any system or component from its original level position. The device has been in commercial use (e.g., in automobile airbag deployment system as a dual-axial accelerometer and in the electronic game play-station as a tilting sensor) with success, but NASA needs an in-depth assessment of its performance under severe dynamic shock environments. It was realized while planning this evaluation task that two assessments would be beneficial to NASA's missions: (1) severe dynamic shock response under nominal thermal environments; and (2) general dynamic performance under cryogenic environments. The first evaluation aims at obtaining a good understanding of its micromachined structure within a framework of brittle fracture dynamics, while the second evaluation focuses on the structure integrity under cryogenic temperature conditions. The information we gathered from the manufacturer indicated that the environmental stresses under NASA's evaluation program have been far beyond what the device has experienced with commercial applications, for which the device was designed. Thus NASA needs the outcome of this evaluation in order to make the selection for possible use for its missions. This paper provides details of the first evaluation the dynamic response under severe multi-axial single-pulse shock load. It was performed using finite element tools with nonlinear dynamics procedures.

  17. Effects of serum, tissue extract, conditioned medium, and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sakai, M; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    The effects of serum, tissue extracts, conditioned medium, (CM), and culture substrata on neurite appearance from spinal cord explants of 6- to 8-day-old chick embryos were investigated. In Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) with no supplement neurites from explants did not appear on collagen coating but on polyornithine coating (PORN). It is concluded that cell-to-substratum interaction is important in neurite appearance. CM, serum and tissue extract potentiated neurite appearance, but their activities were highly dependent on the coating. The amount of collagen was also crucial. On collagen, neurite appearance was observed only when promoting substances were present. CM and serum contained at least two components; one affected neurite appearance after deposition on collagen and the other affected neurite appearance when present in the culture medium. The former was included also in tissue extracts. Both of adsorbable and non-adsorbable components from any origin were necessary for effective induction of neurite appearance. Heat treatment and dialysis differentiated these active components. On PORN, CM highly potentiated neurite appearance. The activity of the CM was reproduced by its low molecular weight fraction. Serum also promoted neurite appearance, but to a lesser extent than CM. The effect of tissue extract was not remarkable.

  18. The analyses of dynamic response and reliability of fuzzy-random truss under stationary stochastic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Juan; Gao, Wei; Wriggers, Peter; Wu, Tao; Sahraee, Shahab

    2010-04-01

    A new two-factor method based on the probability and the fuzzy sets theory is used for the analyses of the dynamic response and reliability of fuzzy-random truss systems under the stationary stochastic excitation. Considering the fuzzy-randomness of the structural physical parameters and geometric dimensions simultaneously, the fuzzy-random correlation function matrix of structural displacement response in time domain and the fuzzy-random mean square values of structural dynamic response in frequency domain are developed by using the two-factor method, and the fuzzy numerical characteristics of dynamic responses are then derived. Based on numerical characteristics of structural fuzzy-random dynamic responses, the structural fuzzy-random dynamic reliability and its fuzzy numerical characteristic are obtained from the Poisson equation. The effects of the uncertainty of the structural parameters on structural dynamic response and reliability are illustrated via two engineering examples and some important conclusions are obtained.

  19. SRRM4-dependent neuron-specific alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts regulates neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Takafumi; Shirane, Michiko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing gives rise to diversity of the proteome, and it is especially prevalent in the mammalian nervous system. Indeed, many factors that control the splicing process govern nervous system development. Among such factors, SRRM4 is an important regulator of aspects of neural differentiation including neurite outgrowth. The mechanism by which SRRM4 regulates neurite outgrowth has remained poorly understood, however. We now show that SRRM4 regulates the splicing of protrudin gene (Zfyve27) transcripts in neuronal cells. SRRM4 was found to promote splicing of protrudin pre-mRNA so as to include a microexon (exon L) encoding seven amino acids in a neuron-specific manner. The resulting protein (protrudin-L) promotes neurite outgrowth during neurogenesis. Depletion of SRRM4 in Neuro2A cells impaired inclusion of exon L in protrudin mRNA, resulting in the generation of a shorter protein isoform (protrudin-S) that is less effective at promoting neurite extension. SRRM4 was found to recognize a UGC motif that is located immediately upstream of exon L and is necessary for inclusion of exon L in the mature transcript. Deletion of exon L in Neuro2A or embryonic stem cells inhibited neurite outgrowth. Our results suggest that SRRM4 controls neurite outgrowth through regulation of alternative splicing of protrudin transcripts. PMID:28106138

  20. VANG-1 and PRKL-1 Cooperate to Negatively Regulate Neurite Formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Su, Anna; Imai, Janice H.; Colavita, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Neuritogenesis is a critical early step in the development and maturation of neurons and neuronal circuits. While extracellular directional cues are known to specify the site and orientation of nascent neurite formation in vivo, little is known about the genetic pathways that block inappropriate neurite emergence in order to maintain proper neuronal polarity. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of Van Gogh (vang-1), Prickle (prkl-1), and Dishevelled (dsh-1), core components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, are required in a subset of peripheral motor neurons to restrict neurite emergence to a specific organ axis. In loss-of-function mutants, neurons display supernumerary neurites that extend inappropriately along the orthogonal anteroposterior (A/P) body axis. We show that autonomous and non-autonomous gene activities are required early and persistently to inhibit the formation or consolidation of growth cone protrusions directed away from organ precursor cells. Furthermore, prkl-1 overexpression is sufficient to suppress neurite formation and reorient neuronal polarity in a vang-1– and dsh-1–dependent manner. Our findings suggest a novel role for a PCP–like pathway in maintaining polarized neuronal morphology by inhibiting neuronal responses to extrinsic or intrinsic cues that would otherwise promote extraneous neurite formation. PMID:21912529

  1. Survival and neurite growth of chick embryo spinal cord cells in serum-free culture.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Obata, K

    1982-07-01

    Cell survival and neurite growth were investigated in serum-free spinal cord cell cultures on polyornithine coating (PORN). Cells were obtained from 6- or 7-day-old chick embryos. Isolated spinal cord cells required promoting factors for their survival and neurite growth. The survival-promoting factors were initially present in spinal cord cells. High density cultures, co-cultures with spinal cord explants, and spinal cord extract promoted survival of isolated spinal cord cells in MEM with no additives. Other tissue extracts (brain, liver, heart and skeletal muscle), serum, and serum-free conditioned medium (SF-CM) of muscle or glioma C6 cells also promoted survival. The active substances in the brain extract and SF-CM were shown to be protein and were separated into 3 fractions (approximately molecular weight 150,000, 70,000, 40,000) by gel filtration chromatography. Survival and neurite growth were suggested to be promoted by different factors because: (1) survival was promoted by both tissue extract and SF-CM, but neurite growth was promoted only by SF-CM; (2) the neurite growth-stimulating activity of SF-CM was lost following dialysis and heat (100 degrees C, 2 min) treatment; however, the survival-promoting activity was not. It was also suggested that spinal cord cells produce neurite growth promoting factors, but did not initially contain these factors.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor enhances neurite elongation of cerebellar granule neurons via TrkB signaling.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca(2+) signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB.

  3. MorphoNeuroNet: an automated method for dense neurite network analysis.

    PubMed

    Pani, Giuseppe; De Vos, Winnok H; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; Baatout, Sarah; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2014-02-01

    High content cell-based screens are rapidly gaining popularity in the context of neuronal regeneration studies. To analyze neuronal morphology, automatic image analysis pipelines have been conceived, which accurately quantify the shape changes of neurons in cell cultures with non-dense neurite networks. However, most existing methods show poor performance for well-connected and differentiated neuronal networks, which may serve as valuable models for inter alia synaptogenesis. Here, we present a fully automated method for quantifying the morphology of neurons and the density of neurite networks, in dense neuronal cultures, which are grown for more than 10 days. MorphoNeuroNet, written as a script for ImageJ, Java based freeware, automatically determines various morphological parameters of the soma and the neurites (size, shape, starting points, and fractional occupation). The image analysis pipeline consists of a multi-tier approach in which the somas are segmented by adaptive region growing using nuclei as seeds, and the neurites are delineated by a combination of various intensity and edge detection algorithms. Quantitative comparison showed a superior performance of MorphoNeuroNet to existing analysis tools, especially for revealing subtle changes in thin neurites, which have weak fluorescence intensity compared to the rest of the network. The proposed method will help determining the effects of compounds on cultures with dense neurite networks, thereby boosting physiological relevance of cell-based assays in the context of neuronal diseases. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Design of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels to Promote Neurite Outgrowth in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Dominte; Hamard, Lauriane; Caraguel, Flavien; Wion, Didier; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2016-09-28

    A hyaluronic acid (HA)-based extracellular matrix (ECM) platform with independently tunable stiffness and density of cell-adhesive peptide (RGD, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) that mimics key biochemical and mechanical features of brain matrix has been designed. We demonstrated here its utility in elucidating ECM regulation of neural progenitor cell behavior and neurite outgrowth. The analysis of neurite outgrowth in 3-D by two-photon microscopy showed several important results in the development of these hydrogels. First, the ability of neurites to extend deeply into these soft HA-based matrices even in the absence of cell-adhesive ligand further confirms the potential of HA hydrogels for central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. Second, the behavior of hippocampal neural progenitor cells differed markedly between the hydrogels with a storage modulus of 400 Pa and those with a modulus of 800 Pa. We observed an increased outgrowth and density of neurites in the softest hydrogels (G' = 400 Pa). Interestingly, cells seeded on the surface of the hydrogels functionalized with the RGD ligand experienced an optimum in neurite outgrowth as a function of ligand density. Surprinsingly, neurites preferentially progressed inside the gels in a vertical direction, suggesting that outgrowth is directed by the hydrogel structure. This work may provide design principles for the development of hydrogels to facilitate neuronal regeneration in the adult brain.

  5. Bifenthrin causes neurite retraction in the absence of cell death: a model for pesticide associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Avishek; Chandil, Daljit; Lechesal, Rethabile; Pryor, Stephen C; McLaughlin, Ashlea; Bonventre, Josephine A; Flynnx, Katherine; Weeks, Benjamin S

    2006-05-01

    Bifenthrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide derivative of naturally occurring pyrethrins from chrysanthemum flowers. Bifenthrin is considered relatively safe and therefore incorporated as the active ingredient in preparations sold over the counter for household use. Recent studies have raised concern that chronic exposure to pesticides in the home setting may increase the risk for neurodegenerative diseases. To address this concer, in the present study, bifenthrin is added to pre-differentiated PC12 and effect of bifenthrin on the retraction of existing neurites is observed a model for neurodegeneration. PC12 cells were differentiated with nerve growth factor for twenty-four hours and then treated with what was determined to be a sublethal dose of bifenthrin for up to an additional 48 hours. The percent of cells with neurites was assessed at various times before and after nerve growth factor treatment. Bifenthrin toxicity was determined using trypan blue exclusion. Bifenthrin was not toxic to PC12 cells at concentrations ranging from 1 x 10(-10) M to 1 x 10(-4) M. Twenty-four hours after nerve growth factor treatment, a maximum percent of cells had formed neurites and with a treatment of 1 x 10(-5) M bifenthrin, approximately 80% of these neurites retracted in within 12 additional hours and almost all neurites had retracted within 48 hours. Trypan exclusion showed that these cells were viable. These data show that bifenthrin can stimulate the retraction of neurites in the absence of frank toxicity.

  6. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells.

  7. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sigma-1 Receptor Enhances Neurite Elongation of Cerebellar Granule Neurons via TrkB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca2+ signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB. PMID:24116072

  9. Dynamic System Response of Truss Panels under High Dynamic Loading through Experimental & Computation Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    has simplified the experimental analysis of dynamic impact simulations. Simulations not only reduce the cost and time of manufacturing prototypes...weight; (4) select the best stacking sequence for face sheets composed of laminated composite materials; (5) compare the optimum structural weight...Detailed finite element calculations using fully meshed geometries with square honeycomb, prismatic corrugations and pyramidal truss topologies made

  10. Research on dynamic creep strain and settlement prediction under the subway vibration loading.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhui; Miao, Linchang

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore the dynamic characteristics and settlement prediction of soft soil. Accordingly, the dynamic shear modulus formula considering the vibration frequency was utilized and the dynamic triaxial test conducted to verify the validity of the formula. Subsequently, the formula was applied to the dynamic creep strain function, with the factors influencing the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soft soil being analyzed. Meanwhile, the variation law of dynamic stress with sampling depth was obtained through the finite element simulation of subway foundation. Furthermore, the improved dynamic creep strain curve of soil layer was determined based on the dynamic stress. Thereafter, it could to estimate the long-term settlement under subway vibration loading by norms. The results revealed that the dynamic shear modulus formula is straightforward and practical in terms of its application to the vibration frequency. The values predicted using the improved dynamic creep strain formula closed to the experimental values, whilst the estimating settlement closed to the measured values obtained in the field test.

  11. Microstructure and velocity of field-driven Ising interfaces moving under a soft stochastic dynamic.

    PubMed

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Kolesik, M

    2003-06-01

    We present theoretical and dynamic Monte Carlo simulation results for the mobility and microscopic structure of (1+1)-dimensional Ising interfaces moving far from equilibrium in an applied field under a single-spin-flip "soft" stochastic dynamic. The soft dynamic is characterized by the property that the effects of changes in field energy and interaction energy factorize in the transition rate, in contrast to the nonfactorizing nature of the traditional Glauber and Metropolis rates "hard" dynamics). This work extends our previous studies of the Ising model with a hard dynamic and the unrestricted solid-on-solid (SOS) model with soft and hard dynamics. [P. A. Rikvold and M. Kolesik, J. Stat. Phys. 100, 377 (2000); J. Phys. A 35, L117 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 66, 066116 (2002).] The Ising model with soft dynamics is found to have closely similar properties to the SOS model with the same dynamic. In particular, the local interface width does not diverge with increasing field as it does for hard dynamics. The skewness of the interface at nonzero field is very weak and has the opposite sign of that obtained with hard dynamics.

  12. Sensitivity of Neural Stem Cell Survival, Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth within 3D Hydrogels to Environmental Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Tasneem, Sameera; Farrell, Kurt; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of embryonic murine neural stem cells exposed to 10 pM – 10 μM concentrations of three heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), continuously for 14 days within 3D collagen hydrogels. Critical endpoints for neurogenesis such as survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth were assessed. Results suggest significant compromise in cell viability within the first four days at concentrations ≥ 10 nM, while lower concentrations induced a more delayed effect. Mercury and lead suppressed neural differentiation at as low as 10 pM concentration within 7 days, while all three metals inhibited neural and glial differentiation by day 14. Neurite outgrowth remained unaffected at lower cadmium or mercury concentrations (≤ 100 pM), but was completely repressed beyond day 1 at higher concentrations. Higher metal concentrations (≥ 100 pM) suppressed NSC differentiation to motor or dopaminergic neurons. Cytokines and chemokines released by NSCs, and the sub-cellular mechanisms by which metals induce damage to NSCs have been quantified and correlated to phenotypic data. The observed degree of toxicity in NSC cultures is in the order: lead > mercury > cadmium. Results point to the use of biomimetic 3D culture models to screen the toxic effects of heavy metals during developmental stages, and investigate their underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:26621541

  13. Genetic Analysis of a Novel Tubulin Mutation That Redirects Synaptic Vesicle Targeting and Causes Neurite Degeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L.; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress. PMID:25392990

  14. Genetic analysis of a novel tubulin mutation that redirects synaptic vesicle targeting and causes neurite degeneration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jiun-Min; Chen, Chun-Hao; Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress.

  15. Control of Retinal Ganglion Cell Positioning and Neurite Growth: Combining 3D Printing with Radial Electrospun Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kador, Karl E; Grogan, Shawn P; Dorthé, Erik W; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Malek, Monisha F; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; D'lima, Darryl D

    2016-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are responsible for the transfer of signals from the retina to the brain. As part of the central nervous system, RGCs are unable to regenerate following injury, and implanted cells have limited capacity to orient and integrate in vivo. During development, secreted guidance molecules along with signals from extracellular matrix and the vasculature guide cell positioning, for example, around the fovea, and axon outgrowth; however, these changes are temporally regulated and are not the same in the adult. Here, we combine electrospun cell transplantation scaffolds capable of RGC neurite guidance with thermal inkjet 3D cell printing techniques capable of precise positioning of RGCs on the scaffold surface. Optimal printing parameters are developed for viability, electrophysiological function and, neurite pathfinding. Different media, commonly used to promote RGC survival and growth, were tested under varying conditions. When printed in growth media containing both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), RGCs maintained survival and normal electrophysiological function, and displayed radial axon outgrowth when printed onto electrospun scaffolds. These results demonstrate that 3D printing technology may be combined with complex electrospun surfaces in the design of future retinal models or therapies.

  16. Sensitivity of neural stem cell survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth within 3D hydrogels to environmental heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Tasneem, Sameera; Farrell, Kurt; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R

    2016-02-03

    We investigated the sensitivity of embryonic murine neural stem cells exposed to 10 pM-10 μM concentrations of three heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), continuously for 14 days within 3D collagen hydrogels. Critical endpoints for neurogenesis such as survival, differentiation and neurite outgrowth were assessed. Results suggest significant compromise in cell viability within the first four days at concentrations ≥10 nM, while lower concentrations induced a more delayed effect. Mercury and lead suppressed neural differentiation at as low as 10 pM concentration within 7 days, while all three metals inhibited neural and glial differentiation by day 14. Neurite outgrowth remained unaffected at lower cadmium or mercury concentrations (≤100 pM), but was completely repressed beyond day 1 at higher concentrations. Higher metal concentrations (≥100 pM) suppressed NSC differentiation to motor or dopaminergic neurons. Cytokines and chemokines released by NSCs, and the sub-cellular mechanisms by which metals induce damage to NSCs have been quantified and correlated to phenotypic data. The observed degree of toxicity in NSC cultures is in the order: lead>mercury>cadmium. Results point to the use of biomimetic 3D culture models to screen the toxic effects of heavy metals during developmental stages, and investigate their underlying mechanistic pathways.

  17. Control of Retinal Ganglion Cell Positioning and Neurite Growth: Combining 3D Printing with Radial Electrospun Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Grogan, Shawn P.; Dorthé, Erik W.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Malek, Monisha F.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are responsible for the transfer of signals from the retina to the brain. As part of the central nervous system, RGCs are unable to regenerate following injury, and implanted cells have limited capacity to orient and integrate in vivo. During development, secreted guidance molecules along with signals from extracellular matrix and the vasculature guide cell positioning, for example, around the fovea, and axon outgrowth; however, these changes are temporally regulated and are not the same in the adult. Here, we combine electrospun cell transplantation scaffolds capable of RGC neurite guidance with thermal inkjet 3D cell printing techniques capable of precise positioning of RGCs on the scaffold surface. Optimal printing parameters are developed for viability, electrophysiological function and, neurite pathfinding. Different media, commonly used to promote RGC survival and growth, were tested under varying conditions. When printed in growth media containing both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), RGCs maintained survival and normal electrophysiological function, and displayed radial axon outgrowth when printed onto electrospun scaffolds. These results demonstrate that 3D printing technology may be combined with complex electrospun surfaces in the design of future retinal models or therapies. PMID:26729061

  18. Changing growth of neurites of sensory ganglion by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurkan, M. V.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.; Bespalov, V. G.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Kipenko, A. V.; Lopatina, E. V.; Krylov, B. V.

    2012-02-01

    Application of terahertz radiation for the creation of medical equipment and solving of biological problems has become widely spread. From this point of view, the influence of THz radiation on the nerve fibers is of primary concern. In addition, several studies indicated both stimulating and depressive effects on nerve cells. However, the mechanism of this effect has not yet been studied, including the dose and exposure time. Our research was devoted to the impact of broadband pulsed THz radiation in the frequency range of 0.05 to 2 THz on the neurite growth in the sensory ganglia of 10-12-day chicken embryos. Dependence of changes in functional responses of cells on the average output power has been found. An increase in the stimulating effect was observed at the lowest power density used (0.5 μW/cm2). Through non-destructive process and choosing the correct parameters of THz radiation, potential control of neural response becomes possible, which can subsequently lead to new medical treatments.

  19. Neuritic regeneration and synaptic reconstruction induced by withanolide A

    PubMed Central

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether withanolide A (WL-A), isolated from the Indian herbal drug Ashwagandha (root of Withania somnifera), could regenerate neurites and reconstruct synapses in severely damaged neurons. We also investigated the effect of WL-A on memory-deficient mice showing neuronal atrophy and synaptic loss in the brain. Axons, dendrites, presynapses, and postsynapses were visualized by immunostaining for phosphorylated neurofilament-H (NF-H), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), synaptophysin, and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), respectively. Treatment with Aβ(25–35) (10 μM) induced axonal and dendritic atrophy, and pre- and postsynaptic loss in cultured rat cortical neurons. Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 μM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 μmol kg−1 day−1, for 13 days, p.o.) recovered Aβ(25–35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks. PMID:15711595

  20. Contribution of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase to neural activity-induced neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Coso, Omar A; Fiszman, Mónica L

    2002-03-01

    In this report we describe our studies on intracellular signals that mediate neurite outgrowth and long-term survival of cerebellar granule cells. The effect of voltage-gated calcium channel activation on neurite complexity was evaluated in cultured cerebellar granule cells grown for 48 h at low density; the parameter measured was the fractal dimension of the cell. We explored the contribution of two intracellular pathways, Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1), to the effects of high [K+ ]e under serum-free conditions. We found that 25 mm KCl (25K) induced an increase in calcium influx through L subtype channels. In neurones grown for 24-48 h under low-density conditions, the activation of these channels induced neurite outgrowth through the activation of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. This also produced an increase in long-term neuronal survival with a partial contribution from the MEK1 pathway. We also found that the addition of 25K increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. Neuronal survival under resting conditions is supported by the MEK1 pathway. We conclude that intracellular calcium oscillations can triggered different biological effects depending on the stage of maturation of the neuronal phenotype. Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activation determines the growth of neurites and the development of neuronal complexity.

  1. Geometric phase of a qubit driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.

    2014-01-15

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to the environmental effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we study quantitatively the GP of a two-level atom system driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics in terms of different parameters involved in the whole system. We find that with the change of the damping coupling, the GP is very sensitive to its properties exhibiting long collapse and revival phenomena, which play a significant role in enhancing the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Moreover, we show that the GP can be considered as a tool for testing and characterizing the nature of the qubit–environment coupling. Due to the significance of how a system is quantum correlated with its environment in the construction of a scalable quantum computer, the entanglement dynamics between the qubit with its environment under external classical noise is evaluated and investigated during the time evolution. -- Highlights: •Geometric phase under noise phase laser. •Dynamics of the geometric phase under non-Markovian dynamics in the presence of classical noise. •Solution of master equation of the system in terms atomic inversion. •Nonlocal correlation between the system and its environment under non-Markovianity.

  2. Power output and carrier dynamics studies of perovskite solar cells under working conditions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Wang, Hao-Yi; Hao, Ming-Yang; Qin, Yujun; Fu, Li-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Ai, Xi-Cheng

    2017-08-02

    Perovskite solar cells have emerged as promising photovoltaic systems with superb power conversion efficiency. For the practical application of perovskite devices, the greatest concerns are the power output density and the related dynamics under working conditions. In this study, the working conditions of planar and mesoscopic perovskite solar cells are simulated and the power output density evolutions with the working voltage are highlighted. The planar device exhibits higher capability of outputting power than the mesoscopic one. The transient photoelectric conversion dynamics are investigated under the open circuit, short circuit and working conditions. It is found that the power output and dynamic processes are correlated intrinsically, which suggests that the power output is the competitive result of the charge carrier recombination and transport. The present work offers a unique view to elucidating the relationship between the power output and the charge carrier dynamics for perovskite solar cells in a comprehensive manner, which would be beneficial to their future practical applications.

  3. Modeling the dynamic stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under low-amplitude vibration loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tengfei; Castel, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a model, initially developed to calculate the stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under static loading, is used to assess the dynamic stiffness. The model allows calculating the average inertia of cracked beams by taking into account the effect of bending cracks (primary cracks) and steel-concrete bond damage (i.e. interfacial microcracks). Free and forced vibration experiments are used to assess the performance of the model. The respective influence of bending cracks and steel-concrete bond damage on both static and dynamic responses is analyzed. The comparison between experimental and simulated deflections confirms that the effects of both bending cracks and steel-concrete bond loss should be taken into account to assess reinforced concrete stiffness under service static loading. On the contrary, comparison of experimental and calculated dynamic responses reveals that localized steel-concrete bond damages do not influence significantly the dynamic stiffness and the fundamental frequency.

  4. [Tissue mechanical behavior of tendinous fibers under statistical and dynamic requirements].

    PubMed

    Arnold, G; Gross, F; Moll, C

    1977-01-01

    With a device for dynamical processes tension tests were performed on bundles of collagen fibres of human and bovin origin. Part of the studies were performed under statical condition with an universal materials testing machine, equipped with a closed loop feed back control system. If the force is to be kept constant subsequently to a strain process on a collagen fiber bundle (isotonic condition), the fiber length must increase (creep phenomenon, retardation). The force decreases under constant length after a preceding strain process (relaxation). In analogy to the statical relaxation, statical isorheological line, and statical force recovery curve the dynamical (cyclic) relaxation, dynamical (cyclic) isorheological curve, and dynamical (cyclic) force recovery curve are described. The mechanical-rheological properties collagen fiber bundles are discussed in relation to functional anatomy.

  5. Effects of DDT and permethrin on neurite growth in cultured neurons of chick embryo brain and Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Audesirk, G

    1990-01-01

    The pesticides permethrin and 1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), dissolved in either ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), were studied to determine their effect on neurite growth from cultured neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis and embryonic chicks. Both of these toxins decreased the percentage of neurons growing neurites, mean neurite length, and number of neurites/cell in a dose-dependent manner. DMSO increased the toxicity of permethrin and DDT in L. stagnalis neurons. EtOH was not used as a solvent with the embryonic chick cultures. Pre-existing neurites of L. stagnalis neurons exposed to permethrin regressed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These two toxins may affect neurite outgrowth through interference with intracellular calcium regulation.

  6. Moderate level exposure to magnetic nanodots encased in tunable poly(ethylene glycol) analouge biopolymer shell do not deleteriously affect neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    GhoshMitra, Somesree; Diercks, David R; Mills, Nathaniel C; Hynds, Di Anna L; Ghosh, Santaneel

    2013-12-01

    Recently, huge interest has been generated in investigating the possible therapeutic use of tunable magnetic nanostructures to overcome the existing challenges to treat central nervous system damage related conditions. However, several issues (e.g., biocompatibility or remote controlled actuation for multi-modal therapeutics) limit the use of conventional magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To address many of these shortcomings, we have synthesized a monodisperse nanoscale system consisting highly water dispersible magnetic nanodots encased in a remotely tunable polyethylene glycol analouge biopolymer shell. The monodisperse nature of the nanospheres, their response to external magnetic field and volumetric transition near physiological temperatures are very attractive, especially for drug delivery systems where triggered release is necessary. To further analyze the potential for combinatorial therapeutics for central nervous system damage related conditions, we have explored the efficiency of the uptake of nanospheres into pheochromocytoma cell line 12 (PC12) cells and assessed several additional measures of neurite outgrowth. We find that nanospheres were readily incorporated into the cytosolic compartment within 3 hours and did not alter the morphology of cellular processes compared to cells not exposed to nanospheres. Quantification of neurite outgrowth did not reveal any significant differences in neurite initiation or elongation between cells treated with moderate level nanomagnet exposure compared to control cultures under similar conditions. Thus, this study reports an attractive nano-scale system with great potential to deliver therapeutics to precise locations within the nervous system for axonal outgrowth and guidance.

  7. Chemicals eluting from disposable plastic syringes and syringe filters alter neurite growth, axogenesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tumanov, Sergey; Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Montgomery, Johanna M; Birch, Nigel P

    2015-04-01

    Cultures of dissociated hippocampal neurons are often used to study neuronal cell biology. We report that the development of these neurons is strongly affected by chemicals leaching from commonly used disposable medical-grade syringes and syringe filters. Contamination of culture medium by bioactive substance(s) from syringes and filters occurred with multiple manufacturing lots and filter types under normal use conditions and resulted in changes to neurite growth, axon formation and the neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton. The effects on neuronal morphology were concentration dependent and significant effects were detected even after substantial dilution of the contaminated medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed many chemicals eluting from the syringes and filters. Three of these chemicals (stearic acid, palmitic acid and 1,2-ethanediol monoacetate) were tested but showed no effects on neurite growth. Similar changes in neuronal morphology were seen with high concentrations of bisphenol A and dibutyl phthalate, two hormonally active plasticisers. Although no such compounds were detected by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, unknown plasticisers in leachates may affect neurites. This is the first study to show that leachates from laboratory consumables can alter the growth of cultured hippocampal neurons. We highlight important considerations to ensure leachate contamination does not compromise cell biology experiments.

  8. Dynamic Buckling of Elastic Bar under Axial Impact Based on Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Yang, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering first order shear deformation theory, the dynamic buckling governing equations of elastic bar with initial imperfections, transverse inertia and axial inertia are derived by Hamilton principle. The equations are converted into the form of non-dimension. Based on the finite difference method, the equations are solved approximately. The buckling mode of elastic bar under different axial impact velocities has been obtained. The influence of different axial impact velocity on the dynamic buckling of elastic bar is discussed.

  9. Deformation and Damage Accumulation in a Ceramic Composite under Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenkov, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.; Naymark, O. B.; Khorechko, U. V.; Ruchina, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Methods of computer modelling were used to investigate the processes of deformation and microdamage formation in ceramic composite materials under intense dynamic loading. It was shown that there was no damage caused by dynamic compression in the vicinity of phase borders of a nanostructured aluminum oxide matrix and reinforcing particles of tetragonal zirconium dioxide. Also, the local origination of microdamages occurs only in the zones close to micropores.

  10. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well's wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well's dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t{sup 3/2} behavior to t{sup 1/2}. It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  11. Calsyntenin-3 C-terminal fragment accumulates in dystrophic neurites surrounding aβ plaques in tg2576 mouse and Alzheimer disease brains: its neurotoxic role in mediating dystrophic neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yoko; Gomi, Fujiya; Murayama, Shigeo; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Dystrophic neurites surrounding β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques precede neuronal death in Alzheimer disease. These neuritic alterations may be one of the initial stages for synaptic loss and dysfunction. However, intracellular pathways that cause local disruption of neuronal processes by Aβ remain to be fully elucidated. The identification of Aβ-induced genes that med