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Sample records for dysfunction bacterial proliferation

  1. Electrospun polystyrene fiber diameter influencing bacterial attachment, proliferation, and growth.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-04-15

    Electrospun materials have been widely investigated in the past few decades as candidates for tissue engineering applications. However, there is little available data on the mechanisms of interaction of bacteria with electrospun wound dressings of different morphology and surface chemistry. This knowledge could allow the development of effective devices against bacterial infections in chronic wounds. In this paper, the interactions of three bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) with electrospun polystyrene meshes were investigated. Bacterial response to meshes with different fiber diameters was assessed through a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Experiments included attachment studies in liquid medium but also directly onto agar plates; the latter was aimed at mimicking a chronic wound environment. Fiber diameter was shown to affect the ability of bacteria to proliferate within the fibrous networks, depending on cell size and shape. The highest proliferation rates occurred when fiber diameter was close to the bacterial size. Nanofibers were found to induce conformational changes of rod shaped bacteria, limiting the colonization process and inducing cell death. The data suggest that simply tuning the morphological properties of electrospun fibers may be one strategy used to control biofilm formation within wound dressings.

  2. Lubricin: a novel means to decrease bacterial adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Aninwene, George E; Abadian, Pegah N; Ravi, Vishnu; Taylor, Erik N; Hall, Douglas M; Mei, Amy; Jay, Gregory D; Goluch, Edgar D; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the ability of lubricin (LUB) to prevent bacterial attachment and proliferation on model tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. The findings from this study indicated that LUB was able to reduce the attachment and growth of Staphylococcus aureus on tissue culture polystyrene over the course of 24 h by approximately 13.9% compared to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-soaked control. LUB also increased S. aureus lag time (the period of time between the introduction of bacteria to a new environment and their exponential growth) by approximately 27% compared to a PBS-soaked control. This study also indicated that vitronectin (VTN), a protein homologous to LUB, reduced bacterial S. aureus adhesion and growth on tissue culture polystyrene by approximately 11% compared to a PBS-soaked control. VTN also increased the lag time of S. aureus by approximately 43%, compared to a PBS-soaked control. Bovine submaxillary mucin was studied because there are similarities between it and the center mucin-like domain of LUB. Results showed that the reduction of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis proliferation on mucin coated surfaces was not as substantial as that seen with LUB. In summary, this study provided the first evidence that LUB reduced the initial adhesion and growth of both S. aureus and S. epidermidis on a model surface to suppress biofilm formation. These reductions in initial bacteria adhesion and proliferation can be beneficial for medical implants and, although requiring more study, can lead to drastically improved patient outcomes.

  3. Lubricin: A novel means to decrease bacterial adhesion and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Aninwene, George E.; Abadian, Pegah N.; Ravi, Vishnu; Taylor, Erik N.; Hall, Douglas M.; Mei, Amy; Jay, Gregory D.; Goluch, Edgar D.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of lubricin (LUB) to prevent bacterial attachment and proliferation on model tissue culture polystyrene surfaces. The findings from this study indicated that LUB was able to reduce the attachment and growth of Staphylococcus aureus on tissue culture polystyrene over the course of 24 h by approximately 13.9% compared to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-soaked control. LUB also increased S. aureus lag time (the period of time between the introduction of bacteria to a new environment and their exponential growth) by approximately 27% compared to a PBS-soaked control. This study also indicated that vitronectin (VTN), a protein homologous to LUB, reduced bacterial S. aureus adhesion and growth on tissue culture polystyrene by approximately 11% compared to a PBS-soaked control. VTN also increased the lag time of S. aureus by approximately 43%, compared to a PBS-soaked control. Bovine submaxillary mucin was studied because there are similarities between it and the center mucin-like domain of LUB. Results showed that the reduction of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis proliferation on mucin coated surfaces was not as substantial as that seen with LUB. In summary, this study provided the first evidence that LUB reduced the initial adhesion and growth of both S. aureus and S. epidermidis on a model surface to suppress biofilm formation. These reductions in initial bacteria adhesion and proliferation can be beneficial for medical implants and, although requiring more study, can lead to drastically improved patient outcomes. PMID:24737699

  4. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jester, James V.; Brown, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:23084144

  5. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Brown, Donald J

    2012-10-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction.

  6. Pancreatic cancer–associated retinoblastoma 1 dysfunction enables TGF-β to promote proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gore, A. Jesse; Deitz, Samantha L.; Palam, Lakshmi Reddy; Craven, Kelly E.; Korc, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is often associated with overexpression of TGF-β. Given its tumor suppressor functions, it is unclear whether TGF-β is a valid therapeutic target for PDAC. Here, we found that proliferating pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) from human PDAC patients and multiple murine models of PDAC (mPDAC) often exhibit abundant levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma 1 (RB) and Smad2. TGF-β1 treatment enhanced proliferation of PCCs isolated from KrasG12D-driven mPDAC that lacked RB (KRC cells). This mitogenic effect was abrogated by pharmacological inhibition of type I TGF-β receptor kinase, combined inhibition of MEK/Src or MEK/PI3K, and restoration of RB expression. TGF-β1 promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion, Smad2/3 phosphorylation, Src activation, Wnt reporter activity, and Smad-dependent upregulation of Wnt7b in KRC cells. Importantly, TGF-β1–induced mitogenesis was markedly attenuated by inhibition of Wnt secretion. In an in vivo syngeneic orthotopic model, inhibition of TGF-β signaling suppressed KRC cell proliferation, tumor growth, stroma formation, EMT, metastasis, ascites formation, and Wnt7b expression, and markedly prolonged survival. Together, these data indicate that RB dysfunction converts TGF-β to a mitogen that activates known oncogenic signaling pathways and upregulates Wnt7b, which synergize to promote PCC invasion, survival, and mitogenesis. Furthermore, this study suggests that concomitantly targeting TGF-β and Wnt7b signaling in PDAC may disrupt these aberrant pathways, which warrants further evaluation in preclinical models. PMID:24334458

  7. Loss of COX5B inhibits proliferation and promotes senescence via mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shui-Ping; Sun, He-Fen; Jiang, Hong-Lin; Li, Liang-Dong; Hu, Xin; Xu, Xiao-En; Jin, Wei

    2015-12-22

    COX5B, a peripheral subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, has previously been reported to maintain the stability of this complex. However, its functions and mechanisms involved in breast cancer progression remain unclear. Here, by performing SILAC assays in breast cancer cell models and detecting COX5B expression in tissues, we found that COX5B expression was elevated in breast cancer. Down-regulation of COX5B in breast cancer cell lines can suppress cell proliferation and induced cell senescence which was accompanied by elevating production of IL-8 and other cytokines. Interestingly, conditioned medium from COX5B knockdown cells could promote breast cancer cell migration. Mechanistic studies reveal that COX5B silence induces an increase in production of ROS, depolarization of MMP and a decrease in ATP. What's more, silence of COX5B leads to metabolic disorders, such as increased glucose uptake and decreased lactate secretion. Collectively, our study shows that loss of COX5B induces mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequently leads to cell growth suppression and cell senescence. Cytokines such as IL-8 secreted by senescent cells may in turn alter the microenvironment which could enhance cell migration. These findings may provide a novel paradigm for the treatment which combined anti-cancer drugs with particular cytokine inhibitors such as IL-8 blockers.

  8. Dysfunction of nucleus accumbens-1 activates cellular senescence and inhibits tumor cell proliferation and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hori, Tsukasa; Huber-Keener, Kathryn J; Zhang, Li; Yap, Kai Lee; Liu, David; Shantz, Lisa; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Shih, Ie-Ming; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Nucleus accumbens-1 (NAC1), a nuclear factor belonging to the BTB/POZ gene family, has emerging roles in cancer. We report here that NAC1 acts as a negative regulator of cellular senescence in transformed and nontransformed cells, and dysfunction of NAC1 induces senescence and inhibits its oncogenic potential. We show that NAC1 deficiency markedly activates senescence and inhibits proliferation in tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of γ-irradiation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts from NAC1 knockout mice, following infection with a Ras virus, NAC1-/- cells undergo significantly more senescence and are either nontransformed or less transformed in vitro and less tumorigenic in vivo when compared with NAC1+/+ cells. Furthermore, we show that the NAC1-caused senescence blunting is mediated by ΔNp63, which exerts its effect on senescence through p21, and that NAC1 activates transcription of ΔNp63 under stressful conditions. Our results not only reveal a previously unrecognized function of NAC1, the molecular pathway involved and its impact on pathogenesis of tumor initiation and development, but also identify a novel senescence regulator that may be exploited as a potential target for cancer prevention and treatment.

  9. Bacterial Folates Provide an Exogenous Signal for C. elegans Germline Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Snehal N; Mukherjee, Madhumati; Vagasi, Alexandra S; Bi, Gaofeng; Rahman, Mohammad M; Nguyen, Christine Q; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-07-11

    Here we describe an in vitro primary culture system for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells. This culture system was used to identify a bacterial folate as a positive regulator of germ cell proliferation. Folates are a family of B-complex vitamins that function in one-carbon metabolism to allow the de novo synthesis of amino acids and nucleosides. We show that germ cell proliferation is stimulated by the folate 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun both in vitro and in animals. Other folates that can act as vitamins to rescue folate deficiency lack this germ cell stimulatory activity. The bacterial folate precursor dihydropteroate also promotes germ cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, despite its inability to promote one-carbon metabolism. The folate receptor homolog FOLR-1 is required for the stimulation of germ cells by 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun and dihydropteroate. This work defines a folate and folate-related compound as exogenous signals to modulate germ cell proliferation. PMID:27404357

  10. Bacterial Folates Provide an Exogenous Signal for C. elegans Germline Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Snehal N; Mukherjee, Madhumati; Vagasi, Alexandra S; Bi, Gaofeng; Rahman, Mohammad M; Nguyen, Christine Q; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-07-11

    Here we describe an in vitro primary culture system for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells. This culture system was used to identify a bacterial folate as a positive regulator of germ cell proliferation. Folates are a family of B-complex vitamins that function in one-carbon metabolism to allow the de novo synthesis of amino acids and nucleosides. We show that germ cell proliferation is stimulated by the folate 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun both in vitro and in animals. Other folates that can act as vitamins to rescue folate deficiency lack this germ cell stimulatory activity. The bacterial folate precursor dihydropteroate also promotes germ cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, despite its inability to promote one-carbon metabolism. The folate receptor homolog FOLR-1 is required for the stimulation of germ cells by 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun and dihydropteroate. This work defines a folate and folate-related compound as exogenous signals to modulate germ cell proliferation.

  11. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  12. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  13. Vibrio vulnificus Secretes an Insulin-degrading Enzyme That Promotes Bacterial Proliferation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Ik-Jung; Wen, Yancheng; Park, Na-Young; Park, Jinyoung; Lee, Keun-Woo; Koh, Ara; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2015-07-24

    We describe a novel insulin-degrading enzyme, SidC, that contributes to the proliferation of the human bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus in a mouse model. SidC is phylogenetically distinct from other known insulin-degrading enzymes and is expressed and secreted specifically during host infection. Purified SidC causes a significant decrease in serum insulin levels and an increase in blood glucose levels in mice. A comparison of mice infected with wild type V. vulnificus or an isogenic sidC-deletion strain showed that wild type bacteria proliferated to higher levels. Additionally, hyperglycemia leads to increased proliferation of V. vulnificus in diabetic mice. Consistent with these observations, the sid operon was up-regulated in response to low glucose levels through binding of the cAMP-receptor protein (CRP) complex to a region upstream of the operon. We conclude that glucose levels are important for the survival of V. vulnificus in the host, and that this pathogen uses SidC to actively manipulate host endocrine signals, making the host environment more favorable for bacterial survival and growth.

  14. Bacterial penetration and proliferation in root canal dentinal tubules after applying dentin adhesives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Assouline, L S; Fuss, Z; Mazor, Y; Weiss, E I

    2001-06-01

    Endodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating infection and preventing bacterial regrowth in the root canal and dentinal tubules. In the present study the ability of two dentin adhesives to prevent bacterial penetration and subsequent proliferation in dentinal tubules was evaluated. Cylindrical root specimens prepared from freshly extracted bovine teeth were used in an in vitro model of dentinal tubule infection. After removal of the smear layer the intracanal dentinal tubules of the specimens were acid-etched and treated with either Gluma or EBS. Untreated specimens served as controls. Specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated in Brain Heart Infusion for 21 days. Powder dentin samples obtained from within the canal lumina, using ISO 025 to 033 burs, were examined for the presence of vital bacteria by inoculating on agar plates and counting colony-forming units. A significant difference was found between the experimental groups and the untreated group. After application with Gluma specimens showed the least viable bacteria in dentinal tubules. Data suggested that dentin adhesives reduced bacterial invasion into dentin and therefore have a potential role in endodontic treatment.

  15. Origin and Proliferation of Multiple-Drug Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Cohen, Ted; Grad, Yonatan H.; Hanage, William P.; O'Brien, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Many studies report the high prevalence of multiply drug-resistant (MDR) strains. Because MDR infections are often significantly harder and more expensive to treat, they represent a growing public health threat. However, for different pathogens, different underlying mechanisms are traditionally used to explain these observations, and it is unclear whether each bacterial taxon has its own mechanism(s) for multidrug resistance or whether there are common mechanisms between distantly related pathogens. In this review, we provide a systematic overview of the causes of the excess of MDR infections and define testable predictions made by each hypothetical mechanism, including experimental, epidemiological, population genomic, and other tests of these hypotheses. Better understanding the cause(s) of the excess of MDR is the first step to rational design of more effective interventions to prevent the origin and/or proliferation of MDR. PMID:25652543

  16. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asit; Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Patra, Ashok K; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30mgL(-1) metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10mgL(-1)), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72-78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP-bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil.

  17. SB-RA-2001 Inhibits Bacterial Proliferation by Targeting FtsZ Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    FtsZ has been recognized as a promising antimicrobial drug target because of its vital role in bacterial cell division. In this work, we found that a taxane SB-RA-2001 inhibited the proliferation of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 38 and 60 μM, respectively. Cell lengths of these microorganisms increased remarkably in the presence of SB-RA-2001, indicating that it inhibits bacterial cytokinesis. SB-RA-2001 perturbed the formation of the FtsZ ring in B. subtilis 168 cells and also affected the localization of the late cell division protein, DivIVA, at the midcell position. Flow cytometric analysis of the SB-RA-2001-treated cells indicated that the compound did not affect the duplication of DNA in B. subtilis 168 cells. Further, SB-RA-2001 treatment did not affect the localization of the chromosomal partitioning protein, Spo0J, along the two ends of the nucleoids and also had no discernible effect on the nucleoid segregation in B. subtilis 168 cells. The agent also did not appear to perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis 168 cells. In vitro, SB-RA-2001 bound to FtsZ with modest affinity, promoted the assembly and bundling of FtsZ protofilaments, and reduced the GTPase activity of FtsZ. GTP did not inhibit the binding of SB-RA-2001 to FtsZ, suggesting that it does not bind to the GTP binding site on FtsZ. A computational analysis indicated that SB-RA-2001 binds to FtsZ in the cleft region between the C-terminal domain and helix H7, and the binding site of SB-RA-2001 on FtsZ resembled that of PC190723, a well-characterized inhibitor of FtsZ. The findings collectively suggested that SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting the assembly dynamics of FtsZ, and this can be exploited further to develop potent FtsZ-targeted antimicrobials. PMID:24749867

  18. The FBPase Encoding Gene glpX Is Required for Gluconeogenesis, Bacterial Proliferation and Division In Vivo of Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Liangdong; Wang, Chuan; Li, Yang; Gao, Qian; Yang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have been identified as important carbon sources for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to utilize in vivo. Thus gluconeogenesis bears a key role for Mtb to survive and replicate in host. A rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) is encoded by the gene glpX. The functions of glpX were studied in M. marinum, a closely related species to Mtb. The glpX deletion strain (ΔglpX) displayed altered gluconeogenesis, attenuated virulence, and altered bacterial proliferation. Metabolic profiles indicate an accumulation of the FBPase substrate, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP) and altered gluconeogenic flux when ΔglpX is cultivated in a gluconeogenic carbon substrate, acetate. In both macrophages and zebrafish, the proliferation of ΔglpX was halted, resulting in dramatically attenuated virulence. Intracellular ΔglpX exhibited an elongated morphology, which was also observed when ΔglpX was grown in a gluconeogenic carbon source. This elongated morphology is also supported by the observation of unseparated multi-nucleoid cell, indicating that a complete mycobacterial division in vivo is correlated with intact gluconeogenesis. Together, our results indicate that glpX has essential functions in gluconeogenesis, and plays an indispensable role in bacterial proliferation in vivo and virulence of M. marinum. PMID:27233038

  19. Tagging frogs with passive integrated transponders causes disruption of the cutaneous bacterial community and proliferation of opportunistic fungi.

    PubMed

    Antwis, Rachael E; Garcia, Gerardo; Fidgett, Andrea L; Preziosi, Richard F

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic bacterial communities play a key role in protecting amphibians from infectious diseases including chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Events that lead to the disruption of the bacterial community may have implications for the susceptibility of amphibians to such diseases. Amphibians are often marked both in the wild and in captivity for a variety of reasons, and although existing literature indicates that marking techniques have few negative effects, the response of cutaneous microbial communities has not yet been investigated. Here we determine the effects of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging on culturable cutaneous microbial communities of captive Morelet's tree frogs (Agalychnis moreletii) and assess the isolated bacterial strains for anti-B. dendrobatidis activity in vitro. We find that PIT tagging causes a major disruption to the bacterial community associated with the skin of frogs (∼12-fold increase in abundance), as well as a concurrent proliferation in resident fungi (up to ∼200-fold increase). Handling also caused a disruption the bacterial community, although to a lesser extent than PIT tagging. However, the effects of both tagging and handling were temporary, and after 2 weeks, the bacterial communities were similar to their original compositions. We also identify two bacterial strains that inhibit B. dendrobatidis, one of which increased in abundance on PIT-tagged frogs at 1 day postmarking, while the other was unaffected. These results show that PIT tagging has previously unobserved consequences for cutaneous microbial communities of frogs and may be particularly relevant for studies that intend to use PIT tagging to identify individuals involved in trials to develop probiotic treatments. PMID:24878599

  20. Tagging Frogs with Passive Integrated Transponders Causes Disruption of the Cutaneous Bacterial Community and Proliferation of Opportunistic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Gerardo; Fidgett, Andrea L.; Preziosi, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic bacterial communities play a key role in protecting amphibians from infectious diseases including chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Events that lead to the disruption of the bacterial community may have implications for the susceptibility of amphibians to such diseases. Amphibians are often marked both in the wild and in captivity for a variety of reasons, and although existing literature indicates that marking techniques have few negative effects, the response of cutaneous microbial communities has not yet been investigated. Here we determine the effects of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging on culturable cutaneous microbial communities of captive Morelet's tree frogs (Agalychnis moreletii) and assess the isolated bacterial strains for anti-B. dendrobatidis activity in vitro. We find that PIT tagging causes a major disruption to the bacterial community associated with the skin of frogs (∼12-fold increase in abundance), as well as a concurrent proliferation in resident fungi (up to ∼200-fold increase). Handling also caused a disruption the bacterial community, although to a lesser extent than PIT tagging. However, the effects of both tagging and handling were temporary, and after 2 weeks, the bacterial communities were similar to their original compositions. We also identify two bacterial strains that inhibit B. dendrobatidis, one of which increased in abundance on PIT-tagged frogs at 1 day postmarking, while the other was unaffected. These results show that PIT tagging has previously unobserved consequences for cutaneous microbial communities of frogs and may be particularly relevant for studies that intend to use PIT tagging to identify individuals involved in trials to develop probiotic treatments. PMID:24878599

  1. A small volatile bacterial molecule triggers mitochondrial dysfunction in murine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Constantinou, Caterina; Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Lee, Sangseok; Mindrinos, Michael; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria integrate distinct signals that reflect specific threats to the host, including infection, tissue damage, and metabolic dysfunction; and play a key role in insulin resistance. We have found that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing infochemical, 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA), produced during acute and chronic infection in human tissues, including in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, acts as an interkingdom immunomodulatory signal that facilitates pathogen persistence, and host tolerance to infection. Transcriptome results have led to the hypothesis that 2-AA causes further harm to the host by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. As normal skeletal muscle function is essential to survival, and is compromised in many chronic illnesses, including infections and CF-associated muscle wasting, we here determine the global effects of 2-AA on skeletal muscle using high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton ((1)H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, in vivo (31)P NMR, whole-genome expression analysis and functional studies. Our results show that 2-AA when injected into mice, induced a biological signature of insulin resistance as determined by (1)H NMR analysis-, and dramatically altered insulin signaling, glucose transport, and mitochondrial function. Genes including Glut4, IRS1, PPAR-γ, PGC1 and Sirt1 were downregulated, whereas uncoupling protein UCP3 was up-regulated, in accordance with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although 2-AA did not alter high-energy phosphates or pH by in vivo (31)P NMR analysis, it significantly reduced the rate of ATP synthesis. This affect was corroborated by results demonstrating down-regulation of the expression of genes involved in energy production and muscle function, and was further validated by muscle function studies. Together, these results further demonstrate that 2-AA, acts as a mediator of interkingdom modulation, and likely effects insulin resistance associated with a

  2. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  3. An Extracellular Bacterial Pathogen Modulates Host Metabolism to Regulate its Own Sensing and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Moshe; Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Hertzog, Baruch B.; Ravins, Miriam; Dov, Eran; McIver, Kevin S.; Le Breton, Yoann S.; Zhou, Yiting; Youting, Catherine Cheng; Hanski, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Successful infection depends on the ability of the pathogen to gain nutrients from the host. The extracellular pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a vast array of human diseases. By using the quorum sensing sil system as a reporter, we found that during adherence to host cells GAS delivers streptolysin toxins creating endoplasmic reticulum stress. This in turn, increases asparagine (ASN) synthetase expression and the production of ASN. The released ASN is sensed by the bacteria altering the expression of ~17% of GAS genes of which about 1/3 are dependent on the two-component system TrxSR. The expression of the streptolysin toxins is strongly upregulated whereas genes linked to proliferation are downregulated in ASN absence. Asparaginase a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, arrests GAS growth in human blood and blocks GAS proliferation in a mouse model of human bacteremia. These results delineate a pathogenic pathway and propose a new therapeutic strategy against GAS infections. PMID:24439371

  4. TRF2 dysfunction elicits DNA damage responses associated with senescence in proliferating neural cells and differentiation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Opresko, Patricia L; Xu, Xiangru; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Mattson, Mark P

    2006-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of chromosomes that consist of tandem repeats of the DNA sequence TTAGGG and several proteins that protect the DNA and regulate the plasticity of the telomeres. The telomere-associated protein TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is critical for the control of telomere structure and function; TRF2 dysfunction results in the exposure of the telomere ends and activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasin mutated)-mediated DNA damage response. Recent findings suggest that telomere attrition can cause senescence or apoptosis of mitotic cells, but the function of telomeres in differentiated neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the impact of telomere dysfunction via TRF2 inhibition in neurons (primary embryonic hippocampal neurons) and mitotic neural cells (astrocytes and neuroblastoma cells). We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction induced by adenovirus-mediated expression of dominant-negative TRF2 (DN-TRF2) triggers a DNA damage response involving the formation of nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX and activated ATM in each cell type. In mitotic neural cells DN-TRF2 induced activation of both p53 and p21 and senescence (as indicated by an up-regulation of beta-galactosidase). In contrast, in neurons DN-TRF2 increased p21, but neither p53 nor beta-galactosidase was induced. In addition, TRF2 inhibition enhanced the morphological, molecular and biophysical differentiation of hippocampal neurons. These findings demonstrate divergent molecular and physiological responses to telomere dysfunction in mitotic neural cells and neurons, indicate a role for TRF2 in regulating neuronal differentiation, and suggest a potential therapeutic application of inhibition of TRF2 function in the treatment of neural tumors. PMID:16539655

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration elicited by a bacterial metabolite in a C. elegans Parkinson's model.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Martinez, B A; Berkowitz, L A; Caldwell, G A; Caldwell, K A

    2014-01-09

    Genetic and idiopathic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by loss of dopamine (DA) neurons and typically the formation of protein inclusions containing the alpha-synuclein (α-syn) protein. Environmental contributors to PD remain largely unresolved but toxins, such as paraquat or rotenone, represent well-studied enhancers of susceptibility. Previously, we reported that a bacterial metabolite produced by Streptomyces venezuelae caused age- and dose-dependent DA neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans and human SH-SY5Y neurons. We hypothesized that this metabolite from a common soil bacterium could enhance neurodegeneration in combination with PD susceptibility gene mutations or toxicants. Here, we report that exposure to the metabolite in C. elegans DA neurons expressing human α-syn or LRRK2 G2019S exacerbates neurodegeneration. Using the PD toxin models 6-hydroxydopamine and rotenone, we demonstrate that exposure to more than one environmental risk factor has an additive effect in eliciting DA neurodegeneration. Evidence suggests that PD-related toxicants cause mitochondrial dysfunction, thus we examined the impact of the metabolite on mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress. An ex vivo assay of C. elegans extracts revealed that this metabolite causes excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Likewise, enhanced expression of a superoxide dismutase reporter was observed in vivo. The anti-oxidant probucol fully rescued metabolite-induced DA neurodegeneration, as well. Interestingly, the stress-responsive FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 was activated following exposure to the metabolite. Through further mechanistic analysis, we discerned the mitochondrial defects associated with metabolite exposure included adenosine triphosphate impairment and upregulation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Metabolite-induced toxicity in DA neurons was rescued by complex I activators. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of mitochondrial

  6. BT-benzo-29 inhibits bacterial cell proliferation by perturbing FtsZ assembly.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shashikant; Jindal, Bhavya; Kunal, Kishore; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2015-10-01

    We have identified a potent antibacterial agent N-(4-sec-butylphenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxamide (BT-benzo-29) from a library of benzimidazole derivatives that stalled bacterial division by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. A short (5 min) exposure of BT-benzo-29 disassembled the cytokinetic Z-ring in Bacillus subtilis cells without affecting the cell length and nucleoids. BT-benzo-29 also perturbed the localization of early and late division proteins such as FtsA, ZapA and SepF at the mid-cell. Further, BT-benzo-29 bound to FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 24 ± 3 μm and inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of purified FtsZ. A docking analysis suggested that BT-benzo-29 may bind to FtsZ at the C-terminal domain near the T7 loop. BT-benzo-29 displayed significantly weaker inhibitory effects on the assembly and GTPase activity of two mutants (L272A and V275A) of FtsZ supporting the prediction of the docking analysis. Further, BT-benzo-29 did not appear to inhibit DNA duplication and nucleoid segregation and it did not perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis cells. The results suggested that BT-benzo-29 exerts its potent antibacterial activity by inhibiting FtsZ assembly. Interestingly, BT-benzo-29 did not affect the membrane integrity of mammalian red blood cells. BT-benzo-29 bound to tubulin with a much weaker affinity than FtsZ and exerted significantly weaker effects on mammalian cells than on the bacterial cells indicating that the compound may have a strong antibacterial potential.

  7. Selenium nanoparticles incorporated into titania nanotubes inhibit bacterial growth and macrophage proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Golshan, Negar H; Deng, Xuliang; Hickey, Daniel J; Zeimer, Katherine; Li, Hongyi; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-08-25

    Since implants often fail due to infection and uncontrolled inflammatory responses, we designed an in vitro study to investigate the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) incorporated with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). Selenium incorporation was achieved by the reaction of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) with glutathione (GSH) under a vacuum in the presence of TNTs. Two types of bacteria and macrophages were cultured on the samples to determine their respective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The results showed that the TNT samples incorporating SeNPs (TNT-Se) inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus compared to unmodified TNTs, albeit the SeNP concentration still needs to be optimized for maximal effect. At their maximum effect, the TNT-Se samples reduced the density of E. coli by 94.6% and of S. aureus by 89.6% compared to titanium controls. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this effect, the expression of six E. coli genes were tracked using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that SeNPs weakened E. coli membranes (ompA and ompF were down-regulated), decreased the function of adhesion-mediating proteins (csgA and csgG were progressively down-regulated with increasing SeNP content), and induced the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ahpF was up-regulated). Moreover, TNT-Se samples inhibited the proliferation of macrophages, indicating that they can be used to control the inflammatory response and even prevent chronic inflammation, a condition that often leads to implant failure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SeNP-TNTs display antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties that are promising for improving the performance of titanium-based implants for numerous orthopedic and dental applications.

  8. Selenium nanoparticles incorporated into titania nanotubes inhibit bacterial growth and macrophage proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Golshan, Negar H; Deng, Xuliang; Hickey, Daniel J; Zeimer, Katherine; Li, Hongyi; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-08-25

    Since implants often fail due to infection and uncontrolled inflammatory responses, we designed an in vitro study to investigate the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) incorporated with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). Selenium incorporation was achieved by the reaction of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) with glutathione (GSH) under a vacuum in the presence of TNTs. Two types of bacteria and macrophages were cultured on the samples to determine their respective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The results showed that the TNT samples incorporating SeNPs (TNT-Se) inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus compared to unmodified TNTs, albeit the SeNP concentration still needs to be optimized for maximal effect. At their maximum effect, the TNT-Se samples reduced the density of E. coli by 94.6% and of S. aureus by 89.6% compared to titanium controls. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this effect, the expression of six E. coli genes were tracked using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that SeNPs weakened E. coli membranes (ompA and ompF were down-regulated), decreased the function of adhesion-mediating proteins (csgA and csgG were progressively down-regulated with increasing SeNP content), and induced the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ahpF was up-regulated). Moreover, TNT-Se samples inhibited the proliferation of macrophages, indicating that they can be used to control the inflammatory response and even prevent chronic inflammation, a condition that often leads to implant failure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SeNP-TNTs display antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties that are promising for improving the performance of titanium-based implants for numerous orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:27533297

  9. Nano-Mg(OH)2-induced proliferation inhibition and dysfunction of human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells through caveolin-1-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ning; Han, Lei; Pan, XiaoHong; Su, Le; Jiang, Zheng; Lin, Zhang; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, ShangLi; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, BaoXiang; Miao, JunYing

    2015-02-01

    Nano-Mg(OH)2 is efficiently used in pollutant adsorption and removal due to its high adsorption capability, low-cost, and recyclability. A recent research from our group showed that Mg(OH)2 nanoflakes are not evidently internalized by cancer cells and are not cytotoxic. But the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of nano-Mg(OH)2 in a normal biological system are largely unclear. Nanoparticles could affect the function of endothelial cells, and endothelial dysfunction represents an early sign of lesion within the vasculature. Here, we applied the human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) as an in vitro model of the endothelium to study the cytotoxicity of nano-Mg(OH)2. Our results showed that nano-Mg(OH)2 at 200 μg/ml impaired proliferation and induced dysfunction of HUVECs, but did not result in cell necrosis and apoptosis. Transmission electron microscopy images and immunofluorescence results showed that the nano-Mg(OH)2 could enter HUVECs through caveolin-1-mediated endocytosis. Nano-Mg(OH)2 at high concentrations decreased the level of caveolin-1 and increased the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), thus leading to the production of excess nitric oxide (NO). In this work, we provide the cell damage concentrations of nano-Mg(OH)2 nanoparticles, and we propose a mechanism of injury induced by nano-Mg(OH)2 in HUVECs.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis dysregulates MMP/TIMP balance to drive rapid cavitation and unrestrained bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, André; Luna, Brian; Larsson, Christer; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Orandle, Marlene; Bock, Kevin W.; Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Molura, Daniel J.; Marshall, John; Burns, Jay; Winglee, Kathryn; Ahidjo, Bintou Ahmadou; Cheung, Laurene S.; Klunk, Mariah; Jain, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T. G.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) often presents with advanced pulmonary disease, including irreversible lung damage and cavities. Cavitary pathology contributes to antibiotic failure, transmission, morbidity and mortality. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-1 are implicated in TB pathogenesis. We explored the mechanisms relating MMP/TIMP imbalance to cavity formation in a modified rabbit model of cavitary TB. Our model results in consistent progression of consolidation to human-like cavities (100% by day 28) with resultant bacillary burdens (>107 CFU/g) far greater than those found in matched granulomatous tissue (105 CFU/g). Using a novel, breath-hold computerized tomography scanning and image analysis protocol. We show that cavities develop rapidly from areas of densely consolidated tissue. Radiological change correlated with a decrease in functional lung tissue as estimated by changes in lung density during controlled pulmonary expansion (R2=0.6356, p<0.0001). We demonstrated that the expression of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) is specifically greater in cavitary compared to granulomatous lesions (p<0.01), and that TIMP-3 significantly decreases at the cavity surface. Our findings demonstrate that an MMP-1/TIMP imbalance, is associated with the progression of consolidated regions to cavities containing very high bacterial burdens. Our model provided mechanistic insight, correlating with human disease at the pathological, microbiological and molecular levels,. It also provides a strategy to investigate therapeutics in the context of complex TB pathology. We used these findings to predict a MMP/TIMP balance in active TB; and confirmed this in human plasma, revealing the potential of MMP/TIMP levels as key components of a diagnostic matrix aimed at distinguishing active from latent TB (PPV=92.9%; 95%CI 66.1–99.8%, NPV=85.6%; 95%CI 77.0–91.9%). PMID:25186281

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis dysregulates MMP/TIMP balance to drive rapid cavitation and unrestrained bacterial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kübler, André; Luna, Brian; Larsson, Christer; Ammerman, Nicole C; Andrade, Bruno B; Orandle, Marlene; Bock, Kevin W; Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Mollura, Daniel J; Marshall, John; Burns, Jay; Winglee, Kathryn; Ahidjo, Bintou Ahmadou; Cheung, Laurene S; Klunk, Mariah; Jain, Sanjay K; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T G; Bishai, William R

    2015-02-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) often presents with advanced pulmonary disease, including irreversible lung damage and cavities. Cavitary pathology contributes to antibiotic failure, transmission, morbidity and mortality. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-1, are implicated in TB pathogenesis. We explored the mechanisms relating MMP/TIMP imbalance to cavity formation in a modified rabbit model of cavitary TB. Our model resulted in consistent progression of consolidation to human-like cavities (100% by day 28), with resultant bacillary burdens (>10(7) CFU/g) far greater than those found in matched granulomatous tissue (10(5) CFU/g). Using a novel, breath-hold computed tomography (CT) scanning and image analysis protocol, we showed that cavities developed rapidly from areas of densely consolidated tissue. Radiological change correlated with a decrease in functional lung tissue, as estimated by changes in lung density during controlled pulmonary expansion (R(2)  = 0.6356, p < 0.0001). We demonstrated that the expression of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) was specifically greater in cavitary compared to granulomatous lesions (p < 0.01), and that TIMP-3 significantly decreased at the cavity surface. Our findings demonstrated that an MMP-1/TIMP imbalance is associated with the progression of consolidated regions to cavities containing very high bacterial burdens. Our model provided mechanistic insight, correlating with human disease at the pathological, microbiological and molecular levels. It also provided a strategy to investigate therapeutics in the context of complex TB pathology. We used these findings to predict a MMP/TIMP balance in active TB and confirmed this in human plasma, revealing the potential of MMP/TIMP levels as key components of a diagnostic matrix aimed at distinguishing active from latent TB (PPV = 92.9%, 95% CI 66.1-99.8%, NPV = 85.6%; 95% CI 77.0-91.9%). PMID:25186281

  12. Reactivation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha is associated with contractile dysfunction in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Young, M E; Laws, F A; Goodwin, G W; Taegtmeyer, H

    2001-11-30

    In pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, the heart increases its reliance on glucose as a fuel while decreasing fatty acid oxidation. A key regulator of this substrate switching in the hypertrophied heart is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). We tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of PPARalpha is an essential component of cardiac hypertrophy at the levels of increased mass, gene expression, and metabolism by pharmacologically reactivating PPARalpha. Pressure overload (induced by constriction of the ascending aorta for 7 days in rats) resulted in cardiac hypertrophy, increased expression of fetal genes (atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal alpha-actin), decreased expression of PPARalpha and PPARalpha-regulated genes (medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4), and caused substrate switching (measured ex vivo in the isolated working heart preparation). Treatment of rats with the specific PPARalpha agonist WY-14,643 (8 days) did not affect the trophic response or atrial natriuretic factor induction to pressure overload. However, PPARalpha activation blocked skeletal alpha-actin induction, reversed the down-regulation of measured PPARalpha-regulated genes in the hypertrophied heart, and prevented substrate switching. This PPARalpha reactivation concomitantly resulted in severe depression of cardiac power and efficiency in the hypertrophied heart (measured ex vivo). Thus, PPARalpha down-regulation is essential for the maintenance of contractile function of the hypertrophied heart. PMID:11574533

  13. Antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} induces cerebellar amyloid-{beta} levels and motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Sun, Bing; Chen, Kui; Fan, Li; Wang, Zhao

    2009-07-03

    Recent evidences show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) is involved in the modulation of the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) cascade causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and treatment with PPAR{gamma} agonists protects against AD pathology. However, the function of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in A{beta} cascade and AD pathology remains unclear. In this study, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, GW9662, was injected into the fourth ventricle of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to inhibit PPAR{gamma} activity in cerebellum. The results show that inhibition of PPAR{gamma} significantly induced A{beta} levels in cerebellum and caused cerebellar motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, GW9662 treatment markedly decreased the cerebellar levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which is responsible for the cellular degradation of A{beta}. Since cerebellum is spared from significant A{beta} accumulation and neurotoxicity in AD patients and animal models, these findings suggest a crucial role of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in protection of cerebellum against AD pathology.

  14. Sendai Virus Induces Persistent Olfactory Dysfunction in a Murine Model of PVOD via Effects on Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, and Response to Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Pinto, Jayant M.; Cui, Xiaolan; Zhang, Henghui; Li, Li; Liu, Yulong; Wu, Chan; Wei, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral infection is a common cause of olfactory dysfunction. The complexities of studying post-viral olfactory loss in humans have impaired further progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Recently, evidence from clinical studies has implicated Parainfluenza virus 3 as a causal agent. An animal model of post viral olfactory disorders (PVOD) would allow better understanding of disease pathogenesis and represent a major advance in the field. Objective To develop a mouse model of PVOD by evaluating the effects of Sendai virus (SeV), the murine counterpart of Parainfluenza virus, on olfactory function and regenerative ability of the olfactory epithelium. Methods C57BL/6 mice (6–8 months old) were inoculated intranasally with SeV or ultraviolet (UV)-inactivated virus (UV-SeV). On days 3, 10, 15, 30 and 60 post-infection, olfactory epithelium was harvested and analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of S-phase nuclei. We also measured apoptosis by TUNEL assay and viral load by real-time PCR. The buried food test (BFT) was used to measure olfactory function of mice at day 60. In parallel, cultured murine olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) infected with SeV or UV-SeV were tested for odorant-mixture response by measuring changes in intracellular calcium concentrations indicated by fura-4 AM assay. Results Mice infected with SeV suffered from olfactory dysfunction, peaking on day 15, with no loss observed with UV-SeV. At 60 days, four out of 12 mice infected with SeV still had not recovered, with continued normal function in controls. Viral copies of SeV persisted in both the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB) for at least 60 days. At day 10 and after, both unit length labeling index (ULLI) of apoptosis and ULLI of proliferation in the SeV group was markedly less than the UV-SeV group. In primary cultured OSNs infected by SeV, the percentage of cells responding to mixed odors was markedly lower in the SeV group

  15. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  16. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans. PMID:27058607

  17. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans.

  18. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  19. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  20. Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activation, and insulin sensitivity are associated with physical function in functionally-limited older adults.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Price, Lori L; Chalé, Angela; Fielding, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Identification of mechanisms underlying physical function will be important for addressing the growing challenge that health care will face with physical disablement in the expanding aging population. Therefore, the goals of the current study were to use metabolic profiling to provide insight into biologic mechanisms that may underlie physical function by examining the association between baseline and the 6-month change in serum mass spectrometry-obtained amino acids, fatty acids, and acylcarnitines with baseline and the 6-month change in muscle strength (leg press one repetition maximum divided by total lean mass, LP/Lean), lower extremity function [short physical performance battery (SPPB)], and mobility (400 m gait speed, 400-m), in response to 6 months of a combined resistance exercise and nutritional supplementation (whey protein or placebo) intervention in functionally-limited older adults (SPPB ≤ 10; 70-85 years, N = 73). Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism (cinnamoylglycine, phenol sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, 3-indoxyl sulfate, serotonin, N-methylproline, hydrocinnamate, dimethylglycine, trans-urocanate, valerate) that are altered in response to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) activation (α-hydroxyisocaproate, α-hydroxyisovalerate, 2-hydroxy-3-methylvalerate, indolelactate, serotonin, 2-hydroxypalmitate, glutarylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, cinnamoylglycine) and that are related to insulin sensitivity (monounsaturated fatty acids: 5-dodecenoate, myristoleate, palmitoleate; γ-glutamylamino acids: γ-glutamylglutamine, γ-glutamylalanine, γ-glutamylmethionine, γ-glutamyltyrosine; branched-chain amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, valine) were associated with function at baseline, with the 6-month change in function or were identified in backward elimination regression predictive models. Collectively, these data suggest that gut microbial metabolism, PPAR-α activation, and insulin sensitivity may be involved in

  1. Genes encoding putative effector proteins of the type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 are required for bacterial virulence and proliferation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hensel, M; Shea, J E; Waterman, S R; Mundy, R; Nikolaus, T; Banks, G; Vazquez-Torres, A; Gleeson, C; Fang, F C; Holden, D W

    1998-10-01

    The type III secretion system of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) is required for systemic infection of this pathogen in mice. Cloning and sequencing of a central region of SPI-2 revealed the presence of genes encoding putative chaperones and effector proteins of the secretion system. The predicted products of the sseB, sseC and sseD genes display weak but significant similarity to amino acid sequences of EspA, EspD and EspB, which are secreted by the type III secretion system encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. The transcriptional activity of an sseA::luc fusion gene was shown to be dependent on ssrA, which is required for the expression of genes encoding components of the secretion system apparatus. Strains carrying nonpolar mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC were severely attenuated in virulence, strains carrying mutations in sseF or sseG were weakly attenuated, and a strain with a mutation in sseE had no detectable virulence defect. These phenotypes were reflected in the ability of mutant strains to grow within a variety of macrophage cell types: strains carrying mutations in sseA, sseB or sseC failed to accumulate, whereas the growth rates of strains carrying mutations in sseE, sseF or sseG were only modestly reduced. These data suggest that, in vivo, one of the functions of the SPI-2 secretion system is to enable intracellular bacterial proliferation.

  2. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Co-Activator-1α Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-10-01

    Reduced telomere length with increasing age in dividing cells has been implicated in contributing to the pathologies of human aging, which include cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, through induction of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening results from the absence of telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain telomere length. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the protein subunit of telomerase, is expressed only transiently in a subset of adult somatic cells, which include stem cells and smooth muscle cells. A recent report from Xiong and colleagues demonstrates a pivotal role for the transcription co-factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) in maintaining TERT expression and preventing vascular senescence and atherosclerosis in mice. Ablation of PGC-1α reduced TERT expression and increased DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in shortened telomeres and vascular senescence. In the ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, forced expression of PGC-1α increased expression of TERT, extended telomeres, and reversed genomic DNA damage, vascular senescence, and the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1α and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1α. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1α expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases. However, further investigation is needed to identify whether ALA induces TERT in human cells, which cell types are susceptible, and whether such changes have clinical significance. PMID:26414604

  3. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  4. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  5. [Gonadal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tahara, R; Toma, Y; Yanaihara, T

    1997-11-01

    Function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is an essential factor for the maintenance of regular cycles in mature women. The disturbance of function of those organs causes gonadal dysfunction such as anovulation, amenorrhea and menstrual disorders. Therefore, the correct diagnosis for the assessment of CNS and ovarian function is clinically important to treat the patients those who have an menstrual disorders. In this review, the mechanism of normal gonadal cycles and the diagnostic method and the treatment of gonadal dysfunction are described.

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  7. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  8. Enhanced proliferation and activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with psoriasis vulgaris mediated by streptococcal antigen with bacterial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-Hua; Lu, Zhi-Yong; Shi, Ruo-Fei; Xue, Feng; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Pan, Meng; Yuan, Wei-Ru; Xu, Han; Li, Wei-Ping; Zheng, Jie

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcal infection is believed to have an intimate relationship with psoriasis, although the pathogenic role of streptococcal DNA is not fully understood. To gain a clearer understanding of these dynamics, we investigated the effect of streptococcal DNA on lymphocyte proliferation and activation as well as cytokine secretion in psoriasis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from psoriatic patients had higher proliferative responses upon stimulation by streptococcal antigen (SA) when compared with those from healthy individuals. Strikingly, this enhanced proliferation of PBMCs was attenuated after administration of SA treated with DNase-I. In addition, CD69 expression levels on T cells, including skin-homing lymphocyte cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen positive T cells, and IFN-alpha secretion by PBMCs were also attenuated in patients after stimulation with SA without nucleic acid (non-nucleic acid SA, non-NASA) compared with stimulation with untreated SA. However, activation marker CD86 expression levels on B cells as well as the secretion of IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha following stimulation with SA or non-NASA were not significantly altered. Interestingly, the attenuated T-cell activation and IFN-alpha secretion in psoriatic patients could be reconstituted when stimulated by non-NASA combined with synthetic CpG-A, but not when combined with synthetic CpG-B. This study demonstrates the integral function of SA, particularly streptococcal DNA, in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  9. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  10. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  11. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  12. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  13. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  14. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics.

  15. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  16. Endothelins & erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Robert; Sullivan, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common and a significant contributor to poor quality of life and psychosocial morbidity in men. Normal erectile function requires effective co-ordination between a number of complex neural pathways. Penile tumescence occurs in response to rapid arterial inflow to the corpora cavernosa with simultaneous venous outflow restriction due to expansion of the lacunar spaces. This process is under both central and local neuromediation. Endothelins are potent vasoconstrictor peptides that cause strong, slowly developing but sustained contraction of trabecular smooth muscles cells of the corpora cavernosa. Multiple mechanisms of action are proposed, including transmembrane calcium flux, mobilisation of inositol triphosphate sensitive intracellular calcium stores and calcium sensitisation through the Rho-Rho kinase pathway. The exact role of endothelins in the pathogenesis of ED currently remains unclear. Elevated endothelin-1 levels are found in patients with diabetes mellitus and this alone may be sufficient to cause ED. However, this is not borne out in clinical studies. The resultant elevated intracellular calcium may, however, modulate gene expression sufficiently to cause smooth muscle proliferation. Alternatively, alterations in endothelin receptor sensitivity in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension may enhance vasoconstrictor processes. Currently there is contradictory evidence for the role of endothelin receptor antagonists in ED. Animals studies suggest they inhibit corporal vasoconstriction, improve erectile function and protect against diabetes-induced smooth muscle apoptosis. However, the results of clinical studies in ED have been less promising. Uncertainty regarding the exact role of endothelin in penile erection hampers progress in this area. It is possible that the endothelin system may only be relevant to ED in certain conditions where global endothelial dysfunction exists (e.g. diabetes mellitus, systemic sclerosis) and

  17. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  18. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, M J

    1991-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction may arise more frequently in men and women with epilepsy than with other chronic illnesses, manifesting primarily as diminished sexual desire and potency. Studies using retrospective self-report of sexual attitude and behavior find an incidence of sexual dysfunction ranging from 14-66%. Sexual dysfunction may be more common in partial than in generalized epilepsies. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy may result from a disturbance in social or psychological factors affecting sexual responsiveness. Alternatively, epileptiform discharges may disrupt the function of structures mediating sexual behavior, particularly the limbic cortex, or alter the release of hypothalamic or pituitary hormones. Antiepileptic drugs modulate hormone release from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and may have direct inhibitory effects on sexual behavior. Evidence both supports and refutes each of these etiologies in the sexual dysfunction seen with epilepsy. Specific evaluation and treatment protocols for patients with sexual dysfunction are available.

  19. Erectile Dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major issue in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as it is observed in around 80 to 90 % of men with this connective tissue disease. ED greatly impacts the quality of life and should be actively addressed as a common complication. Whereas ED in the general population is usually associated with risk factors for atherosclerosis as well as cardiovascular disease, the main aetiology of ED in SSc is microangiopathic. In SSc, the blood flow is reduced in the small penile arteries due to corporal fibrosis and myointimal proliferation. There are no data on the prevention of ED in SSc. On-demand phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have little effect in improving erectile function, but daily or alternate day regimens of long-acting phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide a measurable, although often limited, benefit. When intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injections are also ineffective, the implantation of a penile prosthesis should be considered as an option. PMID:27402106

  20. Increased Production of Lysozyme Associated with Bacterial Proliferation in Barrett's Esophagitis, Chronic Gastritis, Gluten-induced Atrophic Duodenitis (Celiac Disease), Lymphocytic Colitis, Collagenous Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Colitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    The mucosa of the esophagus, the stomach, the small intestine, the large intestine and rectum are unremittingly challenged by adverse micro-environmental factors, such as ingested pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, and harsh secretions with digestive properties with disparate pH, as well as bacteria and secretions from upstream GI organs. Despite the apparently inauspicious mixture of secretions and bacteria, the normal GI mucosa retains a healthy state of cell renewal. To by-pass the tough microenvironment, the epithelia of the GI react by speeding-up cell exfoliation, by increasing peristalsis, eliminating bacteria through secretion of plasma cell-immunoglobulins and by increasing production of natural antibacterial enzymes (lysozyme) and host defense peptides (defensin-5). Lysozyme was recently found up-regulated in Barrett's esophagitis, in chronic gastritis, in gluten-induced atrophic duodenitis (celiac disease), in collagenous colitis, in lymphocytic colitis and in Crohn's colitis. This up-regulation is a response directed towards the special types of bacteria thriving in the microenvironment in each of the aforementioned clinical inflammatory maladies. The purpose of that up-regulation is to protect the mucosa affected by the ongoing chronic inflammation. Bacterial antibiotic resistance continues to exhaust our supply of effective antibiotics. The future challenge is how to solve the increasing menace of bacterial resistance to anti-bacterial drugs. Further research on natural anti-bacterial enzymes such as lysozyme, appears mandatory. PMID:26637845

  1. Germ Cells Need Folate to Proliferate.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy K

    2016-07-11

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Chaudhari and colleagues (2016) use a novel method to create an in vitro proliferative cell line from tumorous C. elegans germ cells, and in the process discover that bacterial folates act as signals for proliferation, independent of their roles as vitamins. PMID:27404353

  2. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  3. Insect endosymbiont proliferation is limited by lipid availability

    PubMed Central

    Herren, Jeremy K; Paredes, Juan C; Schüpfer, Fanny; Arafah, Karim; Bulet, Philippe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Spiroplasma poulsonii is a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont that is naturally associated with Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii resides extracellularly in the hemolymph, where it must acquire metabolites to sustain proliferation. In this study, we find that Spiroplasma proliferation specifically depletes host hemolymph diacylglyceride, the major lipid class transported by the lipoprotein, Lpp. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Lpp expression, which reduces the amount of circulating lipids, inhibits Spiroplasma proliferation demonstrating that bacterial proliferation requires hemolymph-lipids. Altogether, our study shows that an insect endosymbiont acquires specific lipidic metabolites from the transport lipoproteins in the hemolymph of its host. In addition, we show that the proliferation of this endosymbiont is limited by the availability of hemolymph lipids. This feature could limit endosymbiont over-proliferation under conditions of host nutrient limitation as lipid availability is strongly influenced by the nutritional state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02964.001 PMID:25027439

  4. Insect endosymbiont proliferation is limited by lipid availability.

    PubMed

    Herren, Jeremy K; Paredes, Juan C; Schüpfer, Fanny; Arafah, Karim; Bulet, Philippe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Spiroplasma poulsonii is a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont that is naturally associated with Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii resides extracellularly in the hemolymph, where it must acquire metabolites to sustain proliferation. In this study, we find that Spiroplasma proliferation specifically depletes host hemolymph diacylglyceride, the major lipid class transported by the lipoprotein, Lpp. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Lpp expression, which reduces the amount of circulating lipids, inhibits Spiroplasma proliferation demonstrating that bacterial proliferation requires hemolymph-lipids. Altogether, our study shows that an insect endosymbiont acquires specific lipidic metabolites from the transport lipoproteins in the hemolymph of its host. In addition, we show that the proliferation of this endosymbiont is limited by the availability of hemolymph lipids. This feature could limit endosymbiont over-proliferation under conditions of host nutrient limitation as lipid availability is strongly influenced by the nutritional state. PMID:25027439

  5. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  6. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  7. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  9. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  10. Velopharyngeal function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L

    1991-01-01

    The concepts regarding velopharyngeal function, the production of disordered nasalization, and the management of velopharyngeal dysfunction can be summarized as follows: 1. Although the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is critical to the control of oral-nasal balance, the configuration and function of the speech articulatory system as a whole will determine the degree of nasalized speech that is produced. 2. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be related to one or a combination of structural and motor limitations within the velopharyngeal mechanism. 3. There are two perceptual manifestations of velopharyngeal dysfunction. One is acoustic (nasality); the other is aerodynamic (nasal emission). For any given speaker, it is possible to hear both, and it is possible to hear one and not the other. 4. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be treated in a variety of ways. The method of treatment should be determined by the structural characteristics of the velopharyngeal mechanism and the speech-motor abilities of the patient.

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Meets Senescence.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Suchira; Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction are hallmarks of ageing, but until now their relationship has not been clear. Recent work by Wiley et al. shows that mitochondrial defects can cause a distinct senescence phenotype termed MiDAS (mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence). MiDAS has a specific secretome that is able to drive some of the aging phenotypes. These findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for treating age-related pathologies. PMID:26874922

  12. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed.

  13. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  14. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  15. Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Driver, P J; Lemp, M A

    1996-01-01

    Blepharitis is probably the most common disease entity seen in the general ophthalmologist's office. A significant proportion of these cases are secondary to meibomian gland disease. This review outlines our knowledge of the histopathology, lipid abnormalities and role of microorganisms in meibomian gland dysfunction. We will also review the physiology of meibomian gland secretion and present models of meibomian gland dysfunction which have enhanced our knowledge of this condition. The importance of diagnosing associated conditions such as aqueous tear deficiency, contact lens intolerance, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis is emphasized. Although this condition causes significant morbidity in the population, there are effective treatments available and these will be discussed.

  16. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Browne-Martin, K; Emerson, C H

    1997-03-01

    Four disorders of the postpartum period are associated with thyroid dysfunction. The most common is PPT. Although recovery from thyroid dysfunction often occurs in PPT, many patients eventually develop permanent hypothyroidism. Postpartum Graves' Disease is less common than PPT, but it is not unusual. Whereas antithyroid drugs are indicated for postpartum Graves' Disease, they are not useful in PPT. Although they are rare, lymphocytic hypophysitis and postpartum pituitary infarction are important entities because they cause deficiencies of many critical hormones. The autoimmune nature of PPT, postpartum Graves' disease, and lymphocytic hypophysitis highlights the unique effects of pregnancy on the immune system.

  17. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  18. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  19. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  20. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  1. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  2. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  3. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  4. EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    van Sweden, B

    1987-07-01

    Electro-clinical correlations are reported in 200 elderly patients admitted to a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. Normal EEG characteristics were generally associated with functional psychiatric disorder. Abnormal EEG features correlated with organic brain syndromes (O.B.S.). The diagnostic and pathogenetic considerations and restrictions of EEG foci, intermittent rhythmic delta activity (Irda) and diffuse EEG slowing are discussed. The informative value of EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry is emphasised.

  5. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization. PMID:25410225

  6. Soluble Heparan Sulfate in Serum of Septic Shock Patients Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Peters, Carsten; Schmitz, Susanne; Moellmann, Julia; Martincuks, Antons; Heussen, Nicole; Lehrke, Michael; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    The heart is one of the most frequently affected organs in sepsis. Recent studies focused on lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction; however myocardial dysfunction is not restricted to gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The purpose of this study was to investigate circulating heparan sulfate (HS) as an endogenous danger associated molecule causing cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. We used an in vitro model with native sera (SsP) and sera eliminated from HS (HS-free), both of septic shock patients, to stimulate murine cardiomyocytes. As determined by extracellular flux analyzing, SsP increased basal mitochondrial respiration, but reduced maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Cells stimulated with HS-free serum revealed unaltered basal and maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P = 0.1174 and P = 0.8992, respectively). Cellular ATP-level were decreased in SsP-stimulated cells but unaltered in cells stimulated with HS-free serum compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.1593, respectively). Live-cell imaging revealed an increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells stimulated with SsP compared with cells stimulated with HS-free serum (P < 0.0001). Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα and PPARγ) and their co-activators PGC-1α, which regulate mitochondrial function, were studied using PCR. Cells stimulated with SsP showed downregulated PPARs and PGC-1α mRNA-levels compared with HS-free serum (P = 0.0082, P = 0.0128, and P = 0.0185, respectively). Blocking Toll-like receptor 4 revealed an inhibition of HS-dependent downregulation of PPARs and PGC-1α (all P < 0.0001). In conclusion, circulating HS in serum of septic shock patients cause cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that HS may be targets of therapeutics in septic

  7. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  9. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  10. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  11. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    PubMed

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes.

  12. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated – more or less intimately – with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  13. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    PubMed

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  14. [Epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Kuroda, Takeshi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    Acquired higher brain dysfunction is for the most part due to cerebral vascular disease, but epilepsy may also be a cause. In this study with five patients, we discuss the advantages of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for persistent higher brain dysfunction. The patients showed chronic amnesia or acute aphasia, with associated symptoms like personality change. All five cases affected automatism or convulsive attack, though only after the emergence of higher brain dysfunction and administration of AEDs. There were underlying diseases like cerebral arteriovenous malformation in four cases, but the other patient had none. Electroencephalogram and single photon emission computed tomography revealed one case of aphasia epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of AEDs for persistent higher brain dysfunction, and we must differentiate epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction from dementia or cerebral vascular disease. PMID:23399676

  15. Bacterial responses to periodic micropillar array.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng; Wang, Kefeng; Ding, Yonghui; Yang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    For a basic understanding and potential biomedical applications of surface topographical effects on bacterial responses, this study focuses on not only the bacterial retention but also the bacterial growth, proliferation, and viability that are significant post-retentive behaviors playing critical roles in infections of medical implants. Specifically, periodic micropillar arrays (SiPA ) with nine different feature sizes were fabricated on silicon substrates with photolithography and dry etching methods. The SiPA was cultured with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli for different periods to investigate the bacterial retention, growth and proliferation behavior on a patterned surface. The experimental results show that a significant reduction of bacterial retention, growth, and proliferation can be achieved when the pillar size is reduced to the submicrometer level. However, micropillars have no obvious influence on the viability of the bacteria within 24 h. On the basis of the bacterial experiment results, it is inferred that the topographical effects may have resulted from bacterial confinement by micropillars, either limiting the attachment area for individual bacterium or trapping a bacterium between pillars. Furthermore, the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theoretical analysis indicates the effects might have come from the topographic induced surface property changes, mainly hydrophobicity, which is represented by the changes in the interaction free energy of Lifshitz-van der Waals among different periodic micropillar arrays. This study could help to deepen the understanding about the surface topographical effects on bacterial responses and may provide a guidance for the future medical implant surface design to decrease the infection risk by avoiding the surface topography which could attract more bacteria.

  16. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED.

  17. Female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdogan; Fynes, Michelle

    2008-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a common problem with detrimental effects on woman's quality of life. It also has an economical and societal impact. It is defined as disorders of sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and sexual pain, which lead to personal distress. The etiology of sexual dysfunction is frequently multifactorial as it relates to general physical and mental well-being, quality of relationship, past sexual functioning, social class, education, employment, life stressors, personality factors, the presence of a sexual partner, and partner's age and health. It is very important to adopt the most efficient approach to gather information, and this may be achieved via standardized questionnaires or open-ended questions. Therapy should be tailored according to the patient's needs and may involve a multidisciplinary team approach including psychosexual counselor/sexologist/therapist and the physician. There is still more work needed to optimize the care of women with this problem. Priority should be given to international standardization and training of health care professionals.

  18. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure.

  19. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  20. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  1. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  2. [Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Führer, D; Mann, K; Feldkamp, J; Krude, H; Spitzweg, C; Kratzsch, J; Schott, M

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may impair fertility, course of pregnancy and fetal development. Physiological alterations of thyroid function parameters, that occur during pregnancy need to be distinguished from pathophysiological states of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. We performed a literature search (PubMed 1990-2013) and review relevant publications as well as consensus and practice guidelines of international thyroid/endocrine societies. Interpretation of thyroid function values in pregnancy must be based on trimester-specific TSH and T4 ranges. Alterations in thyroid function are present in up to 15% of pregnancies (0.4% overt hypothyroidism, 0.1-0.4% hyperthyroidism) and may lead to preventable complications in the pregnant woman and the fetus. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk for abortion, premature delivery and stillbirth, besides impairment of neurocognitive development. The latter has also been shown in situations of grave iodine deficiency. In addition to new-born screening directed at early recognition of congenital hypothyroidism (incidence 0.03%), universal screening of all pregnant women should be implemented in health care guidelines. Newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism in a pregnant woman requires immediate levothyroxine substitution at adequate doses. In subclinical hypothyroidism thyroid hormone replacement should be considered. Iodine supplementation is strongly recommended in all pregnant and breast-feeding women. Pregnancy causes a number of, that need to be of thyroid dysfunction. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis may impair the course of pregnancy and may negatively affect the fetus. In particular, maternal hypothyroidism may lead to irreparable and detrimental deficits in the neurocognitive development of the fetus. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common cause of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with impaired fertility and miscarriage, and may first manifest in pregnancy due to the

  3. Meibomian gland dysfunction: hyperkeratinization or atrophy?

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Parfitt, Geraint J; Brown, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the major cause of evaporative dry eye disease (EDED) and dysfunction is widely thought to mechanistically involve ductal hyperkeratinization, plugging and obstruction. This review re-evaluates the role of hyperkeratinization in MGD based on more recent findings from mouse models. In these studies, eyelids from normal young and old mice or mice exposed to desiccating stress were evaluated by immunofluorescent tomography and 3-dimensional reconstruction to evaluate gland volume, expression of hyperkeratinization markers and cell proliferation or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to assess lipid quality. Results indicate that aging mice show dropout of meibomian glands with loss of gland volume and a forward migration of the mucocutaneous junction anterior to the gland orifice; similar age-related changes that are detected in human subjects. Atrophic glands also showed evidence of epithelial plugging of the orifice without the presence of hyperkeratinization. Mice exposed to desiccating stress showed hyperproliferation of the meibomian gland and ductal dilation suggesting a marked increase in lipid synthesis. Lipid quality was also affected in EDED mice with an increase in the protein content of lipid within the duct of the gland. Overall, age-related changes in the mouse show similar structural and functional correlates with that observed in clinical MGD without evidence of hyperkeratinization suggesting that gland atrophy may be a major cause of EDED. The response of the meibomian gland to desiccating stress also suggest that environmental conditions may accelerate or potentiate age-related changes.

  4. Meibomian gland dysfunction: hyperkeratinization or atrophy?

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Parfitt, Geraint J; Brown, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the major cause of evaporative dry eye disease (EDED) and dysfunction is widely thought to mechanistically involve ductal hyperkeratinization, plugging and obstruction. This review re-evaluates the role of hyperkeratinization in MGD based on more recent findings from mouse models. In these studies, eyelids from normal young and old mice or mice exposed to desiccating stress were evaluated by immunofluorescent tomography and 3-dimensional reconstruction to evaluate gland volume, expression of hyperkeratinization markers and cell proliferation or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to assess lipid quality. Results indicate that aging mice show dropout of meibomian glands with loss of gland volume and a forward migration of the mucocutaneous junction anterior to the gland orifice; similar age-related changes that are detected in human subjects. Atrophic glands also showed evidence of epithelial plugging of the orifice without the presence of hyperkeratinization. Mice exposed to desiccating stress showed hyperproliferation of the meibomian gland and ductal dilation suggesting a marked increase in lipid synthesis. Lipid quality was also affected in EDED mice with an increase in the protein content of lipid within the duct of the gland. Overall, age-related changes in the mouse show similar structural and functional correlates with that observed in clinical MGD without evidence of hyperkeratinization suggesting that gland atrophy may be a major cause of EDED. The response of the meibomian gland to desiccating stress also suggest that environmental conditions may accelerate or potentiate age-related changes. PMID:26817690

  5. Investigation of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Patel, D V; Halls, J; Patel, U

    2012-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) represents a common and debilitating condition with a wide range of organic and non-organic causes. Physical aetiologies can be divided into disorders affecting arterial inflow, the venous occlusion mechanism or the penile structure itself. Various imaging modalities can be utilised to investigate the physical causes of ED, but penile Doppler sonography (PDS) is the most informative technique, indicated in those patients with ED who do not respond to oral pharmacological agents (e.g. phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors). This review will examine the anatomical and physiological basis of penile erection, the method for performing PDS and features of specific causes of ED, and will also consider the alternative imaging modalities available.

  6. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. PMID:26856307

  7. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Sillén, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB) and the dysfunctional voiding (DV), have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome), most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES) are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB), with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed. PMID:19009037

  8. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. )

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  9. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  10. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  11. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  12. Proliferation: Threat and response

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    ;Table of Contents: Section I: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; The Former Soviet Union: Russia, Ukrane, Kazakstan, And Belarus; South Asia; The International Threat: Dangers from Terrorism, Insurgencies, Civil Wars, And Organized Crime; Section II: Department of Defense Response; Technical Annex: Accessible Technologies; Glossary.

  13. The Bacterial Microbiota in Inflammatory Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huffnagle, Gary B.; Dickson, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920's, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined. PMID:26122174

  14. Disease, dysfunction, and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2014-08-01

    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield's hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research in synthetic biology. In particular, I argue that the possibility of artifactual organisms and the case of oncomice and other bred or genetically modified strains of organism constitute a significant objection to Wakefield's etiological account of the dysfunction requirement. I then develop a new alternative understanding of the dysfunction requirement that builds on the organizational theory of function. I conclude that my suggestion is superior to Wakefield's theory because it (a) can accommodate both artifactual and naturally evolved organisms, (b) avoids the possibility of there being a conflict between what an organismic part is supposed to do and the health of the organism, and (c) provides a nonarbitrary and practical way of determining whether dysfunction occurs.

  15. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induces Senescence with a Distinct Secretory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Christopher D; Velarde, Michael C; Lecot, Pacome; Liu, Su; Sarnoski, Ethan A; Freund, Adam; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Lim, Hyung W; Davis, Sonnet S; Ramanathan, Arvind; Gerencser, Akos A; Verdin, Eric; Campisi, Judith

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence permanently arrests cell proliferation, often accompanied by a multi-faceted senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Loss of mitochondrial function can drive age-related declines in the function of many post-mitotic tissues, but little is known about how mitochondrial dysfunction affects mitotic tissues. We show here that several manipulations that compromise mitochondrial function in proliferating human cells induce a senescence growth arrest with a modified SASP that lacks the IL-1-dependent inflammatory arm. Cells that underwent mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence (MiDAS) had lower NAD+/NADH ratios, which caused both the growth arrest and prevented the IL-1-associated SASP through AMPK-mediated p53 activation. Progeroid mice that rapidly accrue mtDNA mutations accumulated senescent cells with a MiDAS SASP in vivo, which suppressed adipogenesis and stimulated keratinocyte differentiation in cell culture. Our data identify a distinct senescence response and provide a mechanism by which mitochondrial dysfunction can drive aging phenotypes. PMID:26686024

  17. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. PMID:25433782

  18. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  19. [Meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Finis, D; Schrader, S; Geerling, G

    2012-05-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a chronic disease, usually caused by obstruction of the secretory Meibomian glands. The subsequent reduction of gland secretion results in a decreased amount of lipids in the tear film. This results in a faster evaporation of the tear film and thus an evaporative dry eye. MGD alone is responsible for about 60% of all cases in combination with aqueous deficiency for a further 20% of dry eyes. While in Europe up to 20% of the population are suffering from MDD, this is true in Asia for over 60% of the population. MGD is more common in women and it incidence increases with age. It is influenced by the hormonal status as well as chemical and mechanical noxious stimuli. Additional risk factors include various skin diseases such as rosacea, acne or atopy. To diagnose MGD, particular attention should be paid to changes in the lid margin such as plugging or pouting of the ducts, thickening and telangiectasia. However, most important is the diagnostic expression of the glands. At first it should be assessed whether secretion can be caused by pressure to the eyelid against the globe and secondly the quality of the expressed secretions should be evaluated. MGD should be treated according to the severity of the disease. While in mild stages instructions for lid margin hygiene, warming and massage in combination with artificial tears might be sufficient, in more severe stages oral tetracyclin derivatives and anti-inflammatory eye drops such as steroids or CSA are necessary for successful treatment.

  20. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Initially known as multiple system organ failure, the term multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was first described in the 1960s in adults with bleeding, respiratory failure, and sepsis. It is defined as "the development of potentially reversible physiologic derangement involving two or more organ systems not involved in the disorder that resulted in ICU admission, and arising in the wake of a potentially life threatening physiologic insult."(3) There are many risk factors predisposing to MODS; however, the most common risk factors are shock due to any cause, sepsis, and tissue hypoperfusion. A dysregulated immune response, or immuneparalysis, in which the homeostasis between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory reaction is lost is thought to be key in the development of MODS. The clinical course and evolution of MODS is dependent on a combination of acquired and genetic factors. There are several nonspecific therapies for the prevention and resolution of MODS, mostly care is supportive. Mortality from MODS in septic pediatric patients varies between 11% and 54%.

  1. Liver dysfunction in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Small, M; Pettigrew, A; Lowe, G D; Sturrock, R D; Follett, E A; Forbes, C D

    1986-04-01

    Liver function was studied in 139 of 291 haemophiliacs known to a single Regional Haemophilia Centre including patients with classical haemophilia, Christmas disease and von Willebrand's disease. In 57 patients, six-monthly liver function tests over a five year period were also available. Thirty-nine of the 139 patients had had jaundice or hepatitis and 56 had a positive test for HBsAb in the blood although few of these had had an identifiable clinical illness. Fifty-eight haemophiliacs had elevated serum aminotransferases at the time of study, but the five year review revealed only six patients who had had persistently abnormal results, although none had clinically evident liver disease. Liver dysfunction was unrelated to a history of hepatitis, to a positive HBsAb test, or to age, type of haemophilia, factor level or frequency of factor replacement treatment. Abnormalities of liver function in haemophilia appear to be unrelated to past or present hepatitis B infection in most cases and may not be related to any single transmitted infectious agent.

  2. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve. PMID:9531859

  3. [Meibomian gland dysfunction--review].

    PubMed

    Nowińska, Anna; Wylegała, Edward; Tarnawska, Dorota; Janiszewska, Dominika; Dobrowolskia, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction is a common ocular disorder affecting from 39 to 50% of population. Despite that, so far a pathophysiology path of the disease remains unknown, moreover there is no distinct border between physiology and the disease. There has been no clear diagnostic criteria. The purpose of this review was to combine a current knowledge of Meibomian gland anatomy, Meibomian gland dysfunction epidemiology, as well as presenting current definition, nomenclature, classification and diagnostic criteria. The importance of diagnosis associated with conditions such as aqueous tear deficiency, seborrheic dermatitis, and rosacea is emphasized. The available treatment methods are discussed. Meibomian gland dysfunction, blepharitis, dry eye syndrome.

  4. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  5. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-09-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  6. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  7. Meibomian gland dysfunction and contact lens intolerance.

    PubMed

    Korb, D R; Henriquez, A S

    1980-03-01

    A study of a syndrome characterized by deficient or inadequate Meibomian gland secretions, minimal or transient symptoms suggestive of ocular dryness, fluorescein staining of the cornea (often detected only after delayed observation or sequential instillation of stain), and contact lens intolerance is described. Clinical and cytologic studies indicate that the syndrome is due to obstruction of the Meibomian gland orifices by desquamated epithelial cells that tend to aggregate in keratotic clusters, which results in alteration of the Meibomian glands' contribution to the precorneal tear film. Further complication may result from bacterial proliferation in the desquamated keratotic cells and the release of the bacteria and their toxic products into the precorneal tear film from these reservoirs in the excretory pathways of the Meibomian glands.

  8. Sexual dysfunction following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Benson, Cooper R; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. A favored treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer in a middle-aged healthy man is radical prostatectomy (RP). Despite advances in techniques for RP, there remain concerns among physicians and patients alike on its adverse effects on sexual function. Although post-RP erectile dysfunction has been extensively studied, little attention has been focused on the other domains of sexual function, namely loss of libido, ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, penile shortening, and Peyronie disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the most recent literature regarding post-RP sexual dysfunctions. PMID:22744864

  9. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction When is surgery necessary? When medical treatment ... organ (cochlea) is also sacrificed with this procedure. Vestibular nerve section A vestibular nerve section is a ...

  10. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  11. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  12. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-02

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary, Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina; (6) Afghanistan, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland.

  13. Proliferating pilomatricoma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Rogerio Nabor; Pontello Junior, Rubens; Belinetti, Francine Milenkovich; Cilião, Caroline; Vasconcellos, Vanessa Regina Bulla; Grimaldi, Dora Maria

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating pilomatricoma is proliferative, rare tumor variant of pilomatricoma. It is a benign neoplasm of hair matrix that can have potentially involve local recurrence. We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented an asymptomatic nodule on the scalp. Histological exam demonstrated a basaloid epithelium at the periphery, filled with eosinophilic cornified material containing shadow cells. The tumor was excised and there was no evidence of recurrence one year later. PMID:26312685

  14. Bacterial concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Venkataswamy; Ramesh, K. P.; Bang, S. S.

    2001-04-01

    Cracks in concrete are inevitable and are one of the inherent weaknesses of concrete. Water and other salts seep through these cracks, corrosion initiates, and thus reduces the life of concrete. So there was a need to develop an inherent biomaterial, a self-repairing material which can remediate the cracks and fissures in concrete. Bacterial concrete is a material, which can successfully remediate cracks in concrete. This technique is highly desirable because the mineral precipitation induced as a result of microbial activities is pollution free and natural. As the cell wall of bacteria is anionic, metal accumulation (calcite) on the surface of the wall is substantial, thus the entire cell becomes crystalline and they eventually plug the pores and cracks in concrete. This paper discusses the plugging of artificially cracked cement mortar using Bacillus Pasteurii and Sporosarcina bacteria combined with sand as a filling material in artificially made cuts in cement mortar which was cured in urea and CaCl2 medium. The effect on the compressive strength and stiffness of the cement mortar cubes due to the mixing of bacteria is also discussed in this paper. It was found that use of bacteria improves the stiffness and compressive strength of concrete. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to document the role of bacteria in microbiologically induced mineral precipitation. Rod like impressions were found on the face of calcite crystals indicating the presence of bacteria in those places. Energy- dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the microbial precipitation on the surface of the crack indicated the abundance of calcium and the precipitation was inferred to be calcite (CaCO3).

  15. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  16. [Treatment Options for Executive Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Müller, S V

    2016-09-01

    The concept of executive function is a so-called umbrella concept, so that it includes many different and in some cases mutually contradictory higher-level organizational abilities such as planning, monitoring, inhibition and control of action. Typically, the cause of an executive dysfunction is an underlying lesion in the prefrontal cortex or subcortical regions. Deficits in executive functions appear in the fields of cognition as well as behavior. Diagnosis requires the use of a wide-ranging repertoire of tests and questionnaires making it a time-consuming process. Different therapeutic approaches addressing the diverse symptoms of executive dysfunction, both positive and negative, are available. These include modification and manipulation of the environment and practice of cognitive repetitive procedures. The former are implemented particularly in cases of severely impaired persons. The latter are used in persons in whom cognitive dysfunctions are the dominating symptoms of the disorder.The operational area of therapeutic approaches using paper and pencil as well as computer programs limits them to treatment of cognitive dysfunction. If behavioral disturbances dominate the clinical picture, other procedures should be used.The effectiveness of cognitive therapy of executive dysfunction is well demonstrated according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM). PMID:27607068

  17. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  18. [Sexual dysfunctions in selected endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Kowalaczyk, Robert

    2005-01-01

    According to the socio-sexological reports approximately 40-45% of women and up to 30% of males may suffer from different sexual dysfunctions. The prevalence of those disorders is gradually increasing with age. Multiply numbers of endocrinopathies may influence the human sexual life. In diabetic patients all phases of the sexual responses cycle, especially orgasm, might be affected. Women diagnosed with PCOS have decreased adaptation to the sexual life, low self-esteem and perception of self sexual attractiveness. The intimacy of infertile couples has not been well described and the characteristic of particular dysfunction in sex life has not been established yet. Interdisciplinary approach, understood as treatment of the endocrinopathy accompanied with psychological and sexological counseling, seems to be the fundamental issue in the therapy of sexual dysfunctions in patients with endocrinological disorders. PMID:16821220

  19. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases: Pathogenesis, assessment and implications

    PubMed Central

    Cibor, Dorota; Domagala-Rodacka, Renata; Rodacki, Tomasz; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Mach, Tomasz; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered one of the etiological factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An inflammatory process leads to functional and structural changes in the vascular endothelium. An increase of leukocyte adhesiveness and leukocyte diapedesis, as well as an increased vascular smooth muscle tone and procoagulant activity is observed. Structural changes of the vascular endothelium comprise as well capillary and venule remodeling and proliferation of endothelial cells. Hypoxia in the inflammatory area stimulates angiogenesis by up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Inflammatory mediators also alter the lymphatic vessel function and impair lymph flow, exacerbating tissue edema and accumulation of dead cells and bacteria. The endothelial dysfunction might be diagnosed by the use of two main methods: physical and biochemical. Physical methods are based on the assessment of large arteries vasodilatation in response to an increased flow and receptors stimulation. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) is the method that is the most widely used; however, it is less sensitive in detecting early changes of the endothelium function. Most of the studies demonstrated a decrease of FMD in IBD patients but no changes in the carotic intima-media thickness. Biochemical methods of detecting the endothelial dysfunction are based on the assessment of the synthesis of compounds produced both by the normal and damaged endothelium. The endothelial dysfunction is considered an initial step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. In IBD patients, the risk of cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Large, prospective studies are needed to establish the role of particular medications or dietary elements in the endothelial dysfunction as well to determine the real risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26811647

  1. The Relationship between Renal Dysfunction and Abnormalities of the Immune System in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kakazu, Eiji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    In patients with advanced cirrhosis, not only hepatocellular carcinoma but also bacterial infections, such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or pneumonia, are frequent clinical complications in such immune-compromised patients. These pathologies often progress to renal dysfunction, especially hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). The central pathology of HRS is splanchnic arterial vasodilation and hyperpermeability followed by bacterial translocation (BT). BT induces a severe inflammatory response in the peritoneal lymphoid tissue, with the activation of the immune systems and the long-lasting production of vasoactive mediators that can impair the circulatory function and cause renal failure. Recent studies report that the plasma amino acid imbalance appeared to be related to an abnormality of the immune system in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. This paper can provide a new approach for future studies of the pathology in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction. PMID:23326675

  2. The Relationship between Renal Dysfunction and Abnormalities of the Immune System in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakazu, Eiji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    In patients with advanced cirrhosis, not only hepatocellular carcinoma but also bacterial infections, such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or pneumonia, are frequent clinical complications in such immune-compromised patients. These pathologies often progress to renal dysfunction, especially hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). The central pathology of HRS is splanchnic arterial vasodilation and hyperpermeability followed by bacterial translocation (BT). BT induces a severe inflammatory response in the peritoneal lymphoid tissue, with the activation of the immune systems and the long-lasting production of vasoactive mediators that can impair the circulatory function and cause renal failure. Recent studies report that the plasma amino acid imbalance appeared to be related to an abnormality of the immune system in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. This paper can provide a new approach for future studies of the pathology in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction. PMID:23326675

  3. Autophagy-independent senescence and genome instability driven by targeted telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mar, Florie A; Debnath, Jayanta; Stohr, Bradley A

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction plays a complex role in tumorigenesis. While dysfunctional telomeres can block the proliferation of incipient cancer clones by inducing replicative senescence, fusion of dysfunctional telomeres can drive genome instability and oncogenic genomic rearrangements. Therefore, it is important to define the regulatory pathways that guide these opposing effects. Recent work has shown that the autophagy pathway regulates both senescence and genome instability in various contexts. Here, we apply models of acute telomere dysfunction to determine whether autophagy modulates the resulting genome instability and senescence responses. While telomere dysfunction rapidly induces autophagic flux in human fibroblast cell lines, inhibition of the autophagy pathway does not have a significant impact upon the transition to senescence, in contrast to what has previously been reported for oncogene-induced senescence. Our results suggest that this difference may be explained by disparities in the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We also show that chromosome fusions induced by telomere dysfunction are comparable in autophagy-proficient and autophagy-deficient cells. Altogether, our results highlight the complexity of the senescence-autophagy interface and indicate that autophagy induction is unlikely to play a significant role in telomere dysfunction-driven senescence and chromosome fusions.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  5. Cell proliferation is reduced in the hippocampus in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Katherine M; Fung, Samantha J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The molecular and cellular basis of structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus found in schizophrenia is currently unclear. Postnatal neurogenesis contributes to hippocampal function in animal models and is correlated with hippocampal volume in primates. Reduced hippocampal cell proliferation has been previously reported in schizophrenia, which may contribute to hippocampal dysfunction. Method: We measured the cell proliferation marker, Ki67, in post-mortem hippocampal tissue from patients with schizophrenia (n = 10) and matched controls (n = 16). Ki67-labelled cells were counted within the dentate gyrus and hilus on sections taken from the anterior hippocampus. Results: We replicated the finding of a significant reduction in Ki67+ cells/mm2 in schizophrenia cases compared to controls (t24 = 2.1, p = 0.023). In our relatively small sample, we did not find a relationship between Ki67+ cells and age overall, or between Ki67 + cells and duration of illness or antipsychotic treatment in people with schizophrenia. Conclusion: Our results confirm that reduced hippocampal cell proliferation may be present in schizophrenia. Restoring hippocampal neurogenesis may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:26113745

  6. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  7. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction Includes a Broad Spectrum of Inflammatory Responses and Epithelial Repair Processes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsheng; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Stauber, Jennifer; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Trehan, Indi; Barnell, Erica; Head, Richard D.; Maleta, Ken; Tarr, Phillip I.; Manary, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a chronic diffuse inflammation of the small intestine, is associated with stunting in children in the developing world. The pathobiology of EED is poorly understood because of the lack of a method to elucidate the host response. This study tested a novel microarray method to overcome limitation of RNA sequencing to interrogate the host transcriptome in feces in Malawian children with EED. Methods In 259 children, EED was measured by lactulose permeability (%L). After isolating low copy numbers of host messenger RNA, the transcriptome was reliably and reproducibly profiled, validated by polymerase chain reaction. Messenger RNA copy number then was correlated with %L and differential expression in EED. The transcripts identified were mapped to biological pathways and processes. The children studied had a range of %L values, consistent with a spectrum of EED from none to severe. Results We identified 12 transcripts associated with the severity of EED, including chemokines that stimulate T-cell proliferation, Fc fragments of multiple immunoglobulin families, interferon-induced proteins, activators of neutrophils and B cells, and mediators that dampen cellular responses to hormones. EED-associated transcripts mapped to pathways related to cell adhesion, and responses to a broad spectrum of viral, bacterial, and parasitic microbes. Several mucins, regulatory factors, and protein kinases associated with the maintenance of the mucous layer were expressed less in children with EED than in normal children. Conclusions EED represents the activation of diverse elements of the immune system and is associated with widespread intestinal barrier disruption. Differentially expressed transcripts, appropriately enumerated, should be explored as potential biomarkers. PMID:26973864

  8. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  9. The changing proliferation threat

    SciTech Connect

    Sopko, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Technological advances and new adversaries with new motives have reduced the relevancy and effectiveness of the American nonproliferation strategy that was developed during the Cold War. The Cold War`s end and the breakup of the Soviet Union have created new proliferation dangers even as they have reduced others. The familiar balance of nuclear terror that linked the superpowers and their client states for nearly 50 years in a choreographed series of confrontations has given way to a much less predictable situation, where weapons of unthinkable power appear within the grasp of those more willing to use them. Rogue nations and {open_quotes}clientless{close_quotes} states, terrorist groups, religious cults, ethnic minorities, disaffected political groups, and even individuals appear to have jointed a new arms race toward mass destruction. The author describes recent events that suggest the new trends and a serious challenge to US national security.

  10. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingsong; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in surviving DA neurons in most cases. Although the cause of PD is still unclear, the remarkable advances have been made in understanding the possible causative mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Numerous studies showed that dysfunction of mitochondria may play key roles in DA neuronal loss. Both genetic and environmental factors that are associated with PD contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and PD pathogenesis. The induction of PD by neurotoxins that inhibit mitochondrial complex I provides direct evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction to PD. Decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity is present in PD brain and in neurotoxin- or genetic factor-induced PD cellular and animal models. Moreover, PINK1 and parkin, two autosomal recessive PD gene products, have important roles in mitophagy, a cellular process to clear damaged mitochondria. PINK1 activates parkin to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins to induce a selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy. In this review, we summarize the factors associated with PD and recent advances in understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453777

  12. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  13. Current Concepts in Ejaculatory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Jeffrey P; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G

    2006-01-01

    Although erectile dysfunction has recently become the most well-known aspect of male sexual dysfunction, the most prevalent male sexual disorders are ejaculatory dysfunctions. Ejaculatory disorders are divided into 4 categories: premature ejaculation (PE), delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation/anorgasmia. Pharmacologic treatment for certain ejaculatory disorders exists, for example the off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for PE. Unfortunately, the other ejaculatory disorders are less studied and not as well understood. This review revisits the physiology of the normal ejaculatory response, specifically explores the mechanisms of anejaculation, and presents emerging data. The neurophysiology of the ejaculatory reflex is complex, making classification of the role of individual neurotransmitters extremely difficult. However, recent research has elucidated more about the role of serotonin and dopamine at the central level in the physiology of both arousal and orgasm. Other recent studies that look at differing pharmacokinetic profiles and binding affinities of the α1-antagonists serve as an indication of the centrally mediated role of ejaculation and orgasm. As our understanding of the interaction between central and peripheral modulations and regulation of the process of ejaculation increases, the probability of developing centrally acting pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of sexual dysfunction approaches reality. PMID:17215997

  14. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  15. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  16. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... Most of the time, the small intestine does not have a high number ... in the small intestine may use up the nutrients needed by the ...

  17. The bacterial pathogenesis and treatment of pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, S. D.; Clark, S. K.; Tekkis, P. P.; Nicholls, R. J.; Ciclitira, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the operation of choice for patients with ulcerative colitis. Pouchitis is the most common cause of pouch dysfunction. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is not well understood, bacteria have been implicated in the disease process. Numerous bacterial studies have been reported over the last 25 years with few unifying findings. In addition, many different treatments for pouchitis have been reported with varying results. Antibiotic treatment remains the most studied and is the mainstay of treatment. In this article we review the aetiology of pouchitis and the evidenced-based treatment options. PMID:21180613

  18. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  19. Cell-based approach for treatment of corneal endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2014-11-01

    Decompensation of the corneal endothelium causes severe visual impairments that lead to blindness. Although corneal transplantation is a well-known effective therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction, many patients are not afforded that therapeutic opportunity owing to the worldwide shortage of donor corneas. Thus, a tissue engineering-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction is highly anticipated. Obstacles associated with the development of tissue engineering therapy include in vitro culture of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) and the techniques used to transplant those cells. Limited proliferation ability, cellular senescence, and fibroblastic transformation during culture are all problems associated with the cultivation of CECs. In addition, transplantation of cultured CECs is technically difficult because the corneal endothelium is composed of a fragile monolayer sheet of cells located at the posterior cornea. In this review article, we present our recent findings using a novel cell culture protocol and show that modulation of CEC adhesion properties through a Rho-kinase inhibitor enables transplantation of CECs in the form of a cell suspension without the use of a carrier. Finally, we provide an update on the clinical application status of a cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  1. Cardiac dysfunction and prenatal exposure to venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana R; Marçal, Mónica; Tuna, Madalena; Anjos, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Venlofaxine, a widely used antidepressant, is known to cause a withdrawal syndrome. We present a case of neonatal transient ventricular dysfunction in a neonate exposed to venlafaxine in utero. Other causes of ventricular dysfunction were excluded. Neonatal ventricular dysfunction can be a possible side effect of maternal use of this drug. PMID:27099733

  2. Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families: Childhood Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used retrospective accounts to compare adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), adults who experienced stressful events in childhood not involving parental alcoholism (A-D+), and adults with no reported dysfunction in family of origin (A-D-) with regard to dysfunctional roles adopted as children. Dysfunctional role adoption was more frequent in ACOA…

  3. Global proliferation of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Prowse, Thomas A A; Arkhipkin, Alexander; Pierce, Graham J; Semmens, Jayson; Steer, Michael; Leporati, Stephen C; Lourenço, Sílvia; Quetglas, Antoni; Sauer, Warwick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-05-23

    Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions [2-4]. There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment, a perception fuelled by increasing trends in cephalopod fisheries catch [4,5]. To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, we assembled global time-series of cephalopod catch rates (catch per unit of fishing or sampling effort). We show that cephalopod populations have increased over the last six decades, a result that was remarkably consistent across a highly diverse set of cephalopod taxa. Positive trends were also evident for both fisheries-dependent and fisheries-independent time-series, suggesting that trends are not solely due to factors associated with developing fisheries. Our results suggest that large-scale, directional processes, common to a range of coastal and oceanic environments, are responsible. This study presents the first evidence that cephalopod populations have increased globally, indicating that these ecologically and commercially important invertebrates may have benefited from a changing ocean environment. PMID:27218844

  4. Vertical nuclear proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W

    2007-01-01

    All the nuclear-weapon states are working to develop new nuclear-weapon systems and upgrade their existing ones. Although the US Congress has recently blocked further development of small nuclear weapons and earth-penetrating nuclear weapons, the United States is planning a range of new warheads under the Reliable Replacement Warhead programme, and renewing its nuclear weapons infrastructure. The United Kingdom is spending 1 billion pounds sterling on updating the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, and about 20 billion pounds sterling on replacing its Vanguard submarines and maintaining its Trident warhead stockpile. The US has withdrawn from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and plans to install missile defence systems in Poland and the Czech Republic; Russia threatens to upgrade its nuclear countermeasures. The nuclear-weapon states should comply with their obligations under Article VI of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, as summarised in the 13-point plan agreed at the 2000 NPT Review Conference, and they should negotiate a Nuclear Weapons Convention.

  5. Diverging roles of bacterial siderophores during infection.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Bachman, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight, high affinity iron chelating molecules that are essential virulence factors in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Whereas the chemical structure of siderophores is extremely variable, the function of siderophores has been narrowly defined as the chelation and delivery of iron to bacteria for proliferation. The discovery of the host protein Lipocalin 2, capable of specifically sequestering the siderophore Enterobactin but not its glycosylated-derivative Salmochelin, indicated that diversity in structure could be an immune evasion mechanism that provides functional redundancy during infection. However, there is growing evidence that siderophores are specialized in their iron-acquisition functions, can perturb iron homeostasis in their hosts, and even bind non-iron metals to promote bacterial fitness. The combination of siderophores produced by a pathogen can enable inter-bacterial competition, modulate host cellular pathways, and determine the bacterial "replicative niche" during infection. This review will examine both classical and novel functions of siderophores to address the concept that siderophores are non-redundant virulence factors used to enhance bacterial pathogenesis.

  6. Histopathology of meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gutgesell, V J; Stern, G A; Hood, C I

    1982-09-01

    We conducted a histopathologic study of he meibomian glands of seven patients (all men, ranging in age from 58 to 83 years) who had severe or moderately severe meibomian dysfunction and who were undergoing ectropion or entropion repair. Abnormal features included signs of obstruction and dilatation of ducts, enlargement of acini with cystic degeneration and squamous metaplasia, foreign-body reaction and granuloma formation, a mild increase in inflammatory cells, and abnormal keratinization. Demodex organisms were found in both acini and ducts of one patient. These findings were similar to those reported in other entities involving meibomian duct obstruction, probably related to abnormalities of keratinization, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of meibomian gland dysfunction.

  7. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  8. Gonadal dysfunction in systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Asterios; Harsoulis, Faidon

    2005-04-01

    Gonadal function is significantly affected in many acute and chronic systemic diseases. As the function of the testes and the ovaries is determined by the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, it is obvious that a systemic disease may affect one or more levels of the axis in such a manner that the gonadal dysfunction may have various clinical and laboratory manifestations. In this brief review, the most common disturbances seen in the main systemic diseases will be discussed.

  9. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  10. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  11. Hypnotic metaphor and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L G

    1987-01-01

    Although hypnosis can be very effective in alleviating sexual problems, few sex therapists use hypnotic methods. This paper seeks to encourage a greater use of hypnosis among clinicians by presenting: a description of the new hypnosis exemplified in the work of Milton H. Erickson; an explanation of one of Erickson's most important and innovative methods, the use of multiple embedded metaphors; and case histories illustrating the application of hypnotic approaches to sexual dysfunction.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  13. Cardiac Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Kimberly E; Parker, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac function and dysfunction are important in the clinical outcomes of sepsis and septic shock. Cardiac dysfunction is not a single entity, but is a broad spectrum of syndromes that result in biventricular cardiac dysfunction manifested by both systolic and diastolic dysfunction and is influenced by cardiac loading conditions (ie, preload and afterload). Elucidating the underlying pathophysiology has proved to be complex. This article emphasizes the underlying pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction and explores recent evidence related to diagnosis, including the utility of biomarkers, the role of echocardiography, and management goals and treatment. PMID:27229645

  14. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  15. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  16. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review and practical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chamroonkul, Naichaya; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for major morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibility to develop spontaneous bacterial infections, hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infections from uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops, the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokines on a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosis further predispose the development of serious complications such as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renal failure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia are common in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks in the natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidence of infections from resistant bacteria has increased significantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serum biomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improve the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures (e.g., avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination), early recognition, and proper management are required in order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infections in cirrhosis. PMID:26962397

  17. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review and practical guidance.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chamroonkul, Naichaya; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2016-02-28

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for major morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibility to develop spontaneous bacterial infections, hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infections from uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops, the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokines on a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosis further predispose the development of serious complications such as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renal failure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia are common in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks in the natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidence of infections from resistant bacteria has increased significantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serum biomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improve the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures (e.g., avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination), early recognition, and proper management are required in order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infections in cirrhosis. PMID:26962397

  18. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    environmental variation associated with risk of bacterial proliferation determining the strength of such effects. Because of costs associated to nest building, birds should adjust nest building effort to expected bacterial environments during incubation, a prediction that should be further explored. PMID:26871451

  19. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    environmental variation associated with risk of bacterial proliferation determining the strength of such effects. Because of costs associated to nest building, birds should adjust nest building effort to expected bacterial environments during incubation, a prediction that should be further explored. PMID:26871451

  20. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  1. Long noncoding RNA-MEG3 is involved in diabetes mellitus-related microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gui-Zhen; Tian, Wei; Fu, Hai-Tao; Li, Chao-Peng; Liu, Ban

    2016-02-26

    Microvascular dysfunction is an important characteristic of diabetic retinopathy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA-MEG3 in diabetes-related microvascular dysfunction. We show that MEG3 expression level is significantly down-regulated in the retinas of STZ-induced diabetic mice, and endothelial cells upon high glucose and oxidative stress. MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vessel dysfunction in vivo, as shown by serious capillary degeneration, and increased microvascular leakage and inflammation. MEG3 knockdown also regulates retinal endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro. The role of MEG3 in endothelial cell function is mainly mediated by the activation of PI3k/Akt signaling. MEG3 up-regulation may serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating diabetes-related microvascular complications. PMID:26845358

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory responses and cellular senescence: pathogenesis and pharmacological targets for chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Yao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, which couple the various cellular processes that regulate metabolism, cell proliferation and survival. Environmental stress can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and dynamic changes including reduced mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, as well as mitophagy impairment, which leads to increased ROS, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence. Oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular senescence all have important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In this review, we discuss the current state on how mitochondrial dysfunction affects inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases and the potential of mitochondrial transfer and replacement as treatments for these diseases. PMID:27189175

  3. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  6. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  7. A western type of bacterial gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    The first reference to a pathological condition of the gill tissues of salmonid fishes was made by Osburn in 1910. This author in describing a progressive infolding of the opercula of trout, commonly known to hatcherymen as "short gill covers," mentioned a marked proliferation on the gill epithelium as accompanying this condition. Osburn assumed that the club-like appearance of the gill filaments due to the proliferated epithelium was the result of continual irritation of the delicate gill tissue in the absence of the usual protection offered by the normal opercula. Although such a conclusion seems quite logical, it is also possible that Osburn was dealing with "short gill covers" complicated by the unknown bacterial gill disease which was subsequently described by Davis.

  8. Microbiota innate stimulation is a prerequisite for T cell spontaneous proliferation and induction of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Wang, Lanfang; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Elson, Charles O.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how the microbiota regulates T cell proliferation and whether spontaneous T cell proliferation is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we show that stimulation of innate pathways by microbiota-derived ligands and antigen-specific T cell stimulation are both required for intestinal inflammation. Microbiota-derived ligands promoted spontaneous T cell proliferation by activating dendritic cells (DCs) to produce IL-6 via Myd88, as shown by the spontaneous proliferation of T cells adoptively transferred into specific pathogen–free (SPF) RAG−/− mice, but not in germfree RAG−/− mice. Reconstitution of germfree RAG−/− mice with cecal bacterial lysate–pulsed DCs, but not with IL-6−/− or Myd88−/− DCs, restored spontaneous T cell proliferation. CBir1 TCR transgenic (CBir1 Tg) T cells, which are specific for an immunodominant microbiota antigen, induced colitis in SPF RAG−/− mice. Blocking the spontaneous proliferation of CBir1 Tg T cells by co-transferring bulk OT II CD4+ T cells abrogated colitis development. Although transferred OT II T cells underwent spontaneous proliferation in RAG−/− mice, the recipients failed to develop colitis because of the lack of cognate antigen in the intestinal lumen. Collectively, our data demonstrate that induction of colitis requires both spontaneous proliferation of T cells driven by microbiota-derived innate signals and antigen-specific T cell proliferation. PMID:20498021

  9. Erectile dysfunction following retropubic prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lalong-Muh, Julienne; Colm, Treacy; Steggall, Martin

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to affect men in the UK. Treatment options depend on the grade of tumour, the patient's co-existing diseases and choice of treatment. One potentially curative option is surgery, specifically a radical retropubic prostatectomy or variation thereof. As a consequence of the surgery, men commonly experience two side-effects: urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED). This paper outlines the clinical management of ED following surgery and aims to provide an overview of how to assess a man who has developed ED and discuss the various treatment options available, along with the efficacy in terms of recovery of erections. PMID:23448953

  10. Cerebrovascular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Erica S.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy that affects several organ systems, including the maternal brain. Cerebrovascular dysfunction during preeclampsia can lead to cerebral edema, seizures, stroke and potentially maternal mortality. This review will discuss the effects of preeclampsia on the cerebrovasculature that may adversely affect the maternal brain, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and blood-brain barrier disruption, and the resultant clinical outcomes including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and maternal stroke. Potential long-term cognitive outcomes of preeclampsia and the role of the cerebrovasculature are also reviewed. PMID:26126779

  11. Angelman syndrome and thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Monterrubio-Ledezma, C E; Bobadilla-Morales, L; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, H J; Corona-Rivera, J R; Corona-Rivera, A

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic syndrome, has a prevalence of 1:10,000 to 1:40,000. Patients with AS have genetic alterations in maternal imprinting gene UB3A (15q11-q13) and molecular evaluations confirm the diagnosis. Our aim is to report a new case with AS and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) without goiter. Thyroid dysfunction has not been described as part of alterations in AS; the exact pathogenic mechanisms of SCH in patients with AS remains incompletely unknown. PMID:23072182

  12. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  13. Medical treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Burns-Cox, N.; Gingell, C.

    1998-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in demand for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in the last 10 years. This has occurred partly because of a greater understanding and awareness by both the general public and clinicians, and also because there now exists a range of effective treatments. The choice of treatments is increasing rapidly and novel delivery systems which may be more patient-friendly than intracavernosal injections are now becoming available. We review the published data on effectiveness and safety of the currently available treatments and discuss recent advances in oral therapy, as these drugs are likely to become available in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9799886

  14. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Drogo K

    2002-01-01

    Nonpharmacologic treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) includes sex therapy, the use of vacuum erection devices, penile prosthesis implantation, and penile vascular surgery. Sex therapy is indicated for psychogenic ED and is at times a useful adjunct for other treatments in men with mixed psychogenic and organic ED. Vacuum erection devices produce usable erections in over 90% of patients; however, patient and partner acceptability is an issue. Three-piece inflatable penile prostheses create flaccidity and an erection that comes close to that which occurs naturally. Penile vascular surgery has shown greatest efficacy in young men with vasculogenic ED resulting from pelvic or perineal trauma. PMID:16986016

  15. Voiding dysfunction due to neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Garber, S J; Christmas, T J; Rickards, D

    1990-07-01

    Three patients with neurosyphilis presenting with urinary frequency, incontinence and voiding dysfunction were investigated. Unlike the previously reported finding of areflexia in tabes dorsalis, all 3 had hypocompliant detrusor hyper-reflexia with detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia and post-micturition residual urine. One patient also had bladder neck dyssynergia treated by bladder neck incision. The other 2 patients were initially managed by intermittent catheterisation but 1 ultimately underwent urinary diversion. The clinical relevance of these findings and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  16. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  17. Revenge of the phages: defeating bacterial defences.

    PubMed

    Samson, Julie E; Magadán, Alfonso H; Sabri, Mourad; Moineau, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria and their viral predators (bacteriophages) are locked in a constant battle. In order to proliferate in phage-rich environments, bacteria have an impressive arsenal of defence mechanisms, and in response, phages have evolved counter-strategies to evade these antiviral systems. In this Review, we describe the various tactics that are used by phages to overcome bacterial resistance mechanisms, including adsorption inhibition, restriction-modification, CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) systems and abortive infection. Furthermore, we consider how these observations have enhanced our knowledge of phage biology, evolution and phage-host interactions. PMID:23979432

  18. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  19. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction: Endocrine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem G.; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:24533183

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  2. Meibomian gland dysfunction: endocrine aspects.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ozlem G; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction.

  3. Cardiovascular dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, A R; Nava, C; Arriada, N; Violante, A; Corona, T

    2000-02-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction (CD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is related to involvement of reflex pathways in the brainstem. The battery of CD tests was applied to a group of 40 healthy subjects and 40 patients with MS, divided in 2 subgroups according to the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). The tests included: 1) postural blood pressure changes, 2) postural heart rate changes, 3) heart rate changes on inspiration/forced expiration and 4) ECG R-R interval measurement on the Valsalva maneuver. Both groups were subjected to the functional independence scale (FIM). Imaging studies were reviewed and autonomic dysfunction at other levels was explored. The results showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in all tests when comparing patients to controls. Tests 1 and 4 had the highest significance, with findings of more severe involvement in patients with a higher EDSS and lower FIM. A correlation was also found between CD and brainstem lesions on MRI (P < 0.01). A significant number of MS patients had evidence of CD. Test 1 may be considered a simple marker, in daily clinical practice, to detect subclinical CD. Subclinical CD is a cause of disability in this group of patients.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Mitra, Ashim K

    2011-12-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital intracellular organelle for retinal cell function and survival. There is growing confirmation to support an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and a number of retinal degenerations. Investigations have also unveiled mitochondrial genomic instability as one of the contributing factors for age-related retinal pathophysiology. This review highlights the role of mitochondrial dysfunction originating from oxidative stress in the etiology of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage associated with AMD due to susceptibility of mtDNA to oxidative damage and failure of mtDNA repair pathways is also highlighted in this review. The susceptibility of neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) mitochondria to oxidative damage with ageing appears to be a major factor in retinal degeneration. It thus appears that the mitochondrion is a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of retinal cells. In addition, failure of mtDNA repair pathways can also specifically contribute towards pathogenesis of AMD. This review will further summarize the prospective role of mitochondria targeting therapeutic agents for the treatment of retinal disease. Mitochondria based drug targeting to diminish oxidative stress or promote repair of mtDNA damage may offer potential alternatives for the treatment of various retinal degenerative diseases.

  5. Bacterial biofilms and implantable prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, A; Donatucci, C F

    2003-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction afflicts millions of men. A group of patients with advanced degeneration of their erectile tissue do not respond to pharmacological therapy, and surgical prosthetic reconstruction represents an attractive and highly satisfying alternative. Yet many men are unwilling to take this step due to fear of infection. Implanted prosthetic devices are at risk for infection because they provide a platform for the development of a bacterial biofilm, an organized bacterial colony that grows on the surface of the implanted material. The biofilm is resistant to all efforts to eradicate it short of removal of the foreign material. Bacteria may attach to the surface of the foreign material by surface charge attraction, hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions, and by specific attachment by fimbrae. Growth, colonization, and maturation follow bacterial attachment. A mature biofilm is composed of three layers: a linking film binding the biofilm to the surface; a base film made up of a compact layer of bacteria; and a surface film from which free-floating bacteria can arise and spread. The majority of the surface layer is made up of exopolysaccharide matrix. Bacteria deep within the biofilm matrix live in a protected environment; diffusion of antibiotics is difficult, low oxygen tension leads to a lower bacterial metabolic rate rendering the bacteria functionally resistant to high levels of antibiotics. Effective strategies to reduce prosthetic infection levels must rely on the prevention of biofilm formation through surface modification. Possible mechanisms include the addition of antimicrobials to the surface of the device, or chemical modifications, which reduces bacterial attachment.

  6. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  7. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  8. Surgery for cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Gregory D; Kirschner, Richard E

    2011-05-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital anomaly that, if left untreated, results in subsequent velopharyngeal dysfunction. After surgical repair of the palatal cleft, patients must be monitored clinically for any postoperative velopharyngeal dysfunction. If this sequela develops, patients must be evaluated in a multidisciplinary manner with diagnostic procedures performed and individualized care plans made prior to embarking upon surgery for velopharyngeal dysfunction. This article discusses surgical management of patients with cleft palate as well as the proper workup and management of postoperative velopharyngeal dysfunction.

  9. Cholangiocyte proliferation and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Shannon S.; Gaudio, Eugenio; Miller, Tim; Alvaro, Domenico; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Cholangiocyte proliferation is triggered during extrahepatic bile duct obstruction induced by bile duct ligation, which is a common in vivo model used for the study of cholangiocyte proliferation and liver fibrosis. The proliferative response of cholangiocytes during cholestasis is regulated by the complex interaction of several factors, including gastrointestinal hormones, neuroendocrine hormones and autocrine or paracrine signalling mechanisms. Activation of biliary proliferation (ductular reaction) is thought to have a key role in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis. The first part of this review provides an overview of the primary functions of cholangiocytes in terms of secretin-stimulated bicarbonate secretion – a functional index of cholangiocyte growth. In the second section, we explore the important regulators, both inhibitory and stimulatory, that regulate the cholangiocyte proliferative response during cholestasis. We discuss the role of proliferating cholangiocytes in the induction of fibrosis either directly via epithelial mesenchymal transition or indirectly via the activation of other liver cell types. The possibility of targeting cholangiocyte proliferation as potential therapy for reducing and/or preventing liver fibrosis, and future avenues for research into how cholangiocytes participate in the process of liver fibrogenesis are described. PMID:19239726

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone reverses chronic hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced right ventricular dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Dumas de La Roque, Eric; Bellance, Nadège; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Begueret, Hugues; Billaud, Marie; dos Santos, Pierre; Ducret, Thomas; Marthan, Roger; Dahan, Diana; Ramos-Barbón, David; Amor-Carro, Óscar; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Fayon, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) prevents chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricle dysfunction in rats. In this animal model, reoxygenation following hypoxia reverses pulmonary hypertension but not right ventricle dysfunction. We thus studied the effect of DHEA on the right ventricle after reoxygenation, i.e. after a normoxic recovery phase secondary to chronic hypoxia in rats. Right ventricle function was assessed in vivo by Doppler echocardiography and in vitro by the isolated perfused heart technique in three groups of animals: control, recovery (21 days of hypoxia followed by 21 days of normoxia) and recovery DHEA (30 mg · kg(-1) every 2 days during the recovery phase). Right ventricle tissue was assessed by optical and electron microscopy. DHEA abolished right ventricle diastolic dysfunction, as the echographic E wave remained close to that of controls (mean ± SD 76.5 ± 2.4 and 79.7 ± 1.7 cm · s(-1), respectively), whereas it was diminished to 40.3 ± 3.7 in the recovery group. DHEA also abolished right ventricle systolic dysfunction, as shown by the inhibition of the increase in the slope of the pressure-volume curve in isolated heart. The DHEA effect was related to cardiac myocytes proliferation. In conclusion, DHEA prevents right ventricle dysfunction in this animal model by preventing cardiomyocyte alteration.

  11. Novel factors modulating human β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, J; Kulkarni, R N

    2016-09-01

    β-Cell dysfunction in type 1 and type 2 diabetes is accompanied by a progressive loss of β-cells, and an understanding of the cellular mechanism(s) that regulate β-cell mass will enable approaches to enhance hormone secretion. It is becoming increasingly recognized that enhancement of human β-cell proliferation is one potential approach to restore β-cell mass to prevent and/or cure type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While several reports describe the factor(s) that enhance β-cell replication in animal models or cell lines, promoting effective human β-cell proliferation continues to be a challenge in the field. In this review, we discuss recent studies reporting successful human β-cell proliferation including WS6, an IkB kinase and EBP1 inhibitor; harmine and 5-IT, both DYRK1A inhibitors; GNF7156 and GNF4877, GSK-3β and DYRK1A inhibitors; osteoprotegrin and Denosmab, receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) inhibitors; and SerpinB1, a protease inhibitor. These studies provide important examples of proteins and pathways that may prove useful for designing therapeutic strategies to counter the different forms of human diabetes. PMID:27615134

  12. Inside the Spiral of Dysfunction: The Personal Consequences of Working for a Dysfunctional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Brad; Rose, Kevin; Bergman, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional leaders suffocate others with coercive power and ego, are unpredictable, and often lack self-awareness about their dysfunction. Dysfunctional leaders are incredibly difficult to work with and can cause a series of cascading personal consequences for employees who work with them. This Perspectives in Human Resource Development essay…

  13. An Essential Role of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Cell Proliferation Is to Enable Aspartate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Sabatini, David M

    2015-07-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enables many metabolic processes, but why its inhibition suppresses cell proliferation is unclear. It is also not well understood why pyruvate supplementation allows cells lacking ETC function to proliferate. We used a CRISPR-based genetic screen to identify genes whose loss sensitizes human cells to phenformin, a complex I inhibitor. The screen yielded GOT1, the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase, loss of which kills cells upon ETC inhibition. GOT1 normally consumes aspartate to transfer electrons into mitochondria, but, upon ETC inhibition, it reverses to generate aspartate in the cytosol, which partially compensates for the loss of mitochondrial aspartate synthesis. Pyruvate stimulates aspartate synthesis in a GOT1-dependent fashion, which is required for pyruvate to rescue proliferation of cells with ETC dysfunction. Aspartate supplementation or overexpression of an aspartate transporter allows cells without ETC activity to proliferate. Thus, enabling aspartate synthesis is an essential role of the ETC in cell proliferation. PMID:26232224

  14. An essential role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in cell proliferation is to enable aspartate synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enables many metabolic processes, but why its inhibition suppresses cell proliferation is unclear. It is also not well understood why pyruvate supplementation allows cells lacking ETC function to proliferate. We used a CRISPR-based genetic screen to identify genes whose loss sensitizes human cells to phenformin, a complex I inhibitor. The screen yielded GOT1, the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase, loss of which kills cells upon ETC inhibition. GOT1 normally consumes aspartate to transfer electrons into mitochondria, but, upon ETC inhibition, it reverses to generate aspartate in the cytosol, which partially compensates for the loss of mitochondrial aspartate synthesis. Pyruvate stimulates aspartate synthesis in a GOT1-dependent fashion, which is required for pyruvate to rescue proliferation of cells with ETC dysfunction. Aspartate supplementation or overexpression of an aspartate transporter allows cells without ETC activity to proliferate. Thus, enabling aspartate synthesis is an essential role of the ETC in cell proliferation. PMID:26232224

  15. Low Proliferation and Differentiation Capacities of Adult Hippocampal Stem Cells Correlate with Memory Dysfunction in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coras, Roland; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Pauli, Elisabeth; Huttner, Hagen B.; Njunting, Marleisje; Kobow, Katja; Villmann, Carmen; Hahnen, Eric; Neuhuber, Winfried; Weigel, Daniel; Buchfelder, Michael; Stefan, Hermann; Beck, Heinz; Steindler, Dennis A.; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus maintains its capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In animal models, hippocampal neurogenesis is increased by cognitive tasks, and experimental ablation of neurogenesis disrupts specific modalities of learning and memory. In humans, the impact of neurogenesis on cognition remains unclear. Here, we…

  16. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling.

  17. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review.

  18. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  19. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  20. Olfactory dysfunction in Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Jinich, S

    1996-01-01

    Down's Syndrome subjects over 40 years old show neuropathology similar to that of Alzheimer's disease. The olfactory system is particularly vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease, both anatomically and functionally. Several measures of sensory and cognitive functioning were studied in the older Down's Syndrome patient, with the hypothesis of significant olfactory dysfunction. Participants were 23 Down's subjects, and 23 controls. The Dementia Rating Scale showed mean scores of 103 for Down's subjects and 141 for controls. Down's subjects showed significant deficits in odor detection threshold, odor identification, and odor recognition memory. Normal performance in a taste threshold task, similar to the olfactory threshold task in subject demands, suggested that the Down's syndrome subjects' poor performance was not due to task demands. Deficits in olfaction may provide a sensitive and early indicator of the deterioration and progression of the brain in older subjects with Down's Syndrome.

  1. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  2. Prevalence of Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hom, M M; Martinson, J R; Knapp, L L; Paugh, J R

    1990-09-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and to determine which patient profile factors might be associated with the syndrome. Patients were randomly selected, apparently normal patients presenting for routine vision examinations. Of the 398 patients for whom Meibomian gland expression was performed and a detailed history obtained, 155 patients or 38.9% exhibited MGD based on the principal clinical criterion of an absent or cloudy Meibomian gland secretion upon expression. Patient profile factors of gender, age, allergy occurrence, and contact lens wear were analyzed for correlation with MGD. Age was found to be the only significant correlating factor (positive correlation, p less than 0.0001).

  3. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  4. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  5. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction.

    PubMed

    R Blair, R James

    2013-06-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause-ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder.

  6. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction.

    PubMed

    R Blair, R James

    2013-06-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause-ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder. PMID:24174892

  7. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cote, Anita T; Harris, Kevin C; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Sandor, George G S; Devlin, Angela M

    2013-10-01

    Obesity-related cardiovascular disease in children is becoming more prevalent in conjunction with the rise in childhood obesity. Children with obesity are predisposed to an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Importantly, research in children with obesity over the last decade has demonstrated that children may exhibit early signs of cardiovascular dysfunction as a result of their excess adiposity, often independent of other obesity-related comorbidities such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. The clinical evidence is accumulating to suggest that the cardiovascular damage, once observed only in adults, is also occurring in obese children. The objective of this review is to provide a synopsis of the current research on cardiovascular abnormalities in children with obesity and highlight the importance and need for early detection and prevention programs to mitigate this potentially serious health problem.

  8. Pharmacotherapeutic management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, D J; Burnett, A L

    2015-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common condition in aging men and significantly affects their quality of life and interpersonal relationships. Its prevalence and incidence are associated with aging, lifestyle factors and cardiovascular comorbidities. Preoccupation with male virility has been present for centuries, and a wide variety of herbs and potions have been used to treat any sexual deficiencies. Recent major advances in understanding of erectile physiology and pathophysiology led to development of currently available systemic and local pharmacotherapies. They are designed to work either centrally or peripherally and to either suppress anti-erectile mechanisms, enhance the pro-erectile ones or influence both. Since all the current formulations have variable safety and efficacy profiles, the search for highly specific, simple, convenient and clinically effective impotence treatments or prophylactics continues.

  9. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  10. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rinalduzzi, Steno; Missori, Paolo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients' physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence. PMID:25654100

  11. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed.

  12. [Parathyroid dysfunction and rheumatic manifestations].

    PubMed

    Frey, D P

    2011-11-01

    Parathyroid dysfunction, leading to severe clinical symptoms and radiographic changes, has decreased over the last years due to routine laboratory checks including serum calcium levels. Thus, abnormal calcium levels are detected early in the course of the disease and the underlying cause treated accordingly. Hyperparathyroidism often leads to osteoporosis and low-trauma fractures. When evaluating secondary osteoporosis analysis of calcium, phosphate and intact parathyroid hormone levels are mandatory. Osteitis fibrosa cystica and brown tumors are less frequent findings of hyperparathyroidism. However, in patients with arthritis or bone symptoms, hyperparathyroidism has to be evaluated as a possible reason. Other manifestations of hyperparathyroidism include myopathy, tendon ruptures and unspecific symptoms of the muscles and skeleton. Gout as well as pseudogout may be associated with hyperparathyroidism. Hypoparathyroidism may cause musculoskeletal diseases mimicking ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Myopathies are sometimes induced by hypoparathyroidism. An association between systemic lupus erythematosus and hypoparathyroidism seems to exist.

  13. [Topical therapy in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Floth, A

    2000-01-01

    All forms of pharmacological therapy result in a relaxation of the corporeal smooth muscle. Intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs was introduced around 15 years ago and still is the most effective therapy in erectile dysfunction. Resulting in a consistent success rate of 70-80% this form of therapy will find numerous applications, even after the introduction of effective oral agents such as sildenafil. Prostaglandin E1 and--less frequently used--the combination of papaverine and phentolamine are the mainstay of intracorporeal injection therapy. Intraurethral prostaglandin (MUSE) has recently become available and is somewhat less effective than injection therapy. Externally applied drugs (nitroglycerin paste on the penile shaft and minoxidil solution on the glans penis) have not succeeded in the long run. Vacuum erection devices represent a form of physical topical therapy that is very versatile and also effective but rather infrequently applied. PMID:10746290

  14. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    R. Blair, R. James

    2013-01-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause—ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder. PMID:24174892

  15. Nutraceuticals, aging, and cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Head, Elizabeth; Zicker, Steven C

    2004-01-01

    Decline in cognitive function that accompanies aging in dogs might have a biological basis, and many of the disorders associated with aging in canines might be preventable through dietary modifications that incorporate specific nutraceuticals. Based on previous research and the results of laboratory and clinical studies, antioxidants might be one class of nutraceutical that benefits aged dogs. Brains of aged dogs accumulate oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, which can lead to dysfunction of neuronal cells. The production of free radicals and lack of increase in compensatory antioxidant enzymes might lead to detrimental modifications to important macromolecules within neurons. Reducing oxidative damage through food ingredients rich in a broad spectrum of antioxidants significantly improves, or slows the decline of, learning and memory in aged dogs; however, determining which compounds, combinations, dosage ranges, when to initiate intervention, and long-term effects constitute critical gaps in knowledge about this subject.

  16. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  17. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Avafia Y; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.

  18. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  19. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  20. Sinus node dysfunction complicating viper bite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Tarun; Ravindranath, Khandenahally S; Bhat, Prabhavathi; Manjunath, Cholenahally N; Agarwal, Neena

    2015-02-01

    Viper venom toxicities comprise mainly bleeding disorders and nephrotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity is a rare manifestation of viper bite. We describe the case of a previously healthy 35-year-old man who developed coagulopathy and sinus node dysfunction following a viper bite. Electrocardiography showed sinus arrest and junctional escape rhythm. This is the first account of sinus node dysfunction caused by a viper bite.

  1. Proliferation of mutators in A cell population.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, E F; Lane, L; Lee, J; Miller, J H

    1997-01-01

    A Lac- strain of Escherichia coli that reverts by the addition of a G to a G-G-G-G-G-G sequence was used to study the proliferation of mutators in a bacterial culture. Selection for the Lac+ phenotype, which is greatly stimulated in mismatch repair-deficient strains, results in an increase in the percentage of mutators in the selected population from less than 1 per 100,000 cells to 1 per 200 cells. All the mutators detected were deficient in the mismatch repair system. Mutagenesis results in a similar increase in the percentage of mutators. Mutagenesis combined with a single selection can result in a population of more than 50% mutators when a sample of several thousand cells is grown out and selected. Mutagenesis combined with two or more successive selections can generate a population that is 100% mutator. These experiments are discussed in relation to ideas that an early step in carcinogenesis is the creation of a mutator phenotype. PMID:8990293

  2. Nerve fibre proliferation in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J; Chapple, C R; Milroy, E J; Turner-Warwick, R T

    1990-01-01

    The aetiology of pain in interstitial cystitis is not understood, although it has been reported to be due to release of mediators from mast cell granules. Cystolysis and intravesical instillation of dimethyl sulphoxide have been shown to relieve pain in this condition. We have studied the nerve population within the bladder wall using immunohistochemical stains for protein gene product 9.5. A group of 18 cases of chronic interstitial cystitis and 12 controls; neuropathic bladder (n = 1), chronic bacterial cystitis (n = 3), systemic lupus erythematosus cystitis (n = 2) and normals (n = 6), were investigated. There were significantly more nerve fibres within the sub-urothelial and detrusor muscle layers in chronic interstitial cystitis than there were in normals. Patients with chronic cystitis of other aetiology did not have a significant increase in nerve fibre density within the bladder wall suggesting a specific association between nerve fibre proliferation and interstitial cystitis. Cystolysis is shown to deplete selectively the submucosal nerve plexuses without altering the nerve density within detrusor muscle. This finding explains the desensitisation of the bladder without impairment of detrusor function after this procedure.

  3. [The cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive disorder which begins with motor symptoms. Several cognitive deficits can be observed in nondemented patients with PD during their history. The core symptom in the cognitive deficits in PD is the executive dysfunction. Neuropsychological tests such as Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Trail Making Test are used to measure the degree of this dysfunction. Executive dysfunction is thought related to abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit which largely passes through the caudate nucleus. The dysfunction emerges as the pathology spreads to the nigrocaudate project corresponding to Hoehn & Yahr stage II-III. Effective therapy for cognitive dysfunction in PD remains elusive, however donepezil, Attention Process Training, Music therapy and Transcranial magnetic stimulation have been reported to have partial efficacy. PMID:15462384

  4. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

  5. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  6. [Bacterial vaginosis: what risks for the mother and child?].

    PubMed

    Zana, J

    1993-03-01

    Bacterial vaginosis are characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic organisms and the disappearance of the commensal lactobacilli, which can cause ascending utero-adnexitis and endanger ongoing pregnancy. The role of anaerobes in utero-adnexitis and tubal abscess was first raised in 1973 par Eschenbach. Several authors have since established correlations between bacterial vaginosis and both pain from the uterine appendages and gynecologic infections, particularly post-abortum. Bacterial vaginosis is a major problem in pregnant women, given its high prevalence (15-20 p. cent) and significant relationship with premature delivery and premature rupture of the membranes (at less than 37 weeks of amenorrhea) in epidemiological case-control and cohort studies taking into account demographic and concomitant obstetric characteristics. In particular, histological lesions indicative of chorioamniotitis have been correlated with prematurity and with the presence of bacteria (usually those involved in vaginosis) in the amniochorial space. Bacterial vaginosis can give rise to ascending infections which reach the amniochorial space and cause uterine contractions or alter the amniochorial membrane, leading to premature rupture of the membranes. These epidemiological data must, however, be confirmed by controlled trials of antibiotics active in bacterial vaginosis and their preventive effect on prematurity and premature rupture of the membranes. Finally, bacterial vaginosis can play a role in endometritis following both natural and caesarean delivery; this has been shown in multivariate analyses with adjustment for maternal age, duration of labor and rupture of the membranes, and isolation of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis from the endometrium. PMID:8484090

  7. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  8. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  9. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  10. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  11. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  12. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  13. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction. Classification and management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R C

    2001-05-01

    Psychogenic factors are involved alone or in combination with organic causes in a substantial number of cases of erectile dysfunction. Epidemiologic studies have implicated the role of depressed mood, loss of self-esteem, and other psychosocial stresses in the cause of erectile dysfunction. A new definition and classification of psychogenic erectile dysfunction has been proposed based on recent clinical and research findings. According to this new classification, psychogenic erectile dysfunction is categorized as generalized or situational type, with subcategories of each type proposed. Traditional treatment approaches for psychogenic erectile dysfunction have included anxiety reduction and desensitization procedures, cognitive-behavioral interventions, guided sexual stimulation techniques, and couples' or relationship counseling. Recently, these approaches increasingly have been combined with pharmacologic therapy such as sildenafil. Special situations have been identified in which combining psychosocial interventions with medical therapy is recommended. These situations include problems of sexual initiation, low sexual desire, other sexual dysfunctions, and significant couples' or relationship problems. More research is needed on the role of psychosocial interventions in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  14. The anatomy of group dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, David F

    2014-04-01

    The dysfunction of the radiology group has 2 components: (1) the thinking component-the governance structure of the radiology group; how we manage the group; and (2) the structural component-the group's business model and its conflict with the partner's personal business model. Of the 2 components, governance is more important. Governance must be structured on classic, immutable business management principles. The structural component, the business model, is not immutable. In fact, it must continually change in response to the marketplace. Changes in the business model should occur only if demanded or permitted by the marketplace; instituting changes for other reasons, including personal interests or deficient knowledge of the deciders, is fundamentally contrary to the long-term interests of the group and its owners. First, we must learn basic business management concepts to appreciate the function and necessity of standard business models and standard business governance. Peter Drucker's The Effective Executive is an excellent primer on the subjects of standard business practices and the importance of a functional, authorized, and fully accountable chief executive officer.

  15. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  16. Nonobvious obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R; Knop, Eric; Bedi, Raman; Knop, Nadja; Holland, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    This review presents the rationale and supporting data for a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The historical understanding of MGD has been that of an infectious hypersecretory disorder with obvious signs of inflammation, hypersecretion, and purulent excreta. The current understanding of MGD now includes the polar concept of a less obvious or nonobvious type of hyposecretory obstructive MGD, where inflammation and other signs of pathology may be absent unless special examination techniques are employed. A new term, nonobvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD), is used to describe what may be the most common form of obstructive MGD. Obstructive MGD is an area of growing importance because obstructive MGD is now recognized to be the most common cause of evaporative dry eye, and because NOMGD seems to be the precursor to obvious obstructive MGD, it is also an important area to understand. The prevalence of NOMGD seems to be very high but currently significantly underdiagnosed. This review presents the relevant anatomy and physiology, concepts of obstructive MGD, the usual absence of inflammation in obstructive MGD, nomenclature and classification of obstructive and NOMGD, clinical diagnosis of NOMGD emphasizing the necessity for diagnostic expression, the use of a new instrument for diagnostic expression providing a standardized method of assessing meibomian gland functionality, the complementary roles of the aqueous and lipid layers, and the specific treatment of NOMGD, emphasizing that the success of treatment of all forms of obstructive MGD is dependent on the relief of the obstruction.

  17. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment. PMID:25187905

  18. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K

    1994-12-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes secondary to several known causative agents, and parkinsonian syndromes associated with more widespread CNS lesions and extensive neurologic deficits. They constitute movement disorders with a similar constellation of symptoms: rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, gait impairment, and postural instability. All of the parkinsonian syndromes are associated with excess morbidity and mortality from respiratory causes, and all can produce the pattern of pulmonary function impairment consistent with neuromuscular disease. In addition, the parkinsonian syndromes can produce upper airway obstruction and abnormalities of ventilatory control, both of which can be life-threatening in those with MSA. The medications used to treat these disorders can also produce respiratory disease. A syndrome of L-dopa-induced respiratory dysfunction has been described, which may be a heterogeneic disorder of choreiform movements of the respiratory muscles, rigidity-akinesis of the respiratory muscles, or abnormal central control of ventilation, all related to the drug. In addition, the ergot-derived dopamine agonists can cause pleural and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:7867286

  19. Diagnostic testing for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, D O

    1992-09-01

    What can we expect in the next decade? In addition to the obviously anticipated clarification of normal values relating to erectile function and anatomy and refinement of examinations, tests, and procedures, there is still much to be discovered, refined, and defined. We can anticipate new medications being found to enhance penile erections. Maybe a pacemaker will be possible that will stimulate an erection. New methods will be developed to insert coils and scarring agents for veno-occlusive disorders. Drugs will be produced in the form of pills, creams, or injectables that will dilate, clean out, or prevent blockage in the arteries. Preventing erectile dysfunction should become the issue in the 1990s and the next century. Changes in life-style such as reducing stress, eating healthier, stopping smoking, exercising more, and reducing alcohol consumption will lead to better bodily functioning. Essentially, taking responsibility for our own well being will become important. Health promotion, instead of curing, will receive greater focus. Education will play an important part in realizing a goal of mature sexuality and improved general well-being. PMID:1529366

  20. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  1. Nonobvious obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R; Knop, Eric; Bedi, Raman; Knop, Nadja; Holland, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    This review presents the rationale and supporting data for a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The historical understanding of MGD has been that of an infectious hypersecretory disorder with obvious signs of inflammation, hypersecretion, and purulent excreta. The current understanding of MGD now includes the polar concept of a less obvious or nonobvious type of hyposecretory obstructive MGD, where inflammation and other signs of pathology may be absent unless special examination techniques are employed. A new term, nonobvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD), is used to describe what may be the most common form of obstructive MGD. Obstructive MGD is an area of growing importance because obstructive MGD is now recognized to be the most common cause of evaporative dry eye, and because NOMGD seems to be the precursor to obvious obstructive MGD, it is also an important area to understand. The prevalence of NOMGD seems to be very high but currently significantly underdiagnosed. This review presents the relevant anatomy and physiology, concepts of obstructive MGD, the usual absence of inflammation in obstructive MGD, nomenclature and classification of obstructive and NOMGD, clinical diagnosis of NOMGD emphasizing the necessity for diagnostic expression, the use of a new instrument for diagnostic expression providing a standardized method of assessing meibomian gland functionality, the complementary roles of the aqueous and lipid layers, and the specific treatment of NOMGD, emphasizing that the success of treatment of all forms of obstructive MGD is dependent on the relief of the obstruction. PMID:20847669

  2. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease. PMID:10501847

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in degenerative ataxias.

    PubMed

    Connelly, T; Farmer, J M; Lynch, D R; Doty, R L

    2003-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in higher-order olfactory processing. In this study, we administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a standardised test of olfactory function, to patients with ataxias primarily due to cerebellar pathology (spinocerebellar ataxias and related disorders) and to patients with Friedreich ataxia, an ataxia associated mainly with loss of afferent cerebellar pathways. UPSIT scores were slightly lower in both patient groups than in the control subjects, but no differences were noted between the scores of the Friedreich and the other ataxia patients. Within the Friedreich ataxia group, the smell test scores did not correlate with the number of pathologic GAA repeats (a marker of genetic severity), disease duration, or categorical ambulatory ability. UPSIT scores did not correlate with disease duration, although they correlated marginally with ambulatory status in the patients with cerebellar pathology. This study suggests that olfactory dysfunction may be a subtle clinical component of degenerative ataxias, in concordance with the hypothesis that the cerebellum or its afferents plays some role in central olfactory processing.

  4. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  5. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  6. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the nasal and oral cavities by dynamic closure of the velo-pharyngeal port is necessary for normal speech and swallowing. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) may either follow repair of a cleft palate or be independent of clefting. While the diagnosis of VPD is made by audiologic perceptual evaluation of speech, identification of the mechanism of the dysfunction requires instrumental visualization of the velo-pharyngeal port during specific speech tasks. Matching the specific intervention for management of VPD with the type of dysfunction, i.e. differential management for differential diagnosis, maximizes the result while minimizing the morbidity of the intervention. PMID:19884668

  7. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  8. [Management of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, José A; Alarcia-Alejos, Raquel

    2015-04-16

    Autonomic dysfunction is a common manifestation in patients with in Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes precede motor impairment. It can be expressed as orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, supine hypertension, hypersalivation, constipation, delayed gastric emptying, dyshidrosis, bladder and sexual dysfunction. It impairs the quality of life of patients and complicates the management of motor symptoms. Evidence available to treat complications is low. Our aim is to review the pathophysiology and clinical features of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and provide a practical approach to handling the available evidence.

  9. Role of Lipotoxicity in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-a; Montagnani, Monica; Chandrasekran, Sruti; Quon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipotoxicity, caused in large part by overnutrition, directly leads to endothelial dysfunction. Excess lipids in both the circulation and at the tissue level contribute to endothelial dysfunction that underlies much of the pathophysiology of both metabolic disease, including obesity and diabetes and their CV complications. Direct lipotoxic effects on other organs as well as secondary insults from endothelial dysfunction synergize to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle interventions, including reduced calorie intake, diet, and exercise as well as a variety of pharmacologic interventions targeting various mechanisms underlying lipotoxicity in vascular endothelium significantly modify metabolic and CV risk. PMID:22999242

  10. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  11. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  12. New determinants of prognosis in bacterial infections in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Juan; Fernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the knowledge and management of liver diseases achieved in recent decades, decompensation of cirrhosis still carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality. Bacterial infections are one of the main causes of decompensation. It is very important for clinical management to be aware of the population with the highest risk of poor outcome. This review deals with the new determinants of prognosis in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infections reported recently. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria has led to an increasing failure rate of the standard empirical antibiotic therapy recommended by international guidelines. Moreover, it has been recently reported that endothelial dysfunction is associated with the degree of liver dysfunction and, in infected patients, with the degree of sepsis. It has also been reported that relative adrenal insufficiency is frequent in the non-critically ill cirrhotic population and it is associated with a higher risk of developing infection, severe sepsis, hepatorenal syndrome and death. We advise a change in the standard empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with high risk for multiresistant infections and also to take into account endothelial and adrenal dysfunction in prognostic models in hospitalized patients with decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:24966596

  13. Proliferation Vulnerability Red Team report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J.P.; Barnard, R.W.; Bennett, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    This report is the product of a four-month independent technical assessment of potential proliferation vulnerabilities associated with the plutonium disposition alternatives currently under review by DOE/MD. The scope of this MD-chartered/Sandia-led study was limited to technical considerations that could reduce proliferation resistance during various stages of the disposition processes below the Stored Weapon/Spent Fuel standards. Both overt and covert threats from host nation and unauthorized parties were considered. The results of this study will be integrated with complementary work by others into an overall Nonproliferation and Arms Control Assessment in support of a Secretarial Record of Decision later this year for disposition of surplus U.S. weapons plutonium.

  14. The bacterial lipocalins.

    PubMed

    Bishop, R E

    2000-10-18

    The lipocalins were once regarded as a eukaryotic protein family, but new members have been recently discovered in bacteria. The first bacterial lipocalin (Blc) was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Blc is distinguished from most lipocalins by the absence of intramolecular disulfide bonds, but the presence of a membrane anchor is shared with two of its closest homologues, apolipoprotein D and lazarillo. Several common features of the membrane-anchored lipocalins suggest that each may play an important role in membrane biogenesis and repair. Additionally, Blc proteins are implicated in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and in the activation of immunity. Recent genome sequencing efforts reveal the existence of at least 20 bacterial lipocalins. The lipocalins appear to have originated in Gram-negative bacteria and were probably transferred horizontally to eukaryotes from the endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of the mitochondrion. The genome sequences also reveal that some bacterial lipocalins exhibit disulfide bonds and alternative modes of subcellular localization, which include targeting to the periplasmic space, the cytoplasmic membrane, and the cytosol. The relationships between bacterial lipocalin structure and function further illuminate the common biochemistry of bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  15. Proliferation behavior of E. coli in a three-dimensional in vitro tumor model.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Nelita; Lee, Tae; You, Lingchong; Yuan, Fan

    2011-06-01

    Advances in genetic engineering of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) have made this organism an attractive candidate for gene delivery vehicle. However, proliferation and transport behaviors of E. coli in three-dimensional (3D) tumor environment are still unclear. To this end, we developed a novel microfluidics-based tumor model that permitted direct in situ visualization of E. coli in a 3D environment with densely packed tumor cells (B16.F10 or EMT6). The E. coli was engineered to co-express two proteins invasin and mCherry (inv(+)) so that they had the ability to enter mammalian cells and could be visualized via fluorescence microscopy. E. coli expressing mCherry alone (inv(-)) was used as the control counterpart. The inv(-) bacteria proliferated to a higher extent than inv(+) bacteria in both the 3D tumor model and a 2D monolayer culture model. Meanwhile, the proliferation appeared to be tumor cell type dependent since bacteria did not proliferate as well in the EMT6 model compared to the B16.F10 model. These differences in bacterial proliferation were likely to be caused by inhibitors secreted by tumor cells, as suggested by our data from the bacterial-tumor cell monolayer co-culture experiment. The bacterial proliferation provided a driving force for E. coli spreading in the 3D interstitial space of tumors. These findings are useful for researchers to develop novel strategies for improvement of bacteria-mediated oncolysis or gene delivery in cancer treatment.

  16. Prolonged neutrophil dysfunction after Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to hemolysis and heme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Cunnington, Aubrey J; Njie, Madi; Correa, Simon; Takem, Ebako N; Riley, Eleanor M; Walther, Michael

    2012-12-01

    It is not known why people are more susceptible to bacterial infections such as nontyphoid Salmonella during and after a malaria infection, but in mice, malarial hemolysis impairs resistance to nontyphoid Salmonella by impairing the neutrophil oxidative burst. This acquired neutrophil dysfunction is a consequence of induction of the cytoprotective, heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in neutrophil progenitors in bone marrow. In this study, we assessed whether neutrophil dysfunction occurs in humans with malaria and how this relates to hemolysis. We evaluated neutrophil function in 58 Gambian children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria [55 (95%) with uncomplicated disease] and examined associations with erythrocyte count, haptoglobin, hemopexin, plasma heme, expression of receptors for heme uptake, and HO-1 induction. Malaria caused the appearance of a dominant population of neutrophils with reduced oxidative burst activity, which gradually normalized over 8 wk of follow-up. The degree of neutrophil impairment correlated significantly with markers of hemolysis and HO-1 induction. HO-1 expression was increased in blood during acute malaria, but at a cellular level HO-1 expression was modulated by changes in surface expression of the haptoglobin receptor (CD163). These findings demonstrate that neutrophil dysfunction occurs in P. falciparum malaria and support the relevance of the mechanistic studies in mice. Furthermore, they suggest the presence of a regulatory pathway to limit HO-1 induction by hemolysis in the context of infection and indicate new targets for therapeutic intervention to abrogate the susceptibility to bacterial infection in the context of hemolysis in humans.

  17. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  18. Academic Achievement and Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, R. Philip; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The investigation provided no evidence that a diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction based on a pediatric neurological evaluation and/or visual-motor impairment as measured by the Bender-Gestalt, is a useful predictor of academic achievement. (Author)

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Hepatic Dysfunction in Typhoid Fever During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hasbun H., Jorge; Osorio, Raúl; Hasbun, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    We described the hepatic dysfunction found in 10 cases out of 32 women with typhoid fever during pregnancy. This was associated with late diagnosis and maternal and perinatal complications. PMID:17485807

  1. Erectile dysfunction in the cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Jackson, Graham; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Montorsi, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common in the patient with cardiovascular disease. It is an important component of the quality of life and it also confers an independent risk for future cardiovascular events. The usual 3-year time period between the onset of erectile dysfunction symptoms and a cardiovascular event offers an opportunity for risk mitigation. Thus, sexual function should be incorporated into cardiovascular disease risk assessment for all men. A comprehensive approach to cardiovascular risk reduction (comprising of both lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment) improves overall vascular health, including sexual function. Proper sexual counselling improves the quality of life and increases adherence to medication. This review explores the critical connection between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease and evaluates how this relationship may influence clinical practice. Algorithms for the management of patient with erectile dysfunction according to the risk for sexual activity and future cardiovascular events are proposed.

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  3. Shockwave treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Ilan; Appel, Boaz; Kitrey, Noam D; Vardi, Yoram

    2013-04-01

    Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (LI-ESWT) is a novel modality that has recently been developed for treating erectile dysfunction (ED). Unlike other current treatment options for ED, all of which are palliative in nature, LI-ESWT is unique in that it aims to restore the erectile mechanism in order to enable natural or spontaneous erections. Results from basic science experiments have provided evidence that LI-ESWT induces cellular microtrauma, which in turn stimulates the release of angiogenic factors and the subsequent neovascularization of the treated tissue. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been clinically investigated and applied in several medical fields with various degrees of success. High-intensity shock wave therapy is used for lithotripsy because of its focused mechanical destructive nature, and medium-intensity shock waves have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and are used for treating a wide array of orthopedic conditions, such as non-union fractures, tendonitis, and bursitis. In contrast, LI-ESWT has angiogenetic properties and is therefore used in the management of chronic wounds, peripheral neuropathy, and in cardiac neovascularization. As a result of these characteristics we initiated a series of experiments evaluating the effect of LI-ESWT on the cavernosal tissue of patients with vasculogenic ED. The results of our studies, which also included a double-blind randomized control trial, confirm that LI-ESWT generates a significant clinical improvement of erectile function and a significant improvement in penile hemodynamics without any adverse effects. Although further extensive research is needed, LI-ESWT may create a new standard of care for men with vasculogenic ED.

  4. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  5. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Paolo; Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  6. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  8. Experimental Bacterial Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Durack, D. T.; Beeson, P. B.; Petersdorf, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A simple and reliable model for endocarditis in rabbits has been studied and standardized. Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis was produced on either side of the heart by the presence of a polyethylene catheter. One day later, this was converted into bacterial endocarditis by single intravenous injections of streptococci, staphylococci, Proteus and Candida. No infection resulted from injection of L-forms or virus. Reduction of inoculum size or withdrawal of the catheter reduced the incidence of bacterial endocarditis, but the presence of a catheter in the heart for only a few minutes predisposed to infection. Left-sided Streptococcus viridans infection was uniformly fatal, with average survival of about two weeks. Right-sided infection was not always fatal; approximately 25% of infected vegetations healed spontaneously. The advantages of a standardized model for endocarditis which allows exact timing of infection are discussed. ImagesFigs. 1-2 PMID:4700697

  9. Salivary gland dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenfeld, D.; Webster, G.; Cameron, F.; Ferguson, M.M.; MacFadyen, E.E.; MacFarlane, T.W.

    1983-02-01

    Radioactive iodine is used extensively for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid carcinoma. Iodine is actively taken up by the salivary glands and, following its use, salivary dysfunction may result as a consequence of radiation damage. The literature is reviewed and a case is reported in which a patient presented with a significant increase in caries rate attributed to salivary dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy for a thyroid carcinoma.

  10. [Thyroid dysfunction and the hemostatic system].

    PubMed

    Platonova, N M; Sviridonova, M A; Troshina, E A

    2014-01-01

    Whether there is a link between thyroid dysfunction and different impairments in the hemostatic system is discussed. The level of thyroid hormones is an essential factor that influences the coagulation system. Thyroid dysfunction affects the balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis, by increasing the risk of thrombosis and hemorrhage in hyperthyroidism. However, there is no consensus of opinion regarding the mechanisms of the described hemostatic changes in the literature. PMID:25509900

  11. Managing thyroid dysfunction in selected special situations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Managing thyroid dysfunction is simple at first glance, the idea is to bring hormone levels in the euthyroid range, treat with antithyroid drugs, radio-iodine or surgery if toxic and replace with thyroxine or T3 if hypothyroid. Complexities arise when there are coexisting conditions that affect the thyroid or are affected by thyroid dysfunction and this review will deal with the special situations that need care when correcting thyroid hormone levels. PMID:23379325

  12. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context. PMID:24073569

  13. Stratum corneum dysfunction in dandruff.

    PubMed

    Turner, G A; Hoptroff, M; Harding, C R

    2012-08-01

    Dandruff is characterized by a flaky, pruritic scalp and affects up to half the world's population post-puberty. The aetiology of dandruff is multifactorial, influenced by Malassezia, sebum production and individual susceptibility. The commensal yeast Malassezia is a strong contributory factor to dandruff formation, but the presence of Malassezia on healthy scalps indicates that Malassezia alone is not a sufficient cause. A healthy stratum corneum (SC) forms a protective barrier to prevent water loss and maintain hydration of the scalp. It also protects against external insults such as microorganisms, including Malassezia, and toxic materials. Severe or chronic barrier damage can impair proper hydration, leading to atypical epidermal proliferation, keratinocyte differentiation and SC maturation, which may underlie some dandruff symptoms. The depleted and disorganized structural lipids of the dandruff SC are consistent with the weakened barrier indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss. Further evidence of a weakened barrier in dandruff includes subclinical inflammation and higher susceptibility to topical irritants. We are proposing that disruption of the SC of the scalp may facilitate dandruff generation, in part by affecting susceptibility to metabolites from Malassezia. Treatment of dandruff with cosmetic products to directly improve SC integrity while providing effective antifungal activity may thus be beneficial. PMID:22515370

  14. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  15. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  16. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  17. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  18. Bacterial ecologies in limonite.

    PubMed

    Vishniac, W

    1965-01-01

    Limonite (Fe2O3 . nH2O) may be a constituent of the Martian surface. We have prepared culture media with ferric hydroxide as an electron acceptor. One medium contained ethanol, another gaseous hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Bacterial growth without light and oxygen suggests that ferric iron serves as a terminal respiratory electron acceptor. The oxidation of ferrous hydroxide may be carried out by photosynthetic bacteria. A ferrous-ferric couple may thus support bacterial respiration and photosynthesis in the absence of oxygen. This cycle may account for the dark markings of Mars.

  19. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  20. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  1. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials.

  2. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials. PMID:27634843

  3. Osteoblast dysfunctions in bone diseases: from cellular and molecular mechanisms to therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierre J

    2015-04-01

    Several metabolic, genetic and oncogenic bone diseases are characterized by defective or excessive bone formation. These abnormalities are caused by dysfunctions in the commitment, differentiation or survival of cells of the osteoblast lineage. During the recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the osteoblast dysfunctions in osteoporosis, skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors. This led to suggest novel therapeutic approaches to correct these abnormalities such as the modulation of WNT signaling, the pharmacological modulation of proteasome-mediated protein degradation, the induction of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation, the repression of cancer cell proliferation and the manipulation of epigenetic mechanisms. This article reviews our current understanding of the major cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing osteoblastic cell abnormalities in age-related bone loss, genetic skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors, and discusses emerging therapeutic strategies to counteract the osteoblast abnormalities in these disorders of bone formation.

  4. Effects of Supplemental Calcium or Calcium-binding Agents on Staphylococcal Bacteriophage Proliferation in Skim Milk.

    PubMed

    Das, N K; Marshall, R T

    1967-11-01

    Additions of 0.0005 N calcium borogluconate to Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB) produced an increase in phage titer about 1 million-fold, whereas its addition to skim milk resulted in about a 100-fold decrease in the maximal titer. Supplemental calcium had a stimulatory influence on bacterial growth in TSB but not in skim milk. Studies were made of the effect of binding of calcium of skim milk on the proliferation of staphylococcal bacteriophage. Sequestering the calcium with 2% phosphate mixture inactivated the phages without affecting the bacterial growth. However, chelation of calcium by 0.012% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid produced an inhibitory effect on both the phages and the bacteria.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Female Reproduction and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Vitti, Maurizio; Di Emidio, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Michela; Carta, Gaspare; Antonosante, Andrea; Artini, Paolo Giovanni; Cimini, Annamaria; Tatone, Carla; Benedetti, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive functions may be altered by the exposure to a multitude of endogenous and exogenous agents, drug or environmental pollutants, which are known to affect gene transcription through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activation. PPARs act as ligand activated transcription factors and regulate metabolic processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. All PPARs isotypes are expressed along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are strictly involved in reproductive functions. Since female fertility and energy metabolism are tightly interconnected, the research on female infertility points towards the exploration of potential PPARs activating/antagonizing compounds, mainly belonging to the class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and fibrates, as useful agents for the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunctions. In the present review, we discuss the recent evidence about PPARs expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and their involvement in female reproduction. Finally, the therapeutic potential of their manipulation through several drugs is also discussed. PMID:27559343

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Female Reproduction and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Vitti, Maurizio; Di Emidio, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Michela; Carta, Gaspare; Antonosante, Andrea; Artini, Paolo Giovanni; Cimini, Annamaria; Tatone, Carla; Benedetti, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive functions may be altered by the exposure to a multitude of endogenous and exogenous agents, drug or environmental pollutants, which are known to affect gene transcription through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activation. PPARs act as ligand activated transcription factors and regulate metabolic processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. All PPARs isotypes are expressed along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are strictly involved in reproductive functions. Since female fertility and energy metabolism are tightly interconnected, the research on female infertility points towards the exploration of potential PPARs activating/antagonizing compounds, mainly belonging to the class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and fibrates, as useful agents for the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunctions. In the present review, we discuss the recent evidence about PPARs expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and their involvement in female reproduction. Finally, the therapeutic potential of their manipulation through several drugs is also discussed.

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Female Reproduction and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Gaspare; Artini, Paolo Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive functions may be altered by the exposure to a multitude of endogenous and exogenous agents, drug or environmental pollutants, which are known to affect gene transcription through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activation. PPARs act as ligand activated transcription factors and regulate metabolic processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. All PPARs isotypes are expressed along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are strictly involved in reproductive functions. Since female fertility and energy metabolism are tightly interconnected, the research on female infertility points towards the exploration of potential PPARs activating/antagonizing compounds, mainly belonging to the class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and fibrates, as useful agents for the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunctions. In the present review, we discuss the recent evidence about PPARs expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and their involvement in female reproduction. Finally, the therapeutic potential of their manipulation through several drugs is also discussed. PMID:27559343

  8. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  9. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  10. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  11. Staining bacterial flagella easily.

    PubMed Central

    Heimbrook, M E; Wang, W L; Campbell, G

    1989-01-01

    A wet-mount technique for staining bacterial flagella is highly successful when a stable stain and regular slides and cover slips are used. Although not producing a permanent mount, the technique is simple for routine use when the number and arrangement of flagella are critical in identifying species of motile bacteria. Images PMID:2478573

  12. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  13. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  14. The international nuclear non-proliferation system

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, T.

    1985-01-01

    This volume focuses upon the issues raised at this Conference, and attempts to address the international diplomatic, political and trading, rather than technical, questions which surround nuclear non-proliferation policies. It does so by bringing together chapters contributed by participants in non-proliferation diplomacy, those with experience in shaping International Atomic Energy Agency and national policies and academic observers of non-proliferation activities and the international nuclear industry. An analysis is provided of past non-proliferation policies and activities and current issues, and an attempt is made to offer ideas for new initiatives which may sustain the non-proliferation system in the future.

  15. Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Zentner, Michael D.

    2008-05-01

    This article explores how emphasizing proliferation resistance will accomplish that goal. What does it mean for a nuclear fuel cycle to be resistant to proliferation? How can the risk of proliferation from a fuel cycle be evaluated? How has proliferation been considered in the past and how is it being considered in nuclear energy development programs today? How should proliferation concerns interact with facility safety and operations? How do proliferation concerns affect the prospects for nuclear energy in the 21st century? And finally, what is the thinking today in relation to deployment arrangements, technical measures, and R&D programs that are in place or proposed that could both decrease the risk of proliferation and ensure the successful renaissance of nuclear power.

  16. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ACTIVATION OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-ALPHA OR HIGH-FAT FEEDING IN A RAT INFARCT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intracardiac accumulation of lipid and related intermediates (e.g., ceramide) is associated with cardiac dysfunction and may contribute to the progression of heart failure (HF). Overexpression of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) increases intramyocellula...

  17. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  18. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  19. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  20. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  1. Evaluation of Sports-Related Temporomandibular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, Matthew E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the steps used in evaluation of sports- related temporomandibular dysfunctions and make recommendation for treatment and referral based upon the evaluation findings. Data Sources: This review searched Cinahl (1982 to 1995) and Medline (1986 to 1995). Key words searched included “sports related temporomandibular dysfunction,” “temporomandibular dysfunction,” and “temporomandibular joint.” Data Synthesis: This paper provides an introduction to the anatomy and biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as well as causes of temporomandibular disorders in athletes. An analysis of the evaluative steps used for the temporomandibular joint is also given. Findings that suggest specific temporomandibular dysfunctions are discussed. Conclusions/Recommendations: Recommendations about when dental consultation is most appropriate or if conservative treatment is indicated are included. Hopefully, this will provide the sports medicine practitioner with a better understanding of the joint and its dysfunctions, as well as eliminate some unnecessary and costly dental referrals for our athletes. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4. PMID:16558422

  2. In situ evolutionary rate measurements show ecological success of recently emerged bacterial hybrids.

    PubMed

    Denef, Vincent J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2012-04-27

    Few data are available on how quickly free-living microorganisms evolve. We analyzed biofilms collected from a well-defined acid mine drainage system over 9 years to investigate the processes and determine rates of bacterial evolution directly in the environment. Population metagenomic analyses of the dominant primary producer yielded the nucleotide substitution rate, which we used to show that proliferation of a series of recombinant bacterial strains occurred over the past few decades. The ecological success of hybrid bacterial types highlights the role of evolutionary processes in rapid adaptation within natural microbial communities. PMID:22539719

  3. In situ evolutionary rate measurements show ecological success of recently emerged bacterial hybrids.

    PubMed

    Denef, Vincent J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2012-04-27

    Few data are available on how quickly free-living microorganisms evolve. We analyzed biofilms collected from a well-defined acid mine drainage system over 9 years to investigate the processes and determine rates of bacterial evolution directly in the environment. Population metagenomic analyses of the dominant primary producer yielded the nucleotide substitution rate, which we used to show that proliferation of a series of recombinant bacterial strains occurred over the past few decades. The ecological success of hybrid bacterial types highlights the role of evolutionary processes in rapid adaptation within natural microbial communities.

  4. Challenges and Management of Liver Cirrhosis: Pathophysiology of Renal Dysfunction in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Solà, Elsa; Ginès, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a common complication of patients with advanced cirrhosis and is associated with poor prognosis. Patients with advanced cirrhosis show circulatory dysfunction characterized by reduced systemic vascular resistance due to splanchnic arterial vasodilation, which is caused by portal hypertension. The progressive reduction in systemic vascular resistance leads to effective arterial hypovolemia. In order to maintain arterial pressure within normal limits in this setting, there is activation of systemic vasoconstrictor systems, including the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system and, in late stages, nonosmotic hypersecretion of vasopressin. Although these systems have positive effects in maintaining arterial pressure, they have a negative influence on kidney function, leading to the retention of sodium and solute-free water, and in late stages of the disease an intense kidney vasoconstriction develops, leading to decrease of the glomerular filtration rate and the development of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Moreover, bacterial translocation and the existence of a systemic inflammatory state in patients with advanced cirrhosis may play a role in the impairment of circulatory function. HRS is a unique cause of kidney failure of functional origin that develops in patients with cirrhosis. However, besides HRS, patients with cirrhosis may develop kidney failure due to other causes, including bacterial infections, prerenal kidney failure, shock, use of nephrotoxic drugs or intrinsic kidney diseases. Considering the existence of circulatory dysfunction and some degree of kidney vasoconstriction, patients with advanced cirrhosis have fragile kidney function and are susceptible to easily developing kidney failure associated with other complications of the disease, particularly bacterial infections and gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26159270

  5. Menin represses tumorigenesis via repressing cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting; Hua, Xianxin

    2011-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) results from mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, MEN1, which encodes nuclear protein menin. Menin is important for suppressing tumorigenesis in various endocrine and certain non-endocrine tissues. Although menin suppresses MEN1 through a variety of mechanisms including regulating apoptosis and DNA repair, the role of menin in regulating cell proliferation is one of the best-studied functions. Here, we focus on reviewing various mechanisms underlying menin-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Menin inhibits cell proliferation to repress MEN1 through multiple mechanisms. 1) Menin interacts with various histonemodifying enzymes, such as MLL, EZH2 and HDACs, to affect gene transcription, leading to repression of cell proliferation. 2) Menin also interacts with various transcription factors, such as JunD, NF-κB, PPARγ and VDR, to induce or suppress gene transcription. As these various transcription factors are known to regulate cell proliferation, their interaction with menin may be relevant to menin's role in inhibiting cell proliferation. 3) Menin inhibits cell proliferation via TGF-β signaling and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. 4) Menin represses certain pro-proliferative factors involved in endocrine tumors such as IGFBP-2, IGF2 and PTHrP to repress cell proliferation. 5) Menin affects cell cycle progression to inhibit cell proliferation. This review is helpful in our understanding of the comprehensive mechanisms whereby menin represses MEN1 through inhibiting cell proliferation. PMID:22016823

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are involved in lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-induced endothelial cell dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2014-08-15

    The underlying mechanisms that lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency causes infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in multiple organs and subsequent inflammation remain incompletely understood. Endothelial cells (ECs), lining the inner layer of blood vessels, constitute barriers regulating leukocytes transmigration to the site of inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that ECs are dysfunctional in LAL-deficient (lal(-/-)) mice. We found that Ly6G(+) cells transmigrated more efficiently across lal(-/-) ECs than wild-type (lal(+/+)) ECs, which were associated with increased levels of PECAM-1 and MCP-1 in lal(-/-) ECs. In addition, lal(-/-) ECs showed enhanced migration and proliferation, decreased apoptosis, but impaired tube formation and angiogenesis. lal(-/-) ECs also suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, lal(-/-) Ly6G(+) cells promoted in vivo angiogenesis (including a tumor model), EC tube formation, and proliferation. Finally, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was activated in lal(-/-) ECs, and inhibition of mTOR reversed EC dysfunctions, including decreasing Ly6G(+) cell transmigration, delaying migration, and relieving suppression of T cell proliferation, which was mediated by decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that LAL regulates EC functions through interaction with MDSCs and modulation of the mTOR pathway, which may provide a mechanistic basis for targeting MDSCs or mTOR to rejuvenate EC functions in LAL deficiency-related diseases. PMID:25000979

  7. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin.

  8. Mutagenic Assessment of Olmesartan Cilexetil by Bacterial Mutation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Won; Ahn, Ilyoung; Ryu, Sung Ha; Jeon, Hong Ryeol; Lee, Bong Sang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a serious health problem due to high frequency and concomitant other diseases including cardiovascular and renal dysfunction. Olmesartan cilexetil is a new antihypertensive drug associated with angiotensin II receptor antagonist. This study was conducted to evaluate the mutagenicity of olmesartan cilexetil by bacterial reverse mutation test using Salmonella typhimurium (TA100, TA1535, TA98, and TA1537) and Escherichia coli (WP2 uvrA). At the concentrations of 0, 62, 185, 556, 1667, and 5000 μg/ plate, olmesartan cilexetil was negative in both Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli regardless of presence or absence of metabolic activation system (S9 mix). These results demonstrate that olmesartan cilexetil does not induce bacterial reverse mutation. PMID:24386523

  9. Bacterial ratchet motors

    PubMed Central

    Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.; Dell’Arciprete, D.; Ruocco, G.; Iebba, V.; Schippa, S.; Conte, M. P.; Mecarini, F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-propelling bacteria are a nanotechnology dream. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment, and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines can be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for microdevices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric environments can produce a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of nanofabricated objects immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self-assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the rotor boundaries. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter’s ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids. PMID:20457936

  10. Flagella and bacterial pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    As locomotive organelles, flagella allow bacteria to move toward favorable environments. A flagellum consists of three parts: the basal structure (rotary motor), the hook (universal joint), and the filament (helical propeller). For ages, flagella have been generally regarded as important virulence factors, mainly because of their motility property. However, flagella are getting recognized to play multiple roles with more functions besides motility and chemotaxis. Recent evidence has pinpointed that the bacterial flagella participate in many additional processes including adhesion, biofilm formation, virulence factor secretion, and modulation of the immune system of eukaryotic cells. This mini-review summarizes data from recent studies that elucidated how flagella, as a virulence factor, contribute to bacterial pathogenicity.

  11. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  12. Flagella and bacterial pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    As locomotive organelles, flagella allow bacteria to move toward favorable environments. A flagellum consists of three parts: the basal structure (rotary motor), the hook (universal joint), and the filament (helical propeller). For ages, flagella have been generally regarded as important virulence factors, mainly because of their motility property. However, flagella are getting recognized to play multiple roles with more functions besides motility and chemotaxis. Recent evidence has pinpointed that the bacterial flagella participate in many additional processes including adhesion, biofilm formation, virulence factor secretion, and modulation of the immune system of eukaryotic cells. This mini-review summarizes data from recent studies that elucidated how flagella, as a virulence factor, contribute to bacterial pathogenicity. PMID:22359233

  13. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed.

  14. Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cells utilize three-dimensional (3D) protein assemblies to perform important cellular functions such as growth, division, chemoreception, and motility. These assemblies are composed of mechanoproteins that can mechanically deform and exert force. Sometimes, small-nucleotide hydrolysis is coupled to mechanical deformations. In this review, we describe the general principle for an understanding of the coupling of mechanics with chemistry in mechanochemical systems. We apply this principle to understand bacterial cell shape and morphogenesis and how mechanical forces can influence peptidoglycan cell wall growth. We review a model that can potentially reconcile the growth dynamics of the cell wall with the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as MreB and crescentin. We also review the application of mechanochemical principles to understand the assembly and constriction of the FtsZ ring. A number of potential mechanisms are proposed, and important questions are discussed. PMID:22126993

  15. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  16. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  17. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Westerweel, Peter E; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2009-06-01

    Rheumatic disease is characterized by inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, which contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can restore dysfunctional endothelium and thereby protect against atherosclerotic vascular disease. The number and function of EPCs are, however, affected in rheumatic diseases such as psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis. rheumatic disease is often characterized by decreased numbers, and impaired function, of EPCs, although numbers of these cells might increase during the initial years of systemic sclerosis. Pioneering studies show that EPC dysfunction might be improved with pharmacological treatment. How best to restore EPC function, and whether achieving this aim can prevent long-term cardiovascular complications in rheumatic disease, remain to be established.

  18. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  19. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  20. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  1. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  2. Stratum corneum dysfunction in dandruff

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G A; Hoptroff, M; Harding, C R

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synopsis Dandruff is characterized by a flaky, pruritic scalp and affects up to half the world’s population post-puberty. The aetiology of dandruff is multifactorial, influenced by Malassezia, sebum production and individual susceptibility. The commensal yeast Malassezia is a strong contributory factor to dandruff formation, but the presence of Malassezia on healthy scalps indicates that Malassezia alone is not a sufficient cause. A healthy stratum corneum (SC) forms a protective barrier to prevent water loss and maintain hydration of the scalp. It also protects against external insults such as microorganisms, including Malassezia, and toxic materials. Severe or chronic barrier damage can impair proper hydration, leading to atypical epidermal proliferation, keratinocyte differentiation and SC maturation, which may underlie some dandruff symptoms. The depleted and disorganized structural lipids of the dandruff SC are consistent with the weakened barrier indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss. Further evidence of a weakened barrier in dandruff includes subclinical inflammation and higher susceptibility to topical irritants. We are proposing that disruption of the SC of the scalp may facilitate dandruff generation, in part by affecting susceptibility to metabolites from Malassezia. Treatment of dandruff with cosmetic products to directly improve SC integrity while providing effective antifungal activity may thus be beneficial. Résumé Les pellicules se caractérisent par un cuir chevelu prurigineux, squameux, et affectent jusqu’à la moitié de la population post-pubertaire du monde. L’étiologie des pellicules est multifactorielle, influencée par Malassezia, par la production de sébum, et par la susceptibilité individuelle. La levure commensale Malassezia est un facteur fortement contributif à la formation de pellicules, mais la présence de Malassezia aussi sur les cuirs chevelus sains indique que Malassezia seule n’est pas une cause

  3. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  4. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  5. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control.

  6. Neglected Bacterial Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. While many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which a broad spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. Thus, this review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis, and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  7. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298

  8. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: A Dental Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, Clyde D.

    1985-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is common and often acutely painful. Because of the large and diverse symptom complex created by this disorder, patients frequently first seek relief from their physician rather than their dentist. In this article temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is defined and the presenting signs and symptoms are discussed. Their etiology is described in relation to the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination techniques can help in the differential diagnosis. Current treatment ranges from heat, local anesthesia and ultrasound to anxiolytics, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and nutritional supplementation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:21274225

  10. Consideration of sleep dysfunction in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Marie Carmen; Rodenstein, Daniel O; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2011-07-01

    The physiology of sleep is not completely understood but it is widely accepted that sleep is important to the human body in the recovery of metabolic and neurological processes. This paper summarizes the effects of sleep dysfunction on different systems and considers implications in the context of rehabilitation. When sleep is experimentally completely or partially curtailed important brain functions are impacted leading to psychological and neurological disturbances. Increased cortisol levels, reduction of glucose tolerance, and increased sympathetic nervous system activity have also been identified in healthy subjects under such conditions. Several studies show that 50-80% of patients with chronic pain suffer from sleep dysfunction. It has been suggested that on the one hand pain can cause sleep dysfunction and on the other hand that sleep dysfunction can aggravate pain. The physiologic mechanism behind this interaction is not completely clear; although most authors describe the relationship between pain and sleep dysfunction as aberrant processing of tactile-cutaneous sensory inputs at the meso-encephalic level and in the trigeminal nucleus both when asleep and awake. Decreased duration of sleep also increases heart rate, blood pressure and sympathetic activity magnifying the individual's response to stressful stimuli. Possible causal mechanisms for the established connection between short sleep cycles and coronary pathology include sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity, increased blood pressure increase or reduced glucose tolerance. Finally, sleep and fatigue have traditionally been linked. Fatigue can have a physical etiology but is also associated with depression. Sleep alterations are also considered an important risk factor for psychological dysfunction and also mental illness. However, despite the noted repercussions of sleep dysfunction, studies investigating interventions to improve sleep have been limited in number. Benefits of exercise programs on

  11. Vestibular dysfunction in occupational chronic solvent intoxication.

    PubMed

    Arlien-Søborg, P; Zilstorff, K; Grandjean, B; Milling Pedersen, L

    1981-08-01

    Neurotoxic volatile organic solvents used by house and car painters may lead to professional toxic encephalopathy after several years of exposure. The symptoms are memory impairment, fatigue, personality changes, headache and dizziness. Vestibular dysfunction was found in 55% of 113 painters examined, mainly in the form of reduced caloric vestibular reactions. No correlation between vestibular dysfunction and the duration of exposure, cerebral atrophy or intellectual impairment could be demonstrated. Vestibular examination may be helpful in detecting early changes in exposed persons and in determining more accurate safety limits for harmful chemicals.

  12. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria.

  13. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Amar, M. Ben

    2016-01-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching. PMID:26888040

  14. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria. PMID:27434155

  15. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  16. The Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nisbet, Rachel E.; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulate diverse physiological processes ranging from lipogenesis to inflammation. Recent evidence has established potential roles of PPARs in both systemic and pulmonary vascular disease and function. Existing treatment strategies for pulmonary hypertension, the most common manifestation of pulmonary vascular disease, are limited by an incomplete understanding of the underlying disease pathogenesis and lack of efficacy indicating an urgent need for new approaches to treat this disorder. Derangements in pulmonary endothelial-derived mediators and endothelial dysfunction have been shown to play a pivotal role in pulmonary hypertension pathogenesis. Therefore, the following review will focus on selected mediators implicated in pulmonary vascular dysfunction and evidence that PPARs, in particular PPARγ, participate in their regulation and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:17710111

  17. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  18. Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction: Clinical Implications in Cardiovascular Disease and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Ha; Park, Woo Jung

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive vascular disease. It starts early in life, has a long asymptomatic phase, and a progression accelerated by various cardiovascular risk factors. The endothelium is an active inner layer of the blood vessel. It generates many factors that regulate vascular tone, the adhesion of circulating blood cells, smooth muscle proliferation, and inflammation, which are the key mechanisms of atherosclerosis and can contribute to the development of cardiovascular events. There is growing evidence that functional impairment of the endothelium is one of the first recognizable signs of development of atherosclerosis and is present long before the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the endothelium's central role provides not only insights into pathophysiology, but also a possible clinical opportunity to detect early disease, stratify cardiovascular risk, and assess response to treatments. In the present review, we will discuss the clinical implications of endothelial function as well as the therapeutic issues for endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease as primary and secondary endothelial therapy.

  20. Hypoxia, mitochondrial dysfunction and synovial invasiveness in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Ursula; Canavan, Mary; Biniecka, Monika; Veale, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Synovial proliferation, neovascularization and leukocyte extravasation transform the normally acellular synovium into an invasive tumour-like 'pannus'. The highly dysregulated architecture of the microvasculature creates a poor oxygen supply to the synovium, which, along with the increased metabolic turnover of the expanding synovial pannus, creates a hypoxic microenvironment. Abnormal cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction thus ensue and, in turn, through the increased production of reactive oxygen species, actively induce inflammation. When exposed to hypoxia in the inflamed joint, immune-inflammatory cells show adaptive survival reactions by activating key proinflammatory signalling pathways, including those mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and Notch, which contribute to synovial invasiveness. The reprogramming of hypoxia-mediated pathways in synovial cells, such as fibroblasts, dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, and might therefore provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27225300

  1. Trg-deficient Salmonella colonize quiescent tumor regions by exclusively penetrating or proliferating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miaomin; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-02-10

    Chemotherapeutics fail to effectively treat tumors because they cannot reach quiescent regions far from blood vessels. Motile Salmonella are an attractive delivery system that could break this therapeutic barrier. However, little is known about the dissemination and tissue penetration of individual bacteria in tumors after intravenous administration. We hypothesized that eliminating the Trg receptor would improve accumulation in tumor quiescence. To test this hypothesis, we deleted the trg gene from nonpathogenic Salmonella. To quantify individual bacterial behavior, we measured tissue penetration in a tumor-on-a-chip device and measured colony localization in mouse tumors using immunofluorescence. In tumors in vitro and in mice, trg(-) Salmonella penetrated farther into tissue than control bacteria. This difference in localization was caused by the inability to sense sugars in well perfused tissue. Three distinct bacterial phenotypes were observed: proliferating, penetrating, and inactive. Large proliferating colonies, containing more than 40% of individual bacteria, only formed less than 60μm from blood vessels. Small colonies, in comparison, were present both near (inactive) and far (penetrating) from vessels. The farthest was 361.2μm from a vessel, demonstrating the ability to target avascular regions. In addition, colonization was most pronounced in poorly vascularized tumor regions. We show that deletion of trg amplifies Salmonella accumulation in quiescent tumor regions, and, for the first time, identify biological processes that control bacterial distribution in tumors. Understanding how Salmonella penetrate tissue, target quiescence and specifically replicate in tumors are essential steps toward creating a tightly controlled, tunable bacterial therapy.

  2. Renal Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huifang; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been posited to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Due to the heterogeneity of endothelial cells (ECs), it is difficult to generalize about endothelial responses to diabetic stimuli. At present, there are limited techniques fordirectly measuring EC function in vivo, so diagnosis of endothelial disorders still largely depends on indirect assessment of mediators arising from EC injury. In the kidney microcirculation, both afferent and efferent arteries, arterioles and glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) have all been implicated as targets of diabetic injury. Both hyperglycemia per se, as well as the metabolic consequences of glucose dysregulation, are thought to lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. In this regard, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in EC dysfunction. Impaired eNOS activity can occur at numerous levels, including enzyme uncoupling, post-translational modifications, internalization and decreased expression. Reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability exacerbates oxidative stress, further promoting endothelial dysfunction and injury. The injured ECs may then function as active signal transducers of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors that modify the function and morphology of the vessel wall and interact with adjacent cells, which may activate a cascade of inflammatory and proliferative and profibrotic responses in progressive DN. Both pharmacological approaches and potential regenerative therapies hold promise for restoration of impaired endothelial cells in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24720460

  3. Sinus node dysfunction: recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rusk, Karla; Scordo, Kristine

    2012-12-10

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) refers to a wide range of abnormalities involving sinus node and atrial impulse generation and propagation. SND occurs at any age and is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Clinicians must be able to accurately diagnose this syndrome, which can present from asymptomatic bradycardia to atrial standstill.

  4. New insights into environmental enteric dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) has been recognised as an important contributing factor to physical and cognitive stunting, poor response to oral vaccines, limited resilience to acute infections and ultimately global childhood mortality. The aetiology of EED remains poorly defined but the ep...

  5. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  6. Minimal Brain Dysfunction: Associations with Perinatal Complications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Paul L.

    Examined with over 28,000 7-year-old children whose mothers registered for prenatal care was the relationship between perinatal complications and such characteristics as poor school achievement, hyperactivity, and neurological soft signs associated with the diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction (MBD). Ten perinatal antecedents were studied:…

  7. Syllable Structure in Dysfunctional Portuguese Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candeias, Sara; Perdigao, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate whether children with speech dysfunctions (SD) show a deficit in planning some Portuguese syllable structures (PSS) in continuous speech production. Knowledge of which aspects of speech production are affected by SD is necessary for efficient improvement in the therapy techniques. The case-study is focused…

  8. Salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kakaidi, Varvara; Bairaktari, Eleni; Elisaf, Moses

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who was admitted to our clinic for drug poisoning. Twelve hours after the ingestion of 25 tablets of aspirin (12.5 g of acetylsalicylic acid), the patient had a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction characterized by glucosuria (in the face of normal serum glucose levels), proteinuria, and uric acid wasting. Further characterization of the tubular dysfunction using high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the urine showed a pattern consistent with proximal tubular injury. An important characteristic of the salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction in our patient was its rapid reversibility. A trend toward normalization of fractional excretion values of electrolytes was observed 2 days after ingestion. Determination of serum and urine metabolites and spectroscopy of urine 15 days later showed no evidence of tubular dysfunction. The mechanisms potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of salicylate-induced Fanconi syndrome are discussed and a brief review of the relevant literature is provided. PMID:17720526

  9. Adolescent Depression: Stress and Reward Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Admon, Roee; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a peak period for the onset of depression, and it is also a time marked by substantial stress as well as neural development within the brain reward circuitry. In the current review, we provide a selective overview of current animal and human research investigating the relationship among reward processes, stress, and depression. Three separate, but related, etiological models examine the differential roles that stress may play with regard to reward dysfunction and adolescent depression. First, the reward mediation model suggests that acute and chronic stress contribute to reward deficits, which in turn, potentiate depressive symptoms and/or increase the risk for depression. Second, in line with the stress generation perspective, it is plausible that premorbid reward-related dysfunction generates stress, in particular interpersonal stress, which then leads to the manifestation of depressive symptoms. Last, consistent with a diathesis-stress model, the interaction between stress and premorbid reward dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression. Given the equifinal nature of depression, these models could shed important light on different etiological pathways during adolescence, particularly as they may relate to understanding the heterogeneity of depression. To highlight the translational potential of these insights, a hypothetical case study is provided as means of demonstrating the importance of targeting reward dysfunction in both assessment and treatment of adolescent depression. PMID:24704785

  10. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castellon, Xavier; Bogdanova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and subclinical atherosclerosis as well as early-stage endothelial dysfunction screening using the FMD method (Flow Mediated Dilation). This phenomenon, referred to as accelerated pathological remodeling of arterial wall, could be attributed to traditional risk factors associated with atherosclerosis. Several new non-invasive techniques have been used to study arterial wall’s structural and functional alterations. These techniques (based of Radio Frequency, RF) allow for an assessment of artery age through calculations of intima-media thickness (RF- QIMT), pulse wave rate (RF- QAS) and endothelial dysfunction degree (FMD). The inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors, result of the major consequences of oxidative stress and RAS (Renin Angiotensin System) imbalance associated with the deleterious effect of known risk factors that lead to the alteration of the arterial wall. Inflammation plays a key role in all stages of the formation of vascular lesions maintained and exacerbated by the risk factors. The consequence of chronic inflammation is endothelial dysfunction that sets in and we can define it as an integrated marker of the damage to arterial walls by classic risk factors. The atherosclerosis, which develops among these patients, is the main cause for cardiovascular morbi-mortality and uncontrolled chronic biological inflammation, which quickly favors endothelial dysfunction. These inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26815098

  11. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  12. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD).

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Geraint J; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J; Jester, James V

    2013-11-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction.

  13. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  14. Pleiotropic age-dependent effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on epidermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Michael C; Demaria, Marco; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2015-08-18

    Tissue homeostasis declines with age partly because stem/progenitor cells fail to self-renew or differentiate. Because mitochondrial damage can accelerate aging, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction impairs stem cell renewal or function. We developed a mouse model, Tg(KRT14-cre/Esr1) (20Efu/J) × Sod2 (tm1Smel) , that generates mitochondrial oxidative stress in keratin 14-expressing epidermal stem/progenitor cells in a temporally controlled manner owing to deletion of Sod2, a nuclear gene that encodes the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2). Epidermal Sod2 loss induced cellular senescence, which irreversibly arrested proliferation in a fraction of keratinocytes. Surprisingly, in young mice, Sod2 deficiency accelerated wound closure, increasing epidermal differentiation and reepithelialization, despite the reduced proliferation. In contrast, at older ages, Sod2 deficiency delayed wound closure and reduced epidermal thickness, accompanied by epidermal stem cell exhaustion. In young mice, Sod2 deficiency accelerated epidermal thinning in response to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, phenocopying the reduced regeneration of older Sod2-deficient skin. Our results show a surprising beneficial effect of mitochondrial dysfunction at young ages, provide a potential mechanism for the decline in epidermal regeneration at older ages, and identify a previously unidentified age-dependent role for mitochondria in skin quality and wound closure.

  15. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  16. Mucociliary dysfunction in HIV and smoked substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapaiyan, Srinivasan; Unwalla, Hoshang J.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC) is a hallmark of acquired chronic airway diseases like chronic bronchitis associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. This manifests as microbial colonization of the lung consequently leading to recurrent respiratory infections. People living with HIV demonstrate increased incidence of these chronic airway diseases. Bacterial pneumonia continues to be an important comorbidity in people living with HIV even though anti-retroviral therapy has succeeded in restoring CD4+ cell counts. People living with HIV demonstrate increased microbial colonization of the lower airways. The microbial flora is similar to that observed in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD suggesting that mucociliary dysfunction could be a contributing factor to the increased incidence of chronic airway diseases in people living with HIV. The three principal components of the MCC apparatus are, a mucus layer, ciliary beating, and a periciliary airway surface liquid (ASL) layer that facilitates ciliary beating. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a pivotal role in regulating the periciliary ASL. HIV proteins can suppress all the components of the MCC apparatus by increasing mucus secretion and suppressing CFTR function. This can decrease ASL height leading to suppressed ciliary beating. The effects of HIV on MCC are exacerbated when combined with other aggravating factors like smoking or inhaled substance abuse, which by themselves can suppress one or more components of the MCC system. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to MCC suppression in people living with HIV who also smoke tobacco or abuse illicit drugs. PMID:26528246

  17. Mucociliary dysfunction in HIV and smoked substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Chinnapaiyan, Srinivasan; Unwalla, Hoshang J

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC) is a hallmark of acquired chronic airway diseases like chronic bronchitis associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. This manifests as microbial colonization of the lung consequently leading to recurrent respiratory infections. People living with HIV demonstrate increased incidence of these chronic airway diseases. Bacterial pneumonia continues to be an important comorbidity in people living with HIV even though anti-retroviral therapy has succeeded in restoring CD4+ cell counts. People living with HIV demonstrate increased microbial colonization of the lower airways. The microbial flora is similar to that observed in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD suggesting that mucociliary dysfunction could be a contributing factor to the increased incidence of chronic airway diseases in people living with HIV. The three principal components of the MCC apparatus are, a mucus layer, ciliary beating, and a periciliary airway surface liquid (ASL) layer that facilitates ciliary beating. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a pivotal role in regulating the periciliary ASL. HIV proteins can suppress all the components of the MCC apparatus by increasing mucus secretion and suppressing CFTR function. This can decrease ASL height leading to suppressed ciliary beating. The effects of HIV on MCC are exacerbated when combined with other aggravating factors like smoking or inhaled substance abuse, which by themselves can suppress one or more components of the MCC system. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to MCC suppression in people living with HIV who also smoke tobacco or abuse illicit drugs. PMID:26528246

  18. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis.

  19. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  20. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Gregory J; Morgan, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections occur in 25-35 % of cirrhotics admitted to hospital. Health-care associated and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections are the most common epidemiology, with community acquired infections less common (15-30 %). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and urinary infections are the most common sites, with spontaneous bacteremia, pneumonia, cellulitis and other sites being less common. The risk of infection is increased among subjects with more severe liver disease and an infection in the past 6 months. Bacteria are isolated from approximately half of patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection. Gram-negative enterobacteriaceae are the most common organisms among community acquired infections; Gram-positive cocci are the most common organisms isolated among subjects with nosocomial infections. Up to 30 % of hospital associated infections are with multidrug resistant bacteria. Consequently, empiric antibiotic therapy that is recommended for community acquired infections is often inadequate for nosocomial infections. Infections worsen liver function. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of cirrhotics with infections is significantly higher than among cirrhotics without infection. In-hospital complications of infections, such as severe sepsis and septic shock, and mortality, are increased among subjects with multidrug-resistant infections as compared with cirrhotics with susceptible bacteria. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of cirrhotics with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis of selected cirrhotics with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis reduces infections and improves survival. Albumin administration to cirrhotics with SBP and evidence of advanced liver disease improves survival. The benefit of albumin administration to cirrhotics with infections other than SBP is under investigation. PMID:26201326

  1. Diverse Bacterial Microcompartment Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Sinha, Sharmistha; Chun, Sunny; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are sophisticated protein-based organelles used to optimize metabolic pathways. They consist of metabolic enzymes encapsulated within a protein shell, which creates an ideal environment for catalysis and facilitates the channeling of toxic/volatile intermediates to downstream enzymes. The metabolic processes that require MCPs are diverse and widely distributed and play important roles in global carbon fixation and bacterial pathogenesis. The protein shells of MCPs are thought to selectively control the movement of enzyme cofactors, substrates, and products (including toxic or volatile intermediates) between the MCP interior and the cytoplasm of the cell using both passive electrostatic/steric and dynamic gated mechanisms. Evidence suggests that specialized shell proteins conduct electrons between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the MCP and/or help rebuild damaged iron-sulfur centers in the encapsulated enzymes. The MCP shell is elaborated through a family of small proteins whose structural core is known as a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) domain. BMC domain proteins oligomerize into flat, hexagonally shaped tiles, which assemble into extended protein sheets that form the facets of the shell. Shape complementarity along the edges allows different types of BMC domain proteins to form mixed sheets, while sequence variation provides functional diversification. Recent studies have also revealed targeting sequences that mediate protein encapsulation within MCPs, scaffolding proteins that organize lumen enzymes and the use of private cofactor pools (NAD/H and coenzyme A [HS-CoA]) to facilitate cofactor homeostasis. Although much remains to be learned, our growing understanding of MCPs is providing a basis for bioengineering of protein-based containers for the production of chemicals/pharmaceuticals and for use as molecular delivery vehicles. PMID:25184561

  2. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ruth A.; Keen, John A.; Walker, Brian R.; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL) is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing’s disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing’s syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6) and horses with EL (n = 6) destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein) and the facial skin (facial skin arteries) by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10−9–10-5M) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10−9–10-5M) and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10−9–10-5M) was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01). In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006) and veins (P = 0.009) from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof. PMID:27684374

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in head injured workers.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Rutka, J

    1999-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction following trauma has been widely reported and is currently compensable according to existing American Medical Association guidelines when it occurs in the occupational setting. Its presence and the risk factors for its development, however, have not been clearly delineated in occupationally head injured workers. In order to assess this phenomenon, a series of 365 consecutive head injured workers from 1993-1997 was assessed in order to determine the incidence of post-traumatic olfactory dysfunction and its association with the severity of the head injury, the mechanism of injury and other neurotological abnormalities in the same cohort group. Olfactory dysfunction was identified in 13.7% (9.3% with anosmia, 4.4% with hyposmia/dysosmia). It was more likely where the loss of consciousness > 1 h (p < 0.002), in more severe head injuries (grades II-V) (p < 0.001) and when skull fracture (p < 0.001) occurred. The direction of the blow applied to the skull did not influence its presence, although radiologically confirmed skull fractures in the frontal, occipital, skull base and midface were twice as likely as temporal and parietal fractures to result in an olfactory change. From a neurotologic perspective, approximately 21.9% of head injured workers were determined to have recognizable evidence of cochleovestibular dysfunction. Olfactory dysfunction as a physical finding post-head injury compares favourably with the presence of post-traumatic benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) and its atypical variants in 11.2% of head injured workers. PMID:10445080

  4. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Johnston, K L

    1999-03-01

    It is clear that the exact definition of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) needs to be reappraised in veterinary medicine. Antibiotic responsive enteropathies due to SIBO must be distinguished from those that are not associated with SIBO, such as those caused by a lack of immune tolerance. Once appropriate definitions and criteria for diagnosis are in place, the wide variety of diagnostic procedures that may facilitate the diagnosis can be evaluated with respect to their sensitivity and specificity, and statements about the prevalence and significance of this disorder can be made.

  5. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  6. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  7. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections.

  8. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  9. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  10. Calcium Sensing Receptor as a Novel Mediator of Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Mechanisms and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Mattar, Pamela; Díaz, Ximena; Lavandero, Sergio; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue (WAT) is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. WAT dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Among the regulators of WAT physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has arisen as a potential mediator of WAT dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that CaSR activation in the visceral (i.e., unhealthy) WAT is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to CaSR activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in WAT plays a key role in the development of WAT dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that CaSR may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic.

  11. Calcium Sensing Receptor as a Novel Mediator of Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Mechanisms and Potential Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Mattar, Pamela; Díaz, Ximena; Lavandero, Sergio; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue (WAT) is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. WAT dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Among the regulators of WAT physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has arisen as a potential mediator of WAT dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that CaSR activation in the visceral (i.e., unhealthy) WAT is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to CaSR activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in WAT plays a key role in the development of WAT dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that CaSR may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic. PMID:27660614

  12. Calcium Sensing Receptor as a Novel Mediator of Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Mechanisms and Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Mattar, Pamela; Díaz, Ximena; Lavandero, Sergio; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue (WAT) is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. WAT dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Among the regulators of WAT physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has arisen as a potential mediator of WAT dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that CaSR activation in the visceral (i.e., unhealthy) WAT is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to CaSR activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in WAT plays a key role in the development of WAT dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that CaSR may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic. PMID:27660614

  13. Calcium Sensing Receptor as a Novel Mediator of Adipose Tissue Dysfunction: Mechanisms and Potential Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Mattar, Pamela; Díaz, Ximena; Lavandero, Sergio; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently a serious worldwide public health problem, reaching pandemic levels. For decades, dietary and behavioral approaches have failed to prevent this disease from expanding, and health authorities are challenged by the elevated prevalence of co-morbid conditions. Understanding how obesity-associated diseases develop from a basic science approach is recognized as an urgent task to face this growing problem. White adipose tissue (WAT) is an active endocrine organ, with a crucial influence on whole-body homeostasis. WAT dysfunction plays a key role linking obesity with its associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. Among the regulators of WAT physiology, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has arisen as a potential mediator of WAT dysfunction. Expression of the receptor has been described in human preadipocytes, adipocytes, and the human adipose cell lines LS14 and SW872. The evidence suggests that CaSR activation in the visceral (i.e., unhealthy) WAT is associated with an increased proliferation of adipose progenitor cells and elevated adipocyte differentiation. In addition, exposure of adipose cells to CaSR activators in vitro elevates proinflammatory cytokine expression and secretion. An increased proinflammatory environment in WAT plays a key role in the development of WAT dysfunction that leads to peripheral organ fat deposition and insulin resistance, among other consequences. We propose that CaSR may be one relevant therapeutic target in the struggle to confront the health consequences of the current worldwide obesity pandemic.

  14. AB028. New drugs for sexual dysfunction complementary medicine for sexual dysfunction in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Australia both oriental and western products are available as complementary medicines. Our aim was to review the current available over-the-counter (OTC) medications for sexual dysfunction and report on this market. Methods Following an earlier published review in 2010, 37 products were reviewed that were listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) and registered with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). These products were manufactured in Australia and laid claim to provide treatment for sexual dysfunction. A review of these products and newer products was undertaken to establish the extent of complementary medicines in Australia for sexual dysfunction and the reported clinical experience. Results As at July 2015 there were 31 Australian manufactured OTC products registered with the TGA on the ARTG for sexual dysfunction. Twenty-four were for male sexual dysfunction, 3 for female sexual dysfunction and 4 for unisex sexual dysfunction. The main herbs used in sexual health products in Australia are tribulus terrestris, panax ginseng and horny goat weed. However, complementary medicine practitioners also promote the use of gingko Bilbo, avena sativa and damiana. Many of the ingredients found in men’s products are also in the women’s products. Although review articles for complementary medicine, sexual dysfunction and libido have been written in Australia, as far as can be investigated there are no published randomized clinical trials in the area of complementary medicine and sexual function. Conclusions Complementary medicine has reached a high degree of development in Australia. But, due to the lack of properly conducted placebo-controlled clinical trials there is not a body of supporting evidence of efficacy, certification of purity, guarantee of safety, or well-documented side effects. Even though most OTC medications for sexual health have mild side effects and some also promote general health, the lack of such evidence

  15. Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F.; Fassnacht, F.; Kuett, M.; Englert, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. In the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.

  16. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  17. Nuclear Proliferation as a Global Values Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jack L.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity designed to involve students in critical thinking and values inquiry concerning the horizontal nuclear proliferation. Provides a set of global values, explaining the conflict between them and nuclear proliferation. Uses indicators, hypothesis development, and testing. Provides sources for material evidence to use in…

  18. Director`s series on proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E.

    1995-11-17

    This is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The views represented are those of the author`s. Essay topics include: Nuclear Proliferation: Myth and Reality; Problems of Enforcing Compliance with Arms Control Agreements; The Unreliability of the Russian Officer Corps: Reluctant Domestic Warriors; and Russia`s Nuclear Legacy.

  19. Transition from cyclosporine-induced renal dysfunction to nephrotoxicity in an in vivo rat model.

    PubMed

    Sereno, José; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Alves, Rui; Fernandes, João; Santos-Silva, Alice; Carvalho, Eugénia; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, remain the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimens, regardless of nephrotoxicity, which depends on the duration of drug exposure. The mechanisms and biomarkers underlying the transition from CsA-induced renal dysfunction to nephrotoxicity deserve better elucidation, and would help clinical decisions. This study aimed to clarify these issues, using a rat model of short- and long-term CsA (5 mg/kg bw/day) treatments (3 and 9 weeks, respectively). Renal function was assessed on serum and urine; kidney tissue was used for histopathological characterization and gene and/or protein expression of markers of proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the short-term, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels increased and clearances decreased, accompanied by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reduction, but without kidney lesions; at that stage, CsA exposure induced proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κβ) and Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) kidney mRNA up-regulation. In the long-term treatment, renal dysfunction data was accompanied by glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions, with remarkable kidney mRNA up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the antigen identified by monoclonal antibody Ki-67 (Mki67), accompanied by mTOR protein overexpression. Transition from CsA-induced renal dysfunction to nephrotoxicity is accompanied by modification of molecular mechanisms and biomarkers, being mTOR one of the key players for kidney lesion evolution, thus suggesting, by mean of molecular evidences, that early CsA replacement by mTOR inhibitors is indeed the better therapeutic choice to prevent chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:24853130

  20. Bacterial body plans

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Tomáš; Neubauer, Zdeněk; Blahůšková, Anna; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2008-01-01

    The bacterium Serratia marcescens produces a plethora of multicellular shapes of different colorations on solid substrates, allowing immediate visual detection of varieties. Such a plasticity allows studies on multicellular community scale spanning two extremes, from well-elaborated individual colonies to undifferentiated cell mass. For a single strain and medium, we obtained a range of different multicellular bodies, depending on the layout of initial plating. Four principal factors affecting the morphogenetic pathways of such bodies can be distinguished: (1) amount, density and distribution pattern of founder cells; (2) the configuration of surrounding free medium; (3) the presence and character of other bacterial bodies sharing the same niche; and (4) self-perception, resulting in delimitation towards other bodies. The last feature results in an ability of well-formed multicellular individuals to maintain their identity upon a close mutual contact, as well as in spontaneous separation of cell masses in experimental chimeras. We propose an “embryo-like” colony model where multicellular bacterial bodies develop along genuine ontogenetic pathways inherent to the given species (clone), while external shaping forces (like nutrient gradients, pH, etc.,) exert not formative, but only regulative roles in the process. PMID:19513204

  1. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  2. The endocannabinoid system drives neural progenitor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Tania; Monory, Krisztina; Palazuelos, Javier; Stella, Nephi; Cravatt, Benjamin; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Kokaia, Zaal; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2005-10-01

    The discovery of multipotent neural progenitor (NP) cells has provided strong support for the existence of neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, the signals controlling NP proliferation remain elusive. Endocannabinoids, the endogenous counterparts of marijuana-derived cannabinoids, act as neuromodulators via presynaptic CB1 receptors and also control neural cell death and survival. Here we show that progenitor cells express a functional endocannabinoid system that actively regulates cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, NPs produce endocannabinoids and express the CB1 receptor and the endocannabinoid-inactivating enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). CB1 receptor activation promotes cell proliferation and neurosphere generation, an action that is abrogated in CB1-deficient NPs. Accordingly, proliferation of hippocampal NPs is increased in FAAH-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that endocannabinoids constitute a new group of signaling cues that regulate NP proliferation and thus open novel therapeutic avenues for manipulation of NP cell fate in the adult brain.

  3. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future.

  4. The bioactive composite film prepared from bacterial cellulose and modified by hydrolyzed gelatin peptide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Bin; Chen, Chia-Che; Chen, Li-Chen; Chen, Hui-Huang

    2015-05-01

    The hydrolyzed gelatin peptides, obtained from the hydrolysis of Tilapia nilotica skin gelatin with alcalase and pronase E, were fractionated using an ultrafiltration system into hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-a (10 kDa membrane), hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b1, and hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2 (5 kDa membrane) fractions. The highest oxygen radical absorbance capacity was observed in hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2, which contained more nonpolar amino acids than the other hydrolyzed gelatin peptides. Hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2 at a concentration of 12.5 mg/ml exhibited the highest proliferation ability and increased the expression of Type I procollagen mRNA, which indicated an enhanced collagen synthesis. Hydrolyzed gelatin peptides protected Detroit 551 cells from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride-induced oxidative damage and increased cell viability. Hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm were less eligible for Detroit 551 cell proliferation than bacterial cellulose. The release of hydrolyzed gelatin peptides in bacterial cellulose film was slower than that in hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm; thus, bacterial cellulose film and hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm are suitable candidates for applications in delayed release type and rapid release type biofilms, respectively.

  5. Nanoparticle approaches against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infections still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infections. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections.

  6. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  7. Central Processing Dysfunctions in Children: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalfant, James C.; Scheffelin, Margaret A.

    Research on central processing dysfunctions in children is reviewed in three major areas. The first, dysfunctions in the analysis of sensory information, includes auditory, visual, and haptic processing. The second, dysfunction in the synthesis of sensory information, covers multiple stimulus integration and short-term memory. The third area of…

  8. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-induced proliferation of astroglial cells by ethanol: mechanisms and implications for the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2002-12-01

    In utero exposure to ethanol is deleterious to fetal brain development. Children born with the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) display a number of abnormalities, the most significant of which are central nervous system (CNS) dysfunctions, such as microencephaly and mental retardation. An interaction of ethanol with glial cells, particularly astrocytes, has been suggested to contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of this alcohol. At low concentrations (10-100 mM) ethanol inhibits the proliferation of astroglial cells in vitro, particularly when stimulated by acetycholine through muscarinic M3 receptors. Of the several signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors in astrocytes or astrocytoma cells, which are involved in mitogenic signaling, only some (e.g. protein kinase C (PKC) zeta, p70S6 kinase) appear to be targeted by ethanol at the same low concentrations which effectively inhibit proliferation. Inhibition of astroglial proliferation by ethanol may contribute to the microencephaly seen in FAS.

  9. Mode of renal replacement therapy determines endotoxemia and neutrophil dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lemesch, Sandra; Ribitsch, Werner; Schilcher, Gernot; Spindelböck, Walter; Hafner-Gießauf, Hildegard; Marsche, Gunther; Pasterk, Lisa; Payerl, Doris; Schmerböck, Bianca; Tawdrous, Monika; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Stiegler, Philipp; Kager, Gerd; Hallström, Seth; Oettl, Karl; Eberhard, Katharina; Horvath, Angela; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection and sepsis are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A vicious cycle of increased gut permeability, endotoxemia, inadequate activation of the innate immune system and resulting innate immune dysfunction is hypothesized. We assessed endotoxemia, neutrophil function and its relation to oxidative stress, inflammation and gut permeability in patients with CKD grade 3–5 without renal replacement therapy (CKD group, n = 57), patients with CKD stage 5 undergoing haemodialysis (HD, n = 32) or peritoneal dialysis (PD, n = 28) and patients after kidney transplantation (KT, n = 67) in a cross-sectional observational study. In HD patients, endotoxin serum levels were elevated and neutrophil phagocytic capacity was decreased compared to all other groups. Patients on HD had a significantly higher mortality, due to infections during follow up, compared to PD (p = 0.022). Oxidative stress, neutrophil energy charge, systemic inflammation and gut permeability could not completely explain these differences. Our findings suggest that dialysis modality and not renal function per se determine the development of neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia in CKD-patients. HD patients are particularly prone to neutrophil dysfunction and endotoxemia whereas neutrophil function seems to improve after KT. Multi-target approaches are therefore warranted to improve neutrophil function and potentially reduce the rate of infections with patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:27698480

  10. Neutrophil function in healthy aged horses and horses with pituitary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Dianne; Hill, Kim; Anton, Jason

    2015-06-15

    Immunosuppression leading to opportunist bacterial infection is a well-recognized sequela of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). The mechanisms responsible for immune dysfunction in PPID however, are as of yet poorly characterized. Horses with PPID have high concentrations of hormones known to impact immune function including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and insulin. α-MSH and related melanocortins have been shown in rodents and people to impair neutrophil function by decreasing superoxide production (known as oxidative burst activity), migration and adhesion. The goal of this study was to determine if neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID and, if so, to determine if plasma α-MSH or insulin concentration correlated with the severity of neutrophil dysfunction. Specifically, neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst activity, chemotaxis and adhesion were assessed. Results of this study indicate that horses with PPID have reduced neutrophil function, characterized by decreased oxidative burst activity and adhesion. In addition, chemotaxis was greater in healthy aged horses than in young horses or aged horses with PPID. Plasma insulin: α-MSH ratio, but not individual hormone concentration was correlated to neutrophil oxidative burst activity. In summary, neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID, likely due to altered hormone concentrations and may contribute to increased risk of opportunistic infections. Whether regulation of hormone concentration profiles in horses with PPID using therapeutic intervention improves neutrophil function and reduces infections needs to be explored.

  11. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  12. Nanoparticle-Stabilized Capsules for the Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Bradley; Li, Xiaoning; Landis, Ryan F; Kim, Sung Tae; Gupta, Akash; Wang, Li-Sheng; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Tang, Rui; Boerth, Jeffrey A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2015-08-25

    Bacterial biofilms are widely associated with persistent infections. High resistance to conventional antibiotics and prevalent virulence makes eliminating these bacterial communities challenging therapeutic targets. We describe here the fabrication of a nanoparticle-stabilized capsule with a multicomponent core for the treatment of biofilms. The peppermint oil and cinnamaldehyde combination that comprises the core of the capsules act as potent antimicrobial agents. An in situ reaction at the oil/water interface between the nanoparticles and cinnamaldehyde structurally augments the capsules to efficiently deliver the essential oil payloads, effectively eradicating biofilms of clinically isolated pathogenic bacteria strains. In contrast to their antimicrobial action, the capsules selectively promoted fibroblast proliferation in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell system making them promising for wound healing applications. PMID:26083534

  13. Nanoparticle-Stabilized Capsules for the Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Bradley; Li, Xiaoning; Landis, Ryan F; Kim, Sung Tae; Gupta, Akash; Wang, Li-Sheng; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Tang, Rui; Boerth, Jeffrey A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2015-08-25

    Bacterial biofilms are widely associated with persistent infections. High resistance to conventional antibiotics and prevalent virulence makes eliminating these bacterial communities challenging therapeutic targets. We describe here the fabrication of a nanoparticle-stabilized capsule with a multicomponent core for the treatment of biofilms. The peppermint oil and cinnamaldehyde combination that comprises the core of the capsules act as potent antimicrobial agents. An in situ reaction at the oil/water interface between the nanoparticles and cinnamaldehyde structurally augments the capsules to efficiently deliver the essential oil payloads, effectively eradicating biofilms of clinically isolated pathogenic bacteria strains. In contrast to their antimicrobial action, the capsules selectively promoted fibroblast proliferation in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell system making them promising for wound healing applications.

  14. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  15. Leaky gut and the liver: A role for bacterial translocation in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    Gut flora and bacterial translocation (BT) play important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen predispose patients to bacterial infections, major complications and also play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disorders. Levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a component of gram-negative bacteria, are increased in the portal and/or systemic circulation in several types of chronic liver disease. Impaired gut epithelial integrity due to alterations in tight junction proteins may be the pathological mechanism underlying bacterial translocation. Preclinical and clinical studies over the last decade have suggested a role for BT in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Bacterial overgrowth, immune dysfunction, alteration of the luminal factors, and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of NASH and its complications. A better understanding of the cell-specific recognition and intracellular signaling events involved in sensing gut-derived microbes will help in the development of means to achieve an optimal balance in the gut-liver axis and ameliorate liver diseases. These may suggest new targets for potential therapeutic interventions for the treatment of NASH. Here, we review some of the mechanisms connecting BT and NASH and potential therapeutic developments. PMID:22690069

  16. Tadalafil therapy for erectile dysfunction following prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Ortaç, Mazhar; Dinçer, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a major complication affecting the quality of life of patients and partners after radical prostatectomy. Evolving evidence suggests that early penile rehabilitation may provide better erectile function after surgery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are routinely considered a first-line treatment option in most algorithms for penile rehabilitation owing to their efficacy, ease of use, wide availability and minimal morbidity. Tadalafil is a long-acting, potent PDE-5 inhibitor for erectile dysfunction, with demonstrated effect in animal studies at preserving penile smooth muscle content and prevention of fibrosis of cavernosal tissue. This article evaluates the existing literature on tadalafil and critically analyzes its impact on erectile function following radical prostatectomy. PMID:26161145

  17. Assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, V; Vijayalakshmi, P; Steffina, Lily; Jayanthan, Ra V

    2009-01-01

    Dysarthria is a neuromotor impairment of speech that affects one or more of the speech sub-systems. It is reflected in the acoustic characteristics of the phonemes as deviations from their healthy counterparts. In the current work, the deviations associated with laryngeal dysfunctions are analysed in order to assess and quantify parameters that will help evaluate dysarthria. Perturbation measures, pitch period statistics and Pitch Variation Index (PVI) are computed for the assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers. The assessments were performed on the Nemours database of dysarthric speech and compared with normal speakers available in the TIMIT speech corpus. The results were correlated with Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment (FDA) scores. The analysis resulted in a technique to predict the degree of severity of dysarthria and illustrate the multi-causal nature of the disorder. PMID:19965223

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  20. Baroreflex Dysfunction in Prader Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Srivastav, Shival; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a classical hypothalamic insufficiency disorder. This syndrome is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality - which could probably be attributed to autonomic dysfunction. A 21-year-old Prader Willi syndrome patient was referred for cardiovascular and autonomic function assessment. We performed a battery of tests assessing vascular structure (carotid intima thickness), vascular function (arterial stiffness indices), baroreflex sensitivity (overall integrator of short term regulation of blood pressure), blood pressure variability and autonomic tone (heart rate variability) along with autonomic reactivity tests. We observed impaired baroreflex sensitivity along with orthostatic tachycardia with normal vascular function tests. Prader- Willi syndrome patient have baroreflex dysfunction with probable afferent and/ central autonomic neural defects. PMID:27134867

  1. Baroreflex Dysfunction in Prader Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Srivastav, Shival; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a classical hypothalamic insufficiency disorder. This syndrome is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality - which could probably be attributed to autonomic dysfunction. A 21-year-old Prader Willi syndrome patient was referred for cardiovascular and autonomic function assessment. We performed a battery of tests assessing vascular structure (carotid intima thickness), vascular function (arterial stiffness indices), baroreflex sensitivity (overall integrator of short term regulation of blood pressure), blood pressure variability and autonomic tone (heart rate variability) along with autonomic reactivity tests. We observed impaired baroreflex sensitivity along with orthostatic tachycardia with normal vascular function tests. Prader- Willi syndrome patient have baroreflex dysfunction with probable afferent and/ central autonomic neural defects. PMID:27134867

  2. High-voltage electrocution causing bulbar dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parvathy, G; Shaji, C V; Kabeer, K A; Prasanth, S R

    2016-01-01

    Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. High-voltage electrical injuries are uncommonly reported and may predispose to both immediate and delayed neurologic complications. We report the case of a 68-year-old man who experienced a high-voltage electrocution injury, subsequently developed bulbar dysfunction and spontaneously recovered. We describe the development of bulbar palsy following a significant electrical injury, which showed no evidence of this on magnetic resonance imaging. High-voltage electrocution injuries are a serious problem with potential for both immediate and delayed neurologic sequelae. The existing literature has no reports on bulbar dysfunction following electrocution, apart from motor neuron disease.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kimmy; Bourdette, Dennis; Forte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has traditionally been considered an autoimmune inflammatory disorder leading to demyelination and clinical debilitation as evidenced by our current standard anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment regimens. While these approaches do control the frequency of clinical relapses, they do not prevent the progressive functional decline that plagues many people with MS. Many avenues of research indicate that a neurodegenerative process may also play a significant role in MS from the early stages of disease, and one of the current hypotheses identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key contributing mechanism. We have hypothesized that pathological permeability transition pore (PTP) opening mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium dysregulation is central to mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in MS. This focused review highlights recent evidence supporting this hypothesis, with particular emphasis on our in vitro and in vivo work with the mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA. PMID:23898299

  4. Effects of cigarette smoking on erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J R; Labbate, C; Ramasamy, R; Tang, D; Lipshultz, L I

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States. Although public policies have resulted in a decreased number of new smokers, smoking rates remain stubbornly high in certain demographics with 20% of all American middle-aged men smoking. In addition to the well-established harmful effects of smoking (i.e. coronary artery disease and lung cancer), the past three decades have led to a compendium of evidence being compiled into the development of a relationship between cigarette smoking and erectile dysfunction. The main physiologic mechanism that appears to be affected includes the nitric oxide signal transduction pathway. This review details the recent literature linking cigarette smoking to erectile dysfunction, epidemiological associations, dose dependency and the effects of smoking cessation on improving erectile quality.

  5. Family Therapy in Complex Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Pamela G.; Mercuri, Louis G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a collaborative approach to the treatment of complex temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Through a positive relationship with a family therapist, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon in this case reports family therapy intervention as an additive solution to resolving apparent recurrent surgical failures. After three surgical procedures, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon noted continued muscle hyperactivity brought on by family environmental stress and arranged for family therapy treatment before a fourth surgical procedure. This paper presents a complicated TMJ case history, documentation for including the family in treatment of pain problems, collaborative efforts necessary for acceptance of referral for psychological intervention, and a family therapy approach to treatment in complex TMJ dysfunction. PMID:3166348

  6. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. PMID:27594188

  7. Tadalafil therapy for erectile dysfunction following prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Ortaç, Mazhar; Dinçer, Murat; Brock, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a major complication affecting the quality of life of patients and partners after radical prostatectomy. Evolving evidence suggests that early penile rehabilitation may provide better erectile function after surgery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are routinely considered a first-line treatment option in most algorithms for penile rehabilitation owing to their efficacy, ease of use, wide availability and minimal morbidity. Tadalafil is a long-acting, potent PDE-5 inhibitor for erectile dysfunction, with demonstrated effect in animal studies at preserving penile smooth muscle content and prevention of fibrosis of cavernosal tissue. This article evaluates the existing literature on tadalafil and critically analyzes its impact on erectile function following radical prostatectomy. PMID:26161145

  8. NATO and nuclear proliferation. Research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Necas, P.; Oliveira, L.; Alligood, M.J.; Frake, S.; Viloria-Villega, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    This research project explores the topic of nuclear proliferation in the current, post-Cold War environment. The intention is to provide the military planner with a basic primer on what has been and will continue to be a highly dynamic problem. The methodology for this research is primarily a literature review to illuminate the nuclear proliferation issue. These topics are critically assessed as they relate to NATO. This process will highlight tasks which NATO should consider accomplishing to confront the challenge of nuclear proliferation. Included in Chapter 1 is an examination of the nuclear environment - which states presently possess or are in pursuit of acquiring nuclear weapons, and what are the motives and disincentives of this pursuit. Methods of proliferation will be explored followed by an analysis of the factors which complicate decision-making on nuclear issues. Chapter 2 discusses the effectiveness of current treaties and international organizations in countering proliferation. Chapter 3 investigates current issues confronting NATO. An overview of the alliance`s new proliferation policy is included in Chapter 4. The paper`s fundamental theme is to provide the reader an understanding of the proliferation issue as well as an appreciation for today`s opportunities to confront the problem.

  9. Ribonucleotides in Bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Randall, Justin R.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2014-01-01

    In all living cells, DNA is the storage medium for genetic information. Being quite stable, DNA is well-suited for its role in storage and propagation of information, but RNA is also covalently included in DNA through various mechanisms. Recent studies also demonstrate useful aspects of including ribonucleotides in the genome during repair. Therefore, our understanding of the consequences of RNA inclusion into bacterial genomic DNA is just beginning, but with its high frequency of occurrence the consequences and potential benefits are likely to be numerous and diverse. In this review, we discuss the processes that cause ribonucleotide inclusion in genomic DNA, the pathways important for ribonucleotide removal and the consequences that arise should ribonucleotides remain nested in genomic DNA. PMID:25387798

  10. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. PMID:24780273

  11. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    PubMed

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed.

  12. Epigenetics and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases. PMID:23209181

  13. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    PubMed

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed. PMID:27664746

  14. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  15. Meibomian gland dysfunction in floppy eyelid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonnering, R S; Sonneland, P R

    1987-01-01

    A 41-year-old obese man presented with bilateral ocular irritation and clinical findings consistent with floppy eyelid syndrome. Light- and electron-microscopic examination of tarsus removed at surgical correction revealed cystic degeneration and squamous metaplasia of the meibomian glands, along with abnormal keratinization and granuloma formation. These findings, not reported before in this syndrome, suggest that meibomian gland dysfunction with attendant qualitative abnormalities of the tear film, may be partly responsible for the keratoconjunctivitis seen in this syndrome.

  16. Tachycardia induced myocardial dysfunction. A reversible phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    McLaran, C J; Gersh, B J; Sugrue, D D; Hammill, S C; Seward, J B; Holmes, D R

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with myocardial dysfunction related to tachycardia underwent electrophysiological studies, which showed a re-entrant supraventricular tachycardia using an accessory atrioventricular connexion. Serial assessment of left ventricular function by echocardiography before and after control of the tachycardia indicated a variable degree of reversibility. Endomyocardial biopsy in two patients detected non-specific histological changes. Because of the possible role of ischaemia in this condition effective control of prolonged tachycardia is needed to prevent deterioration of myocardial function. Images PMID:3970789

  17. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  18. PROFILE OF LIVER DYSFUNCTION IN ALCHOHOL DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Desai, N.G.; Vaswani, M.; Chavan, B.S.; Tripathi, B.M.; Kaw, N.

    1996-01-01

    Ninety two patients of alcohol dependence were studied for liver function at a specialised drug dependence treatment centre. Biochemical laboratory evidence of liver dysfunction was found in a very large number of patients, including the patients who had no clinical signs or symptoms. The findings from this retrospective study are discussed in the context of the earlier studies from other settings in India. PMID:21584115

  19. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  20. The bacterial proteogenomic pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteogenomics combines the cutting-edge methods from genomics and proteomics. While it has become cheap to sequence whole genomes, the correct annotation of protein coding regions in the genome is still tedious and error prone. Mass spectrometry on the other hand relies on good characterizations of proteins derived from the genome, but can also be used to help improving the annotation of genomes or find species specific peptides. Additionally, proteomics is widely used to find evidence for differential expression of proteins under different conditions, e.g. growth conditions for bacteria. The concept of proteogenomics is not altogether new, in-house scripts are used by different labs and some special tools for eukaryotic and human analyses are available. Results The Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline, which is completely written in Java, alleviates the conducting of proteogenomic analyses of bacteria. From a given genome sequence, a naïve six frame translation is performed and, if desired, a decoy database generated. This database is used to identify MS/MS spectra by common peptide identification algorithms. After combination of the search results and optional flagging for different experimental conditions, the results can be browsed and further inspected. In particular, for each peptide the number of identifications for each condition and the positions in the corresponding protein sequences are shown. Intermediate and final results can be exported into GFF3 format for visualization in common genome browsers. Conclusions To facilitate proteogenomics analyses the Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline is a set of comprehensive tools running on common desktop computers, written in Java and thus platform independent. The pipeline allows integrating peptide identifications from various algorithms and emphasizes the visualization of spectral counts from different experimental conditions. PMID:25521444

  1. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME.

  2. Hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction in obese males.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J M; Hochstein, M; Hsu, T H; Lockwood, D H

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated dysfunction of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis in obesity. We have studied 12 obese males to further characterize the extent of this dysfunction. The hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis is normal as determined by the testicular response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), the pituitary response to 200 micrograms gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular response to clomiphene. Although L-dopa suppresses prolactin normally, the ability of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) to stimulate the release of prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is blunted. These latter responses are inversely related to the degree of obesity. The response to chlorpromazine, a hypothalamic stimulus for prolactin secretion, is also blunted, and to a greater extent than the prolactin response to TRH. These data indicate that exogenous obesity in males is associated with more extensive hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction than previously realized. The abnormalities with regard to prolactin and TSH release become progressively worse when body weight exceeds 200 percent of ideal. In addition, when evaluating pituitary function with regard to gonadotropin release, obese males may have an abnormal response to 100 micrograms GnRH but respond normally to 200 micrograms.

  3. Insight Into Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Medalia, Alice; Thysen, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Insight into psychotic symptoms is typically poor in schizophrenia; however, it is not known whether insight into neurocognitive impairment is similarly impaired. Most people with schizophrenia experience cognitive dysfunction, and the deficits in attention, memory, and critical thinking have been associated with poor functional outcome. As new treatments are developed for the cognitive impairments, it will be important to know whether patients will be receptive to yet another therapy. Insight is an important factor in treatment compliance and treatment outcome; however, it is not known if patients have insight into their cognitive dysfunction. In order to assess insight into neuro cognitive dysfunction, 75 subjects were administered the Measure of Insight into Cognition–Clinician Rated, a newly created measure based on the Scale to Access the Unawareness of Mental Disorder, that assesses insight into cognitive impairment. Subjects were also administered the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia and Independent Living Scale–Problem Solving to objectively assess neuropsychological status and problem-solving skills needed for independent living. Results demonstrated that virtually all subjects had cognitive impairment, yet insight into their neuro cognitive symptoms was limited. This finding has potential implications for treatment programs seeking to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia PMID:18199632

  4. An Exposome Perspective on Environmental Enteric Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mapesa, Job O.; Maxwell, Amy L.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposures to chemicals have been shown to influence gastrointestinal function, yet little is known regarding whether chemical mixtures may be involved in the development of a subclinical enteric dysfunction found in infants and children born into poor hygiene and sanitation. Advances in gastrointestinal and immunotoxicology fields merit inclusion in complex discussions of environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) that severely affects children in developing countries. Objective: We aimed to highlight exposome approaches for investigating the potential influence of environmental chemical exposures on EED development, including a role for toxicant modulation of gut immune system and microbiome function. Discussion: A major focus on fecal–oral contamination in impoverished living conditions already exists for EED, and should now expand to include environmental chemicals such as pesticides and heavy metals that may be anthropogenic or dietary or from microbial sources. A comprehensive characterization of environmental chemical exposures prenatally and occurring in infants and young children will enhance our knowledge of any associated risks for EED and stunting. Conclusions: Integrating EED, chemical exposure, and stunting at various ages during childhood will enhance our apparent limited view when evaluating EED. Etiology and intervention studies should evaluate the suite of environmental chemical exposures as candidates in the composite of EED biomarkers. Citation: Mapesa JO, Maxwell AL, Ryan EP. 2016. An exposome perspective on environmental enteric dysfunction. Environ Health Perspect 124:1121–1126; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510459 PMID:26713888

  5. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  6. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  7. Neurocircuitry of limbic dysfunction in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lipsman, Nir; Woodside, D Blake; Lozano, Andres M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric condition marked by firmly entrenched and maladaptive behaviors and beliefs about body, weight and food, as well as high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. The neural roots of AN are now beginning to emerge, and appear to be related to dysfunctional, primarily limbic, circuits driving pathological thoughts and behaviors. As a result, the significant physical symptoms of AN are increasingly being understood at least partially as a result of abnormal or dysregulated emotional processing. This paper reviews the nature of limbic dysfunction in AN, and how structural and functional imaging has implicated distinct emotional and perceptual neural circuits driving AN symptoms. We propose that top-down and bottom-up influences converge on key limbic modulatory structures, such as the subcallosal cingulate and insula, whose normal functioning is critical to affective regulation and emotional homeostasis. Dysfunctional activity in these structures, as is seen in AN, may lead to emotional processing deficits and psychiatric symptoms, which then drive maladaptive behaviors. Modulating limbic dysregulation may therefore be a potential treatment strategy in some AN patients.

  8. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria

    2013-03-10

    The four most common bacterial skin infections are impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, and folliculitis. This article summarizes current information about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and implications for primary care practice needed to effectively diagnose and treat common bacterial skin infections. PMID:23361375

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  10. Urodynamic assessment of voiding dysfunction and dysfunctional voiding in girls and women.

    PubMed

    Everaert, K; Van Laecke, E; De Muynck, M; Peeters, H; Hoebeke, P

    2000-01-01

    Voiding dysfunction is defined as impaired bladder emptying, and presents with a mixture of lower urinary tract symptoms. Dysfunctional voiding is a condition in which there is a lack of coordination between the sphincter and detrusor during emptying in a patient without overt uropathy or neuropathy. Assessment of voiding dysfunction is important in women and girls in the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence, retention, urinary tract infection and subsequent kidney damage. Accurate diagnosis is essential in order to select the correct treatment. Screening can be done by history-taking: symptom scores can help to guide the screening. More objective measures are uroflowmetry, ultrasonography and video-urodynamics. The latter is the gold standard for the diagnosis of voiding dysfunction and consists of simultaneous registration of pressure in the bladder and rectum and external sphincter behavior, either by electromyographic recording of pelvic floor activity or by pressure recording at the external sphincter, during the whole bladder cycle of filling and emptying. On fluoroscopy the bladder can be visualized throughout the filling and emptying phase. In dysfunctional voiding, hypertonicity and instability of the external urethral sphincter during filling cystometry and impaired external sphincter relaxation during emptying are pathognomonic findings. Pressure-flow analysis reveals no obstruction and the detrusor contractility is low.

  11. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  12. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  13. Effects of weightlessness on tissue proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, W. H.; Tavassoli, M.

    1975-01-01

    The repair of bone marrow stroma following mechanical injury was studied to obtain baseline data for a proposed space experiment regarding the effect of weightlessness on marrow stroma and other proliferating cell systems.

  14. Social Preference and Glutamatergic Dysfunction: Underappreciated Prerequisites for Social Dysfunction in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghee; Green, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Impaired social functioning is pervasive in schizophrenia. Unfortunately, existing treatments have limited efficacy, and possible psychological or neurobiological mechanisms underlying social dysfunction in this disorder remain obscure. Here, we evaluate whether social preference, one key aspect of social processing that has been largely overlooked in schizophrenia research, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction can provide insights into the mechanism underlying social dysfunction in schizophrenia. Based on evidence from developmental psychology, and behavioral and clinical neuroscience, we propose a heuristic model in which reduced NMDAR function may induce disrupted social preference that can subsequently lead to social cognitive impairment and social disability. We discuss its implications in terms of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, other disorders with marked social disability, and potential treatments. PMID:27477199

  15. Fighting proliferation new concerns for the nineties

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolski, H.

    1996-09-01

    Iraq`s threatened chemical missile strikes against US forces, combined with its efforts to build nuclear weapons, have quite literally put issues about the proliferation of strategic weapons on the map. Indeed, after Operation Desert Shield, both the Bush and Clinton administrations focused considerable attention on the need to dismantle Iraq`s strategic weapons capabilities and to assure that the strategic weapons complex in the former Soviet Union doesn`t end up helping future Iraqs. Since Operation Desert Storm, though, additional proliferation concern devising an effective strategy against proliferation, coping with the spread of space technology, and curbing Iran`s and North Korea`s strategic programs have emerged. Fighting Proliferation examines these challenges and their implications for US policy. The first of these concern how best to reform existing non- proliferation efforts-is examined in part 1. With the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) indefinitely extended, just exactly how the treaty will be implemented remains unclear. The Clinton administration is on record arguing that the NPT is a model for how the US will curb the proliferation of not only nuclear but all other kinds of strategic weapons. But what does the NPT and its obligations actually mean. Its key proscriptions in Articles 1, 2, and 3 are ambiguous. The treaty also lacks any clear enforcement measures and is nearly impossible to amend.

  16. Managing Proliferation Issues with Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C. Richard; Saltiel, David H.

    2002-02-15

    particular, will continue to play a vital role in determining the extent to which Iran is able to pursue WMD options. Without a fundamental change in the regional security environment, however, there is little reason to expect changes in Iranian WMD and missile policies, and the United States, acting alone and short of war, cannot prevent Iran from ultimately developing WMD and delivery systems. Furthermore, U.S. policies that take a tougher line with Russia, China and North Korea are not likely to lead to more restraint among these potential sources of WMD and missile technology. In the absence of engagement with Iran, unilateral U.S. economic sanctions will remain the principal, if flawed, U.S. policy tool for seeking to prevent Iran from acquiring WMD. The rationale is that by discouraging trade and investment, particularly in Iran's energy sector, the government of Iran will have less revenue to pursue proliferation. Without broad international support for economic isolation, however, such an effort may hinder Iran's WMD programs, though it cannot block them. Finally, options are needed to deal with major failures in nonproliferation efforts. These options include measures to deter Iranian use of WMD, to defend against their use if deterrence fails, and to destroy Iranian WMD capabilities should the need arise.

  17. Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial gastroenteritis is a disease that is pervasive in both the developing and developed worlds. While for the most part bacterial gastroenteritis is self-limiting, identification of an etiological agent by bacterial stool culture is required for the management of patients with severe or prolonged diarrhea, symptoms consistent with invasive disease, or a history that may predict a complicated course of disease. Importantly, characterization of bacterial enteropathogens from stool cultures in clinical laboratories is one of the primary means by which public health officials identify and track outbreaks of bacterial gastroenteritis. This article provides guidance for clinical microbiology laboratories that perform stool cultures. The general characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of key bacterial enteropathogens are summarized. Information regarding optimal specimen collection, transport, and processing and current diagnostic tests and testing algorithms is provided. This article is an update of Cumitech 12A (P. H. Gilligan, J. M. Janda, M. A. Karmali, and J. M. Miller, Cumitech 12A, Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial diarrhea, 1992). PMID:25567220

  18. Bacterial Secretion Systems: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin R; Mecsas, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection.

  19. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  20. Bacterial phospholipases C.

    PubMed Central

    Titball, R W

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pathogenic bacteria produce phospholipases C, and since the discovery in 1944 that a bacterial toxin (Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin) possessed an enzymatic activity, there has been considerable interest in this class of proteins. Initial speculation that all phospholipases C would have lethal properties has not been substantiated. Most of the characterized enzymes fall into one of four groups of structurally related proteins: the zinc-metallophospholipases C, the sphingomyelinases, the phosphatidylinositol-hydrolyzing enzymes, and the pseudomonad phospholipases C. The zinc-metallophospholipases C have been most intensively studied, and lethal toxins within this group possess an additional domain. The toxic phospholipases C can interact with eukaryotic cell membranes and hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, leading to cell lysis. However, measurement of the cytolytic potential or lethality of phospholipases C may not accurately indicate their roles in the pathogenesis of disease. Subcytolytic concentrations of phospholipase C can perturb host cells by activating the arachidonic acid cascade or protein kinase C. Nonlethal phospholipases C, such as the Listeria monocytogenes PLC-A, appear to enhance the release of the organism from the host cell phagosome. Since some phospholipases C play important roles in the pathogenesis of disease, they could form components of vaccines. A greater understanding of the modes of action and structure-function relationships of phospholipases C will facilitate the interpretation of studies in which these enzymes are used as membrane probes and will enhance the use of these proteins as models for eukaryotic phospholipases C. PMID:8336671

  1. Bacterial genotoxicity bioreporters

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Alva; Yagur‐Kroll, Sharon; Pedahzur, Rami; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Ben‐Yoav, Hadar; Shacham‐Diamand, Yosi; Belkin, Shimshon

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ever since the introduction of the Salmonella typhimurium mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay (the ‘Ames test’) over three decades ago, there has been a constant development of additional genotoxicity assays based upon the use of genetically engineered microorganisms. Such assays rely either on reversion principles similar to those of the Ames test, or on promoter–reporter fusions that generate a quantifiable dose‐dependent signal in the presence of potential DNA damaging compounds and the induction of repair mechanisms; the latter group is the subject of the present review. Some of these assays were only briefly described in the scientific literature, whereas others have been developed all the way to commercial products. Out of these, only one, the umu‐test, has been fully validated and ISO‐ and OECD standardized. Here we review the main directions undertaken in the construction and testing of bacterial‐based genotoxicity bioassays, including the attempts to incorporate at least a partial metabolic activation capacity into the molecular design. We list the genetic modifications introduced into the tester strains, compare the performance of the different assays, and briefly describe the first attempts to incorporate such bacterial reporters into actual genotoxicity testing devices. PMID:21255340

  2. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    PubMed

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere.

  3. Positioning of bacterial chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Armitage, Judith P

    2015-05-01

    For optimum growth, bacteria must adapt to their environment, and one way that many species do this is by moving towards favourable conditions. To do so requires mechanisms to both physically drive movement and provide directionality to this movement. The pathways that control this directionality comprise chemoreceptors, which, along with an adaptor protein (CheW) and kinase (CheA), form large hexagonal arrays. These arrays can be formed around transmembrane receptors, resulting in arrays embedded in the inner membrane, or they can comprise soluble receptors, forming arrays in the cytoplasm. Across bacterial species, chemoreceptor arrays (both transmembrane and soluble) are localised to a variety of positions within the cell; some species with multiple arrays demonstrate this variety within individual cells. In many cases, the positioning pattern of the arrays is linked to the need for segregation of arrays between daughter cells on division, ensuring the production of chemotactically competent progeny. Multiple mechanisms have evolved to drive this segregation, including stochastic self-assembly, cellular landmarks, and the utilisation of ParA homologues. The variety of mechanisms highlights the importance of chemotaxis to motile species.

  4. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  5. Impermanence of bacterial clones

    PubMed Central

    Bobay, Louis-Marie; Traverse, Charles C.; Ochman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria reproduce asexually and pass on a single genome copied from the parent, a reproductive mode that assures the clonal descent of progeny; however, a truly clonal bacterial species is extremely rare. The signal of clonality can be interrupted by gene uptake and exchange, initiating homologous recombination that results in the unique sequence of one clone being incorporated into another. Because recombination occurs sporadically and on local scales, these events are often difficult to recognize, even when considering large samples of completely sequenced genomes. Moreover, several processes can produce the appearance of clonality in populations that undergo frequent recombination. The rates and consequences of recombination have been studied in Escherichia coli for over 40 y, and, during this time, there have been several shifting views of its clonal status, population structure, and rates of gene exchange. We reexamine the studies and retrace the evolution of the methods that have assessed the extent of DNA flux, largely focusing on its impact on the E. coli genome. PMID:26195749

  6. All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Nehra, Ajay; Jackson, Graham; Bhasin, Shalender; Billups, Kevin; Burnett, Arthur L; Buvat, Jacques; Carson, Culley; Cunningham, Glenn; Ganz, Peter; Goldstein, Irwin; Guay, Andre; Hackett, Geoff; Kloner, Robert A; Kostis, John B; LaFlamme, K Elizabeth; Montorsi, Piero; Ramsey, Melinda; Rosen, Raymond; Sadovsky, Richard; Seftel, Allen; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wu, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.

  7. All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Nehra, Ajay; Jackson, Graham; Bhasin, Shalender; Billups, Kevin; Burnett, Arthur L; Buvat, Jacques; Carson, Culley; Cunningham, Glenn; Ganz, Peter; Goldstein, Irwin; Guay, Andre; Hackett, Geoff; Kloner, Robert A; Kostis, John B; LaFlamme, K Elizabeth; Montorsi, Piero; Ramsey, Melinda; Rosen, Raymond; Sadovsky, Richard; Seftel, Allen; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wu, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:24423973

  8. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life.

  9. Bacterial genomes: evolution of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Dawn L; Jackson, Robert W

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial pathogens continue to pose a major threat to economically important plant resources. Disease outbreaks can occur through rapid evolution of a pathogen to overcome host defences. The advent of genome sequencing, especially next-generation technologies, has seen a revolution in the study of plant pathogen evolution over the past five years. This review highlights recent developments in understanding bacterial plant pathogen evolution, enabled by genomics and specifically focusing on type III protein effectors. The genotypic changes and mechanisms involved in pathogen evolution are now much better understood. However, there is still much to be learned about the drivers of pathogen evolution, both in terms of plant resistance and bacterial lifestyle.

  10. Function and dysfunction of human sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Joung, Boyoung; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Sinoatrial node (SAN) automaticity is jointly regulated by a voltage (cyclic activation and deactivation of membrane ion channels) and Ca(2+) clocks (rhythmic spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release). Using optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused canine right atrium, we previously demonstrated that the β-adrenergic stimulation pushes the leading pacemaker to the superior SAN, which has the fastest activation rate and the most robust late diastolic intracellular calcium (Cai) elevation. Dysfunction of the superior SAN is commonly observed in animal models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF), which are known to be associated with abnormal SAN automaticity. Using the 3D electroanatomic mapping techniques, we demonstrated that superior SAN served as the earliest atrial activation site (EAS) during sympathetic stimulation in healthy humans. In contrast, unresponsiveness of superior SAN to sympathetic stimulation was a characteristic finding in patients with AF and SAN dysfunction, and the 3D electroanatomic mapping technique had better diagnostic sensitivity than corrected SAN recovery time testing. However, both tests have significant limitations in detecting patients with symptomatic sick sinus syndrome. Recently, we reported that the location of the EAS can be predicted by the amplitudes of P-wave in the inferior leads. The inferior P-wave amplitudes can also be used to assess the superior SAN responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Inverted or isoelectric P-waves at baseline that fail to normalize during isoproterenol infusion suggest SAN dysfunction. P-wave morphology analyses may be helpful in determining the SAN function in patients at risk of symptomatic sick sinus syndrome.

  11. Dysfunctional stress responses in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; Picard, Pascale; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Many dysfunctional and chronic pain conditions overlap. This review describes the different modes of chronic deregulation of the adaptive response to stress which may be a common factor for these conditions. Several types of dysfunction can be identified within the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis: basal hypercortisolism, hyper-reactivity, basal hypocortisolism and hypo-reactivity. Neuroactive steroid synthesis is another component of the adaptive response to stress. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form DHEA-S, and progesterone and its derivatives are synthetized in cutaneous, nervous, and adipose cells. They are neuroactive factors that act locally. They may have a role in the localization of the symptoms and their levels can vary both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Persistent changes in neuroactive steroid levels or precursors can induce localized neurodegeneration. The autonomic nervous system is another component of the stress response. Its dysfunction in chronic stress responses can be expressed by decreased basal parasympathethic activity, increased basal sympathetic activity or sympathetic hyporeactivity to a stressful stimulus. The immune and genetic systems also participate. The helper-T cells Th1 secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whereas Th2 secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IGF-10, IL-13. Chronic deregulation of the Th1/Th2 balance can occur in favor of anti- or pro-inflammatory direction, locally or systemically. Individual vulnerability to stress can be due to environmental factors but can also be genetically influenced. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics are the main keys to understanding the influence of genetics on the response of individuals to constraints. PMID:27262345

  12. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit Kumar; Bhasin, Rohit; Bisht, Y. S.; Kumar, K. V. S. Hari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18–70 years, any duration) in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40) and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20) and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females) had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4), sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3), growth hormone (GH) deficiency (n = 2), primary hypogonadism (n = 2) and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism) and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006). Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study. PMID:25932392

  13. Biocompatible, Free-Standing Film Composed of Bacterial Cellulose Nanofibers-Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Zeng, Zhiping; Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Wu, Dingcai; Zhang, Yilei; Wang, Zhenling

    2016-01-13

    In recent years, graphene films have been used in a series of wide applications in the biomedical area, because of several advantageous characteristics. Currently, these films are derived from graphene oxide (GO) via chemical or physical reduction methods, which results in a significant decrease in surface hydrophilicity, although the electrical property could be greatly improved, because of the reduction process. Hence, the comprehensive performance of the graphene films showed practical limitations in the biomedical field, because of incompatibility of highly hydrophobic surfaces to support cell adhesion and growth. In this work, we present a novel fabrication of bacterial cellulose nanofibers/reduced graphene oxide (BC-RGO) film, using a bacterial reduction method. Thus-prepared BC-RGO films maintained excellent hydrophilicity, while electrical properties were improved by bacterial reduction of GO films in culture. Human marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on these surfaces showed improved cellular response with higher cell proliferation on the BC-RGO film, compared to free-standing reduced graphene oxide film without the nanoscale fibrous structure. Furthermore, the cellular adhesion and proliferation were even comparable to that on the tissue culture plate, indicating that the bacterial cellulose nanofibers play a critically contructive role in supporting cellular activities. The novel fabrication method greatly enhanced the biochemical activity of the cells on the surface, which could aid in realizing several potential applications of graphene film in biomedical area, such as tissue engineering, bacterial devices, etc. PMID:26670811

  14. Bacterial response to different surface chemistries fabricated by plasma polymerization on electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-01-01

    Control over bacterial attachment and proliferation onto nanofibrous materials constitutes a major challenge for a variety of applications, including filtration membranes, protective clothing, wound dressings, and tissue engineering scaffolds. To develop effective devices, the interactions that occur between bacteria and nanofibers with different morphological and physicochemical properties need to be investigated. This paper explores the influence of fiber surface chemistry on bacterial behavior. Different chemical functionalities were generated on the surface of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers through plasma polymerization of four monomers (acrylic acid, allylamine, 1,7-octadiene, and 1,8-cineole). The interactions of Escherichia coli with the surface modified fibers were investigated through a combination of scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fiber wettability, surface charge, and chemistry were found to affect the ability of bacterial cells to attach and proliferate throughout the nanofiber meshes. The highest proportion of viable cells attachment occurred on the hydrophilic amine rich coating, followed by the hydrophobic octadiene. The acrylic acid coating rich in carboxyl groups showed a significantly lower attraction of bacterial cells. The 1,8-cineole retained the antibacterial activity of the monomer, resulting with a high proportion of dead isolated cells attached onto the fibers. Results showed that the surface chemistry properties of nanofibrous membranes can be strategically tuned to control bacterial behavior. PMID:26251319

  15. Repeated treatment with oxytocin promotes hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation and affects socio-emotional behavior.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Chan, Ngai-Man Jackie; Chan, Alan H L; Hui, Katy K Y; Lee, Sylvia; Chan, Hoi-Yi; Law, Yuen Shan; Sze, Mei Yi; Tsui, Wai-Ching Sarah; Fung, Timothy K H; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Lai, Cynthia Y Y

    2016-10-01

    Rewarding social behaviors including positive social interactions and sexual behaviors are shown to regulate adult neurogenesis, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. Oxytocin, a neurohypophysial hormone secreted after exposure to social interaction or sexual behaviors, has a profound role in the formation of social bonding and regulation of emotional distress. While the acute effect of oxytocin was usually studied, relatively scarce evidence showed the behavioral consequence of repeated oxytocin treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of repeated oxytocin treatment on hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation of new born neurons and social/emotional behaviors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received treatment with either vehicle or oxytocin (1mg/kg) daily for two weeks. Behavioral tests revealed that oxytocin increased social behaviors and reduced the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Cell proliferation, differentiation and the dendritic complexity of new born neurons in the hippocampus were promoted by oxytocin treatment. Depression- and anxiety-like behaviors were induced by repeated treatment of corticosterone (40mg/kg) for two weeks while oxytocin treatment reversed the behavioral disturbances. Suppression of cell proliferation caused by corticosterone was reverted by oxytocin treatment in which cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and dendritic complexity increased. The present findings reveal that oxytocin not only enhances cell proliferation, but also promotes the development of the new neurons which is associated with the induction of positive emotional and social behaviors. The results also suggest that oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of emotional and social dysfunction. PMID:27418343

  16. Shigella Effector OspB Activates mTORC1 in a Manner That Depends on IQGAP1 and Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, Heather D.; Fu, Yang; Bloom, Alexander; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Shigella infects and spreads through the human intestinal epithelium. Effector proteins delivered by Shigella into cells promote infection by modulating diverse host functions. We demonstrate that the effector protein OspB interacts directly with the scaffolding protein IQGAP1, and that the absence of either OspB or IQGAP1 during infection leads to larger areas of S. flexneri spread through cell monolayers. We show that the effect on the area of bacterial spread is due to OspB triggering increased cell proliferation at the periphery of infected foci, thereby replacing some of the cells that die within infected foci and restricting the area of bacterial spread. We demonstrate that OspB enhancement of cell proliferation results from activation of mTORC1, a master regulator of cell growth, and is blocked by the mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin. OspB activation of mTORC1, and its effects on cell proliferation and bacterial spread, depends on IQGAP1. Our results identify OspB as a regulator of mTORC1 and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation early during S. flexneri infection and establish a role for IQGAP1 in mTORC1 signaling. They also raise the possibility that IQGAP1 serves as a scaffold for the assembly of an OspB-mTORC1 signaling complex. PMID:26473364

  17. Extrapyramidal dysfunction with cerebral arteriovenous malformations 1

    PubMed Central

    Lobo-Antunes, Joao; Yahr, Melvin D.; Hilal, Sadek K.

    1974-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations have only rarely been implicated as a cause of basal ganglia dysfunction. In four instances where such a lesion was uncovered, abnormal involuntary movements were present. In two, tremor involving the contralateral limbs occurred, while in others the head and neck were involved in dystonic movements and posture. The clinical and angiographic characteristics of these four patients have been assessed and are presented in detail in this report. The possible mechanism by which arteriovenous malformations may disturb the internal circuitry of the basal ganglia and induce symptoms are discussed. Images PMID:4829531

  18. [Hand motor dysfunctions in computer users].

    PubMed

    Shavlovskaia, O A; Shvarkov, S B; Posokhov, S I

    2010-01-01

    It were studied 239 female typists aged from 16 to 62 years (mean age 20,1±7,8 years) using author's questionnaire for computer typists to assess hand function and develop preventive measures of disturbances revealed. Indirect signs of tunnel hand neuropathy (27,2%), focal hand dystonia (21,4%) and muscular-tonic syndromes of different localization (18%) have been found. Typists are a risk group of fine hand motor dysfunctions. As preventive measures, authors recommend to use computer auxiliary devices, to change a motor stereotype during the day, to make hand "motor holidays", to organize working place. PMID:21183901

  19. Mechanisms of transplant right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Trigt, P; Bittner, H B; Kendall, S W; Milano, C A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction remains the leading cause of early mortality after cardiac transplantation. The effect of brain death and subsequent hypothermic cardioplegic arrest and storage on subsequent post-transplant right ventricular function was examined. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Right ventricular dysfunction in the donor heart usually is attributed to failure of the donor right ventricle to adapt to the sudden increase in afterload (pulmonary vascular resistance) in the recipient. Strategies to improve ventricular mechanics in the postoperative period are aimed at reducing pulmonary vascular resistance with vasodilators or augmenting right ventricular contractility with inotropic agents. Events occurring in the donor heart (brain death, hypothermic cardioplegic arrest, and storage) also may be directly related to post-transplant RV dysfunction. METHODS: A canine model of brain death and orthotopic cardiac transplantation was used. A dynamic pressure-volume analysis of RV mechanics was performed using micromanometers and sonomicrometric dimension transducers. Systolic function was assessed by measurement of preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW). Brain death was induced in 17 dogs by inflation of an intracranial balloon. Right ventricular function then was assessed serially to 6 hours (PRSW). Right ventricular adrenergic beta receptor density and function was sampled at control and after 6 hours of brain death. The effect of cardioplegic arrest and hypothermic storage was assessed in a second group of 17 dogs, using the same instrumentation and method of RV analysis. RESULTS: A significant decrease in right ventricular PRSW occurred after brain death, with the average decrease being 37% +/- 10.4% from the control. The RV myocardial beta adrenergic receptor density did not significantly change (253 +/- 34 fmol/ng control vs. 336 +/- 54 fmol/ng after brain death). The adenylyl cyclase activity of the RV beta receptor was assessed and was not

  20. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction, and chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M

    2015-04-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of antichronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development, and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review, we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in the development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for antichronic rejection intervention.

  1. Erectile Dysfunction in the Older Adult Male.

    PubMed

    Mola, Joanna R

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in the older adult male is a significant problem affecting more than 75% of men over 70 years of age in the United States. Older men have an increased likelihood of developing ED due to chronic disease, comorbid conditions, and age-related changes. Research has demonstrated that while the prevalence and severity of ED increases with age, sexual desire often remains unchanged. This article discusses the clinical picture of ED, including relevant pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and evaluation and treatment options. PMID:26197627

  2. [Thyroid dysfunction in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Wuerzner, Kaisa; Pasche, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Portmann, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Thyroid function tests include the measuring of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in the case of abnormal TSH. These tests are frequently performed in primary care medicine since many clinical situations can be suggestive of dysthyroidism, as for example fatigue, depressive states or cardiac arthmia. In the case of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, the indications for treatment are controversial there being a lack of significant randomised studies. For primary care physicians faced with abnormal thyroid function tests we propose a diagnostic approach, clinical recommendations, and indications for referral to the specialist. PMID:21207724

  3. Emerging neural stimulation technologies for bladder dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-03-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation.

  4. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  5. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression.

  6. Surgical Management of Male Voiding Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Jessica; Mourtzinos, Arthur

    2016-06-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) is a common cause of voiding dysfunction. BPH may lead to bladder outlet obstruction and resultant troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Initial management of BPH and bladder outlet obstruction is typically conservative. However, when symptoms are severe or refractory to medical therapy or when urinary retention, bladder stone formation, recurrent urinary tract infections, or upper urinary tract deterioration occur, surgical intervention is often necessary. Numerous options are available for surgical management of BPH ranging from simple office-based procedures to transurethral operative procedures and even open and robotic surgeries. This article reviews the current, most commonly used techniques available for surgical management of BPH. PMID:27261790

  7. Circulatory support for right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jett, G K; Picone, A L; Clark, R E

    1987-07-01

    New modes of circulatory support for right ventricular dysfunction have recently been described. The present study compared the effectiveness of pulmonary artery balloon counterpulsation with a right ventricular assist device for support of surgically induced right ventricular dysfunction. Right ventricular hypertrophy was created in 16 neonatal lambs by pulmonary artery banding. Right ventricular dysfunction was produced in all animals by performing a right ventriculotomy and maintaining the pulmonary artery band. Four unassisted animals developed severe acute right heart failure and died. Six sheep had pulmonary artery balloon counterpulsation with a Dacron graft anastomosed to the proximal pulmonary artery as a reservoir for a 40 ml intra-aortic balloon after the onset of heart failure. The remaining six sheep had a pneumatically activated ventricular assist device inserted between the proximal pulmonary artery and the right ventricular apex. Periods of circulatory support with the balloon pump and the assist device on and off were compared. Decreases in right atrial pressure were observed with both balloon counterpulsation and right ventricular assistance: 14 +/- 1 to 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, p less than 0.0001, versus 19 +/- 2 to 12 +/- 2 mm Hg, p less than 0.0002, respectively. Cardiac output increased with both balloon counterpulsation and ventricular assistance: 1.45 +/- 0.16 to 2.03 +/- 0.13 L/min, p less than 0.001, versus 0.72 +/- 0.15 to 2.24 +/- 0.23 L/min, p less than 0.0002, respectively. Aortic systolic pressure increased in both support groups: 78 +/- 7 to 99 +/- 6 mm Hg, p less than 0.0004, versus 53 +/- 9 to 85 +/- 9 mm Hg, p less than 0.0001, respectively. Ventricular assistance produced greater changes in the right atrial pressure (39% +/- 6% versus 17% +/- 3%, p less than 0.01), cardiac output (153% +/- 39% versus 54% +/- 11%, p less than 0.05), and aortic systolic pressure (85% +/- 13% versus 39% +/- 9%, p less than 0.01). The insertion of a right

  8. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction and chronic rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z.; Li, Xian C.; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of anti-chronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for anti-chronic rejection intervention. PMID:25793439

  9. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists. PMID:26962155

  11. Incidence and risk factors for early renal dysfunction after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Patricia; Massion, Paul B; Joris, Jean; Detry, Olivier; Damas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine renal dysfunction post liver transplantation, its incidence and risk factors in patients from a Belgian University Hospital. METHODS: Orthotopic liver transplantations performed from January 2006 until September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed (n = 187). Patients with no renal replacement therapy (RRT) before transplantation were classified into four groups according to their highest creatinine plasma level during the first postoperative week. The first group had a peak creatinine level below 12 mg/L, the second group between 12 and 20 mg/L, the third group between 20 and 35 mg/L, and the fourth above 35 mg/L. In addition, patients who needed RRT during the first week after transplantation were also classified into the fourth group. Perioperative parameters were recorded as risk factors, namely age, sex, body mass index (BMI), length of preoperative hospital stay, prior bacterial infection within one month, preoperative ascites, preoperative treatment with β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, preoperative creatinine and bilirubin levels, donor status (cardiac death or brain death), postoperative lactate level, need for intraoperative vasopressive drugs, surgical revision, mechanical ventilation for more than 24 h, postoperative bilirubin and transaminase peak levels, postoperative hemoglobin level, amount of perioperative blood transfusions and type of immunosuppression. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using logistic ordinal regression method. Post hoc analysis of the hemostatic agent used was also done. RESULTS: There were 78 patients in group 1 (41.7%), 46 in group 2 (24.6%), 38 in group 3 (20.3%) and 25 in group 4 (13.4%). Twenty patients required RRT: 13 (7%) during the first week after transplantation. Using univariate analysis, the severity of renal dysfunction was correlated with presence of ascites and prior bacterial infection, preoperative bilirubin, urea and

  12. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  13. Laying date, incubation and egg breakage as determinants of bacterial load on bird eggshells: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Soler, Juan José; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Exploring factors guiding interactions of bacterial communities with animals has become of primary importance for ecologists and evolutionary biologists during the last years because of their likely central role in the evolution of animal life history traits. We explored the association between laying date and eggshell bacterial load (mesophilic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococci, and Enterococci) in natural and artificial magpie (Pica pica) nests containing fresh commercial quail (Coturnix coturnix) eggs. We manipulated hygiene conditions by spilling egg contents on magpie and artificial nests and explored experimental effects during the breeding season. Egg breakage is a common outcome of brood parasitism by great spotted cuckoos (Clamator glandarius) on the nests of magpie, one of its main hosts. We found that the treatment increased eggshell bacterial load in artificial nests, but not in magpie nests with incubating females, which suggests that parental activity prevents the proliferation of bacteria on the eggshells in relation to egg breakage. Moreover, laying date was positively related to eggshell bacterial load in active magpie nests, but negatively in artificial nests. The results suggest that variation in parental characteristics of magpies rather than climatic variation during the breeding season explained the detected positive association. Because the eggshell bacterial load is a proxy of hatching success, the detected positive association between eggshell bacterial loads and laying date in natural, but not in artificial nests, suggests that the generalized negative association between laying date and avian breeding success can be, at least partially, explained by differential bacterial effects.

  14. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale.

    PubMed

    Stubbendieck, Reed M; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  15. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    PubMed Central

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  16. Myocardial steatosis as a possible mechanistic link between diastolic dysfunction and coronary microvascular dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Wei, Janet; Nelson, Michael D; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Smith, Laura; Mehta, Puja K; Thomson, Louise E J; Berman, Daniel S; Li, Debiao; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Szczepaniak, Lidia S

    2016-01-01

    Women with coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have increased rates of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The mechanisms of HFpEF are not well understood. Ectopic fat deposition in the myocardium, termed myocardial steatosis, is frequently associated with diastolic dysfunction in other metabolic diseases. We investigated the prevalence of myocardial steatosis and diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and subclinical HFpEF. In 13 women, including eight reference controls and five women with CMD and evidence of subclinical HFpEF (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure >12 mmHg), we measured myocardial triglyceride content (TG) and diastolic function, by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance tissue tagging, respectively. When compared with reference controls, women with CMD had higher myocardial TG content (0.83 ± 0.12% vs. 0.43 ± 0.06%; P = 0.025) and lower diastolic circumferential strain rate (168 ± 12 vs. 217 ± 15%/s; P = 0.012), with myocardial TG content correlating inversely with diastolic circumferential strain rate (r = -0.779; P = 0.002). This study provides proof-of-concept that myocardial steatosis may play an important mechanistic role in the development of diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and no obstructive CAD. Detailed longitudinal studies are warranted to explore specific treatment strategies targeting myocardial steatosis and its effect on diastolic function.

  17. Bacterial cholangiohepatitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ramery, Eve; Papakonstantinou, Stratos; Pinilla, Manuel; McAllister, Hester; Jahns, Hanne; Gallagher, Barbara; O'Brien, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    A 9-year-old female Yorkshire terrier was presented for vomiting and diarrhea. Blood chemistry tests revealed hepatic dysfunction, cholestasis, and inflammation. Liver ultrasonography and liver biopsy were consistent with cholangiohepatitis. Fine-needle aspiration of the gallbladder revealed the presence of bacteria later identified as Clostridium spp. The cholangiohepatitis was successfully treated.

  18. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-11-27

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic-eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential.

  19. Microbe-dependent lymphatic migration of neutrophils modulates lymphocyte proliferation in lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Henry R.; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to the site of injury is an essential first step of an anti-bacterial response. However, little is known about the basis for and relevance of neutrophil migration from inflamed tissue into lymphoid organs. We established a photoconversion-based system to monitor the fate of neutrophils recruited to inflamed skin. While neutrophils are efficiently recruited to sites of both microbial and sterile lesions, subsequent re-localization to draining lymph nodes happens only when bacteria are present in the primary lesion. Skin egress of neutrophils occurs via lymphatic vessels and is dependent on CD11b and CXCR4 but not CCR7. Neutrophils are the predominant immune cell to migrate from inflamed skin into lymph nodes where they augment lymphocyte proliferation. Furthermore, inhibition of neutrophil migration from skin reduces T-cell proliferation in draining lymph nodes. Thus neutrophils mediate rapid cellular communication between the initial injury site and secondary lymphoid organs and modulate immune responsiveness. PMID:25972253

  20. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879