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Sample records for dysfunctional hdl cholesterol

  1. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  2. HDL Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities HDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... HDL; HDL-C Formal name: High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  3. LDL and HDL subfractions, dysfunctional HDL: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Nikolic, Dragana; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Rizzo, Manfredi; Hoogeveen, Ron C

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are considered as important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), while highdensity lipoproteins (HDL) are well recognized for their putative role in reverse cholesterol transport and other atheroprotective functions. Both LDL and HDL are heterogeneous in nature, including various subfractions depending on the method of isolation (≥ 7 LDL and 10 HDL subspecies, respectively). While it is established that small, dense LDL (sdLDL) have atherogenic potential, the role of different HDL subfractions is still largely unclear. The majority of clinical studies suggest an atheroprotective role of larger HDL particles, although recent work has highlighted the role of dysfunctional HDL within different subfractions. Several therapeutic approaches are able to primarily target cholesterol concentration in LDL or HDL. Certain drugs, such as niacin, statins and fibrates target multiple lipid traits (i.e. pleiotropic drug effects), while cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors are able to increase plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Statins represent the most used lipid-lowering drugs, but there is a continued interest in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, including those that might affect dysfunctional HDL. Targeting distinct LDL and HDL subfractions may potentially reduce the residual risk seen in clinical endpoint trials.

  4. The role of dysfunctional HDL in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on HDL function in modulating LDL oxidation and LDL-induced inflammation. Dysfunctional HDL has been identified in animal models and humans with chronic inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The loss of antiinflammatory function correlated with a loss of function in reverse cholesterol transport. In animal models and perhaps in humans, dysfunctional HDL can be improved by apoA-I mimetic peptides that bind oxidized lipids with high affinity. PMID:18955731

  5. [Accuracy of HDL cholesterol measurements].

    PubMed

    Niedmann, P D; Luthe, H; Wieland, H; Schaper, G; Seidel, D

    1983-02-01

    The widespread use of different methods for the determination of HDL-cholesterol (in Europe: sodium phosphotungstic acid/MgCl2) in connection with enzymatic procedures (in the USA: heparin/MnCl2 followed by the Liebermann-Burchard method) but common reference values makes it necessary to evaluate not only accuracy, specificity, and precision of the precipitation step but also of the subsequent cholesterol determination. A high ratio of serum vs. concentrated precipitation reagent (10:1 V/V) leads to the formation of variable amounts of delta-3.5-cholestadiene. This substance is not recognized by cholesterol oxidase but leads to an 1.6 times overestimation by the Liebermann-Burchard method. Therefore, errors in HDL-cholesterol determination should be considered and differences up to 30% may occur between HDL-cholesterol values determined by the different techniques (heparin/MnCl2 - Liebermann-Burchard and NaPW/MgCl2-CHOD-PAP).

  6. Effects of Dietary Flavonoids on Reverse Cholesterol Transport, HDL Metabolism, and HDL Function.

    PubMed

    Millar, Courtney L; Duclos, Quinn; Blesso, Christopher N

    2017-03-01

    Strong experimental evidence confirms that HDL directly alleviates atherosclerosis. HDL particles display diverse atheroprotective functions in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic processes. In certain inflammatory disease states, however, HDL particles may become dysfunctional and proatherogenic. Flavonoids show the potential to improve HDL function through their well-documented effects on cellular antioxidant status and inflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the basic science and clinical research examining the effects of dietary flavonoids on RCT and HDL function. Based on preclinical studies that used cell culture and rodent models, it appears that many flavonoids (e.g., anthocyanidins, flavonols, and flavone subclasses) influence RCT and HDL function beyond simple HDL cholesterol concentration by regulating cellular cholesterol efflux from macrophages and hepatic paraoxonase 1 expression and activity. In clinical studies, dietary anthocyanin intake is associated with beneficial changes in serum biomarkers related to HDL function in a variety of human populations (e.g., in those who are hyperlipidemic, hypertensive, or diabetic), including increased HDL cholesterol concentration, as well as HDL antioxidant and cholesterol efflux capacities. However, clinical research on HDL functionality is lacking for some flavonoid subclasses (e.g., flavanols, flavones, flavanones, and isoflavones). Although there has been a tremendous effort to develop HDL-targeted drug therapies, more research is warranted on how the intake of foods or specific nutrients affects HDL function.

  7. [Determination of HDL-cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, W; Schütz, C; Reuter, W

    1983-01-01

    For the clinical practice methods of the determination of HDL-cholesterol made their way which are based on the precipitation of apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins and a determination of cholesterol following. The expensive methods of the ultracentrifugation serve as reference methods. The most-spread precipitation techniques (heparin/MCl2, dextran sulphate/CaCl2 or MgCl2 photungstic acid/MgCl2) are comparatively observed with regard to their effectiveness, practicability and methodical and technical conditions (influence of the concentration of the precipitation reagents, pH-value, temperature, incubation and centrifugation conditions). Results of own investigations as well as data from literature are presented to the problem of the harmonization of the cholesterol determination with the precipitation technique. According to the opinion of the authors for the enzymatic determination of cholesterol by means of the CHOD-PAP-method the phosphotungstic acid precipitation well stood the test, whereas for the chemical determination of cholesterol after Liebermann-Burchard in manual or automatized works the precipitation by means of dextran sulphate/CaCl2 (40 g/l, 2.0 mol/l) is to be recommended. The superabundant precipitations with phosphotungstic acid and dextran sulphate/MgCl2 (20 g/l, 2.0 mol/l) achieve higher results in Liebermann-Burchard's reaction likely on account of interferences.

  8. [Diagnostic importance of HDL cholesterol determination].

    PubMed

    Reissner, J; Herrmann, W

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes the sensitivity to quantification of changes of HDL-cholesterol in serum by two different precipitation and analytical techniques during the treatment of patients. After the precipitation of VLDL and LDL by phosphotungstic acid/magnesium chloride the chemical determination of HDL-cholesterol in serum with the Liebermann-Burchard reaction yields different results in comparison to enzymatic HDL-cholesterol determined in serum supernatant after the precipitation by polyethylene glycol 20.000. Correlation analyses of apolipoprotein A-I with enzymatic HDL-, HDL2-, HDL3-cholesterol or electrophoretic alpha-cholesterol demonstrate that the therapeutically induced changes (by training and diet) of lipid composition are more correctly reflected by the enzymatic determination of HDL-cholesterol after serum precipitation by polyethylene glycol.

  9. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rysz-Górzyńska, Magdalena; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD.

  10. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  11. [The real measurement of non-HDL-cholesterol: Atherogenic cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Millán, Jesús; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Brea, Angel; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Mantilla, Teresa; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Pintó, Xavier

    Lowe density lipoproteins (LDL) are the causal agent of cardiovascular diseases. In practice, we identify LDL with cholesterol transported in LDL (cLDL). So, cLDL has become the major target for cardiovascular prevention. Howewer, we have progressive evidences about the role of triglycerides rich lipoproteins, particularly those very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in promotion and progression of atherosclerosis, that leads cholesterol in VLDL and its remanents as a potential therapeutic target. This feature is particularly important and of a great magnitude, in patients with hypertiglyceridemia. We can to considere, that the non-HDL cholesterol -cLDL+cVLDL+c-remmants+Lp(a)- is the real measurement of atherogenic cholesterol. In addition, non-HDL-cholesterol do not show any variations between postprandial states. In fact, non-HDL-cholesterol should be an excellent marker of atherogenic cholesterol, and an major therapeutic target in patients with atherogenic dyslipidaemia. According with different clinical trials and with the epidemiological and mendelian studies, in patients with high cardiovascular risk, optimal level of cLDL will be under 70mg/dl, and under 100 ng/dl for non-HDL-cholesterol; and in high risk patients, 100mg/dl and 130mg/dl, respectively.

  12. Niacin to Boost Your HDL "Good" Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... to increase your HDL cholesterol or correct a vitamin deficiency, niacin is sold in higher doses that are ... Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional-disorders/vitamin-deficiency%2c-dependency%2c-and-toxicity/niacin?qt=niacin& ...

  13. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Josephine L.C.; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J.F.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification. PMID:28148911

  14. High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles from end-stage renal disease patients are defective in promoting reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Josephine L C; Gautier, Thomas; Nijstad, Niels; Tölle, Markus; Schuchardt, Mirjam; van der Giet, Markus; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2017-02-02

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the largest cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). CVD in ESRD is not explained by classical CVD risk factors such as HDL cholesterol mass levels making functional alterations of lipoproteins conceivable. HDL functions in atheroprotection by promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), comprising cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, uptake into hepatocytes and final excretion into the feces. ESRD-HDL (n = 15) were compared to healthy control HDL (n = 15) for their capacity to promote in vitro (i) cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage foam cells and (ii) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into ldla[SR-BI] cells as well as (iii) in vivo RCT. Compared with HDL from controls, ESRD-HDL displayed a significant reduction in mediating cholesterol efflux (p < 0.001) and SR-BI-mediated selective uptake (p < 0.01), two key steps in RCT. Consistently, also the in vivo capacity of ESRD-HDL to promote RCT when infused into wild-type mice was significantly impaired (p < 0.01). In vitro oxidation of HDL from healthy controls with hypochloric acid was able to fully mimic the impaired biological activities of ESRD-HDL. In conclusion, we demonstrate that HDL from ESRD patients is dysfunctional in key steps as well as overall RCT, likely due to oxidative modification.

  15. Prosopis farcta beans increase HDL cholesterol and decrease LDL cholesterol in ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Omidi, Arash; Ansari nik, Hossein; Ghazaghi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Ten blue-neck male ostriches (Struthio camelus) were fed Prosopis farcta beans throughout a 30-day experiment. Blood samples were collected from ostriches on days 0 and 30 to measure levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, cholesterol, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, the activity of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT). From days 0 to 30, HDL cholesterol, total protein, and globulins levels increased significantly whereas LDL cholesterol, inorganic phosphorus, and γ-GT activity decreased significantly.

  16. Impaired HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux is associated with metabolic syndrome in families with early onset coronary heart disease and low HDL-cholesterol level

    PubMed Central

    Paavola, Timo; Kuusisto, Sanna; Jauhiainen, Matti; Kakko, Sakari; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Metso, Jari; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Bloigu, Risto; Hannuksela, Minna L.; Savolainen, Markku J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The potential of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to facilitate cholesterol removal from arterial foam cells is a key function of HDL. We studied whether cholesterol efflux to serum and HDL subfractions is impaired in subjects with early coronary heart disease (CHD) or metabolic syndrome (MetS) in families where a low HDL-cholesterol level (HDL-C) predisposes to early CHD. Methods HDL subfractions were isolated from plasma by sequential ultracentrifugation. THP-1 macrophages loaded with acetyl-LDL were used in the assay of cholesterol efflux to total HDL, HDL2, HDL3 or serum. Results While cholesterol efflux to serum, total HDL and HDL3 was unchanged, the efflux to HDL2 was 14% lower in subjects with MetS than in subjects without MetS (p<0.001). The efflux to HDL2 was associated with components of MetS such as plasma HDL-C (r = 0.76 in men and r = 0.56 in women, p<0.001 for both). The efflux to HDL2 was reduced in men with early CHD (p<0.01) only in conjunction with their low HDL-C. The phospholipid content of HDL2 particles was a major correlate with the efflux to HDL2 (r = 0.70, p<0.001). A low ratio of HDL2 to total HDL was associated with MetS (p<0.001). Conclusion Our results indicate that impaired efflux to HDL2 is a functional feature of the low HDL-C state and MetS in families where these risk factors predispose to early CHD. The efflux to HDL2 related to the phospholipid content of HDL2 particles but the phospholipid content did not account for the impaired efflux in cardiometabolic disease, where a combination of low level and poor quality of HDL2 was observed. PMID:28207870

  17. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Martin, Gregory G.; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H. Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Kier, Ann B.

    2012-01-01

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  18. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  19. Hypertriglyceridaemia, postprandial lipaemia and non-HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Claudia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels within healthy limits decreases the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD) and cardiovascular (CV) events. The predictive value of elevated TG levels for coronary artery disease (CAD) seen in univariate analysis tends to disappear on multivariate analyses, especially when correction is made for HDL-C. The relationship between TG and HDL-C is complex and not fully understood. Hydrolysis of TG by lipoprotein lipase converts HDL subclass 3 to a larger lipoprotein enriched in both phospholipid and TG. This process occurs in postprandial lipaemia (PPL). An additional factor for the complex relationship between TGs and CV risk is that the lipoproteins which transport plasma TG (chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins and their remnants) are heterogeneous particles. Therefore, they may differ in their level of atherogenicity. PPL is a physiological process during which plasma lipoproteins and their subclasses undergo variations in concentration and composition following consumption of food, particularly fatty food. "Postprandial hyperlipidaemia" is the quantitative/qualitative alteration of this normal process. These lipoprotein alterations could play a role in the development of CV disease (CVD). However, lipid levels used to evaluate CV risk are usually measured in the fasting state. This review focuses on TG, PPL, postprandial hyperlipidaemia and non-HDL-C, their relationships and potential predictive role in atherogenesis and CVD.

  20. HDL Cholesterol Efflux Predicts Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; Freark de Boer, Jan; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are involved in the protection against cardiovascular disease by promoting cholesterol efflux, in which accumulated cholesterol is removed from macrophage foam cells. We investigated whether HDL cholesterol efflux capacity is associated with cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and graft failure in a cohort of renal transplant recipients (n=495, median follow-up 7.0 years). Cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline was quantified using incubation of human macrophage foam cells with apolipoprotein B–depleted plasma. Baseline efflux capacity was not different in deceased patients and survivors (P=0.60 or P=0.50 for cardiovascular or all-cause mortality, respectively), whereas recipients developing graft failure had lower efflux capacity than those with functioning grafts (P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated a lower risk for graft failure (P=0.004) but not cardiovascular (P=0.30) or all-cause mortality (P=0.31) with increasing gender-stratified tertiles of efflux capacity. Cox regression analyses adjusted for age and gender showed that efflux capacity was not associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.67 to 1.19; P=0.43). Furthermore, the association between efflux capacity and all-cause mortality (HR, .79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.98; P=0.031) disappeared after further adjustment for potential confounders. However, efflux capacity at baseline significantly predicted graft failure (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.64; P<0.001) independent of apolipoprotein A-I, HDL cholesterol, or creatinine clearance. In conclusion, this prospective study shows that cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophage foam cells is not associated with cardiovascular or all-cause mortality but is a strong predictor of graft failure independent of plasma HDL cholesterol levels in renal transplant recipients. PMID:26319244

  1. Enzymatic assessment of cholesterol on electrophoresis gels for estimating HDL size distribution and plasma concentrations of HDL subclasses[S

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; García-Sánchez, Cynthia; Ávila-Vazzini, Nydia; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an enzymatic cholesterol staining method to determine HDL subclasses in a polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, which further allows staining by protein in the same electrophoresis lane. HDLs from 120 healthy individuals were separated through nondenaturing PAGE. HDLs were stained for cholesterol using an enzymatic semisolid mixture. Once the gels were unstained, they were stained again for proteins with Coomassie blue. The proportions of HDL subclasses were determined by densitometry. HDL subclasses were transformed to concentrations using as reference HDL-cholesterol plasma levels. This method is comparable in linearity and reproducibility to Coomassie blue staining, although it provides quantitative data. As expected, HDL size distribution shifted toward larger particles when determined by cholesterol as compared with protein. With this method, we observed different proportions of HDL subclasses between men and women as compared with Coomassie blue staining. We described a method to determine HDL size distribution by enzymatic cholesterol staining on polyacrylamide gels. The method allows the quantification of the cholesterol plasma concentration of each HDL subclass with the possibility to further stain the protein in the same sample. The combination of HDL staining by cholesterol and protein on electrophoresis gels provides information that may have clinical relevance. PMID:20097938

  2. Selective delipidation of plasma HDL enhances reverse cholesterol transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Frank M; Rudel, Lawrence L; Conner, Adam; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Kostner, Gerhard; Baki, Talal; Rothblat, George; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Asztalos, Bela; Perlman, Timothy; Zheng, Chunyu; Alaupovic, Petar; Maltais, Jo-Ann B; Brewer, H Bryan

    2009-05-01

    Uptake of cholesterol from peripheral cells by nascent small HDL circulating in plasma is necessary to prevent atherosclerosis. This process, termed reverse cholesterol transport, produces larger cholesterol-rich HDL that transfers its cholesterol to the liver facilitating excretion. Most HDL in plasma is cholesterol-rich. We demonstrate that treating plasma with a novel selective delipidation procedure converts large to small HDL [HDL-selectively delipidated (HDL-sdl)]. HDL-sdl contains several cholesterol-depleted species resembling small alpha, prebeta-1, and other prebeta forms. Selective delipidation markedly increases efficacy of plasma to stimulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol transfer from monocytic cells to HDL. Plasma from African Green monkeys underwent selective HDL delipidation. The delipidated plasma was reinfused into five monkeys. Prebeta-1-like HDL had a plasma residence time of 8 +/- 6 h and was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL having residence times of 13-14 h. Small alpha-HDL was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL. These findings suggest that selective HDL delipidation activates reverse cholesterol transport, in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with delipidated plasma tended to reduce diet-induced aortic atherosclerosis in monkeys measured by intravascular ultrasound. These findings link the conversion of small to large HDL, in vivo, to improvement in atherosclerosis.

  3. Targeted next-generation sequencing to diagnose disorders of HDL cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Sadananda, Singh N.; Foo, Jia Nee; Toh, Meng Tiak; Cermakova, Lubomira; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Chan, Teddy; Liany, Herty; Collins, Jennifer A.; Gerami, Sima; Singaraja, Roshni R.; Hayden, Michael R.; Francis, Gordon A.; Frohlich, Jiri; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Brunham, Liam R.

    2015-01-01

    A low level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is a common clinical scenario and an important marker for increased cardiovascular risk. Many patients with very low or very high HDL-C have a rare mutation in one of several genes, but identification of the molecular abnormality in patients with extreme HDL-C is rarely performed in clinical practice. We investigated the accuracy and diagnostic yield of a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay for extreme levels of HDL-C. We developed a targeted NGS panel to capture the exons, intron/exon boundaries, and untranslated regions of 26 genes with highly penetrant effects on plasma lipid levels. We sequenced 141 patients with extreme HDL-C levels and prioritized variants in accordance with medical genetics guidelines. We identified 35 pathogenic and probably pathogenic variants in HDL genes, including 21 novel variants, and performed functional validation on a subset of these. Overall, a molecular diagnosis was established in 35.9% of patients with low HDL-C and 5.2% with high HDL-C, and all prioritized variants identified by NGS were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Our results suggest that a molecular diagnosis can be identified in a substantial proportion of patients with low HDL-C using targeted NGS. PMID:26255038

  4. Impact of Lifestyle Intervention on HDL-Induced eNOS Activation and Cholesterol Efflux Capacity in Obese Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Wesnigk, Jenny; De Guchtenaere, Ann; Fischer, Tina; Schuler, Gerhard; Vrints, Christiaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in obese children and adolescent and is regarded as a key step in the development of atherosclerosis. Important components for the development of endothelial dysfunction are reduced activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and an increase in cholesterol deposition in the vessel wall, due to reduced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) activity. High density lipoprotein (HDL) exhibits antiatherosclerotic properties including modulation of eNOS activity and cholesterol efflux capacity. Lifestyle intervention programs can modify endothelial dysfunction in obese adolescents, but their impact on HDL-mediated eNOS activation and RCT is unknown so far. Methods. Obese adolescents (15 ± 1 years, BMI > 35 kg/m2) where randomized either to an intervention group (IG, n = 8; restricted diet and exercise) or to a usual care group (UC, n = 8). At the beginning and after 10 months of treatment HDL-mediated eNOS phosphorylation and cholesterol efflux capacity were evaluated. Results. Ten months of treatment resulted in a substantial weight loss (−31%), an improvement of endothelial function, and an increase in HDL-mediated eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation and RCT. A correlation between change in eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation or RCT and change in endothelial function was noted. Conclusion. A structured lifestyle intervention program improves antiatherosclerotic HDL functions, thereby positively influencing endothelial function. PMID:27965912

  5. Human paraoxonase 1 overexpression in mice stimulates HDL cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Ikhlef, Souade; Berrougui, Hicham; Kamtchueng Simo, Olivier; Zerif, Echarki

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of human PON1 overexpression in mice on cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport. PON1 overexpression in PON1-Tg mice induced a significant 3-fold (p<0.0001) increase in plasma paraoxonase activity and a significant ~30% (p<0.0001) increase in the capacity of HDL to mediate cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages compared to wild-type mice. It also caused a significant 4-fold increase (p<0.0001) in the capacity of macrophages to transfer cholesterol to apoA-1, a significant 2-fold (p<0.0003) increase in ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression, and a significant increase in the expression of PPARγ (p<0.0003 and p<0.04, respectively) and LXRα (p<0.0001 and p<0.01, respectively) mRNA and protein compared to macrophages from wild-type mice. Moreover, transfection of J774 macrophages with human PON1 also increased ABCA1, PPARγ and LXRα protein expression and stimulates macrophages cholesterol efflux to apo A1. In vivo measurements showed that the overexpression of PON1 significantly increases the fecal elimination of macrophage-derived cholesterol in PON1-Tg mice. Overall, our results suggested that the overexpression of PON1 in mice may contribute to the regulation of the cholesterol homeostasis by improving the capacity of HDL to mediate cholesterol efflux and by stimulating reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:28278274

  6. HDL Cholesterol Efflux Capacity: Cardiovascular Risk Factor and Potential Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Anish; Rohatgi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with incident cardiovascular events; however, many therapies targeting increases in HDL-C have failed to show consistent clinical benefit. Thus, focus has recently shifted toward measuring high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. HDL is the key mediator of reverse cholesterol transport, the process of cholesterol extraction from foam cells, and eventual excretion into the biliary system. Cholesterol efflux from peripheral macrophages to HDL particles has been associated with atherosclerosis in both animals and humans. We review the mechanism of cholesterol efflux and the emerging evidence on the association between cholesterol efflux capacity and cardiovascular disease in human studies. We also focus on the completed and ongoing trials of novel therapies targeting different aspects of HDL cholesterol efflux.

  7. Adiponectin and the mediation of HDL-cholesterol change with improved lifestyle: the Look AHEAD Study.

    PubMed

    Belalcazar, L Maria; Lang, Wei; Haffner, Steven M; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Schwenke, Dawn C; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Tracy, Russell P; Kriska, Andrea P; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2012-12-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role in the development of the metabolic abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and participates actively in lipid metabolism. Adiponectin, found abundantly in circulation and a marker of adipose health, is decreased in obese persons with T2DM. We investigated whether the changes in adiponectin with an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss could potentially mediate the increase in low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) with ILI. Adiponectin and its fractions were determined using an ELISA with selective protease treatment in 1,397 participants from Look AHEAD, a trial examining whether ILI will reduce cardiovascular events in overweight/obese subjects with T2DM when compared with a control arm, diabetes support and education (DSE). Multivariable regression and mediational analyses were performed for adiponectin and its high-molecular-weight (HMW) and non-HMW fractions. ILI increased baseline HDL-C by 9.7% and adiponectin by 11.9%; changes with DSE were 1.3% and 0.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In a model including changes in weight, fitness, triglycerides, and glucose control and that adjusted for demographics and medical history, adiponectin changes remained significantly associated with HDL-C change. Data supported the contribution of changes in both HMW- and non-HMW-adiponectin to the improvement in HDL-C with ILI.

  8. HDL-apolipoprotein A-I exchange is independently associated with cholesterol efflux capacity

    PubMed Central

    Borja, Mark S.; Ng, Kit F.; Irwin, Angela; Hong, Jaekyoung; Wu, Xing; Isquith, Daniel; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Prazen, Bryan; Gildengorin, Virginia; Oda, Michael N.; Vaisar, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    HDL is the primary mediator of cholesterol mobilization from the periphery to the liver via reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). A critical first step in this process is the uptake of cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages by HDL, a function of HDL inversely associated with prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that the dynamic ability of HDL to undergo remodeling and exchange of apoA-I is an important and potentially rate-limiting aspect of RCT. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HDL-apoA-I exchange (HAE) and serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity. We compared HAE to the total and ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of 77 subjects. We found that HAE was highly correlated with both total (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and ABCA1-specific (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) efflux, and this relationship remained significant after adjustment for HDL-C or apoA-I. Multivariate models of sterol efflux capacity indicated that HAE accounted for approximately 25% of the model variance for both total and ABCA1-specific efflux. We conclude that the ability of HDL to exchange apoA-I and remodel, as measured by HAE, is a significant contributor to serum HDL efflux capacity, independent of HDL-C and apoA-I, indicating that HDL dynamics are an important factor in cholesterol efflux capacity and likely RCT. PMID:26254308

  9. LXR driven induction of HDL-cholesterol is independent of intestinal cholesterol absorption and ABCA1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Kristina; Gåfvels, Mats; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Slätis, Katharina; Hu, Xiaoli; Jorns, Carl; Steffensen, Knut R; Eggertsen, Gösta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether: (1) liver X receptor (LXR)-driven induction of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and other LXR-mediated effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on intestinal cholesterol absorption; and (2) combined treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 and the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe results in synergistic effects on cholesterol metabolism that could be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. Mice were fed 0.2 % cholesterol and treated with GW3965+ezetimibe, GW3965 or ezetimibe. GW3965+ezetimibe treatment elevated serum HDL-C and Apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, effectively reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased the excretion of faecal neutral sterols. No changes in intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 or ABCG5 protein expression were observed, despite increased mRNA expression, while hepatic ABCA1 was slightly reduced. The combined treatment caused a pronounced down-regulation of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and reduced hepatic and intestinal cholesterol levels. GW3965 did not affect the intestinal cholesterol absorption, but increased serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels. GW3965 also increased Apoa1 mRNA levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and HEPA1-6 cells. Ezetimibe reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption, ABCA1 and ABCG5, but did not affect the serum HDL-C or ApoAI levels. Thus, the LXR-driven induction of HDL-C and ApoAI was independent of the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased expression of intestinal or hepatic ABCA1 was not required. Inhibited influx of cholesterol via NPC1L1 and/or low levels of intracellular cholesterol prevented post-transcriptional expression of intestinal ABCA1 and ABCG5, despite increased mRNA levels. Combined LXR activation and blocked intestinal cholesterol absorption induced effective faecal elimination of cholesterol.

  10. The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux as a HDL function index in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Narita, Ichiei; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux are considered to be a key player in atherosclerotic formation in relation to the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The HDL function can be evaluated by the reaction between lipid-loaded macrophages and lipid-acceptors in the HDL fraction from the plasma, apolipoprotein B-depleted serum, and/or whole serum/plasma. Recent studies have reported that an impaired cholesterol efflux of HDL is observed in patients with cardiometabolic diseases, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. A population-based cohort study has reported an inverse association between the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL and the incidence of atherosclerotic disease, regardless of the serum HDL-cholesterol level. Moreover, in this paper, when we summarized several clinical interventional studies of statin treatment that examined cholesterol efflux, a potential increase in the efflux in patients treated with statins was implied. However, the effect was not fully defined in the current situation because of the small sample sizes, lack of a unified protocol for measuring the efflux, and short-term intervention periods without cardiovascular outcomes in available studies. Further investigation is necessary to determine the effect of drugs on cholesterol efflux. With additional advanced studies, cholesterol efflux is a promising laboratory index to understand the HDL function.

  11. WWOX gene is associated with HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Altered lipid profile, and in particular low HDL and high triglyceride (TG) plasma levels, are within the major determinants of cardiovascular diseases. The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting these lipid levels is a relevant issue for predictive purposes. The WWOX gene has been recently associated with HDL levels. This gene is located at chromosome 16q23, a region previously linked to familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) and HDL. Our objective is to perform a genetic association analysis at the WWOX gene region with HDL, TG and TG/HDL ratio. Methods A quantitative association analysis performed in 801 individuals selected from the Spanish general population. Results For HDL levels, two regions of intron 8 display clustering of positive signals (p < 0.05) but none of them was associated in the haplotypic analysis (0.07 ≤ p ≤ 0.165). For TG levels not only intron 8 but also a 27 kb region spanning from the promoter region to intron 4 are associated in this study. For the TG/HDL genetic association analysis, positive signals are coincident with those of the isolated traits. Interestingly, haplotypic analysis at the 5' region showed that variation in this region modified both HDL and TG levels, especially the latter (p = 0.003). Conclusions Our results suggest that WWOX is a QTL for both TG and HDL. PMID:20942981

  12. Isomer-specific effects of conjugated linoleic acid on HDL functionality associated with reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Nicod, Nathalie; Parker, Robert S; Giordano, Elena; Maestro, Virginia; Davalos, Alberto; Visioli, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are atheroprotective because of their role in reverse cholesterol transport. The intestine is involved in this process because it synthesizes HDL, removes cholesterol from plasma and excretes it into the lumen. We investigated the role of selected dietary fatty acids on intestinal cholesterol uptake and HDL functionality. Caco-2 monolayers grown on Transwells were supplemented with either palmitic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, docosahexaenoic, eicosapentaenoic, arachidonic or conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs): c9,t11-CLA; t9,t11-CLA; c10,t12-CLA. Cells synthesized HDL in the basolateral compartment for 24 h in the absence or presence of an antibody to SR-BI (aSR-BI), which inhibits its interaction with HDL. Free cholesterol (FC) accumulated to a greater extent in the presence than in the absence of aSR-BI, indicating net uptake of FC by SR-BI. Uptake's efficiency was significantly decreased when cells were treated with c9,t11-CLA relative to the other fatty acids. These differences were associated with lower HDL functionality, since neither SR-BI protein expression nor expression and alternative splicing of other genes involved lipid metabolism were affected. Only INSIG2 expression was decreased, with no increase of its target genes. Increasing pre-β-HDL synthesis, by inducing ABCA1 and adding APOA1, resulted in reduced uptake of FC by SR-BI after c9,t11-CLA treatment, indicating reduced functionality of pre-β-HDL. Conversely, treatment with c9,t11-CLA resulted in a greater uptake of FC and esterified cholesterol from mature HDL. Therefore, Caco-2 monolayers administered c9,t11-CLA produced a nonfunctional pre-β-HDL but took up cholesterol more efficiently via SR-BI from mature HDL.

  13. Current and future therapies for addressing the effects of inflammation on HDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fatima; Baker, Wendy S; Khan, Madiha I; Thukuntla, Shwetha; McKinney, Kevin H; Abate, Nicola; Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa

    2017-03-22

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammatory processes arising from metabolic abnormalities are known to precipitate the development of CVD. Several metabolic and inflammatory markers have been proposed for predicting the progression of CVD, including high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). For ~50 years, HDL-C has been considered as the atheroprotective 'good' cholesterol because of its strong inverse association with the progression of CVD. Thus, interventions to increase the concentration of HDL-C have been successfully tested in animals; however, clinical trials were unable to confirm the cardiovascular benefits of pharmaceutical interventions aimed at increasing HDL-C levels. Based on these data, the significance of HDL-C in the prevention of CVD has been called into question. Fundamental in vitro and animal studies suggest that HDL-C functionality, rather than HDL-C concentration, is important for the CVD-preventive qualities of HDL-C. Our current review of the literature positively demonstrates the negative impact of systemic and tissue (i.e. adipose tissue) inflammation in the healthy metabolism and function of HDL-C. Our survey indicates that HDL-C may be a good marker of adipose tissue health, independently of its atheroprotective associations. We summarize the current findings on the use of anti-inflammatory drugs to either prevent HDL-C clearance or improve the function and production of HDL-C particles. It is evident that the therapeutic agents currently available may not provide the optimal strategy for altering HDL-C metabolism and function, and thus, further research is required to supplement this mechanistic approach for preventing the progression of CVD.

  14. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Larach, Daniel B.; Hancock-Cerutti, William F.; Millar, John S.; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J. Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J.; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J.; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  15. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti, William F; Millar, John S; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan O; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-03-11

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant).

  16. Historical milestones in measurement of HDL-cholesterol: impact on clinical and laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Michel R; Blaton, Victor H

    2006-07-23

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) comprises a family of particles with differing physicochemical characteristics. Continuing progress in improving HDL-C analysis has originated from two separate fields-one clinical, reflecting increased attention to HDL-C in estimating risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), and the other analytical, reflecting increased emphasis on finding more reliable and cost-effective HDL-C assays. Epidemiologic and prospective studies established the inverse association of HDL-C with CHD risk, a relationship that is consistent with protective mechanisms demonstrated in basic research and animal studies. Atheroprotective and less atheroprotective HDL subpopulations have been described. Guidelines on primary and secondary CHD prevention, which increased the workload in clinical laboratories, have led to a revolution in HDL-C assay technology. Many analytical techniques including ultracentrifugation, electrophoresis, chromatography, and polyanion precipitation methods have been developed to separate and quantify HDL-C and HDL subclasses. More recently developed homogeneous assays enable direct measurement of HDL-C on an automated analyzer, without the need for manual pretreatment to separate non-HDL. Although homogeneous assays show improved accuracy and precision in normal serum, discrepant results exist in samples with atypical lipoprotein characteristics. Hypertriglyceridemia and monoclonal paraproteins are important interfering factors. A novel approach is nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that allows rapid and reliable analysis of lipoprotein subclasses, which may improve the identification of individuals at increased CHD risk. Apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein of HDL, has been proposed as an alternative cardioprotective marker avoiding the analytical limitations of HDL-C.

  17. How do elevated triglycerides and low HDL-cholesterol affect inflammation and atherothrombosis?

    PubMed

    Welty, Francine K

    2013-09-01

    This review article summarizes recent research into the mechanisms as to how elevated levels of triglyceride (TG) and low levels of high- density- lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) contribute to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Evidence supports the role of TG-rich lipoproteins in signaling mechanisms via apolipoproteins C-III and free fatty acids leading to activation of NFKβ, VCAM-1 and other inflammatory mediators which lead to fatty streak formation and advanced atherosclerosis. Moreover, the cholesterol content in TG-rich lipoproteins has been shown to predict CAD risk better than LDL-C. In addition to reverse cholesterol transport, HDL has many other cardioprotective effects which include regulating immune function. The "functionality" of HDL appears more important than the level of HDL-C. Insulin resistance and central obesity underlie the pathophysiology of elevated TG and low HDL-C in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle recommendations including exercise and weight loss remain first line therapy in ameliorating insulin resistance and the adverse signaling processes from elevated levels of TG-rich lipoproteins and low HDL-C.

  18. Plasma triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio, insulin resistance, and cardiometabolic risk in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Jiménez-Flores, J. Rafael; Sigrist-Flores, Santiago C.; Espinoza-Camacho, Miguel A.; Jiménez-Morales, Mayra; Piña, Enrique; Méndez-Cruz, A. René; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Reaven, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies in mature adults suggest that the plasma concentration ratio of triglyceride (TG)/HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) provides a simple way to identify apparently healthy individuals who are insulin resistant (IR) and at increased cardiometabolic risk. This study extends these observations by examining the clinical utility of the TG/HDL-C ratio and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in 2,244 healthy college students (17–24 years old) of Mexican Mestizo ancestry. The TG/HDL-C ratio separating the 25% with the highest value was used to identify IR and increased cardiometabolic risk. Cardiometabolic risk factors were more adverse in men and women whose TG/HDL-C ratios exceeded 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, and approximately one third were identified as being IR. The MetS identified fewer individuals as being IR, but their risk profile was accentuated. In conclusion, both a higher TG/HDL-C ratio and a diagnosis of the MetS identify young IR individuals with an increased cardiometabolic risk profile. The TG/HDL-C ratio identified a somewhat greater number of “high risk” subjects, whereas the MetS found a group whose risk profile was somewhat magnified. These findings suggest that the TG/HDL-C ratio may serve as a simple and clinically useful approach to identify apparently healthy, young individuals who are IR and at increased cardiometabolic risk. PMID:23863983

  19. Serum total cholesterol: HDL cholesterol ratios in US white and black adults by selected demographic and socioeconomic variables (HANES II).

    PubMed Central

    Linn, S; Fulwood, R; Carroll, M; Brook, J G; Johnson, C; Kalsbeek, W D; Rifkind, B M

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Framingham Study findings suggest that total cholesterol (TC):High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio is a useful summary of the joint contribution of TC and HDL-C to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Information on the distribution of TC:HDL-C in the US population is limited to selected populations and the relationship of the ratio distribution and its correlates has received little attention. METHOD: TC/HDL-C ratios were examined in a representative sample of the United States adult population ages 20 to 74 years, between February 1976 and February 1980 during NHANES II, using stratification and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: Age-adjusted mean ratios were higher in men compared with women and were higher in Whites compared with Blacks. White men had the highest TC/HDL-C mean ratios. These relationships remained after stratification by age, education, body mass index, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and physical activity. Using multivariate analyses, the ratios were positively related to BMI, age, and smoking; and negatively related to female sex, alcohol use, being Black, and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Using a ratio reference point of greater than or equal to 4.5 from the Framingham study, at least an estimated 44 million persons ages 25 to 74 years in the US were found to be at higher risk of developing coronary heart disease. PMID:1853996

  20. Control of Cholesterol Metabolism and Plasma HDL Levels by miRNA-144

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Rotllan, Noemi; Vlassov, Alexander V.; Dávalos, Alberto; Li, Mu; Goedeke, Leigh; Aranda, Juan F.; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Araldi, Elisa; Salerno, Alessandro; Wanschel, Amarylis; Zavadil, Jiri; Castrillo, Antonio; Kim, Jungsu; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Foam cell formation due to excessive accumulation of cholesterol by macrophages is a pathological hallmark of atherosclerosis, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. Liver X nuclear receptors (LXRs) regulate the expression of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including ABCA1 and ABCG1. ABCA1 and ABCG1 facilitate the efflux of cholesterol from macrophages and regulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis. Increasing evidence supports the role of microRNA (miRNAs) in regulating cholesterol metabolism through ABC transporters. Objective We aimed to identify novel miRNAs that regulate cholesterol metabolism in macrophages stimulated with LXR agonists. Methods and Results To map the miRNA expression signature of macrophages stimulated with LXR agonists, we performed a miRNA profiling microarray analysis in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LXR ligands. We report that LXR ligands increase miR-144 expression in macrophages and mouse livers. Overexpression of miR-144 reduces ABCA1 expression and attenuates cholesterol efflux to ApoA1 in macrophages. Delivery of miR-144 oligonucleotides to mice attenuates ABCA1 expression in the liver, reducing HDL levels. Conversely, silencing of miR-144 in mice increases the expression of ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. Thus, miR-144 appears to regulate both macrophage cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis in the liver. Conclusions 1) miR-144 regulates cholesterol metabolism via suppressing ABCA1 expression; and 2) modulation of miRNAs may represent a potential therapeutical intervention for treating dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:23519695

  1. Signal transduction pathways provide opportunities to enhance HDL and apoAI-dependent reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Wood, Peta; Rentero, Carles; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Binding of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) to cell surface receptors is believed to initiate a plethora of signaling cascades that promote atheroprotective cell behavior, including the removal of excess cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages. More specifically, HDL and apoA-I binding to scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 has been shown to activate protein kinase A and C (PKA, PKC), Rac/Rho GTPases, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2), calmodulin as well as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Some of these signaling events upregulate mobilization of cholesterol from cellular pools, while others promote efflux pathways through increased expression, stability, and cell surface localization of SR-BI and ABCA1. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of HDL- and apoA-I -induced signal transduction pathways that are linked to cholesterol efflux and discusses the underlying mechanisms that could couple ligand binding to SR-BI and ABCA1 with signaling and cholesterol export. Additional focus is given on the potential of pharmacological intervention to modulate the activity of signaling cascades for the inhibition or regression of cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions.

  2. Normal Non-HDL Cholesterol, Low Total Cholesterol, and HDL Cholesterol Levels in Sickle Cell Disease Patients in the Steady State: A Case-Control Study of Tema Metropolis

    PubMed Central

    Adu, Patrick; Ake, Edem; Agbodzakey, Hope; Adoba, Prince; Cudjoe, Obed; Agoni, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Background. Abnormal lipid homeostasis in sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by defects in plasma and erythrocyte lipids and may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study assessed the lipid profile and non-HDL cholesterol level of SCD patients. Methods. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 50 SCD patients, in the steady state, aged 8–28 years, attending the SCD clinic, and 50 healthy volunteers between the ages of 8–38 years. Serum lipids were determined by enzymatic methods and non-HDL cholesterol calculated by this formula: non-HDL-C = TC-HDL-C. Results. Total cholesterol (TC) (p = 0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p < 0.0001) were significantly decreased in cases compared to controls. The levels of non-HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) were similar among the participants. The levels of decrease in TC and HDL were associated with whether a patient was SCD-SS or SCD-SC. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were each significantly associated with increased VLDL [SBP, p = 0.01, OR: 0.74 (CI: 0.6–0.93); DBP, p = 0.023, OR: 1.45 (CI: 1.05–2.0)]. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is common among participants in this study. It was more pronounced in the SCD-SS than in SCD-SC. This dyslipidemia was associated with high VLDL as well as increased SBP and DBP. PMID:28078142

  3. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Barbalic, Maja; Jensen, Majken K; Hindy, George; Hólm, Hilma; Ding, Eric L; Johnson, Toby; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Thompson, John F; Li, Mingyao; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Musunuru, Kiran; Pirruccello, James P; Saleheen, Danish; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Schillert, Arne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John; Stoll, Monika; Berger, Klaus; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P; Patterson, Christopher C; Epstein, Stephen E; Devaney, Joseph; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Mooser, Vincent; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Havulinna, Aki; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Ingelsson, Erik; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; de Bakker, Paul I W; Klungel, Olaf H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J M; de Boer, Anthonius; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Deneer, Vera H M; Elbers, Clara C; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Verschuren, WM Monique; Boer, Jolanda MA; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Demissie, Serkalem; Willer, Cristen; Do, Ron; Ordovas, Jose M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L; Daly, Mark J; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Surti, Aarti; Gonzalez, Elena; Purcell, Shaun; Gabriel, Stacey; Marrugat, Jaume; Peden, John; Erdmann, Jeanette; Diemert, Patrick; Willenborg, Christina; König, Inke R; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ziegler, Andreas; Buysschaert, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Van de Werf, Frans; Fox, Keith A; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Rubin, Diana; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Schäfer, Arne; Danesh, John; Blankenberg, Stefan; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S; Overvad, Kim; Rimm, Eric; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reilly, Muredach P; Melander, Olle; Mannucci, Pier M; Ardissino, Diego; Siscovick, David; Elosua, Roberto; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; Rader, Daniel J; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal. Methods We performed two mendelian randomisation analyses. First, we used as an instrument a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the endothelial lipase gene (LIPG Asn396Ser) and tested this SNP in 20 studies (20 913 myocardial infarction cases, 95 407 controls). Second, we used as an instrument a genetic score consisting of 14 common SNPs that exclusively associate with HDL cholesterol and tested this score in up to 12 482 cases of myocardial infarction and 41 331 controls. As a positive control, we also tested a genetic score of 13 common SNPs exclusively associated with LDL cholesterol. Findings Carriers of the LIPG 396Ser allele (2·6% frequency) had higher HDL cholesterol (0·14 mmol/L higher, p=8×10−13) but similar levels of other lipid and non-lipid risk factors for myocardial infarction compared with non-carriers. This difference in HDL cholesterol is expected to decrease risk of myocardial infarction by 13% (odds ratio [OR] 0·87, 95% CI 0·84–0·91). However, we noted that the 396Ser allele was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·99, 95% CI 0·88–1·11, p=0·85). From observational epidemiology, an increase of 1 SD in HDL cholesterol was associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·62, 95% CI 0·58–0·66). However, a 1 SD increase in HDL cholesterol due to genetic score was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·93, 95% CI 0·68–1·26, p=0·63). For LDL cholesterol, the estimate from observational epidemiology (a 1 SD increase in LDL cholesterol

  4. [New trends in lipidology: the increasing role of HDL-cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Paragh, György; Harangi, Mariann; László, Márk

    2008-07-27

    Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the low level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, the increase of which is one of the cornerstones of preventive cardiovascular care. In addition to its major role in reverse cholesterol transport, HDL-C has other biological activities that may contribute to its protective effects against atherosclerosis. These include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic/profibrinolytic and vasoprotective effects. Current guidelines recommend aggressive lifestyle modifications, niacin, fibrate, statin or a combination of these to increase HDL-cholesterol levels. In addition, several novel HDL-based therapeutic strategies have been or are currently being tested. These include newer formulations of nicotinic acid/receptor agonists, CETP inhibitors, cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists, PPAR agonists, liver X receptor/farnesoid X receptor agonists, and apoA-I and/or phospholipid-derived therapies. In this article previous clinical trials, epidemiological observations, basic science studies and the most important trials of novel agents are reviewed.

  5. Size, density and cholesterol load of HDL predict microangiopathy, coronary artery disease and β-cell function in men with T2DM.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Michel P; Amoussou-Guenou, K Daniel; Bouenizabila, Evariste; Sadikot, Shaukat S; Ahn, Sylvie A; Rousseau, Michel F

    2016-09-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease is increasingly debated, notwithstanding the finding that small-dense and dysfunctional HDL are associated with the metabolic syndrome and T2DM. In order to better clarify the epidemiological risk related to HDL of different size/density, without resorting to direct measures, it would seem appropriate to adjust HDL-C to the level of its main apolipoprotein (apoA-I), thereby providing an [HDL-C/apoA-I] ratio. The latter allows not only to estimate an average size for HDLs, but also to derive indices on particle number, cholesterol load, and density. So far, the potential usefulness of this ratio in diabetes is barely addressed. To this end, we sorted 488 male patients with T2DM according to [HDL-C/apoA-I] quartiles (Q), to determine how the ratio relates to cardiometabolic risk, β-cell function, glycaemic control, and micro- and macrovascular complications. Five lipid parameters were derived from the combined determination of HDL-C and apoA-I, namely HDL size; particle number; cholesterol load/particle; apoA-I/particle; and particle density. An unfavorable cardiometabolic profile characterized patients from QI and QII, in which HDLs were pro-atherogenic, denser and apoA-I-depleted. By contrast, QIII patients had an [HDL-C/apoA-I] ratio close to that of non-diabetic controls. QIV patients had better than average HDL size and composition, and in those patients whose [HDL-C/apoA-I] ratio was above normal, a more favorable phenotype was observed regarding lifestyle, anthropometry, metabolic comorbidities, insulin sensitivity, MetS score/severity, glycaemic control, and target-organ damage pregalence in small or large vessels. In conclusion, [HDL-C/apoA-I] and the resulting indices of HDL composition and functionality predict macrovascular risk and β-cell function decline, as well as overall microangiopathic risk, suggesting that this ratio could serve

  6. Epistasis contributes to the genetic buffering of plasma HDL cholesterol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Stressful environmental factors, such as a high-fat diet, can induce responses in the expression of genes that act to maintain physiological homeostasis. We observed variation in plasma concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol across inbred mouse strains in response to high dietary fat intake. Several strains, including C57BL/6J, have stable levels of plasma HDL independent of diet, whereas other strains, including DBA2/J, show marked changes in plasma HDL. To explore this phenomenon further, we used publicly available data from a C57BL/6J × DBA/2J intercross to identify genetic factors that associate with HDL under high-fat diet conditions. Our analysis identified an epistatic interaction that plays a role in the buffering of HDL levels in C57BL/6J mice, and we have identified Arl4d as a candidate gene that mediates this effect. Structural modeling further elucidates the interaction of genetic factors that contribute to the robustness of HDL in response to high-fat diet in the C57BL/6J strain. PMID:20858711

  7. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  8. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-07-19

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages.

  9. Human pedigree-based quantitative-trait-locus mapping: localization of two genes influencing HDL-cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Almasy, L; Hixson, J E; Rainwater, D L; Cole, S; Williams, J T; Mahaney, M C; VandeBerg, J L; Stern, M P; MacCluer, J W; Blangero, J

    1999-01-01

    Common disorders with genetic susceptibilities involve the action of multiple genes interacting with each other and with environmental factors, making it difficult to localize the specific genetic loci responsible. An important route to the disentangling of this complex inheritance is through the study of normal physiological variation in quantitative risk factors that may underlie liability to disease. We present an analysis of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), which is inversely correlated with risk of heart disease. A variety of HDL subphenotypes were analyzed, including HDL particle-size classes and the concentrations and proportions of esterified and unesterified HDL-C. Results of a complete genomic screen in large, randomly ascertained pedigrees implicated two loci, one on chromosome 8 and the other on chromosome 15, that influence a component of HDL-C-namely, unesterified HDL2a-C. Multivariate analyses of multiple HDL phenotypes and simultaneous multilocus analysis of the quantitative-trait loci identified permit further characterization of the genetic effects on HDL-C. These analyses suggest that the action of the chromosome 8 locus is specific to unesterified cholesterol levels, whereas the chromosome 15 locus appears to influence both HDL-C concentration and distribution of cholesterol among HDL particle sizes. PMID:10330356

  10. Postpartum weight retention is associated with elevated ratio of oxidized LDL lipids to HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Puhkala, Jatta; Luoto, Riitta; Ahotupa, Markku; Raitanen, Jani; Vasankari, Tommi

    2013-12-01

    Oxidized LDL lipids (ox-LDL) are associated with lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The present study investigated how postpartum weight retention effects on ox-LDL and serum lipids. The study is a nested comparative research of a cluster-randomized controlled trial, NELLI (lifestyle and counselling during pregnancy). During early pregnancy (8-12 weeks) and 1 year postpartum, 141 women participated in measurements for determining of plasma lipids: total cholesterol (T-C), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerols (TAG) and ox-LDL. Subjects were stratified into tertiles (weight loss, unaltered weight and weight gain groups) based on their weight change from baseline to follow-up. Ox-LDL was determined by baseline level of conjugated dienes in LDL lipids. Among the group of weight gainers, concentration of TAG reduced less (-0.14 vs. -0.33, p = 0.002), HDL-C reduced more (-0.31 vs. -0.16, p = 0.003) and ox-LDL/HDL-C ratio increased (3.0 vs. -0.2, p = 0.003) when compared to group of weight loss. Both T-C and LDL-C elevated more (0.14 vs. -0.21, p = 0.008; 0.31 vs. 0.07, p = 0.015) and TAG and ox-LDL reduced less (-0.33 vs. 0.20, p = 0.033; -3.33 vs. -0.68, p = 0.026) in unaltered weight group compared to weight loss group. The women who gained weight developed higher TAG and ox-LDL/HDL-C ratio as compared to those who lost weight. Postpartum weight retention of 3.4 kg or more is associated with atherogenic lipid profile.

  11. Serum triglycerides and HDL cholesterol from SHR after evening primrose oil and other polyunsaturated fats.

    PubMed

    Singer, P; Hoffmann, P; Beitz, J; Förster, W; Wirth, M; Gödicke, W

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were fed diets enriched with evening primrose (EPO), sunflower (SO) and linseed oils (LO) as well as palm kernel fat (PKF), the latter being deficient in polyunsarated fatty acids (PUFA). In SHR fed EPO serum triglycerides were lowest and HDL1 cholesterol was highest as compared to the other groups of animals. Total cholesterol was not different. The data suggest that - as with blood pressure - serum lipids and lipoproteins might be influenced most effectively by EPO in comparison to other polyunsaturated fats.

  12. β-COP as a Component of Transport Vesicles for HDL Apolipoprotein-Mediated Cholesterol Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weilie; Lin, Margarita; Ding, Hang; Lin, Guorong; Zhang, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Objective HDL and its apolipoproteins protect against atherosclerotic disease partly by removing excess cholesterol from macrophage foam cells. But the underlying mechanisms of cholesterol clearance are still not well defined. We investigated roles of vesicle trafficking of coatomer β-COP in delivering cholesterol to the cell surface during apoA-1 and apoE-mediated lipid efflux from fibroblasts and THP-1 macrophages. Methods shRNA knockout, confocal and electron microscopy and biochemical analysis were used to investigate the roles of β-COP in apolipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux in fibroblasts and THP-1 macrophages. Results We showed that β-COP knockdown by lentiviral shRNA resulted in reduced apoA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux, while increased cholesterol accumulation and formation of larger vesicles were observed in THP-1 macrophages by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that β-COP appeared on the membrane protrusion complexes and colocalized with apoA-1 or apoE during cholesterol efflux. This was associated with releasing heterogeneous sizes of small particles into the culture media of THP-1 macrophage. Western blotting also showed that apoA-1 promotes β-COP translocation to the cell membrane and secretion into culture media, in which a total of 17 proteins were identified by proteomics. Moreover, β-COP exclusively associated with human plasma HDL fractions. Conclusion ApoA-1 and apoE promoted transport vesicles consisting of β-COP and other candidate proteins to exocytose cholesterol, forming the protrusion complexes on cell surface, which were then released from the cell membrane as small particles to media. PMID:26986486

  13. Ciprofibrate therapy in patients with hypertriglyceridemia and low high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol: greater reduction of non-HDL cholesterol in subjects with excess body weight (The CIPROAMLAT study)

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Assis-Luores-Vale, Andréia; Stockins, Benjamín; Rengifo, Hector Mario; Filho, José Dondici; Neto, Abrahão Afiune; Rabelo, Lísia Marcílio; Torres, Kerginaldo Paulo; Oliveira, José Egídio Paulo de; Machado, Carlos Alberto; Reyes, Eliana; Saavedra, Victor; Florenzano, Fernando; Hernández, Ma Victoria; Jiménez, Sergio Hernandez; Ramírez, Erika; Vazquez, Cuauhtémoc; Salinas, Saul; Hernández, Ismael; Medel, Octavio; Moreno, Ricardo; Lugo, Paula; Alvarado, Ricardo; Mehta, Roopa; Gutierrez, Victor; Gómez Pérez, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia in combination with low HDL cholesterol levels is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of ciprofibrate for the treatment of this form of dyslipidemia and to identify factors associated with better treatment response. Methods Multicenter, international, open-label study. Four hundred and thirty seven patients were included. The plasma lipid levels at inclusion were fasting triglyceride concentrations between 1.6–3.9 mM/l and HDL cholesterol ≤ 1.05 mM/l for women and ≤ 0.9 mM/l for men. The LDL cholesterol was below 4.2 mM/l. All patients received ciprofibrate 100 mg/d. Efficacy and safety parameters were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. The primary efficacy parameter of the study was percentage change in triglycerides from baseline. Results After 4 months, plasma triglyceride concentrations were decreased by 44% (p < 0.001). HDL cholesterol concentrations were increased by 10% (p < 0.001). Non-HDL cholesterol was decreased by 19%. A greater HDL cholesterol response was observed in lean patients (body mass index < 25 kg/m2) compared to the rest of the population (8.2 vs 19.7%, p < 0.001). In contrast, cases with excess body weight had a larger decrease in non-HDL cholesterol levels (-20.8 vs -10.8%, p < 0.001). There were no significant complications resulting from treatment with ciprofibrate. Conclusions Ciprofibrate is efficacious for the correction of hypertriglyceridemia / low HDL cholesterol. A greater decrease in non-HDL cholesterol was found among cases with excess body weight. The mechanism of action of ciprofibrate may be influenced by the pathophysiology of the disorder being treated. PMID:15272932

  14. MediterrAsian Diet Products That Could Raise HDL-Cholesterol: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Giacosa, Attilio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Guido, Davide; Grassi, Mario; Morandi, Gabriella; Bologna, Chiara; Riva, Antonella; Allegrini, Pietro; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Background. High HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) values are negatively correlated with cardiovascular diseases. This review analyses the effect of the supplementation with various Mediterranean diet products (artichoke, bergamot, and olive oil) and Asian diet products (red yeast rice) on the HDL-C value in dyslipidemic subjects. Methods. A systematic review has been done involving all the English written studies published from the 1st of January 1958 to the 31st of March 2016. Results. The results of this systematic review indicate that the dietary supplementation with red yeast rice, bergamot, artichoke, and virgin olive oil has promising effects on the increase of HDL-C serum levels. The artichoke leaf extract and virgin olive oil appear to be particularly interesting, while bergamot extract needs further research and the effect of red yeast rice seems to be limited to patients with previous myocardial infarction. Conclusions. Various MediterrAsian diet products or natural extracts may represent a potential intervention treatment to raise HDL-C in dyslipidemic subjects.

  15. MediterrAsian Diet Products That Could Raise HDL-Cholesterol: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Giacosa, Attilio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Guido, Davide; Grassi, Mario; Morandi, Gabriella; Bologna, Chiara; Allegrini, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Background. High HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) values are negatively correlated with cardiovascular diseases. This review analyses the effect of the supplementation with various Mediterranean diet products (artichoke, bergamot, and olive oil) and Asian diet products (red yeast rice) on the HDL-C value in dyslipidemic subjects. Methods. A systematic review has been done involving all the English written studies published from the 1st of January 1958 to the 31st of March 2016. Results. The results of this systematic review indicate that the dietary supplementation with red yeast rice, bergamot, artichoke, and virgin olive oil has promising effects on the increase of HDL-C serum levels. The artichoke leaf extract and virgin olive oil appear to be particularly interesting, while bergamot extract needs further research and the effect of red yeast rice seems to be limited to patients with previous myocardial infarction. Conclusions. Various MediterrAsian diet products or natural extracts may represent a potential intervention treatment to raise HDL-C in dyslipidemic subjects. PMID:27882320

  16. Discordance of Non-HDL and Directly Measured LDL Cholesterol: Which Lipid Measure is Preferred When Calculated LDL Is Inaccurate?

    PubMed

    Baruch, Lawrence; Chiong, Valerie J; Agarwal, Sanjay; Gupta, Bhanu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine if non-HDL cholesterol (N-HDL) and directly measured LDL cholesterol (D-LDL) are clinically equivalent measurements. Patients and Methods. Eighty-one subjects recruited for 2 cholesterol treatment studies had at least 1 complete fasting lipid panel and D-LDL performed simultaneously; 64 had a second assessment after 4 to 6 weeks, resulting in 145 triads of C-LDL, D-LDL, and N-HDL. To directly compare N-HDL to D-LDL and C-LDL, we normalized the N-HDL by subtracting 30 from the N-HDL (N-HDLA). Results. There was significant correlation between N-HDLA, D-LDL, and C-LDL. Correlation was significantly greater between N-HDLA and C-LDL than between N-HDLA and D-LDL. A greater than 20 mg/dL difference between measures was observed more commonly between N-HDLA and D-LDL, 29%, than between C-LDL and N-HDLA, 11% (P < 0.001), and C-LDL and D-LDL, 17% (P = 0.028). Clinical discordance was most common, and concordance was least common between N-HDL and D-LDL. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that N-HDL cholesterol and D-LDL cholesterol are not clinically equivalent and frequently discordant. As N-HDL may be superior to even C-LDL for predicting events in statin-treated patients, utilizing N-HDL to guide therapy would appear to be preferable to D-LDL when C-LDL is inaccurate.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Studies of Gold Nanoparticle Templated HDL-like Nanoparticles for Cholesterol Metabolism Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Sun, Wangqiang; Palekar, Rohun U; Thaxton, C Shad; Schatz, George C

    2017-01-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays an important role in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol. Mimics of HDL are being explored as potentially powerful therapeutic agents for removing excess cholesterol from arterial plaques. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with apolipoprotein A-I and with the lipids 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] have been demonstrated to be robust acceptors of cellular cholesterol. However, detailed structural information about this functionalized HDL AuNP is still lacking. In this study, we have used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase activation experiments together with coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to model the structure and cholesterol uptake properties of the HDL AuNP construct. By simulating different apolipoprotein-loaded AuNPs, we find that lipids are oriented differently in regions with and without apoA-I. We also show that in this functionalized HDL AuNP, the distribution of cholesteryl ester maintains a reverse concentration gradient that is similar to the gradient found in native HDL.

  18. Hepatic and extrahepatic uptake of HDL-derived plasma cholesterol in exercised and sedentary rats

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanathan, S.; Green, M.H.; Kris-Etherton, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    The present investigation was designed to study high density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived plasma cholesterol (C) turnover in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues of sedentary (S) and exercised (E) rats. 4-week-old Long Evans rats were exercised for 1 hr, 6 days weekly, for a period of 38 weeks, on a motor-driven treadmill at 0.8 mph at a 12% grade. Animals were injected with HDL that was labelled in vitro with /sup 3/H-cholesteryl ester. Serial blood samples and tissues were collected. HDL-C concentration was lower in E vs S rats (23.0 +/- 1.2 and 26.6 +/- 1.9 mg/dl, p < 0.01). While total plasma C was not different, liver C was higher in S vs E rats (8.2 +/- 0.8 and 7.2 +/- 0.5 mg/g). Adrenal C was higher in E vs S rats (29.5 +/- 2.3 and 20.7 +/- 2.3 mg/g, p < 0.01). Multicompartmental analysis of plasma and tissue tracer response led to development of an 8-component model (5 physiological; 3 nonphysiological) that depicted HDL-derived plasma C turnover. Plasma fraction of tracer declined more rapidly in E vs S rats. E rats cleared nonphysiological tracer more rapidly than S rats, but delayed release of tracer into the plasma longer. Fractional rate of tracer uptake into adrenals, liver, testes, and carcass was greater in E rats. There was a greater fractional turnover rate of tracer in adrenals and liver in S vs E rats. Hence HDL-derived plasma C turnover is altered with vigorous exercise.

  19. Niacin Reduces Atherosclerosis Development in APOE*3Leiden.CETP Mice Mainly by Reducing NonHDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Pieterman, Elsbet J.; van Klinken, Jan B.; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van der Hoorn, José W. A.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Objective Niacin potently lowers triglycerides, mildly decreases LDL-cholesterol, and largely increases HDL-cholesterol. Despite evidence for an atheroprotective effect of niacin from previous small clinical studies, the large outcome trials, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE did not reveal additional beneficial effects of niacin (alone or in combination with laropiprant) on top of statin treatment. We aimed to address this apparent discrepancy by investigating the effects of niacin without and with simvastatin on atherosclerosis development and determine the underlying mechanisms, in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice, a model for familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Approach and Results Mice were fed a western-type diet containing cholesterol without or with niacin (120 mg/kg/day), simvastatin (36 mg/kg/day) or their combination for 18 weeks. Similarly as in FD patients, niacin reduced total cholesterol by -39% and triglycerides by −50%, (both P<0.001). Simvastatin and the combination reduced total cholesterol (−30%; −55%, P<0.001) where the combination revealed a greater reduction compared to simvastatin (−36%, P<0.001). Niacin decreased total cholesterol and triglycerides primarily by increasing VLDL clearance. Niacin increased HDL-cholesterol (+28%, P<0.01) and mildly increased reverse cholesterol transport. All treatments reduced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium (−46%; −47%, P<0.01; −53%, P<0.001), atherosclerotic lesion area (−78%; −49%, P<0.01; −87%, P<0.001) and severity. Compared to simvastatin, the combination increased plaque stability index [(SMC+collagen)/macrophages] (3-fold, P<0.01). Niacin and the combination reduced T cells in the aortic root (−71%, P<0.01; −81%, P<0.001). Lesion area was strongly predicted by nonHDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.69, P<0.001) and to a much lesser extent by HDL-cholesterol (R2 = 0.20, P<0.001). Conclusion Niacin decreases atherosclerosis development mainly by reducing nonHDL-cholesterol with modest HDL-cholesterol

  20. HDL functionality in reverse cholesterol transport--Challenges in translating data emerging from mouse models to human disease.

    PubMed

    Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T

    2016-07-01

    Whereas LDL-derived cholesterol accumulates in atherosclerotic lesions, HDL particles are thought to facilitate removal of cholesterol from the lesions back to the liver thereby promoting its fecal excretion from the body. Because generation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages is inherent to atherogenesis, studies on the mechanisms stimulating the release of cholesterol from these cells and its ultimate excretion into feces are crucial to learn how to prevent lesion development or even induce lesion regression. Modulation of this key anti-atherogenic pathway, known as the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, has been extensively studied in several mouse models with the ultimate aim of applying the emerging knowledge to humans. The present review provides a detailed comparison and critical analysis of the various steps of reverse cholesterol transport in mouse and man. We attempt to translate this in vivo complex scenario into practical concepts, which could serve as valuable tools when developing novel HDL-targeted therapies.

  1. A plant stanol yogurt drink alone or combined with a low-dose statin lowers serum triacylglycerol and non-HDL cholesterol in metabolic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Plat, Jogchum; Brufau, Gemma; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Dasselaar, Margreet; Mensink, Ronald P

    2009-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of 2 commonly available strategies (plant stanol ester drink and 10 mg simvastatin) on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk variables in participants with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome patients are at increased risk to develop CHD, partly due to high triacylglycerol (TAG) and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and a low-grade inflammatory profile. Effects of plant stanol esters on TAG concentrations in these participants are unknown. After a 3-wk run-in period in which individuals consumed placebo yogurt drinks and placebo capsules, participants were randomly divided into 4 groups: placebo (n = 9), simvastatin + placebo drink (n = 10), placebo + stanol drink (n = 9), and simvastatin + stanol drink (n = 8). After 9 wk, we evaluated the effects on serum lipids, low-grade inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction markers. In metabolic syndrome patients, stanol esters (2.0 g/d), simvastatin, or the combination lowered non-HDL-C by 12.8% (P = 0.011), 30.7% (P < 0.001), and 35.4% (P < 0.001), respectively, compared with placebo. TAG were lowered by 27.5% (P = 0.044), 21.7% (P = 0.034), and 32.7% (P < 0.01), respectively. The total-:HDL-C ratio was significantly lowered in all 3 intervention groups. We found no treatment effects on the apolipoprotein CII:CIII ratio, cholesterol ester transfer protein mass, FFA concentrations, and markers for low-grade inflammation or endothelial dysfunction. This study shows that in metabolic syndrome patients, plant stanol esters lower not only non-HDL-C, but also TAG. Effects on TAG were also present in combination with statin treatment, illustrating an additional benefit of stanol esters in this CHD risk population.

  2. Chronic kidney disease - different role for HDL?

    PubMed

    Jacek, Rysz; Anna, Gluba; Danilo, Fliser; Timo, Speer; Andrzej, Wiecek

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging health hazard, connected to very high cardiovascular mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Increased cardiovascular risk cannot be explained only by traditional risk factors. Patients with renal dysfunction have significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism and HDL in these patients becomes dysfunctional. It has been documented that in patients with CKD lower plasma level of HDL cholesterol and reduced ability of HDL to bind to ABCA1 are seen, which result in slowing down the reverse cholesterol transport and disturbances in HDL maturation due to decreased lecithin cholesterol ester transfer protein. Studies demonstrated that HDL of CKD patients loses its vasoprotective, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and turns into a noxious particle which promotes endothelial dysfunction via stimulating superoxide production and limiting NO bioavailability. Alterations of HDL at the 'molecular and functional level' are also seen in renal transplant recipients even in those with excellent graft function.

  3. Enhanced vascular permeability facilitates entry of plasma HDL and promotes macrophage-reverse cholesterol transport from skin in mice.

    PubMed

    Kareinen, Ilona; Cedó, Lídia; Silvennoinen, Reija; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Julve, Josep; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway from macrophage foam cells initiates when HDL particles cross the endothelium, enter the interstitial fluid, and induce cholesterol efflux from these cells. We injected [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages into the dorsal skin of mice and measured the transfer of macrophage-derived [(3)H]cholesterol to feces [macrophage-RCT (m-RCT)]. Injection of histamine to the macrophage injection site increased locally vascular permeability, enhanced influx of intravenously administered HDL, and stimulated m-RCT from the histamine-treated site. The stimulatory effect of histamine on m-RCT was abolished by prior administration of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, indicating that the histamine effect was H1R-dependent. Subcutaneous administration of two other vasoactive mediators, serotonin or bradykinin, and activation of skin mast cells to secrete histamine and other vasoactive compounds also stimulated m-RCT. None of the studied vasoactive mediators affected serum HDL levels or the cholesterol-releasing ability of J774 macrophages in culture, indicating that acceleration of m-RCT was solely due to increased availability of cholesterol acceptors in skin. We conclude that disruption of the endothelial barrier by vasoactive compounds enhances the passage of HDL into interstitial fluid and increases the rate of RCT from peripheral macrophage foam cells, which reveals a novel tissue cholesterol-regulating function of these compounds.

  4. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial

    PubMed Central

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele L.; Shigenaga, Mark K.; Suh, Jung H.; Shenvi, Swapna V.; Lal, Ashutosh; McHugh, Tara; Olson, Don; Lilienstein, Joshua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Gildengoren, Ginny; McCann, Joyce C.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. A low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins and minerals, fruit polyphenolics, β-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid) appropriate for deconstruction and mechanistic studies is described and evaluated in a pilot trial. The bar was developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Changes in cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk biomarkers were measured after 2 wk twice-daily consumption of the bar, and compared against baseline controls in 25 healthy adults. Plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) increased 6.2% (P=0.001), due primarily to a 28% increase in large HDL (HDL-L; P<0.0001). Total plasma homocysteine (Hcy) decreased 19% (P=0.017), and glutathione (GSH) increased 20% (P=0.011). The changes in HDL and Hcy are in the direction associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline; increased GSH reflects improved antioxidant defense. Changes in biomarkers linked to insulin resistance and inflammation were not observed. A defined food-based supplement can, within 2 wk, positively impact metabolic biomarkers linked to disease risk. These results lay the groundwork for mechanistic/deconstruction experiments to identify critical bar components and putative synergistic combinations responsible for observed effects.—Mietus-Snyder, M. L., Shigenaga, M. K., Suh, J. H., Shenvi, S. V., Lal, A., McHugh, T., Olson, D., Lilienstein, J., Krauss, R. M., Gildengoren, G., McCann, J. C., Ames, B. N. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial. PMID:22549511

  5. The mouse QTL map helps interpret human genome-wide association studies for HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Lyons, Malcolm; Darvishi, Katayoon; Walsh, Kenneth; Sheehan, Susan; Amend, Sarah; Cox, Allison; Orho-Melander, Marju; Kathiresan, Sekar; Paigen, Beverly; Korstanje, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful strategy for identifying susceptibility genes for complex diseases in human populations but results must be confirmed and replicated. Because of the close homology between mouse and human genomes, the mouse can be used to add evidence to genes suggested by human studies. We used the mouse quantitative trait loci (QTL) map to interpret results from a GWA study for genes associated with plasma HDL cholesterol levels. We first positioned single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a human GWA study on the genomic map for mouse HDL QTL. We then used mouse bioinformatics, sequencing, and expression studies to add evidence for one well-known HDL gene (Abca1) and three newly identified genes (Galnt2, Wwox, and Cdh13), thus supporting the results of the human study. For GWA peaks that occur in human haplotype blocks with multiple genes, we examined the homologous regions in the mouse to prioritize the genes using expression, sequencing, and bioinformatics from the mouse model, showing that some genes were unlikely candidates and adding evidence for candidate genes Mvk and Mmab in one haplotype block and Fads1 and Fads2 in the second haplotype block. Our study highlights the value of mouse genetics for evaluating genes found in human GWA studies.

  6. Prediction of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in patients with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and low HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Corrado, Egle; Coppola, Giuseppe; Muratori, Ida; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2008-10-01

    Low HDL-cholesterol concentrations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and recent evidences suggest that HDL may aggravate the atherosclerotic process promoting inflammation: HDL are anti-inflammatory in the absence of inflammation but can become proinflammatory in the presence of atherosclerosis. Yet, no data is available on the cardiovascular outcome in subjects with low HDL-cholesterol and early stages of atherosclerosis. Therefore, we included in a prospective 5-year follow-up study 150 subjects with low HDL-cholesterol concentrations and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid colour doppler, evaluating at baseline all the established traditional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. male gender, older age, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, family history of coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia), as well as levels of two markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and fibrinogen). At the end of the follow-up we registered vascular events in the 21% of patients and we found that lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations were associated with ischemic stroke (p=.0164), peripheral arterial disease (p=.0248) and the presence of any clinical event (p=.0105). By multivariate analysis we searched, among all baseline parameters, for independent variables associated with the events and we found a predictive role for elevated fibrinogen concentrations (OR 6.3, 95% CI 2.0-19.6, p=.0016), family history of coronary artery disease (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.7-12.8, p=.0045) and lower HDL-cholesterol levels (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9, p=.0278). These findings further suggest a synergistic role of low-HDL and inflammation on the atherosclerotic disease progression from subclinical lesions to clinical events. Yet, their therapeutical implications remain to be established in future studies.

  7. High HDL cholesterol level after treatment with pitavastatin is an important factor for regression in carotid intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Kenji; Tsukamoto, Hideto; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hirayama, Haruo; Kamiya, Haruo; Watarai, Masato; Ishiki, Ryoji; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-03-01

    This study is a prospective multicenter study designed to investigate the effects of lipid-lowering therapy with pitavastatin on atherosclerotic plaque in patients with coronary heart disease, and to determine which factor is more closely associated with plaque regression. Participants (n = 63) were treated with pitavastatin for 12 months, and the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound before and after treatment. Mean IMT slightly but significantly decreased (from 0.99 ± 0.33 to 0.94 ± 0.28 mm for overall, P = 0.01) regardless of the presence of pretreatment with other statins. There were no significant relations with hs-CRP, malondialdehyde-LDL, LDL cholesterol, and smaller LDL cholesterol levels despite their decrease by pitavastatin. Decreases in mean IMT were observed significantly more frequently in subjects with high on-treatment HDL cholesterol levels than with low HDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.017). The change in mean IMT tended to be inversely correlated with increments in HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I. The IMT regression was more often observed in the absence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, we demonstrated that treatment with pitavastatin attenuated atherosclerotic plaque. This effect was associated with the level of HDL cholesterol, and was stronger in the absence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome in our ischemic heart disease patients.

  8. NMR-Based Lipid Profiling of High Density Lipoprotein Particles in Healthy Subjects with Low, Normal, and Elevated HDL-Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kostara, Christina E; Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Elisaf, Moses S; Bairaktari, Eleni T

    2017-03-21

    Recent studies suggest that the cholesterol content of HDL (high density lipoproteins) may provide limited information on their antiatherogenic properties and that the composition and particles' structure provide more information on their functionality. We used NMR-based (nuclear magnetic resonance-based) lipidomics to study the relationships of serum HDL-C (HDL-cholesterol) levels with the lipid composition of HDL particles in three groups of subjects selected on the basis of their HDL-C levels. Subjects with low and high HDL-C levels exhibited differences in HDL lipidome compared to those with normal HDL-C levels. In pattern recognition analysis, the discrimination power among all groups was of high significance. The low HDL-C group presented enrichment of the core in triglycerides and depletion in cholesterol esters, whereas the high HDL-C group showed a decrease in triglycerides content. Additionally, as HDL-C increases, all lipid classes are esterified with higher percentage of unsaturated than saturated fatty acids. In addition to the aforementioned differences, the surface layer is enriched in sphingomyelin and free cholesterol in the high HDL-C level group. NMR-based lipidomic analysis of HDL can be particularly useful since it provides insights into molecular features and helps in the characterization of the atheroprotective function of HDL lipoproteins and in the identification of novel biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

  9. Lower HDL-cholesterol among healthy middle-aged Japanese-Brazilians in São Paulo compared to Natives and Japanese-Brazilians in Japan.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, Andiara; Nakata, Yoshio; Ito, Lucy S; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J; Shigematsu, Ryosuke; Erb, Christopher T; Souza, Simone M; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Marie, Suely K N; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2007-01-01

    Blood lipid levels are determined by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Higher than average values of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol) have been observed in people of Japanese ethnicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Japanese immigrants to Brazil and subsequent generations maintain the protective benefits associated with higher levels of HDL-cholesterol, and to examine the potential associations between HDL-cholesterol and a variety of other blood lipids, anthropometric and lifestyle factors. Healthy men and women aged 35 years and older who were Native Japanese (n = 198) or Japanese-Brazilians (JB) living in São Paulo, Brazil (n = 198) and in some Japanese cities (n = 246) were investigated. Anthropometric variables, blood lipids including HDL-cholesterol, and lifestyle factors were assessed. Serum HDL-cholesterol was observed to be lower for JB in São Paulo (both women and men) compared with Natives and JB in Japan. Among the groups, triglycerides, waist circumference, LDL-cholesterol, meat intake, stress, and smoking were observed to be independently negatively associated with HDL-cholesterol, whereas total cholesterol, fish intake, and physical activity were positively associated. Lower levels of HDL-cholesterol among both men and women of JB in São Paulo compared with both other groups were confirmed even after lifestyle adjustments. Our findings highlight the significantly lower levels of HDL-cholesterol among Japanese-Brazilians living in São Paulo city compared to Japanese-Brazilians and Native Japanese residing in Japan. Although several lifestyle factors were found to be significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol, they cannot adequately explain the role of the Brazilian cultural environment on HDL-cholesterol levels.

  10. Peripheral plasma vitamin D and non-HDL cholesterol reflect the severity of cerebral cavernous malformation disease

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Romuald; Khanna, Omaditya; Shenkar, Robert; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Jesselson, Michael; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Gangal, Anupriya; Fam, Maged D; Gibson, Christopher C; Whitehead, Kevin J; Li, Dean Y; Liao, James K; Shi, Changbin; Awad, Issam A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To correlate cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) disease aggressiveness with peripheral blood biomarkers hypothesized mechanistically. Patients & methods: A prospective case–control study enrolled 43 CCM patients, where 25-(OH) vitamin D, HDL and non-HDL cholesterol, CRP plasma levels and leukocyte ROCK activity were correlated with parameters of disease aggressiveness reflecting chronic and acute domains. Results: Patients with one or more features of chronically aggressive disease (early age at symptom onset, two or more symptomatic bleeds, high lesion burden) had significantly lower 25-(OH) vitamin D and non-HDL cholesterol levels in comparison to patients without these features. Conclusion: Validation of these biomarkers and their potential treatment modulation may influence the clinical care of patients with CCM disease. PMID:26861901

  11. Fish protein hydrolysate reduces plasma total cholesterol, increases the proportion of HDL cholesterol, and lowers acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity in liver of Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Wergedahl, Hege; Liaset, Bjørn; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun Anita; Lied, Einar; Espe, Marit; Muna, Ziad; Mørk, Sverre; Berge, Rolf K

    2004-06-01

    There is growing evidence that soy protein improves the blood lipid profiles of animals and humans. We compared the effects of fish protein hydrolysate (FPH), soy protein, and casein (control) on lipid metabolism in Wistar rats and genetically obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats. In Zucker rats, FPH treatment affected the fatty acid composition in liver, plasma, and triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. The mRNA levels of Delta 5 and Delta 6 desaturases were reduced by FPH and soy protein feeding compared with casein feeding. In Zucker rats both FPH and soy protein treatment reduced the plasma cholesterol level. Furthermore, the HDL cholesterol:total cholesterol ratio was greater in these rats and in the Wistar rats fed FPH and soy protein compared with those fed casein. Although fecal total bile acids were greater in soy protein-fed Zucker rats than in casein-fed controls, those fed FPH did not differ from the controls. However, the acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity was reduced in Zucker rats fed FPH and tended to be lower (P = 0.13) in those fed soy protein compared with those fed casein. Low ratios of methionine to glycine and lysine to arginine in the FPH and soy protein diets, compared with the casein diet, may be involved in lowering the plasma cholesterol concentration. Our results indicate that the effects of FPH and soy protein on fatty acid metabolism are similar in many respects, but the hypocholesterolemic effects of FPH and soy protein appear to be due to different mechanisms. FPH may have a role as a cardioprotective nutrient.

  12. Are low levels of HDL2-cholesterol a risk factor for atherosclerosis of cerebral vascular disease? Case report.

    PubMed

    Cordova, C; Alessandri, C; Basili, S; Peverini, F; Ferro, D; Barsi, R; Paradiso, M

    1990-01-01

    A case of a 45 years old man with an atherosclerotic stenosis of right internal carotid and TIA event is reported. The patient showed an increase of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol serum levels and, in particular, a very low familiar HDL2-cholesterol serum value. The possibility that this last condition could represent an important co-factor of the extracranial cerebrovascular disease is discussed. The usefulness of a long-term follow-up of all family members, showing the same lipids pattern, is also suggested.

  13. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients display an altered lipoprotein profile with dysfunctional HDL

    PubMed Central

    Jorissen, Winde; Wouters, Elien; Bogie, Jeroen F.; Vanmierlo, Tim; Noben, Jean-Paul; Sviridov, Denis; Hellings, Niels; Somers, Veerle; Valcke, Roland; Vanwijmeersch, Bart; Stinissen, Piet; Mulder, Monique T.; Remaley, Alan T.; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In the chronic inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS), reports on lipoprotein level alterations are inconsistent and it is unclear whether lipoprotein function is affected. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the lipoprotein profile of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients, progressive MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We observed smaller LDL in RRMS patients compared to healthy controls and to progressive MS patients. Furthermore, low-BMI (BMI ≤ 23 kg/m2) RRMS patients show increased levels of small HDL (sHDL), accompanied by larger, triglyceride (TG)-rich VLDL, and a higher lipoprotein insulin resistance (LP-IR) index. These alterations coincide with a reduced serum capacity to accept cholesterol via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G1, an impaired ability of HDL3 to suppress inflammatory activity of human monocytes, and modifications of HDL3’s main protein component ApoA-I. In summary, lipoprotein levels and function are altered in RRMS patients, especially in low-BMI patients, which may contribute to disease progression in these patients. PMID:28230201

  14. Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) levels in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Alkhouri, Naim; Eng, Katharien; Lopez, Rocio; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in children. Non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) has been shown to be a good predictor of cardiovascular events. Recent data in adults found non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to be associated with significantly higher levels of non-HDL-C than simple steatosis, suggestive it might be used as a non-invasive tool to diagnose NASH. The goal of our study was to assess non-HDL-C levels in children with NAFLD. Our cohort consisted of pediatric patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Anthropometric, laboratory, and histologic data were obtained on all patients. Univariable analysis was performed to assess differences in clinical characteristics between groups. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the correlation between non-HDL-C levels and clinical variables. ANCOVA was used to adjust for possible confounders. 302 subjects with NAFLD were included in our study; 203 with NASH and 99 without NASH. Subjects with NASH had significantly higher non-HDL-C levels than those without (p = 0.004). Histologic features of NASH, including ballooning, inflammation, and fibrosis were found to be weakly correlated with non-HDL-C levels, (p < 0.05 for all). After adjusting for the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), ALT, and GGT, the association between non-HDL-C and NASH was not significant (p = 0.66). In Conclusion, non-HDL-C levels are higher in children with NASH than those with simple steatosis, suggesting increased CVD risk. This may be a reflection of the higher prevalence of MetS. Non-HDL-C had a positive association with histologic features of NASH.

  15. Novel natural food colourant G8000 benefits LDL- and HDL-cholesterol in humans.

    PubMed

    Peres, Rogerio Correa; Gollücke, Andrea Pitelli Boiago; Soares, Clayton; Machado, Patricia; Viveiros Filho, Vitor; Rocha, Silvana; Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Bataglion, Giovana Anceski; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenolic composition of a natural food colourant (G8000™) as well as its effects on plasma markers after 28-day consumption by healthy individuals at a dietary dose (70 g). Parameters of total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides and plasma enzymes biomarkers of muscle injury were measured. Major compounds identified in G8000™ by ESI-MS showed the presence of anthocyanins, organic acids, phenolic acids as well as monosaccharides. HDL levels significantly increased from 43 ± 10.2 mg/dL to 95 ± 16.9 mg/dL. LDL levels significantly decreased from 110 ± 40.9 mg/dL to 69 ± 39 mg/dL (p < 0.001). No significant statistical differences (p > 0.05) were observed for total cholesterol, triglycerides and VLDL. After the intake, plasma enzyme CK-MB decreased from 20 ± 12.1 U/L to 10 ± 1.9 U/L while LDH levels increased from 275 ± 124.4 U/L to 317 ± 114.7 U/L (p < 0.005). No significant differences were observed for CK levels. Taken together, dietary intake of natural colourant G8000™ was able to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis biomarkers.

  16. Association of total cholesterol and HDL-C levels and outcome in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Li, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Li, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate associations of total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels with prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with heart failure (HF). Patients who were angiographical-diagnosis of CHD and echocardiographical-diagnosis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 45% were enrolled. Baseline characteristics were collected and association of TC and HDL-C levels with rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality was assessed. A total of 118 patients were recruited. Mean age was 58.6 ± 10.9 years and male accounted for 65%. Mean LVEF was 39.5 ± 4.0%. Twenty-eight patients were rehospitalized for HF and 6 patients were dead. In patients with poor prognosis, lower body mass index (BMI), TC, HDL-C and albumin while higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) was observed. TC was positively correlated with BMI and albumin, and HDL-C was inversely correlated with Hs-CRP. The associations of TC level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were attenuated but consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with odds ratio (OR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92–0.99). Associations of HDL-C level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were also consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with OR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–0.98). Strength of association was attenuated prominently in model 3 after adjusted for Hs-CRP, and no change was observed after further adjusted for BMI and albumin. Higher baseline TC and HDL-C levels are associated with better outcome in CHD patients with HF. PMID:28248864

  17. Genetic-epidemiological evidence on genes associated with HDL cholesterol levels: a systematic in-depth review.

    PubMed

    Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Heid, Iris M; Kronenberg, Florian

    2009-03-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles exhibit multiple antiatherogenic effects. They are key players in the reverse cholesterol transport which shuttles cholesterol from peripheral cells (e.g. macrophages) to the liver or other tissues. This complex process is thought to represent the basis for the antiatherogenic properties of HDL particles. The amount of cholesterol transported in HDL particles is measured as HDL cholesterol (HDLC) and is inversely correlated with the risk for coronary artery disease: an increase of 1mg/dL of HDLC levels is associated with a 2% and 3% decrease of the risk for coronary artery disease in men and women, respectively. Genetically determined conditions with high HDLC levels (e.g. familial hyperalphalipoproteinemia) often coexist with longevity, and higher HDLC levels were found among healthy elderly individuals. HDLC levels are under considerable genetic control with heritability estimates of up to 80%. The identification and characterization of genetic variants associated with HDLC concentrations can provide new insights into the background of longevity. This review provides an extended overview on the current genetic-epidemiological evidence from association studies on genes involved in HDLC metabolism. It provides a path through the jungle of association studies which are sometimes confusing due to the varying and sometimes erroneous names of genetic variants, positions and directions of associations. Furthermore, it reviews the recent findings from genome-wide association studies which have identified new genes influencing HDLC levels. The yet identified genes together explain only a small amount of less than 10% of the HDLC variance, which leaves an enormous room for further yet to be identified genetic variants. This might be accomplished by large population-based genome-wide meta-analyses and by deep-sequencing approaches on the identified genes. The resulting findings will probably result in a re-drawing and extension of

  18. HDL cholesterol: all hope is not lost after the torcetrapib setback--emerging therapeutic strategies on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nitin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) has been definitely shown to reduce cardiovascular events and improve clinical outcomes in the literature. As a result, LDL lowering has become the cornerstone of therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention. Recently, there has been a focus on targeting other lipid fractions to improve the clinical risk profile of patients. Raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has received considerable attention. Low HDL levels are often seen in combination with elevated triglyceride levels. New therapeutic modalities are being developed to increase HDL levels. Recent failure of agents such as cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitor torcetrapib has highlighted the importance of measuring functionality of HDL particles and not just focus quantitatively on HDL-C levels. The heterogeneity of HDL within the systemic circulation results from constant remodeling of particles in response to several factors. Established dyslipidemia therapies such as stains, fibrates, and niacin have already been well known in the literature to have a substantial benefit. Lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and moderate alcohol consumption have also shown to have some benefit. Several novel HDL therapies are currently being developed, but only the cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitors have received considerable attention. Although torcetrapib has received some negative attention due to adverse effects, this overall class of therapeutic agents still holds a lot of promise. Newer agents without the concerned toxicities are currently being developed. ApoA-1-related peptides, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists, endothelial lipase inhibitors, and liver X receptor agonists are some of the other novel agents currently in various stages of development.

  19. Mitochondrial Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1) Is Present in Human Serum and Is Positively Correlated with HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Genoux, Annelise; Pons, Véronique; Radojkovic, Claudia; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Combes, Guillaume; Rolland, Corinne; Malet, Nicole; Monsarrat, Bernard; Lopez, Frédéric; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Perret, Bertrand; Martinez, Laurent O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial ATP synthase is expressed as a plasma membrane receptor for apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the major protein component in High Density Lipoproteins (HDL). On hepatocytes, apoA-I binds to cell surface ATP synthase (namely ecto-F1-ATPase) and stimulates its ATPase activity, generating extracellular ADP. This production of extracellular ADP activates a P2Y13-mediated HDL endocytosis pathway. Conversely, exogenous IF1, classically known as a natural mitochondrial specific inhibitor of F1-ATPase activity, inhibits ecto-F1-ATPase activity and decreases HDL endocytosis by both human hepatocytes and perfused rat liver. Methodology/Principal Findings Since recent reports also described the presence of IF1 at the plasma membrane of different cell types, we investigated whether IF1 is present in the systemic circulation in humans. We first unambiguously detected IF1 in human serum by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. We then set up a competitive ELISA assay in order to quantify its level in human serum. Analyses of IF1 levels in 100 normolipemic male subjects evidenced a normal distribution, with a median value of 0.49 µg/mL and a 95% confidence interval of 0.22–0.82 µg/mL. Correlations between IF1 levels and serum lipid levels demonstrated that serum IF1 levels are positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol and negatively with triglycerides (TG). Conclusions/Significance Altogether, these data support the view that, in humans, circulating IF1 might affect HDL levels by inhibiting hepatic HDL uptake and also impact TG metabolism. PMID:21935367

  20. Serum amyloid A impairs the antiinflammatory properties of HDL

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Yeop; Tang, Chongren; Guevara, Myriam E.; Wei, Hao; Wietecha, Tomasz; Shao, Baohai; Subramanian, Savitha; Omer, Mohamed; Wang, Shari; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Wight, Thomas N.; Vaisar, Tomas; de Beer, Maria C.; de Beer, Frederick C.; Osborne, William R.; Elkon, Keith B.; Chait, Alan

    2015-01-01

    HDL from healthy humans and lean mice inhibits palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation; however, the effect of the inflammatory state on the functional properties of HDL on adipocytes is unknown. Here, we found that HDL from mice injected with AgNO3 fails to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and reduces cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, HDL isolated from obese mice with moderate inflammation and humans with systemic lupus erythematosus had similar effects. Since serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations in HDL increase with inflammation, we investigated whether elevated SAA is a causal factor in HDL dysfunction. HDL from AgNO3-injected mice lacking Saa1.1 and Saa2.1 exhibited a partial restoration of antiinflammatory and cholesterol efflux properties in adipocytes. Conversely, incorporation of SAA into HDL preparations reduced antiinflammatory properties but not to the same extent as HDL from AgNO3-injected mice. SAA-enriched HDL colocalized with cell surface–associated extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes, suggesting impaired access to the plasma membrane. Enzymatic digestion of proteoglycans in the ECM restored the ability of SAA-containing HDL to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and cholesterol efflux. Collectively, these findings indicate that inflammation results in a loss of the antiinflammatory properties of HDL on adipocytes, which appears to partially result from the SAA component of HDL binding to cell-surface proteoglycans, thereby preventing access of HDL to the plasma membrane. PMID:26642365

  1. The effect of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for CVD risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hoang V T; Sievenpiper, John L; Zurbau, Andreea; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Jovanovski, Elena; Au-Yeung, Fei; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Oats are a rich source of β-glucan, a viscous, soluble fibre recognised for its cholesterol-lowering properties, and are associated with reduced risk of CVD. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) investigating the cholesterol-lowering potential of oat β-glucan on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB for the risk reduction of CVD. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched. We included RCT of ≥3 weeks of follow-up, assessing the effect of diets enriched with oat β-glucan compared with controlled diets on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol or apoB. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using the generic inverse-variance method with random effects models and expressed as mean differences with 95 % CI. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran's Q statistic and quantified by the I 2-statistic. In total, fifty-eight trials (n 3974) were included. A median dose of 3·5 g/d of oat β-glucan significantly lowered LDL-cholesterol (-0·19; 95 % CI -0·23, -0·14 mmol/l, P<0·00001), non-HDL-cholesterol (-0·20; 95 % CI -0·26, -0·15 mmol/l, P<0·00001) and apoB (-0·03; 95 % CI -0·05, -0·02 g/l, P<0·0001) compared with control interventions. There was evidence for considerable unexplained heterogeneity in the analysis of LDL-cholesterol (I 2=79 %) and non-HDL-cholesterol (I 2=99 %). Pooled analyses showed that oat β-glucan has a lowering effect on LDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and apoB. Inclusion of oat-containing foods may be a strategy for achieving targets in CVD reduction.

  2. Postprandial lipemia enhances the capacity of large HDL2 particles to mediate free cholesterol efflux via SR-BI and ABCG1 pathways in type IIB hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Julia, Zélie; Duchene, Emilie; Fournier, Natalie; Bellanger, Natacha; Chapman, M John; Le Goff, Wilfried; Guerin, Maryse

    2010-11-01

    Lipid and cholesterol metabolism in the postprandial phase is associated with both quantitative and qualitative remodeling of HDL particle subspecies that may influence their anti-atherogenic functions in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma or isolated HDL particles to mediate cellular free cholesterol (FC) efflux, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-mediated cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer, and selective hepatic CE uptake during the postprandial phase in subjects displaying type IIB hyperlipidemia (n = 16). Postprandial, large HDL2 displayed an enhanced capacity to mediate FC efflux via both scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-dependent (+12%; P < 0.02) and ATP binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1)-dependent (+31%; P < 0.008) pathways in in vitro cell systems. In addition, the capacity of whole postprandial plasma (4 h and 8 h postprandially) to mediate cellular FC efflux via the ABCA1-dependent pathway was significantly increased (+19%; P < 0.0003). Concomitantly, postprandial lipemia was associated with elevated endogenous CE transfer rates from HDL2 to apoB lipoproteins and with attenuated capacity (-17%; P < 0.02) of total HDL to deliver CE to hepatic cells. Postprandial lipemia enhanced SR-BI and ABCG1-dependent efflux to large HDL2 particles. However, postprandial lipemia is equally associated with deleterious features by enhancing formation of CE-enriched, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles through the action of CETP and by reducing the direct return of HDL-CE to the liver.

  3. Non-HDL cholesterol is a good predictor of the risk of increased arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women in an urban Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Alvim, Rafael; Mourao, Carlos Alberto; Magalhães, Géssica Lopes; de Oliveira, Camila Maciel; Krieger, José Eduardo; Mill, José Geraldo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased arterial stiffness is an important determinant of the risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipid profile impairment, especially hypercholesterolemia, is associated with stiffer blood vessels. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine which of the five circulating lipid components (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides) is the best predictor of increased arterial stiffness in an urban Brazilian population. METHODS: A random sample of 1,662 individuals from the general population of Vitoria, Brazil (25-64 years), was selected, and lipid components were measured using standard methods. Pulse wave velocity was measured using a non-invasive automatic device, and increased arterial stiffness was defined as a pulse wave velocity ≥10 m/s. RESULTS: In men, only total cholesterol (OR=1.59; CI=1.02 to 2.48, p=0.04) was associated with the risk of increased arterial stiffness. In women, HDL-C (OR=1.99; CI=1.18 to 3.35, p=0.01) and non-HDL-C (OR=1.61; CI=1.01 to 2.56, p=0.04) were good predictors of the risk of increased arterial stiffness. However, these associations were only found in postmenopausal women (OR=2.06; CI=1.00 to 4.26, p=0.05 for HDL-C and OR=1.83; CI=1.01 to 3.33, p=0.04 for non-HDL-C). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that both HDL-C and non-HDL-C are good predictors of the risk of increased arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women in an urban Brazilian population and may be useful tools for assessing the risk of arterial stiffness. PMID:28273234

  4. Raw Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita) promotes cecal fermentation and reduces plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naomichi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effects of raw Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita), containing resistant starch (RS), on lipid metabolism and cecal fermentation in rats. Raw yam (RY) and boiled yam (BY) contained 33.9% and 6.9% RS, respectively. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a cholesterol-free, control (C) diet supplemented with or without 15 and 30 g of RY or BY/100 g for 3 wk. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations in the tail vein of rats fed the 30% RY diet were significantly lower than in the C group throughout the feeding period. Compared with the C group, non-HDL concentrations in arterial plasma in the 30% RY group was significantly reduced. Liver cholesterol concentration in rats fed the 30% RY diet was significantly higher compared with those fed the C diet. Hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase mRNA and fecal bile acid excretion were significantly higher in the BY, but not the RY group, compared with the C group. Fecal cholesterol excretion in the 30% RY group was greater compared with the C group. Hepatic microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein mRNA was significantly lower in the 30% RY group compared with the C group. Cecal pools of acetate, propionate and butyrate were 113-257%, 181-476% and 410-789% greater in the RY group compared with the C group. These results suggest raw yam is effective as a source of RS and facilitates production of short chain fatty acid (SCFA), especially butyrate, in the rat cecum. In addition, RY has a plasma-cholesterol lowering effect, possibly due to the inhibited release of VLDL.

  5. Effect of 360His mutation in apolipoprotein A-IV on plasma HDL-cholesterol response to dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Jansen, S; Lopez-Miranda, J; Ordovas, J M; Zambrana, J L; Marin, C; Ostos, M A; Castro, P; McPherson, R; Lopez Segura, F; Blanco, A; Jimenez Pereperez, J A; Perez-Jimenez, F

    1997-10-01

    In order to determine whether genetic variability of apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV is responsible for the improvement in lipid profile when dietary saturated fats are replaced by carbohydrates or monounsaturated fats, 41 healthy male subjects were studied: 33 were homozygous for the 360Gln allele and 8 were heterozygote carriers of the 360His allele. These were administered three consecutive 4-week diets. The first was a diet rich in saturated fat (SAT diet, with 38% fat, 20% saturated. This was followed by a low fat diet (NCEP-I, with < 30% fat, < 10% saturated). The final diet was rich in monounsaturated fat (MUFA diet, with 38% fat, 22% monounsaturated). There was no difference in plasma lipid and apolipoprotein levels of both groups of individuals after consuming the SAT diet. Switching from this diet to the NCEP-I diet, carriers of the 360His allele presented a greater decrease in high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (-10 vs. -1 mg/dL, P < 0.004) and apoA-I levels (-19 vs. -8 mg/dL, P < 0.037). Similarly, replacement of carbohydrates by monounsaturated fats produced a greater increase in HDL-C (9 vs. 1 mg/dL, P < 0.003) and apoA-I levels (9 vs. 2 mg/dL, P < 0.036) in carriers of the 360His mutation. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activities and apoA-IV levels were also measured. However, no genotype-related differences were observed for these parameters. Our results suggest that variability in HDL-C and apoA-I response to diet is, at least partially, determined by the 360His mutation of apoA-IV.

  6. Lower serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in major depression and in depressed men with serious suicidal attempts: relationship with immune-inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Smith, R; Christophe, A; Vandoolaeghe, E; Van Gastel, A; Neels, H; Demedts, P; Wauters, A; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-03-01

    Recently, there have been some reports that changes in serum lipid composition may be related to suicide, major depression and immune-inflammatory responses. Findings from our laboratory suggest that major depression is accompanied by reduced formation of cholesteryl esters and perhaps by impairment of reverse cholesterol transport. The latter is reportedly accompanied by lower serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The aim of this study was to examine whether (i) major depression is accompanied by lower serum HDL-C or by abnormal levels of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-C (LDL-C) or vitamin E, (ii) suicidal attempts are related to lower serum HDL-C and (iii) there are significant associations between serum HDL-C and immune/inflammatory markers. A total of 36 subjects with major depression, of whom 28 patients showed treatment resistance, as well as 28 normal control subjects, had blood sampled for the assay of the above lipids, serum zinc (Zn), albumin (Alb) and flow cytometric determination of the T-helper/T-suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) T-cell ratio. In total, 28 depressed subjects had repeated measures of these variables both before and after treatment with antidepressants. Serum HDL-C and total cholesterol, as well as the HDL-C/cholesterol ratio, were significantly lower in subjects with major depression than in normal controls. Serum HDL-C levels were significantly lower in depressed men who had at some time made serious suicidal attempts than in those without such suicidal behaviour. Treatment with antidepressants for 5 weeks did not significantly alter either serum HDL-C or other lipid variables. Serum HDL-C levels were significantly and negatively correlated with the (CD4+/CD8+) T-cell ratio, and positively correlated with serum Alb and Zn. These results suggest that (i) lower serum HDL-C levels are a marker for major depression and suicidal behaviour in depressed men, (ii) lower serum HDL-C levels are probably

  7. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) among children with steady-state sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The search for sickle cell disease (SCD) prognosis biomarkers is a challenge. These markers identification can help to establish further therapy, later severe clinical complications and with patients follow-up. We attempted to study a possible involvement of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in steady-state children with SCD, once that this lipid marker has been correlated with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-aggregation, anti-coagulant and pro-fibrinolytic activities, important aspects to be considered in sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Methods We prospectively analyzed biochemical, inflammatory and hematological biomarkers of 152 steady-state infants with SCD and 132 healthy subjects using immunochemistry, immunoassay and electronic cell counter respectively. Clinical data were collected from patient medical records. Results Of the 152 infants investigated had a significant positive association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with hemoglobin (P < 0.001), hematocrit (P < 0.001) and total cholesterol (P < 0.001) and a negative significant association with reticulocytes (P = 0.046), leukocytes (P = 0.015), monocytes (P = 0.004) and platelets (P = 0.005), bilirubins [total bilirubin (P < 0.001), direct bilirubin (P < 0.001) and indirect bilirubin (P < 0.001], iron (P < 0.001), aminotransferases [aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.004), alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.035)], lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.001), urea (P = 0.030), alpha 1-antitrypsin (P < 0.001), very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.003), triglycerides (P = 0.005) and hemoglobin S (P = 0.002). Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration was associated with the history of cardiac abnormalities (P = 0.025), pneumonia (P = 0.033) and blood transfusion use (P = 0.025). Lipids and inflammatory markers were associated with the presence of cholelithiasis. Conclusions We hypothesize that some SCD patients can have a specific dyslipidemic

  8. HDL cholesterol quantitation by phosphotungstate-Mg2+ and by dextran sulfate-Mn2+-polyethylene glycol precipitation, both with enzymic cholesterol assay compared with the lipid research method.

    PubMed

    Warnick, G R; Mayfield, C; Benderson, J; Chen, J S; Albers, J J

    1982-11-01

    Two methods using commercial kits for high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol quantitation were compared with the Lipid Research Clinics (LRC) procedures. HDL cholesterol quantitations on 50 patient specimens by the Lancer HDL cholesterol Rapid Stat Kit (Lancer) with phosphotungstate-Mg2+ precipitation and enzymic cholesterol assay averaged 424 mg/L, and by a method with dextran sulfate-Mn2+-polyethylene glycol (dextran sulfate) precipitation and enzymic cholesterol assay averaged 474 mg/L. By comparison, the LRC method (heparin-Mn2+ precipitation combined with a Liebermann-Burchard reagent cholesterol assay) averaged 478 mg/L. Supernates obtained by the three precipitation methods had similar cholesterol values when analyzed by the LRC assay, suggesting that the observed differences were primarily due to differences between the cholesterol assays. Results were consistent with underestimation by the enzymic assay of cholesterol in the supernates, offset by a positive interference of Mn2+ in the dextran sulfate-produced supernates. Among-day CVs of 4-5% were observed for the Lancer method, and 6-7% for the dextran sulfate method. Sedimentation of precipitates in hypertriglyceridemic specimens was excellent by both methods.

  9. Using bioinformatics and systems genetics to dissect HDL-cholesterol genetics in an MRL/MpJ x SM/J intercross.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Blair, Rachael Hageman; Verdugo, Ricardo A; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Walsh, Kenneth; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly

    2012-06-01

    A higher incidence of coronary artery disease is associated with a lower level of HDL-cholesterol. We searched for genetic loci influencing HDL-cholesterol in F2 mice from a cross between MRL/MpJ and SM/J mice. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping revealed one significant HDL QTL (Apoa2 locus), four suggestive QTL on chromosomes 10, 11, 13, and 18 and four additional QTL on chromosomes 1 proximal, 3, 4, and 7 after adjusting HDL for the strong Apoa2 locus. A novel nonsynonymous polymorphism supports Lipg as the QTL gene for the chromosome 18 QTL, and a difference in Abca1 expression in liver tissue supports it as the QTL gene for the chromosome 4 QTL. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified a module that after adjustment for Apoa2, correlated with HDL, was genetically determined by a QTL on chromosome 11, and overlapped with the HDL QTL. A combination of bioinformatics tools and systems genetics helped identify several candidate genes for both the chromosome 11 HDL and module QTL based on differential expression between the parental strains, cis regulation of expression, and causality modeling. We conclude that integrating systems genetics to a more-traditional genetics approach improves the power of complex trait gene identification.

  10. Effects of curcumin on HDL functionality.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Shiva; Blesso, Christopher N; Banach, Maciej; Pirro, Matteo; Majeed, Muhammed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-02-10

    Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol, is a yellow pigment of the Curcuma longa (turmeric) plant. Curcumin has many pharmacologic effects including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-obesity, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, it has been found that curcumin affects lipid metabolism, and subsequently, may alleviate hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is an independent negative risk predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, numerous clinical and genetic studies have yielded disappointing results about the therapeutic benefit of raising plasma HDL-C levels. Therefore, research efforts are now focused on improving HDL functionality, independent of HDL-C levels. The quality of HDL particles can vary considerably due to heterogeneity in composition. Consistent with its complexity in composition and metabolism, a wide range of biological activities is reported for HDL, including antioxidant, anti-glycation, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, anti-apoptotic and immune modulatory activities. Protective properties of curcumin may influence HDL functionality; therefore, we reviewed the literature to determine whether curcumin can augment HDL function. In this review, we concluded that curcumin may modulate markers of HDL function, such as apo-AI, CETP, LCAT, PON1, MPO activities and levels. Curcumin may subsequently improve conditions in which HDL is dysfunctional and may have potential as a therapeutic drug in future. Further clinical trials with bioavailability-improved formulations of curcumin are warranted to examine its effects on lipid metabolism and HDL function.

  11. Consumption of high-oleic acid ground beef increases HDL-cholesterol concentration but both high- and low-oleic acid ground beef decrease HDL particle diameter in normocholesterolemic men.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L Anne; Walzem, Rosemary L; Crouse, Stephen F; Smith, Dana R; Adams, Thaddeus H; Vaidyanathan, Vidya; Cao, Xiaojuan; Smith, Stephen B

    2011-06-01

    On the basis of previous results from this laboratory, this study tested the hypothesis that ground beef high in MUFA and low in SFA would increase the HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and LDL particle diameter. In a crossover dietary intervention, 27 free-living normocholesterolemic men completed treatments in which five 114-g ground beef patties/wk were consumed for 5 wk with an intervening 4-wk washout period. Patties contained 24% total fat with a MUFA:SFA ratio of either 0.71 (low MUFA, from pasture-fed cattle) or 1.10 (high MUFA, from grain-fed cattle). High-MUFA ground beef provided 3.21 g more 18:1(n-9), 1.26 g less 18:0, 0.89 g less 16:0, and 0.36 g less 18:1(trans) fatty acids per patty than did the low-MUFA ground beef. Both ground beef interventions decreased plasma insulin and HDL(2) and HDL(3) particle diameters and increased plasma 18:0 and 20:4(n-6) (all P ≤ 0.05) relative to baseline values. Only the high-MUFA ground beef intervention increased the HDL-C concentration from baseline (P = 0.02). The plasma TG concentration was positively correlated with the plasma insulin concentration (r = 0.40; P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with HDL-C (r = -0.47; P < 0.001) and plasma 18:0 (r = -0.24; P < 0.01). Plasma insulin and HDL diameters were not correlated (r = 0.01; P > 0.50), indicating that reductions in these measures were not coordinately regulated. The data indicate that dietary beef interventions have effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are independent (insulin, HDL diameters) and dependent (HDL-C) on beef fatty acid composition.

  12. Resolution of genetic and cultural inheritance in twin families by path analysis: application to HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    McGue, M; Rao, D C; Iselius, L; Russell, J M

    1985-01-01

    A path model and associated statistical method for the analysis of data on twin families are introduced and applied to high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) observations in the Swedish Twin Family Study. The proposed path model incorporates both genetic and environmental sources of familial resemblance, maternal environmental effects, intergenerational differences in heritabilities, marital resemblance due to either primary or secondary phenotypic homogamy, and twin residual environmental correlations. Application of the model to HDL-c levels resulted in parameter estimates consistent with those reported in earlier reviews and in the analysis of nuclear family and twin data. Genetic heritability was estimated as h2 = .363 +/- .243, cultural heritability as c2 = .187 +/- .082, and the proportion of phenotypic variance due to residual environmental effects as r2 = .450 +/- .207. Although the parameter estimates were comparable, the statistical tests of hypotheses were, relative to other designs, of low statistical power. It appears that environmental indices are necessary for powerful tests of hypotheses. PMID:4050793

  13. Novel Apo E-Derived ABCA1 Agonist Peptide (CS-6253) Promotes Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Induces Formation of preβ-1 HDL In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K; Johansson, Jan O; Genest, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  14. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    DOE PAGES

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; ...

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from themore » carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  15. Associations between HDL-cholesterol and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase genes are modified by dietary fat intake in African American and White adults.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; Steffen, Lyn M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R

    2007-10-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism influence plasma HDL-C concentrations. We examined whether dietary fat intake modified relations between HDL-C and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase (LIPC-514C-->T), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL S447X) genes. Diet (food frequency questionnaire), plasma lipids, and LIPC, CETP, and LPL genotypes were assessed in approximately 12,000 White and African American adults. In both races and all genotypes studied, minor allele homozygotes had highest HDL-C concentrations compared to the other genotypes (P<0.001). However, main effects were modified by usual dietary fat intake. In African Americans - women somewhat more strongly than men -LIPC TT homozygotes with fat intake >or=33.2% of energy had approximately 3-4 mg/dL higher HDL-C concentrations than CC and CT genotypes. In contrast, when fat intake was <33.2% of energy, TT homozygotes had HDL-C concentrations approximately 3.5mg/dL greater than those with the CC genotype but not different from those with the CT genotype (P(interaction)=0.013). In Whites, LPLGG homozygotes had greatest HDL-C at lower total, saturated, and monounsaturated fat intakes but lowest HDL-C at higher intakes of these fats (P(interaction)HDL-C. In conclusion, these data show that plasma HDL-C differs according to LIPC, LPL, and CETP genotypes. In the case of LIPC and LPL, data suggest dietary fat modifies these relations.

  16. Adiponectin and the mediation of HDL cholesterol change with improved lifestyle: The Look AHEAD Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role in the development of the metabolic abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and participates actively in lipid metabolism. Adiponectin, found abundantly in circulation and a marker of adipose health, is decreased in obese persons with T2DM. ...

  17. Anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alters HDL metabolism and macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport at similar levels of CETP inhibition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Thieblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Sulpice, Thierry; Johns, Douglas G

    2014-10-05

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors dalcetrapib and anacetrapib differentially alter LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels, which might be related to the potency of each drug to inhibit CETP activity. We evaluated the effects of both drugs at similar levels of CETP inhibition on macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in hamsters. In normolipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 30 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~60%. After injection of 3H-cholesteryl oleate labeled HDL, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib reduced HDL-cholesteryl esters fractional catabolic rate (FCR) by 30% and 26% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle) respectively, but only dalcetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 30% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage intraperitoneal injection, anacetrapib stimulated 3H-tracer appearance in HDL, but both drugs did not promote macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In dyslipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~65% and reduced HDL-cholesteryl ester FCR by 36% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle), but only anacetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion significantly by 39%. After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage injection, only anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD stimulated macrophage-derived 3H-tracer appearance in HDL. These effects remained weaker than those observed with anacetrapib 60 mg/kg QD, which induced a maximal inhibition of CETP and stimulation of macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In contrast, dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID reduced macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 23% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). In conclusion, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alter HDL metabolism and RCT in hamsters. A stronger inhibition of CETP may be required to promote macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport in dyslipidemic hamsters.

  18. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations depend on smoking habit in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background-Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and concentrations are modulated by genetic and environmental factors such as smoking. Objective- To assess whether the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...

  19. The Ala54Thr Polymorphism of the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2 Gene Modulates HDL Cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Salto, Lorena M; Bu, Liming; Beeson, W Lawrence; Firek, Anthony; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-12-23

    The alanine to threonine amino acid substitution at codon 54 (Ala54Thr) of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (FABP2) has been associated with elevated levels of insulin and blood glucose as well as with dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of this FABP2 polymorphism in Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the context of a three-month intervention to determine if the polymorphism differentially modulates selected clinical outcomes. For this study, we genotyped 43 participant samples and performed post-hoc outcome analysis of the profile changes in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid panel and body composition, stratified by the Ala54Thr polymorphism. Our results show that the Thr54 allele carriers (those who were heterozygous or homozygous for the threonine-encoding allele) had lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels at baseline compared to the Ala54 homozygotes (those who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele). Both groups made clinically important improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic control as a response to the intervention. Whereas the Ala54 homozygotes decreased HDL cholesterol in the context of an overall total cholesterol decrease, Thr54 allele carriers increased HDL cholesterol as part of an overall total cholesterol decrease. We conclude that the Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 modulates HDL cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with T2D and that Thr54 allele carriers may be responsive in interventions that include dietary changes.

  20. The Ala54Thr Polymorphism of the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2 Gene Modulates HDL Cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Salto, Lorena M.; Bu, Liming; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Firek, Anthony; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-01-01

    The alanine to threonine amino acid substitution at codon 54 (Ala54Thr) of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (FABP2) has been associated with elevated levels of insulin and blood glucose as well as with dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of this FABP2 polymorphism in Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the context of a three-month intervention to determine if the polymorphism differentially modulates selected clinical outcomes. For this study, we genotyped 43 participant samples and performed post-hoc outcome analysis of the profile changes in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid panel and body composition, stratified by the Ala54Thr polymorphism. Our results show that the Thr54 allele carriers (those who were heterozygous or homozygous for the threonine-encoding allele) had lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels at baseline compared to the Ala54 homozygotes (those who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele). Both groups made clinically important improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic control as a response to the intervention. Whereas the Ala54 homozygotes decreased HDL cholesterol in the context of an overall total cholesterol decrease, Thr54 allele carriers increased HDL cholesterol as part of an overall total cholesterol decrease. We conclude that the Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 modulates HDL cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with T2D and that Thr54 allele carriers may be responsive in interventions that include dietary changes. PMID:26703680

  1. HDL endocytosis and resecretion.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Stangl, Herbert

    2013-11-01

    HDL removes excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues and delivers it to the liver and steroidogenic tissues via selective lipid uptake without catabolism of the HDL particle itself. In addition, endocytosis of HDL holo-particles has been debated for nearly 40years. However, neither the connection between HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake, nor the physiological relevance of HDL uptake has been delineated clearly. This review will focus on HDL endocytosis and resecretion and its relation to cholesterol transfer. We will discuss the role of HDL endocytosis in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis in tissues and cell types involved in atherosclerosis, focusing on liver, macrophages and endothelium. We will critically summarize the current knowledge on the receptors mediating HDL endocytosis including SR-BI, F1-ATPase and CD36 and on intracellular HDL transport routes. Dependent on the tissue, HDL is either resecreted (retro-endocytosis) or degraded after endocytosis. Finally, findings on HDL transcytosis across the endothelial barrier will be summarized. We suggest that HDL endocytosis and resecretion is a rather redundant pathway under physiologic conditions. In case of disturbed lipid metabolism, however, HDL retro-endocytosis represents an alternative pathway that enables tissues to maintain cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

  2. Evacetrapib is a novel, potent, and selective inhibitor of cholesteryl ester transfer protein that elevates HDL cholesterol without inducing aldosterone or increasing blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guoqing; Beyer, Thomas P.; Zhang, Youyan; Schmidt, Robert J.; Chen, Yan Q.; Cockerham, Sandra L.; Zimmerman, Karen M.; Karathanasis, Sotirios K.; Cannady, Ellen A.; Fields, Todd; Mantlo, Nathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) catalyses the exchange of cholesteryl ester and triglyceride between HDL and apoB containing lipoprotein particles. The role of CETP in modulating plasma HDL cholesterol levels in humans is well established and there have been significant efforts to develop CETP inhibitors to increase HDL cholesterol for the treatment of coronary artery disease. These efforts, however, have been hampered by the fact that most CETP inhibitors either have low potency or have undesirable side effects. In this study, we describe a novel benzazepine compound evacetrapib (LY2484595), which is a potent and selective inhibitor of CETP both in vitro and in vivo. Evacetrapib inhibited human recombinant CETP protein (5.5 nM IC50) and CETP activity in human plasma (36 nM IC50) in vitro. In double transgenic mice expressing human CETP and apoAI, evacetrapib exhibited an ex vivo CETP inhibition ED50 of less than 5 mg/kg at 8 h post oral dose and significantly elevated HDL cholesterol. Importantly, no blood pressure elevation was observed in rats dosed with evacetrapib at high exposure multiples compared with the positive control, torcetrapib. In addition, in a human adrenal cortical carcinoma cell line (H295R cells), evacetrapib did not induce aldosterone or cortisol biosynthesis whereas torcetrapib dramatically induced aldosterone and cortisol biosynthesis. Our data indicate that evacetrapib is a potent and selective CETP inhibitor without torcetrapib-like off-target liabilities. Evacetrapib is currently in phase II clinical development. PMID:21957197

  3. Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Blood Cholesterol Formal name: Total Cholesterol Related tests: HDL Cholesterol , ...

  4. THE CONSUMPTION OF RED PUPUNHA (BACTRIS GASIPAES KUNTH) INCREASES HDL CHOLESTEROL AND REDUCES WEIGHT GAIN OF LACTATING AND POST-LACTATING WISTAR RATS

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, R. Piccolotto; Lemos, J.R. Gonzaga; de Aquino Sales, R. Souza; Martins, M. Gassen; Nascimento, C.H.; Bayona, M.; Marcon, J.L.; Monteiro, J. Barros

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lactating and post-lactating periods are marked by large metabolic change. Production of milk is 60% lipid dependent. We reported in a recent scientific meeting that Red pupunha palm tree fruit increases HDL cholesterol in lactating rats. This study evaluated if consumption of Red Pupunha by adult female rats has a beneficial impact on the lipid metabolism of lacting and post-lacting adult rats. Objective Evaluate if consumption of red pupunha has a beneficial effect in the lipid metabolism of lacting and post-lacting adult Wistar rats. Research Methods Four groups including two for control; (1) control adult lactating rats, (2) control adults post-lactating rats; and two experimental groups; (3) pupunha adults lactating rats and (4) pupunha adult post-lactating rats were evaluated and compared regarding: weight gain, food consumption, plasma total protein, glucose, total lipid, triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels. The mean difference and its 95% confidence intervals were used for group comparisons. Group comparisons were evaluated by using analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). The statistical significance of the pairwise differences among groups was assessed by using the two-sided Tukey test. Results There were no important differences in food consumption, plasma glucose, total lipids and triglycerides among groups. The red pupunha lactating group gain less weight showing lower body mass index (BMI) than controls (p < 0.05). Total cholesterol was lower in red pupunha lactating than in controls but not in the red pupunha post-lactating group as compared to controls. Triglycerides were lower in the post-lactating red pupunha group as compared to the control group (p = 0.039) but not for the lactating groups. Red pupunha lactating and post-lactating groups had higher HDL-cholesterol than their corresponding control groups (p ≤ 0.01). Conclusion Original findings include the beneficial effect of red pupunha in post

  5. [ANTIOXIDANT DYSFUNCTIONALITY OF HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS (HDL) IN DECOMPENSATED DIABETIC PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Awad, Fernanda; Contreras-Duarte, Susana; Molina, Patricia; Quiñones, Verónica; Serrano, Valentina; Abbott, Eduardo; Maiz, Alberto; Busso, Dolores; Rigotti, Attilio

    2015-09-01

    Introducción: las lipoproteínas de alta densidad (HDL) tienen un importante efecto protector cardiovascular mediado por su función durante el transporte reverso del colesterol, así como por otras actividades, incluyendo una significativa acción antiinflamatoria y antioxidante. La funcionalidad antiinflamatoria y antioxidante de las HDL está alterada en los pacientes diabéticos crónicos estables, aunque no existe mayor información en caso de una crisis hiperglicémica. Objetivo: determinar si durante un estado de descompensación diabética aguda las partículas de HDL exhiben un deterioro de su función antioxidante y si esta logra recuperarse una vez resuelto el cuadro agudo. Métodos: la actividad antioxidante de las HDL se midió mediante un ensayo de fluorescencia in vitro en muestras plasmáticas de pacientes diabéticos con descompensación aguda obtenidas tanto al ingreso, alcanzada la resolución intrahospitalaria del evento agudo, así como en un control ambulatorio post-hospitalización. Como comparación, se analizaron partículas de HDL de algunos sujetos sanos como condición control. Resultados: la actividad antioxidante de las HDL en pacientes con descompensación diabética aguda fue significativamente menor a la observada en el grupo control sano, y esta se fue recuperando progresivamente hasta normalizarse en el momento del control ambulatorio. La crisis hiperglicémica también demostró una baja actividad plasmática de la enzima antioxidante paraoxonasa- 1, la cual aumentó significativamente en el control ambulatorio. Conclusión: las partículas de HDL presentes en pacientes con una descompensación diabética aguda presentan una reducción significativa y reversible de su capacidad antioxidante, probablemente como consecuencia de una alteración en la actividad de la paraoxonasa-1.

  6. Knowledge-driven multi-locus analysis reveals gene-gene interactions influencing HDL cholesterol level in two independent EMR-linked biobanks.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen D; Berg, Richard L; Linneman, James G; Peissig, Peggy L; Crawford, Dana C; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Wilke, Russell A

    2011-05-11

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are routinely being used to examine the genetic contribution to complex human traits, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Although HDL-C levels are highly heritable (h(2)∼0.7), the genetic determinants identified through GWAS contribute to a small fraction of the variance in this trait. Reasons for this discrepancy may include rare variants, structural variants, gene-environment (GxE) interactions, and gene-gene (GxG) interactions. Clinical practice-based biobanks now allow investigators to address these challenges by conducting GWAS in the context of comprehensive electronic medical records (EMRs). Here we apply an EMR-based phenotyping approach, within the context of routine care, to replicate several known associations between HDL-C and previously characterized genetic variants: CETP (rs3764261, p = 1.22e-25), LIPC (rs11855284, p = 3.92e-14), LPL (rs12678919, p = 1.99e-7), and the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 locus (rs964184, p = 1.06e-5), all adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status. By using a novel approach which censors data based on relevant co-morbidities and lipid modifying medications to construct a more rigorous HDL-C phenotype, we identified an association between HDL-C and TRIB1, a gene which previously resisted identification in studies with larger sample sizes. Through the application of additional analytical strategies incorporating biological knowledge, we further identified 11 significant GxG interaction models in our discovery cohort, 8 of which show evidence of replication in a second biobank cohort. The strongest predictive model included a pairwise interaction between LPL (which modulates the incorporation of triglyceride into HDL) and ABCA1 (which modulates the incorporation of free cholesterol into HDL). These results demonstrate that gene-gene interactions modulate complex human traits, including HDL cholesterol.

  7. Intake of up to 3 Eggs/Day Increases HDL Cholesterol and Plasma Choline While Plasma Trimethylamine-N-oxide is Unchanged in a Healthy Population.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Diana M; Missimer, Amanda; Murillo, Ana Gabriela; Lemos, Bruno S; Malysheva, Olga V; Caudill, Marie A; Blesso, Christopher N; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2017-03-01

    Eggs are a source of cholesterol and choline and may impact plasma lipids and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) concentrations, which are biomarkers for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Therefore, the effects of increasing egg intake (0, 1, 2, and 3 eggs/day) on these and other CVD risk biomarkers were evaluated in a young, healthy population. Thirty-eight subjects [19 men/19 women, 24.1 ± 2.2 years, body mass index (BMI) 24.3 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)] participated in this 14-week crossover intervention. Participants underwent a 2-week washout with no egg consumption, followed by intake of 1, 2, and 3 eggs/day for 4 weeks each. Anthropometric data, blood pressure (BP), dietary records, and plasma biomarkers (lipids, glucose, choline, and TMAO) were measured during each intervention phase. BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, plasma glucose, and plasma triacylglycerol did not change throughout the intervention. Diastolic BP decreased with egg intake (P < 0.05). Compared to 0 eggs/day, intake of 1 egg/day increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) (P < 0.05), and decreased LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) (P < 0.05) and the LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (P < 0.01). With intake of 2-3 eggs/day, these changes were maintained. Plasma choline increased dose-dependently with egg intake (P < 0.0001) while fasting plasma TMAO was unchanged. These results indicate that in a healthy population, consuming up to 3 eggs/day results in an overall beneficial effect on biomarkers associated with CVD risk, as documented by increased HDL-c, a reduced LDL-c/HDL-c ratio, and increased plasma choline in combination with no change in plasma LDL-c or TMAO concentrations.

  8. Enzymatic analysis of total- and HDL-cholesterol: comparison with the standardized Liebermann-Burchard method used by the Lipid Research Clinics program.

    PubMed

    Bachorik, P S; Virgil, D G; Derby, C; Widman, D; McMahon, R; Fulwood, R P; Ezzati, T

    1988-06-15

    We compared two enzymatic cholesterol methods with the standardized chemical method used in the Lipid Research Clinic's (LRC) program. The methods were used to measure total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in heparin-MnCl2 supernatants of 1,812 sera collected over a 16-mth period from subjects who were sampled as part of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Thirty percent of the subjects had fasted for 12 h or more before venepuncture. The enzymatic total cholesterol values were 1.4-1.8% lower than the LRC method and both enzymatic methods correlated highly with the LRC method (r greater than 0.97). The enzymatic HDL cholesterol values were 2.4 and 6.4% higher than the LRC method, and the correlation between the enzymatic and LRC methods was greater than 0.93. The differences between the enzymatic and LRC methods were the same in samples from fasting and non-fasting subjects.

  9. The low-resolution structure of nHDL reconstituted with DMPC with and without cholesterol reveals a mechanism for particle expansion[S

    PubMed Central

    Gogonea, Valentin; Gerstenecker, Gary S.; Wu, Zhiping; Lee, Xavier; Topbas, Celalettin; Wagner, Matthew A.; Tallant, Thomas C.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Callow, Philip; Pipich, Vitaliy; Malet, Hélène; Schoehn, Guy; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with contrast variation was used to obtain the low-resolution structure of nascent HDL (nHDL) reconstituted with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in the absence and presence of cholesterol, [apoA1:DMPC (1:80, mol:mol) and apoA1:DMPC:cholesterol (1:86:9, mol:mol:mol)]. The overall shape of both particles is discoidal with the low-resolution structure of apoA1 visualized as an open, contorted, and out of plane conformation with three arms in nascent HDL/dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine without cholesterol (nHDLDMPC) and two arms in nascent HDL/dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine with cholesterol (nHDLDMPC+Chol). The low-resolution shape of the lipid phase in both nHDLDMPC and nHDLDMPC+Chol were oblate ellipsoids, and fit well within their respective protein shapes. Modeling studies indicate that apoA1 is folded onto itself in nHDLDMPC, making a large hairpin, which was also confirmed independently by both cross-linking mass spectrometry and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry analyses. In nHDLDMPC+Chol, the lipid was expanded and no hairpin was visible. Importantly, despite the overall discoidal shape of the whole particle in both nHDLDMPC and nHDLDMPC+Chol, an open conformation (i.e., not a closed belt) of apoA1 is observed. Collectively, these data show that full length apoA1 retains an open architecture that is dictated by its lipid cargo. The lipid is likely predominantly organized as a bilayer with a micelle domain between the open apoA1 arms. The apoA1 configuration observed suggests a mechanism for accommodating changing lipid cargo by quantized expansion of hairpin structures. PMID:23349207

  10. Apolipoproteins and HDL cholesterol do not associate with the risk of future dementia and Alzheimer's disease: the National Finnish population study (FINRISK).

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, Juho; Hernesniemi, Jussi A; Laatikainen, Tiina; Havulinna, Aki S; Sundvall, Jouko; Leiviskä, Jaana; Salo, Perttu; Salomaa, Veikko

    2016-12-01

    Data on associations of apolipoproteins A-I and B (apo A-I, apo B) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) with dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are conflicting. Our aim was to examine, whether apo B, apoA-I, their ratio, or HDL-C are significant, independent predictors of incident dementia and AD in the general population free of dementia at baseline. We analyzed the results from two Finnish prospective population-based cohort studies in a total of 13,275 subjects aged 25 to 74 years with mainly Caucasian ethnicity. The follow-up time for both cohorts was 10 years. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia (including AD) (n = 220) and for AD (n = 154). Cumulative incidence function (CIF) analysis was also performed to adjust the results for competing risks of death. Adjusted for multiple dementia and AD risk factors, log-transformed apo A-I, log HDL-C, log apo B, and log apo B/A-I ratio were not associated with incident dementia or AD. HDL-C was inversely associated with AD risk when adjusted for competing risks but no other statistically significant associations were observed in the CIF analyses. Apo A-I, HDL-C, apo B, or apo B/A-I ratio were not associated with future dementia or AD. HDL-C was inversely associated with incident AD risk when adjusted for competing risks of death, but the finding is unlikely to be of clinical relevance. Our study does not support the use of these risk markers to predict incident dementia or AD.

  11. HDL cholesterol and risk of diabetic nephropathy in patient with type 1 diabetes: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhi, Yunqing; Li, Chengqian; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lifang; Wang, Yangang; Che, Kui

    2016-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of HDL on risk of diabetic nephropathy in T1DM patients. Ten papers containing (7698) participants were included in this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis suggest that the risk of diabetic nephropathy was decreased with HDL in type 1 diabetes.

  12. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D; Granados-Silvestre, Ma de Angeles; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M; Knowler, William C; Bortolini, M Cátira; Hayden, Michael R; Baier, Leslie J; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-07-15

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 x 10(-11)) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations.

  13. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  14. Substitution of whole cows' milk with defatted milk for 4 months reduced serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and total apoB in a sample of Mexican school-age children (6-16 years of age).

    PubMed

    Villalpando, Salvador; Lara Zamudio, Yaveth; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; Manzano, Alejandra Contreras; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor

    2015-09-14

    We carried out this study to compare the effect of consuming whole, partially defatted and defatted cows' milk for 4 months on serum concentrations of blood indicators of cardiovascular risk (CVR) in Mexican children and adolescents. Children aged between 6 and 16 years living in indigenous boarding schools in Mexico and who were usual consumers of whole milk were recruited to this study. Totally, thirteen boarding schools were randomly selected to receive full supplies of whole, partially defatted and defatted cows' milk for 4 months. Serum total cholesterol (TC), TAG, HDL-cholesterol, apoA and total apoB, and Lp(a) concentrations were measured before and after the intervention. Comparisons were made with multi-level mixed-effects linear regression models using the difference in differences approach. Compared with the whole milk group, TC, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and total apoB were lower in defatted milk consumers by -0·43, -0·28, -0·16 mmol/l and -0·05 g/l, respectively (all P<0·001). Compared with the whole milk group, the group that consumed partially defatted milk showed a significant decrease in the concentrations of LDL-cholesterol (-0·12, P=0·01), apoA (-0·05 g/l, P=0·01) and total apoB (-0·05 g/l, P=0·001). Defatted milk intake for 4 months reduced some of the serum indicators of CVR.

  15. Low HDL cholesterol as a cardiovascular risk factor in rural, urban, and rural-urban migrants: PERU MIGRANT cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Porras, María; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Málaga, Germán; Gilman, Robert H.; Acuña-Villaorduña, Ana; Cardenas-Montero, Deborah; Smeeth, Liam; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whilst the relationship between lipids and cardiovascular mortality has been well studied and appears to be controversial, very little has been explored in the context of rural-to-urban migration in low-resource settings. Objective Determine the profile and related factors for HDL-c patterns (isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c) in three population-based groups according to their migration status, and determine the effect of HDL-c patterns on the rates of cardiovascular outcomes (i.e. non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction) and mortality. Methods Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal data from the PERU MIGRANT study, designed to assess the effect of migration on cardiovascular risk profiles and mortality in Peru. Two different analyses were performed: first, we estimated prevalence and associated factors with isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c at baseline. Second, using longitudinal information, relative risk ratios (RRR) of composite outcomes of mortality, non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction were calculated according to HDL-c levels at baseline. Results Data from 988 participants, rural (n = 201), rural-to-urban migrants (n = 589), and urban (n = 199) groups, was analysed. Low HDL-c was present in 56.5% (95%CI: 53.4%–59.6%) without differences by study groups. Isolated low HDL-c was found in 36.5% (95%CI: 33.5–39.5%), with differences between study groups. In multivariable analysis, urban group (vs. rural), female gender, overweight and obesity were independently associated with isolated low HDL-c. Only female gender, overweight and obesity were associated with non-isolated low HDL-c. Longitudinal analyses showed that non-isolated low HDL-c increased the risk of negative cardiovascular outcomes (RRR = 3.46; 95%CI: 1.23–9.74). Conclusions Isolated low HDL-c was the most common dyslipidaemia in the study population and was more frequent in rural subjects. Non-isolated low HDL-c increased three-to fourfold

  16. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  17. High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ingrid V; Helland, Anita; Bratlie, Marianne; Brokstad, Karl A; Rosenlund, Grethe; Sveier, Harald; Mellgren, Gunnar; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken). More knowledge is needed concerning the potential health effects of high fish intake (>300 g/week) in normal-weight adults. In this randomised clinical trial, thirty-eight young, healthy, normal-weight participants consumed 750 g/week of lean or fatty fish or lean meat (as control) for 4 weeks at dinner according to provided recipes to ensure similar ways of preparations and choices of side dishes between the groups. Energy and macronutrient intakes at baseline and end point were similar in all groups, and there were no changes in energy and macronutrient intakes within any of the groups during the course of the study. High intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish, significantly reduced TAG and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations in fasting serum when compared with lean meat intake. When compared with lean fish intake, fatty fish intake increased serum HDL-cholesterol. No differences were observed between lean fish, fatty fish and lean meat groups regarding fasting and postprandial glucose regulation. These findings suggest that high intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, could beneficially affect serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol, which are CVD risk factors, in healthy, normal-weight adults, when compared with high intake of lean meat.

  18. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content.

    PubMed

    Balboa, Elisa; Castro, Juan; Pinochet, María-José; Cancino, Gonzalo I; Matías, Nuria; José Sáez, Pablo; Martínez, Alexis; Álvarez, Alejandra R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, José C; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2017-03-02

    MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria.

  19. [Effect of the DiabetIMSS program on cardiovascular risk, blood pressure and HDL cholesterol in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Romo, Miguel Angel; Montes-Acuña, Juan Felipe; Zavala-Cruz, Gad Gamed; Nieva-de Jesús, Rafael Natividad; Ramírez-Arreola, María Cleofas; Andrade-Rodríguez, Héctor Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: evaluar el efecto del programa DiabetIMSS sobre el riesgo cardiovascular, la tensión arterial y colesterol-HDL en pacientes con síndrome metabólico. Métodos: estudio de intervención cuasiexperimental. Muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia. Se incluyeron 35 sujetos que participaron en la estrategia educativa de un año de duración. Se recolectaron las siguientes variables: edad, género, tabaquismo, colesterol total, HDL, TA sistólica y diastólica; se calculó el riesgo cardiovascular con calculadora basada en Framingham. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva con porcentajes e inferencial con t de Student. Resultados: hubo una elevación de la proporción de sujetos que incrementaron sus cifras del colesterol-HDL posterior a la intervención, generando, por ende, un incremento del factor protector (p < 0.05). En razón de las cifras tensionales, se presentó una mejoría notable en todos los rangos de presión arterial (p < 0.05). Conclusiones: la estrategia educativa para el control del paciente diabético presentó un comportamiento favorable en el colesterol-HDL y tensión arterial, disminuyendo el riesgo cardiovascular de los pacientes.

  20. HDL Cholesterol Level Is Associated with Contrast Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Undergoing PCI

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon Suk; Kim, Chan Joon; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Koh, Yoon Seok; Park, Hun-Jun; Her, Sung-Ho; Jang, Sung Won; Park, Chul-Soo; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hee-Yeol; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Pum-Joon; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Chang, Kiyuk; Jin, Dong Chan; Seung, Ki-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor for contrast induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This study included 1592 CKD patients extracted from a prospective multicenter, all comer-based registry of patients undergoing PCI. In multivariate logistic analysis for CI-AKI development, a significant linear trend was observed between the quartiles of HDL-C (quartile 1 vs. 2: odds ratio [OR], 0.716; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.421–1.219; quartile 1 vs. 3: OR, 0.534; 95% CI, 0.301–0.947; quartile 1 vs. 4: OR, 0.173; 95% CI, 0.079–0.377; P for trend < 0.001). HDL-C quartiles were also negatively correlated with the incidence of CI-AKI; 19.0%, 12.1%, 8.7%, and 3.7% for quartile 1(Q1) (<34 mg/dL), Q2 (34–40 mg/dL), Q3 (40–48 mg/dL), and Q4 (>48 mg/dL) respectively (P < 0.001 overall and for the trend). Multivariate Cox regression analysis for the long term mortality, the highest HDL-C quartile was associated with decreased mortality compared with the lowest HDL-C quartile (hazard ratio [HR] 0.516, 95% CI, 0.320–0.832, P = 0.007). Our study suggests more intensive strategies should be considered for preventing CI-AKI in CKD patients with low serum HDL-C level who is planned for PCI. PMID:27775043

  1. Changes in body weight are significantly associated with changes in fasting plasma glucose and HDL cholesterol in Japanese men without abdominal obesity (waist circumference < 85 cm).

    PubMed

    Oda, Eiji; Kawai, Ryu

    2011-06-01

    The aims are to examine whether changes in body weight (dBW) are associated with changes in cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese men without abdominal obesity (waist circumference (WC) < 85 cm) and which anthropometric index, dBW or changes in WC (dWC), is more strongly associated with changes in cardiovascular risk factors in men without abdominal obesity. It is a retrospective study in 692 Japanese men without abdominal obesity who took annual health screening tests consecutively over one year. Standardized linear regression coefficients (SRCs) of dBW and dWC were calculated for changes in systolic blood pressure (dSBP), diastolic blood pressure (dDBP), fasting plasma glucose (dFPG), triglycerides (dTG), HDL cholesterol (dHDL), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (dCRP). The SRCs of dBW for dFPG and dHDL were significant in all men and in men with each risk factor corresponding to the component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The SRCs of dWC for dTG and dCRP were significant in all men but not in men with each risk factor corresponding to the MetS component. In conclusions, dBW were significantly associated with dFPG and dHDL in Japanese men without abdominal obesity. Therefore, abdominal obesity should not be considered as a necessary component of MetS in Japanese men. dBW may be more useful than dWC as a marker of changes in cardiovascular risk factors in lifestyle intervention programs.

  2. Predictive value of chemotherapy-related high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) elevation in patients with colorectal cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy: an exploratory analysis of 851 cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-hua; Lei, Xue-fen; Yan, Shu-mei; Wang, De-shen; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Rui-hua; Wang, Ling-yun; Li, Yu-hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of chemotherapy-related lipid alterations has been reported based on a small number of patients and varies among different cancers. However, little is known about these alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Results Patients in cohort 1, but not in cohort 2, exhibited significantly increased cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C, and ApoA-I levels, and decreased LDL-C and ApoB levels after adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with chemotherapy-related HDL-C elevation exhibited better 3-year DFS (84.5% vs. 73%, P = 0.001) and 7-year OS (82% vs. 70%, P = 0.002) than those without. Similarly, the 3-year DFS (83.3% vs. 77.6%, P = 0.008) and 7-year OS (81% vs. 74.6%, P = 0.040) were superior in chemotherapy-related ApoA-I elevation patients. However, only HDL-C elevation remained an independent prognostic value in the multivariate Cox model. Methods Eight hundred fifty-one CRC patients with curative-intent resection were retrospectively analyzed. Six hundred sixty-seven receiving fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 3 months were enrolled in cohort 1. The lipid alterations before and after chemotherapy were studied. Simultaneously, 184 patients not treated with chemotherapy (cohort 2) were included as a control for the comparisons of lipids alterations within 1 month after resection and at half-year follow-up. Furthermore, these significant alterations were investigated with respect to the prognostic value of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). An internal validation was performed. Conclusion We observed significant changes in the levels of various lipids in CRC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Furthermore, chemotherapy-related HDL-C elevation was determined to be an independent prognostic indicator for superior DFS and OS. PMID:27344180

  3. Plasma cholesterol-lowering and transient liver dysfunction in mice lacking squalene synthase in the liver.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shuichi; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Tozawa, Ryuichi; Tazoe, Fumiko; Takahashi, Manabu; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Yamamuro, Daisuke; Sakai, Kent; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Honda, Akira; Ishibashi, Shun

    2015-05-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of squalene, the first specific intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. To test the feasibility of lowering plasma cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic SS, we generated mice in which SS is specifically knocked out in the liver (L-SSKO) using Cre-loxP technology. Hepatic SS activity of L-SSKO mice was reduced by >90%. In addition, cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver slices was almost eliminated. Although the hepatic squalene contents were markedly reduced in L-SSKO mice, the hepatic contents of cholesterol and its precursors distal to squalene were indistinguishable from those of control mice, indicating the presence of sufficient centripetal flow of cholesterol and/or its precursors from the extrahepatic tissues. L-SSKO mice showed a transient liver dysfunction with moderate hepatomegaly presumably secondary to increased farnesol production. In a fed state, the plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly reduced in L-SSKO mice, primarily owing to reduced hepatic VLDL secretion. In a fasted state, the hypolipidemic effect was lost. mRNA expression of liver X receptor α target genes was reduced, while that of sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 target genes was increased. In conclusion, liver-specific ablation of SS inhibits hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and induces hypolipidemia without increasing significant mortality.

  4. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  5. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system.

  6. LDL Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities LDL Cholesterol Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... LDL; LDL-C Formal name: Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; Lipid Profile ; ...

  7. Acute Cocoa Supplementation Increases Postprandial HDL Cholesterol and Insulin in Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes after Consumption of a High-Fat Breakfast123

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arpita; Betts, Nancy M; Leyva, Misti J; Fu, Dongxu; Aston, Christopher E; Lyons, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dietary cocoa is an important source of flavonoids and is associated with favorable cardiovascular disease effects, such as improvements in vascular function and lipid profiles, in nondiabetic adults. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with adverse effects on postprandial serum glucose, lipids, inflammation, and vascular function. Objective: We examined the hypothesis that cocoa reduces metabolic stress in obese T2D adults after a high-fat fast-food–style meal. Methods: Adults with T2D [n = 18; age (mean ± SE): 56 ± 3 y; BMI (in kg/m2): 35.3 ± 2.0; 14 women; 4 men] were randomly assigned to receive cocoa beverage (960 mg total polyphenols; 480 mg flavanols) or flavanol-free placebo (110 mg total polyphenols; <0.1 mg flavanols) with a high-fat fast-food–style breakfast [766 kcal, 50 g fat (59% energy)] in a crossover trial. After an overnight fast (10–12 h), participants consumed the breakfast with cocoa or placebo, and blood sample collection [glucose, insulin, lipids, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)] and vascular measurements were conducted at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h postprandially on each study day. Insulin resistance was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment. Results: Over the 6-h study, and specifically at 1 and 4 h, cocoa increased HDL cholesterol vs. placebo (overall Δ: 1.5 ± 0.8 mg/dL; P ≤ 0.01) but had no effect on total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and hsCRP. Cocoa increased serum insulin concentrations overall (Δ: 5.2 ± 3.2 mU/L; P < 0.05) and specifically at 4 h but had no overall effects on insulin resistance (except at 4 h, P < 0.05), systolic or diastolic blood pressure, or small artery elasticity. However, large artery elasticity was overall lower after cocoa vs. placebo (Δ: −1.6 ± 0.7 mL/mm Hg; P < 0.05), with the difference significant only at 2 h. Conclusion: Acute cocoa supplementation showed no clear overall benefit in T2D patients after a high-fat fast-food–style meal challenge

  8. Synbiotic food consumption reduces levels of triacylglycerols and VLDL, but not cholesterol, LDL, or HDL in plasma from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Teibeh; Shakeri, Hossein; Abedi, Fatemeh; Sabihi, Sima-Sadat; Alizadeh, Sabihe-Alsadat; Asemi, Zatolla

    2014-02-01

    To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of synbiotic food consumption on blood lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress among pregnant women. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of a synbiotic food on blood lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress in pregnant women. This randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was performed among 52 primigravida pregnant women, aged 18 to 35-year-old at their third trimester. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomly assigned to consume either a synbiotic (n = 26) or control food (n = 26) for 9 weeks. The synbiotic food consisted of a probiotic viable and heat-resistant Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10⁷ CFU) and 0.04 g inulin (HPX)/g as the prebiotic. Patients were asked to consume the synbiotic and control foods two times a day. Biochemical measurements including blood lipid profiles, plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total glutathione (GSH) were conducted before and after 9 weeks of intervention. Consumption of a synbiotic food for 9 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in serum TAG (P = 0.04), VLDL (P = 0.04) and a significant rise in plasma GSH levels (P = 0.004) compared to the control food. No significant effects of the synbiotic food consumption on serum TC, LDL, HDL and plasma TAC levels (P > 0.05) were observed. Trial registry code: http://www.irct.ir . IRCT201212105623N3.

  9. CC-Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) Suppresses High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Internalization and Cholesterol Efflux via CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Induction and p42/44 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation in Human Endothelial Cells *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Run-Lu; Huang, Can-Xia; Bao, Jin-Lan; Jiang, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Shu-Xian; Cai, Wei-Bin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to be internalized and to promote reverse cholesterol transport in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism underlying these processes has not been studied. In this study, we aim to characterize HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux in ECs and regulatory mechanisms. We found mature HDL particles were reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which was associated with an increase in CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). In cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we determined that CCL2 suppressed the binding (4 °C) and association (37 °C) of HDL to/with ECs and HDL cellular internalization. Furthermore, CCL2 inhibited [3H]cholesterol efflux to HDL/apoA1 in ECs. We further found that CCL2 induced CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and siRNA-CCR2 reversed CCL2 suppression on HDL binding, association, internalization, and on cholesterol efflux in ECs. Moreover, CCL2 induced p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation via CCR2, and p42/44 MAPK inhibition reversed the suppression of CCL2 on HDL metabolism in ECs. Our study suggests that CCL2 was elevated in CAD patients. CCL2 suppressed HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux via CCR2 induction and p42/44 MAPK activation in ECs. CCL2 induction may contribute to impair HDL function and form atherosclerosis in CAD. PMID:27458015

  10. CC-Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) Suppresses High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Internalization and Cholesterol Efflux via CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Induction and p42/44 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Run-Lu; Huang, Can-Xia; Bao, Jin-Lan; Jiang, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Shu-Xian; Cai, Wei-Bin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Ling

    2016-09-09

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to be internalized and to promote reverse cholesterol transport in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism underlying these processes has not been studied. In this study, we aim to characterize HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux in ECs and regulatory mechanisms. We found mature HDL particles were reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which was associated with an increase in CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). In cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we determined that CCL2 suppressed the binding (4 °C) and association (37 °C) of HDL to/with ECs and HDL cellular internalization. Furthermore, CCL2 inhibited [(3)H]cholesterol efflux to HDL/apoA1 in ECs. We further found that CCL2 induced CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and siRNA-CCR2 reversed CCL2 suppression on HDL binding, association, internalization, and on cholesterol efflux in ECs. Moreover, CCL2 induced p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation via CCR2, and p42/44 MAPK inhibition reversed the suppression of CCL2 on HDL metabolism in ECs. Our study suggests that CCL2 was elevated in CAD patients. CCL2 suppressed HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux via CCR2 induction and p42/44 MAPK activation in ECs. CCL2 induction may contribute to impair HDL function and form atherosclerosis in CAD.

  11. Cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA mixture does not change body composition, induces insulin resistance and increases serum HDL cholesterol level in rats.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Mariana Macedo; de Souza, Yamara Oliveira; Dutra Luquetti, Sheila Cristina Potente; Sabarense, Céphora Maria; do Amaral Corrêa, José Otávio; da Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos; Lisboa, Patrícia Cristina; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Andrade Soares, Sara Malaguti; Moura Gualberto, Ana Cristina; Gameiro, Jacy; da Gama, Marco Antônio Sundfeld; Ferraz Lopes, Fernando César; González Garcia, Raúl Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic supplements of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) containing 50:50 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers have been commercialized in some places for reducing body fat. However the safety of this CLA mixture is controversial and in some countries the CLA usage as food supplement is not authorized. Changes in insulinemic control and serum lipids profile are potential negative effects related to consumption of CLA mixture. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of a diet containing mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA on prevention of obesity risk as well as on potential side effects such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Wistar rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following dietary treatments (n=10/group), for 60 days: Normolipidic Control (NC), diet containing 4.0% soybean oil (SO); High Fat-Control (HF-C), diet containing 24.0% SO; High Fat-synthetic CLA (HF-CLA), diet containing 1.5% of an isomeric CLA mixture (Luta-CLA 60) and 22.5% SO. Luta-CLA 60 (BASF) contained nearly 60% of CLA (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA at 50:50 ratio). The HF-CLA diet contained 0.3% of each CLA isomer. HF-CLA diet had no effect on dietary intake and body composition. HF-CLA-fed rats had lower levels of PPARγ protein in retroperitoneal adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia compared to HF-C-fed rats, hyperglycemia compared to NC-fed rats while no differences in glycemia were observed between NC and HF-C groups, increased HOMA index and higher levels of serum HDL cholesterol. Thus, feeding rats with a high fat diet containing equal parts of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers had no effect on body composition and induced insulin resistance. Despite HF-CLA-fed rats had increased serum HDL cholesterol levels, caution should be taken before synthetic supplements containing cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA are recommended as a nutritional strategy for weight management.

  12. Sex-specific HDL Cholesterol Changes with Weight Loss and Their Association with Anthropometric variables: the LIFE Study

    PubMed Central

    Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Jeffery, Robert W; Erickson, Darin J; Welsh, Ericka M; Flood, Andrew P; Jaeb, Melanie A; Laqua, Patricia S; Mitchell, Nathan; Langer, Shelby L; Levy, Rona L

    2010-01-01

    Decrease in the level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) has been observed in women who start dieting, but not in men. Patterns of HDLC change during intentional weight loss through 30-months of follow-up, and their association with changes in anthropometric measurements were examined in obese women (N=112) and men (N=100). Missing HDLC values at 6-, 12-, 18-, and 30-month follow-up (N=16, 34, 55, and 50, respectively) due to drop-out were imputed by multiple imputation. Mean ages and body mass indices (BMIs) of subjects at baseline were 47.2 years and 34.8 kg/m2 for women, and 50.4 years and 35.0 kg/m2 for men. On average, participants lost weight steadily for 12 months, followed by slow regain. During the first six months, HDLC decreased significantly in women (−4.1 mg/dl, P=0.0007), but not in men. Significant HDLC increases were observed in both men and women from 6- to 12-month follow-up. HDLC changes in women were positively associated with changes in hip circumference from baseline to 12-month independent of changes in triglycerides, glucose and insulin. Rapid decrease of predominantly subcutaneous fat in the femoral and gluteal area might be associated with HDLC decrease in women during initial weight loss. PMID:20885387

  13. Dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins in coronary heart disease: implications for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-07-01

    Low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased risks of coronary heart disease. HDL mediates cholesterol efflux from macrophages for reverse transport to the liver and elicits many anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities which are potentially anti-atherogenic. Nevertheless, HDL has not been successfully targeted by drugs for prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. One potential reason is the targeting of HDL cholesterol which does not capture the structural and functional complexity of HDL particles. Hundreds of lipid species and dozens of proteins as well as several microRNAs have been identified in HDL. This physiological heterogeneity is further increased in pathologic conditions due to additional quantitative and qualitative molecular changes of HDL components which have been associated with both loss of physiological function and gain of pathologic dysfunction. This structural and functional complexity of HDL has prevented clear assignments of molecules to the functions of normal HDL and dysfunctions of pathologic HDL. Systematic analyses of structure-function relationships of HDL-associated molecules and their modifications are needed to test the different components and functions of HDL for their relative contribution in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The derived biomarkers and targets may eventually help to exploit HDL for treatment and diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  15. Peptide Mimetics of Apolipoproteins Improve HDL Function

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Buga, Georgette M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade evidence has accumulated that suggests that the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL may be at least as important as the levels of HDL-cholesterol. The recent failure of the torcetrapib clinical trails has highlighted the potential differences between HDL-cholesterol levels and HDL function. Agents to improve HDL function including HDL anti-inflammatory properties provide a new therapeutic strategy for ameliorating atherosclerosis and other chronic inflammatory conditions related to dyslipidemia. Seeking guidance from the structure of the apolipoproteins of the plasma lipoproteins has allowed the creation of a series of polypeptides that have interesting functionality with therapeutic implications. In animal models of atherosclerosis, peptide mimetics of apolipoproteins have been shown to improve the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL, significantly reduce lesions and improve vascular inflammation and function without necessarily altering HDL-cholesterol levels. Some of these are now entering the clinical arena as interventions in pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic studies. PMID:18449337

  16. Glycemic load is associated with HDL cholesterol but not with the other components and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994

    PubMed Central

    Culberson, Amy; Kafai, Mohammad R; Ganji, Vijay

    2009-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate quality and quantity may affect the risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus. Glycemic load (GL) is a mathematical concept based on carbohydrate quality and quantity. GL is a product of glycemic index (GI) and the carbohydrate content of a food item divided by 100. Objective In this study, the association between GL and components and prevalence of metabolic syndrome was investigated in a representative sample survey of US residents utilizing the data reported in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5011). Methods Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria established by the Adult Treatment Panel III. Multivariate-adjusted means for waist circumference, triacylglycerol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, blood glucose, and HDL cholesterol were determined according to the energy-adjusted GL intake quartiles using regression models. Results In all subjects and in men, high GL was associated with low HDL-cholesterol concentrations in multivariate-adjusted analysis (P for trend < 0.01). However, no association was observed between GL and any of the individual components of metabolic syndrome in women. Also, no association was observed between energy-adjusted GL and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both men (P for trend < 0.21) and women (P for trend < 0.09) in the multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analysis. Conclusion It is likely that the diets low in GL may mitigate the risk for CVD through HDL cholesterol. PMID:19144143

  17. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-cholesterol concentrations depend on ABCA1 genetic variants in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) are associated with HDL-C concentrations. To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 genetic variants on HDL-C concentrations is dependent on ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1), we studied potential interactions between ...

  18. The effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol levels depends on the ABCA1 gene variation in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 have shown an association with HDL-C. One of the most likely mechanisms to explain those associations is through ABCA1. Objective: To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-C is dependent on ABCA1, we studied potential interacti...

  19. Impaired Lipoprotein Processing in HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: Aberrant HDL Lipids, Stability, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Baiba K.; Raya, Joe L.; Ruiz-Esponda, Raul; Iyer, Dinakar; Coraza, Ivonne; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Pownall, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy (HIV/ART) exhibit a unique atherogenic dyslipidemic profile with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) and low plasma concentrations of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In the Heart Positive Study of HIV/ART patients, a hypolipidemic therapy of fenofibrate, niacin, diet, and exercise reduced HTG and plasma non-HDL-C concentrations and raised plasma HDL-C and adiponectin concentrations. We tested the hypothesis that HIV/ART HDL have abnormal structures and properties and are dysfunctional. Approach and Results Hypolipidemic therapy reduced the TG contents of LDL and HDL. At baseline, HIV/ART low density lipoproteins (LDL) were more triglyceride (TG)-rich and HDL were more TG- and cholesteryl ester (CE)-rich than the corresponding lipoproteins from normolipidemic (NL) subjects. Very low density lipoproteins, LDL and HDL were larger than the corresponding lipoproteins from NL subjects; HIV/ART HDL were less stable than NL HDL. HDL-[3H]CE uptake by Huh7 hepatocytes was used to assess HDL functionality. HIV/ART plasma were found to contain significantly less competitive inhibition activity for hepatocyte HDL-CE uptake than did NL plasma (p<0.001). Conclusion Compared to NL subjects, lipoproteins from HIV/ART patients are larger and more neutral lipid-rich, and their HDL are less stable and less receptor-competent. Based on this work and previous studies of lipase activity in HIV, we present a model in which plasma lipolytic activities and/or hepatic CE uptake are impaired in HIV/ART patients. These findings provide a rationale to determine whether the distinctive lipoprotein structure, properties and function of HIV/ART HDL predict atherosclerosis as assessed by carotid artery intimal medial thickness. PMID:23640486

  20. apo B gene knockout in mice results in embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube defects, male infertility, and reduced HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I transport rates in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L S; Voyiaziakis, E; Markenson, D F; Sokol, K A; Hayek, T; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    apo B is a structural constituent of several classes of lipoprotein particles, including chylomicrons, VLDL, and LDL. To better understand the role of apo B in the body, we have used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to create a null apo B allele in the mouse. Homozygous apo B deficiency led to embryonic lethality, with resorption of all embryos by gestational day 9. Heterozygotes showed an increased tendency to intrauterine death with some fetuses having incomplete neural tube closure and some live-born heterozygotes developing hydrocephalus. The majority of male heterozygotes were sterile, although the genitourinary system and sperm were grossly normal. Viable heterozygotes had normal triglycerides, but total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels were decreased by 37, 37, and 39%, respectively. Hepatic and intestinal apo B mRNA levels were decreased in heterozygotes, presumably contributing to the decreased LDL levels through decreased synthesis of apo B-containing lipoproteins. Kinetic studies indicated that heterozygotes had decreased transport rates of HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I. As liver and intestinal apo A-I mRNA levels were unchanged, the mechanism for decreased apo A-I transport must be posttranscriptional. Heterozygotes also had normal cholesterol absorption and a normal response of the plasma lipoprotein pattern to chronic consumption of a high fat, high cholesterol, Western-type diet. In summary, we report a mouse model for apo B deficiency with several phenotypic features that were unexpected based on clinical studies of apo B-deficient humans, such as embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube closure defects, male infertility, and a major defect in HDL production in heterozygotes. This model presents an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes. Images PMID:7593600

  1. Apolipoprotein A-II is a key regulatory factor of HDL metabolism as appears from studies with transgenic animals and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maïga, Sira Fatoumata; Kalopissis, Athina-Despina; Chabert, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The structure and metabolism of HDL are linked to their major apolipoproteins (apo) A-I and A-II. HDL metabolism is very dynamic and depends on the constant remodeling by lipases, lipid transfer proteins and receptors. HDL exert several cardioprotective effects, through their antioxidant and antiinflammatory capacities and through the stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport from extrahepatic tissues to the liver for excretion into bile. HDL also serve as plasma reservoir for C and E apolipoproteins, as transport vehicles for a great variety of proteins, and may have more physiological functions than previously recognized. In this review we will develop several aspects of HDL metabolism with emphasis on the structure/function of apo A-I and apo A-II. An important contribution to our understanding of the respective roles of apo A-I and apo A-II comes from studies using transgenic animal models that highlighted the stabilizatory role of apo A-II on HDL through inhibition of their remodeling by lipases. Clinical studies coupled with proteomic analyses revealed the presence of dysfunctional HDL in patients with cardiovascular disease. Beyond HDL cholesterol, a new notion is the functionality of HDL particles. In spite of abundant literature on HDL metabolic properties, a major question remains unanswered: which HDL particle(s) confer(s) protection against cardiovascular risk?

  2. Altered relationship of plasma triglycerides to HDL cholesterol in patients with HIV/HAART-associated dyslipidemia: further evidence for a unique form of Metabolic Syndrome in HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Catherine N.; Ruiz-Esponda, Raul; Yang, Eric; Chang, Evelyn; Gillard, Baiba; Pownall, Henry J.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Coraza, Ivonne; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Plasma triglycerides (TG) and HDL-C are inversely related in Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), due to exchange of VLDL-TG for HDL-cholesteryl esters catalyzed by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). We investigated the relationship of TG to HDL-C in highly-active antiretroviral drug (HAART)-treated HIV patients. Methods Fasting plasma TG and HDL-C levels were compared in 179 hypertriglyceridemic HIV/HAART patients and 71 HIV-negative persons (31 normotriglyceridemic (NL) and 40 hypertriglyceridemic due to type IV hyperlipidemia (HTG)). CETP mass and activity were compared in 19 NL and 87 HIV/HAART subjects. Results Among the three groups, a plot of HDL-C vs. TG gave similar slopes but significantly different y-intercepts (9.24 ± 0.45, 8.16 ± 0.54, 6.70 ± 0.65, sqrt(HDL-C) for NL, HIV and HTG respectively; P<0.001); this difference persisted after adjusting HDL-C for TG, age, BMI, gender, glucose, CD4 count, viral load and HAART strata (7.18 ± 0.20, 6.20 ± 0.05 and 4.55 ± 0.15 sqrt(HDL-C) for NL, HIV and HTG, respectively, P <0.001). CETP activity was not different between NL and HIV, but CETP mass was significantly higher in HIV (1.47 ± 0.53 compared to 0.93 ± 0.27 μg/mL, P<0.0001), hence CETP specific activity was lower in HIV (22.67 ± 13.46 compared to 28.46 ± 8.24 nmol/μg/h, P=0.001). Conclusions Dyslipidemic HIV/HAART patients have a distinctive HDL-C plasma concentration adjusted for TG. The weak inverse relationship between HDL-C and TG is not explained by altered total CETP activity; it could result from a non-CETP-dependent mechanism or a decrease in CETP function due to inhibitors of CETP activity in HIV patients’ plasma. PMID:23522788

  3. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Is Positively Associated with Baseline Triglyceride Concentrations, and Changes in Intake Are Inversely Associated with Changes in HDL Cholesterol over 12 Months in a Multi-Ethnic Sample of Children123

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompay, Maria I; McKeown, Nicola M; Goodman, Elizabeth; Eliasziw, Misha; Chomitz, Virginia R; Gordon, Catherine M; Economos, Christina D; Sacheck, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is linked to greater cardiometabolic risk in adults. Although longitudinal evidence is sparse among children, SSB intake reduction is targeted to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors in this group. Objective: We investigated characteristics associated with consumption of SSBs in a multi-ethnic sample of children/adolescents and measured cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between SSB intake and plasma HDL cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs) over 12 mo. Methods: In a diverse cohort of children aged 8–15 y, cross-sectional associations (n = 613) between baseline SSB intake and blood lipid concentrations and longitudinal associations (n = 380) between mean SSB intake, changes in SSB intake, and lipid changes over 12 mo were assessed with multivariable linear regression. Results: Greater SSB intake was associated with lower socioeconomic status, higher total energy intake, lower fruit/vegetable intake, and more sedentary time. In cross-sectional analysis, greater SSB intake was associated with higher plasma TG concentrations among consumers (62.4, 65.3, and 71.6 mg/dL in children who consumed >0 but <2, ≥2 but <7, and ≥7 servings/wk, respectively; P-trend: 0.03); plasma HDL cholesterol showed no cross-sectional association. In the longitudinal analysis, mean SSB intake over 12 mo was not associated with lipid changes; however, the 12-mo increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration was greater among children who decreased their intake by ≥1 serving/wk (4.6 ± 0.8 mg/dL) compared with children whose intake stayed the same (2.0 ± 0.8 mg/dL) or increased (1.5 ± 0.8 mg/dL; P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a multi-ethnic sample of children, intake of SSBs was positively associated with TG concentrations among consumers, and changes in SSB intake were inversely associated with HDL cholesterol concentration changes over 12 mo. Further research in large diverse samples of children is needed to study the

  4. Cholesterol homeostasis failure in the brain: implications for synaptic dysfunction and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Marco; Leboffe, Loris; Trapani, Laura; Pallottini, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most important molecules in cell physiology because of its involvement in several biological processes: for instance, it determines both physical and biochemical properties of cell membranes and proteins. Disruption to cholesterol homeostasis leads to coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Strong evidence suggests that cholesterol also has a crucial role in the brain as various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson diseases are associated with disruptions to cholesterol homeostasis. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role cholesterol plays at synaptic junctions and the pathological consequences caused by disruptions in the homeostatic maintenance of this compound.

  5. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia- ... Some cholesterol is considered good and some is considered bad. Different blood tests can be done to measure each ...

  6. Data in support of a central role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism in recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in the setting of high HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein using Bayesian network modeling.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Salzman, Peter; Ryan, Dan; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech; Sparks, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented that was utilized as the basis for Bayesian network modeling of influence pathways focusing on the central role of a polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) on recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in patients with high levels of HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation, "Influences on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Polymorphism-Associated Recurrent Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients with High HDL Cholesterol and Inflammation" (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]). The data consist of occurrence of recurrent coronary events in 166 post myocardial infarction patients along with 1. clinical data on gender, race, age, and body mass index; 2. blood level data on 17 biomarkers; and 3. genotype data on 53 presumptive CVD-related single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, a flow diagram of the Bayesian modeling procedure is presented along with Bayesian network subgraphs (root nodes to outcome events) utilized as the data from which PAI-2 associated influence pathways were derived (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]).

  7. HDL and endothelial protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Dinh, A; Diallo, D; Delbosc, S; Varela-Perez, L Maria; Dang, QB; Lapergue, B; Burillo, E; Michel, JB; Levoye, A; Martin-Ventura, JL; Meilhac, O

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) represent a family of particles characterized by the presence of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and by their ability to transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues back to the liver. In addition to this function, HDLs display pleiotropic effects including antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic or anti-proteolytic properties that account for their protective action on endothelial cells. Vasodilatation via production of nitric oxide is also a hallmark of HDL action on endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express receptors for apoA-I and HDLs that mediate intracellular signalling and potentially participate in the internalization of these particles. In this review, we will detail the different effects of HDLs on the endothelium in normal and pathological conditions with a particular focus on the potential use of HDL therapy to restore endothelial function and integrity. PMID:23488589

  8. Enhanced HDL Functionality in Small HDL Species Produced Upon Remodeling of HDL by Reconstituted HDL, CSL112

    PubMed Central

    Didichenko, Svetlana A.; Navdaev, Alexei V.; Cukier, Alexandre M.O.; Gille, Andreas; Schuetz, Patrick; Spycher, Martin O.; Thérond, Patrice; Chapman, M. John; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: CSL112, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) reconstituted with phosphatidylcholine, is known to cause a dramatic rise in small high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Objective: To explore the mechanisms by which the formation of small HDL particles is induced by CSL112. Methods and Results: Infusion of CSL112 into humans caused elevation of 2 small diameter HDL fractions and 1 large diameter fraction. Ex vivo studies showed that this remodeling does not depend on lipid transfer proteins or lipases. Rather, interaction of CSL112 with purified HDL spontaneously gave rise to 3 HDL species: a large, spherical species composed of apoA-I from native HDL and CSL112; a small, disc-shaped species composed of apoA-I from CSL112, but smaller because of the loss of phospholipids; and the smallest species, lipid-poor apoA-I composed of apoA-I from HDL and CSL112. Time-course studies suggest that remodeling occurs by an initial fusion of CSL112 with HDL and subsequent fission leading to the smaller forms. Functional studies showed that ATP-binding cassette transporter 1–dependent cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory effects in whole blood were carried by the 2 small species with little activity in the large species. In contrast, the ability to inactivate lipid hydroperoxides in oxidized low-density lipoprotein was carried predominantly by the 2 largest species and was low in lipid-poor apoA-I. Conclusions: We have described a mechanism for the formation of small, highly functional HDL species involving spontaneous fusion of discoidal HDL with spherical HDL and subsequent fission. Similar remodeling is likely to occur during the life cycle of apoA-I in vivo. PMID:27436846

  9. HDL: bridging past and present with a look at the future

    PubMed Central

    Scanu, Angelo M.; Edelstein, Celina

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that HDLs, a class of plasma lipoproteins, heterogeneous in size and density, have an atheroprotective role attributed, for years, to their capacity to promote the efflux of cholesterol from activated cholesterol-loaded arterial macrophages. Recent studies, however, have recognized that the physical heterogeneity of HDLs is associated with multiple functions that involve both the protein and the lipid components of these particles. ApoA-I, quantitatively the major protein constituent, has an amphipathic structure suited for transport of lipids. It readily interacts with the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1, the SR-B1 scavenger receptor; activates the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), which is critical for HDL maturation. It also has antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, along with the HDL-associated enzymes paraoxonase, platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF), and glutathione peroxidase. Regarding the lipid moiety, an atheroprotective role has been recognized for lysosphingolipids, particularly sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). All of these atheroprotective functions are lost in the post-translational dependent dysfunctional plasma HDLs of subjects with systemic inflammation, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and chronic renal disease. The emerging notion that particle quality has more predictive power than quantity has stimulated further exploration of the HDL proteome, already revealing unsuspected pro- or antiatherogenic proteins/peptides associated with HDL.—Scanu, A. M., Edelstein, C. HDL: bridging past and present with a look at the future. PMID:18716026

  10. Markers of Systemic Inflammation and Apo-AI Containing HDL Subpopulations in Women with and without Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giuseppina T; Giandalia, Annalisa; Romeo, Elisabetta L; Alibrandi, Angela; Horvath, Katalin V; Asztalos, Bela F; Cucinotta, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Background. Besides their role in reverse cholesterol transport, HDL particles may affect the atherosclerotic process through the modulation of subclinical inflammation. HDL particles differ in size, composition, and, probably, anti-inflammatory properties. This hypothesis has never been explored in diabetic women, frequently having dysfunctional HDL. The potential relationship between lipid profile, Apo-AI containing HDL subclasses distribution, and common inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6) was examined in 160 coronary heart disease- (CHD-) free women with and without type 2 diabetes. Results. Compared to controls, diabetic women showed lower levels of the atheroprotective large α-1, α-2, and pre-α-1 and higher concentration of the small, lipid-poor α-3 HDL particles (P < 0.05 all); diabetic women also had higher hsCRP and IL-6 serum levels (age- and BMI-adjusted P < 0.001). Overall, HDL subclasses significantly correlated with inflammatory markers: hsCRP inversely correlated with α-1 (P = 0.01) and pre-α-1 (P = 0.003); IL-6 inversely correlated with α-1 (P = 0.003), α-2 (P = 0.004), and pre-α-1 (P = 0.002) and positively with α-3 HDL (P = 0.03). Similar correlations were confirmed at univariate regression analysis. Conclusions. More atheroprotective HDL subclasses are associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers, especially in diabetic women. These data suggest that different HDL subclasses may influence CHD risk also through the modulation of inflammation.

  11. Metabolic and functional relevance of HDL subspecies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though the association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) was described as early as 1950, HDL’s role in CVD still remains to be fully elucidated. There are numerous publications showing the inverse relationship between HDL-C and CVD risk; however, in t...

  12. The Arg59Trp variant in ANGPTL8 (betatrophin) is associated with total and HDL-cholesterol in American Indians and Mexican Americans and differentially affects cleavage of ANGPTL3.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert L; Leti, Fatjon; Tsinajinnie, Darwin; Kobes, Sayuko; Puppala, Sobha; Curran, Joanne E; Almasy, Laura; Lehman, Donna M; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; DiStefano, Johanna K

    2016-06-01

    We previously identified a locus linked to total cholesterol (TC) concentration in Pima Indians on chromosome 19p. To characterize this locus, we genotyped >2000 SNPs in 1838 Pimas and assessed association with log(TC). We observed evidence for association with log(TC) with rs2278426 (3.5% decrease/copy of the T allele; P=5.045×10(-6)) in the ANGPTL8 (angiopoietin-like 8) gene. We replicated this association in 2413 participants of the San Antonio Mexican American Family Study (SAMAFS: 2.0% decrease per copy of the T allele; P=0.005842). In a meta-analysis of the combined data, we found the strongest estimated effect with rs2278426 (P=2.563×10(-7)). The variant T allele at rs2278426 predicts an Arg59Trp substitution and has previously been associated with LDL-C and HDL-C. In Pimas and SAMAFS participants, the T allele of rs2278426 was associated with reduced HDL-C levels (P=0.000741 and 0.00002, respectively), and the combined estimated effect for the two cohorts was -3.8% (P=8.526×10(-8)). ANGPTL8 transcript and protein levels increased in response to both glucose and insulin. The variant allele was associated with increased levels of cleaved ANGPTL3. We conclude that individuals with the variant allele may have lower TC and HDL-C levels due to increased activation of ANGPTL3 by ANGPTL8.

  13. Polymorphisms in the CD36 gene modulate the ability of fish oil supplements to lower fasting plasma triacyl glycerol and raise HDL cholesterol concentrations in healthy middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Madden, Jacqueline; Carrero, Juan J; Brunner, Andreas; Dastur, Neville; Shearman, Cliff P; Calder, Philip C; Grimble, Robert F

    2008-06-01

    Five SNPs in the CD36 gene, 25444G>A, 27645del>ins, 30294G>C, -31118G>A and -33137A>G in haplotypic combinations, link to fasting plasma NEFA concentrations. Fish oil lowers TAG concentrations. The influence of CD36 SNPs on hypotriglyceridemic effects is unknown. The study examines how four of the SNPs modify the effects of fish oil on fasting plasma TAG, NEFA, glucose LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations in 111 healthy, middle-aged, Caucasian men. Subjects consumed habitual diets while taking 6g MaxEPA daily for 12 weeks. TAG decreased from 1.48 mol/l to 0.11 mmol/l, and glucose and HDL rose from 5.92 to 0.15 mmol/l and from 1.27 to 0.04 mmol/l, respectively, irrespective of genotype. NEFA was unaffected. Significant falls in TAG only occurred in individuals with the GG variant of the 25444, 30294, -31118 or -33137 SNPs. The TAG-lowering effects may be via stimulation of CD36 activity in extrahepatic tissue in individuals with the GG variants of these SNPs.

  14. Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoprotein and the Potential of Apolipoprotein A-1 Mimetic Peptides to Normalize the Composition and Function of Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Navab, Mohamad; Morgantini, Cecilia; Charles-Sehoeman, Christina; Su, Feng; Gao, Feng; Kwon, Murray; Ganapathy, Ekambaram; Meriwether, David; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.

    2013-01-01

    Although high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in large epidemiological studies are inversely related to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), increasing the level of circulating HDL-C does not necessarily decrease the risk of CHD events, CHD deaths, or mortality, HDL can act as an anti- or a proinflammatory molecule, depending on the context and environment. Based on a number of recent studies, it appears that the anti- or proinflammatory nature of HDL may be a more sensitive indicator of the presence or absence of atherosclerosis than HDL-C levels. The HDL proteome has been suggested to be a marker, and perhaps a mediator, of CHD. Apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-I), the major protein in HDL is a selective target for oxidation by myeloperoxidase, which results in impaired HDL function. Improving HDL function through modification of its lipid and/or protein content maybe a therapeutic target for the treatment of CHD and many inflammatory disorders. HDL/apoA-I mimetic peptides may have the ability to modify the lipid and protein content of HDL and convert dysfunctional HDL to functional HDL. This review focuses on recent studies of dysfunctional HDL in animal models and human disease, and the potential of apoA-I mimetic peptides to normalize the composition and (function of lipoproteins. PMID:21628835

  15. Life style and cardiovascular risk factors in the Japanese population--from an epidemiological survey on serum lipid levels in Japan 1990 part 1: influence of life style and excess body weight on HDL-cholesterol and other lipid parameters in men.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Temba, Hitomi; Horibe, Hiroshi; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasushi; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Kita, Toru; Nakamura, Haruo

    2003-01-01

    Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) has long been used as an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD), although HDL-C values themselves are influenced by various factors including serum triglyceride (TG) levels, obesity, and life style. In view of the importance of the metabolic syndrome as a risk factor of CAD, changes in HDL-C and other lipid parameters in the Japanese population associated with life style, especially in males, were analyzed in this study based on data obtained in an epidemiological survey carried out in 1990. Smokers had higher TG and lower HDL-C levels than non-smokers, while BMI and LDL-C were slightly decreased by smoking in middle-aged men (40-59 years old). Increases in both HDL-C and TG due to alcohol consumption were associated with an increase in BMI in younger men aged 20-39. In middle-aged men, significant increases in HDL-C were seen in every quintile of BMI, while the increase in TG levels due to alcohol was small. Middle-aged men engaged in occupations requiring greater physical activity also had higher HDL-C levels in every quintile of BMI. The influence of life style on serum lipid parameters appeared to be mostly expressed as a function of BMI in younger men, while it appeared to be independent of BMI in older men.

  16. Innovative Target Therapies Are Able to Block the Inflammation Associated with Dysfunction of the Cholesterol Biosynthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Loganes, Claudia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Knowles, Alessandra; Bilel, Sabrine; Tommasini, Alberto; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina

    2015-12-30

    The cholesterol pathway is an essential biochemical process aimed at the synthesis of bioactive molecules involved in multiple crucial cellular functions. The end products of this pathway are sterols, such as cholesterol, which are essential components of cell membranes, precursors of steroid hormones, bile acids and other molecules such as ubiquinone. Several diseases are caused by defects in this metabolic pathway: the most severe forms of which cause neurological involvement (psychomotor retardation and cerebellar ataxia) as a result of a variety of cellular impairments, including mitochondrial dysfunction. These pathologies are induced by convergent mechanisms in which the mitochondrial unit plays a pivotal role contributing to defective apoptosis, autophagy and mitophagy processes. Unraveling these mechanisms would contribute to the development of effective drug treatments for these disorders. In addition, the development of biochemical models could have a substantial impact on the understanding of the mechanism of action of drugs that act on this pathway in multifactor disorders. In this review we will focus in particular on inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, mitochondria-targeted drugs and inhibitors of the inflammasome.

  17. Innovative Target Therapies Are Able to Block the Inflammation Associated with Dysfunction of the Cholesterol Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Loganes, Claudia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Knowles, Alessandra; Bilel, Sabrine; Tommasini, Alberto; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The cholesterol pathway is an essential biochemical process aimed at the synthesis of bioactive molecules involved in multiple crucial cellular functions. The end products of this pathway are sterols, such as cholesterol, which are essential components of cell membranes, precursors of steroid hormones, bile acids and other molecules such as ubiquinone. Several diseases are caused by defects in this metabolic pathway: the most severe forms of which cause neurological involvement (psychomotor retardation and cerebellar ataxia) as a result of a variety of cellular impairments, including mitochondrial dysfunction. These pathologies are induced by convergent mechanisms in which the mitochondrial unit plays a pivotal role contributing to defective apoptosis, autophagy and mitophagy processes. Unraveling these mechanisms would contribute to the development of effective drug treatments for these disorders. In addition, the development of biochemical models could have a substantial impact on the understanding of the mechanism of action of drugs that act on this pathway in multifactor disorders. In this review we will focus in particular on inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, mitochondria-targeted drugs and inhibitors of the inflammasome. PMID:26729102

  18. Improved Endothelial Dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice Fed a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)−/− mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE−/− mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE−/− mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  19. HDL particle number and size as predictors of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kontush, Anatol

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that reduced concentrations of circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles can be superior to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Measurements of HDL particle numbers, therefore, bear a potential for the improved assessment of cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, such measurement can be relevant for the evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches targeting HDL. Modern in-depth analyses of HDL particle profile may further improve evaluation of cardiovascular risk. Although clinical relevance of circulating concentrations of HDL subpopulations to cardiovascular disease remains controversial, the negative relationship between the number of large HDL particles and cardiovascular disease suggests that assessment of HDL particle profile can be clinically useful. Reduced mean HDL size is equally associated with cardiovascular disease in large-scale clinical studies. Since HDL-C is primarily carried in the circulation by large, lipid-rich HDL particles, the inverse relationship between HDL size and cardiovascular risk can be secondary to those established for plasma levels of HDL particles, HDL-C, and large HDL. The epidemiological data thereby suggest that HDL particle number may represent a more relevant therapeutic target as compared to HDL-C.

  20. Emerging therapeutic strategies to enhance HDL function.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Santiago; Martínez-González, José; Urraca, Concha; Tejerina, Teresa

    2011-10-10

    Epidemiologic studies indicate a strong inverse correlation between plasma levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The most relevant cardioprotective mechanism mediated by HDL is thought to be reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). New insights in HDL biology and RCT have allowed the development of promising agents aimed to increase HDL function and promote atherosclerosis regression. In this regard, apo-AI analogs and CETP inhibitors dalcetrapib and anacetrapib have aroused a great interest and opened new expectations in the treatment of CVD.

  1. LDL-apheresis depletes apoE-HDL and pre-β1-HDL in familial hypercholesterolemia: relevance to atheroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Orsoni, Alexina; Saheb, Samir; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Atassi, Marielle; Bittar, Randa; Robillard, Paul; Bruckert, Eric; Kontush, Anatol; Carrié, Alain; Chapman, M. John

    2011-01-01

    Subnormal HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo)AI levels are characteristic of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), reflecting perturbed intravascular metabolism with compositional anomalies in HDL particles, including apoE enrichment. Does LDL-apheresis, which reduces HDL-cholesterol, apoAI, and apoE by adsorption, induce selective changes in HDL subpopulations, with relevance to atheroprotection? Five HDL subpopulations were fractionated from pre- and post-LDL-apheresis plasmas of normotriglyceridemic FH subjects (n = 11) on regular LDL-apheresis (>2 years). Apheresis lowered both plasma apoE (−62%) and apoAI (−16%) levels, with preferential, genotype-independent reduction in apoE. The mass ratio of HDL2:HDL3 was lowered from ∼1:1 to 0.72:1 by apheresis, reflecting selective removal of HDL2 mass (80% of total HDL adsorbed). Pre-LDL-apheresis, HDL2 subpopulations were markedly enriched in apoE, consistent with ∼1 copy of apoE per 4 HDL particles. Large amounts (50-66%) of apoE-HDL were removed by apheresis, preferentially in the HDL2b subfraction (−50%); minor absolute amounts of apoE-HDL were removed from HDL3 subfractions. Furthermore, pre-β1-HDL particle levels were subnormal following removal (−53%) upon apheresis, suggesting that cellular cholesterol efflux may be defective in the immediate postapheresis period. In LDL-receptor (LDL-R) deficiency, LDL-apheresis may enhance flux through the reverse cholesterol transport pathway and equally attenuate potential biglycan-mediated deposition of apoE-HDL in the arterial matrix. PMID:21957200

  2. A COCONUT EXTRA VIRGIN OIL-RICH DIET INCREASES HDL CHOLESTEROL AND DECREASES WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE AND BODY MASS IN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Diuli A; Moreira, Annie S B; de Oliveira, Glaucia M M; Raggio Luiz, Ronir; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-11-01

    diferencia significativa entre los grupos para DC (-2,1 ± 2,7 cm; p < 0,01). Además, se produjo un aumento en las concentraciones de HDL-C, Apo A, con una diferencia significativa en GD, solo para HDL-C (3,1 ± 7,4 mg/dl; p = 0,02). Conclusión: se observó que el tratamiento nutricional asociado con el consumo de aceite de coco virgen extra redujo la CC e incrementó los niveles de HDL-C en pacientes con CAD.

  3. HDL-C: does it matter? An update on novel HDL-directed pharmaco-therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Ramprasad; Amanullah, Aman; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2013-08-10

    It has long been recognized that elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CHD) and that pharmacologic therapy to decrease LDL-C significantly reduces cardiovascular events. Despite the effectiveness of statins for CHD risk reduction, even optimal LDL-lowering therapy alone fails to avert 60% to 70% of CHD cases. A low plasma concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is also associated with increased risk of CHD. However, the convincing epidemiologic data linking HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) to CHD risk in an inverse correlation has not yet translated into clinical trial evidence supporting linearity between HDL-C increases and CHD risk reduction. It is becoming clear that a functional HDL is a more desirable target than simply increasing HDL-C levels. Discoveries in the past decade have shed light on the complex metabolic and antiatherosclerotic pathways of HDL. These insights, in turn, have fueled the development of new HDL-targeted drugs, which can be classified according to four different therapeutic approaches: directly augmenting the concentration of apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the major protein constituent of HDL; indirectly augmenting the concentration of apo A-I and HDL cholesterol; mimicking the functionality of apo A-I and enhancing reverse cholesterol transport. This review discusses the latest in novel HDL directed therapeutic strategies.

  4. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, protects against pancreatic β-cells dysfunction induced by high cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Gotteland, Martin; Castillo, Rodrigo L; Chen, Chen

    2015-06-10

    Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, characterized by an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose, representing a hallmark of the transition from pre-diabetes to diabetes. 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (ES) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of ES against apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress induced by cholesterol in Min6 pancreatic β-cells. Cholesterol decreased viability, induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction by reducing complex I activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP levels and oxygen consumption. Cholesterol promoted oxidative stress by increasing cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreasing antioxidant enzyme activities; in addition, it slightly increased Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. These events resulted in the impairment of the glucose-induced insulin secretion. ES increased Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus and protected pancreatic β-cells against impaired insulin secretion induced by cholesterol by preventing oxidative stress, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Nrf2 activation seems to be involved in the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant protection exerted by ES in addition to preventing the disruption of antioxidant enzymatic defenses. Although additional in vivo experiments are required, this metabolite is suggested as a promising drug target for the prevention of the pathological development from a pre-diabetic to a diabetic state.

  5. Oxidation-induced loss of the ability of HDL to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidized LDL on vasorelaxation.

    PubMed

    Perségol, Laurence; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Rageot, David; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Monier, Serge; Vergès, Bruno; Duvillard, Laurence

    2015-11-01

    Several current diseases are associated with an increase in the oxidation of HDL, which is likely to impair their functionality. Our aim was to identify whether oxidation could change the protective effect of HDL against the deleterious effect on vasoreactivity induced by oxidative stress. HDL from healthy subjects were oxidized in vitro by Cu(2+), and the ability of oxidized HDL to counteract the inhibitory effect of oxidized LDL on acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was tested on isolated rabbit aorta rings. Oxidation of HDL was evidenced by the increase in the 7-oxysterols/cholesterol ratio (3.20 ± 1.12 vs 0.02 ± 0.01 % in native HDL, p < 0.05). Oxidized LDL inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation (E max = 50.2 ± 5.0 vs 92.5 ± 1.7 % for incubation in Kreb's buffer, p < 0.05) and native HDL counteracted this inhibition (E max = 72.4 ± 4.8 vs 50.2 ± 5.0 % p < 0.05). At the opposite, oxidized HDL had no effect on oxidized LDL-induced inhibition on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation (E max = 53.7 ± 4.8 vs 50.2 ± 5.0 %, NS). HDL oxidation is associated with a decreased ability of HDL to remove 7-oxysterols from oxidized LDL. In conclusion, these results show that oxidation of HDL induces the loss of their protective effect against endothelial dysfunction, which could promote atherosclerosis in diseases associated with increased oxidative stress.

  6. Optical Properties of Europium Tetracycline Complexes in the Presence of High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) Subfractions.

    PubMed

    Sicchieri, Letícia Bonfante; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Figueiredo Neto, Antônio Martins; Gomes, Laércio; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2016-12-12

    Standard lipoprotein measurements of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) fail to identify many lipoprotein abnormalities that contribute to cardiovascular heart diseases (CHD). Studies suggested that the presence of CHD is more strongly associated with the HDL subspecies than with total HDL cholesterol levels. The HDL particles can be collected in at least three subfractions, the HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3. More specifically, atherosclerosis is associated with low levels of HDL2. In this work, the optical spectroscopic properties of europium tetracycline (EuTc) complex in the presence of different HDL subspecies was studied. The results show that the europium spectroscopic properties in the EuTc complex are influenced by sizes and concentrations of subclasses. Eu(3+) emission intensity and lifetime can discriminate the subfractions HDL3 and HDL2b.

  7. HDL-Targeting Therapeutics: Past, Present And Future.

    PubMed

    Zakiev, Emile; Feng, Ma; Sukhorukov, Vasily; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-10-27

    Large-scale epidemiological studies firmly established the association between low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. This relationship is thought to reflect the key biological function of HDL, which involves reverse cholesterol transport from the arterial wall to the liver for further excretion from the body. Other aspects of the cardioprotective HDL functionality include antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic, vasodilatory, anti-infectious and anti-diabetic activities. Over the last decades, wide interest in HDL as an athero- and cardioprotective particle has resulted in the development of HDL-C raising as a therapeutic approach to reduce cardiovascular risk. Several strategies to increase circulating HDL-C concentrations were developed that primarily included use of niacin and fibrates as potent HDL-C raising agents. In the statin era, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, infusion of artificially reconstituted HDL and administration of apolipoprotein A-I mimetics were established as other approaches to raise HDL-C. More recently, novel strategies targeting HDL metabolism, such as upregulation of apolipoprotein A-I production by the liver, were added to the list of HDL therapeutics. This review summarises current knowledge of HDL-targeting therapies and discusses perspectives of their use.

  8. Postmenopausal Women Have Higher HDL and Decreased Incidence of Low HDL than Premenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria Luz; Murillo, Ana Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that plasma lipids, waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) increase following menopause. In addition, there is a perceived notion that plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations also decrease in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated plasma lipids, fasting glucose, anthropometrics and BP in 88 post and 100 pre-menopausal women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. No differences were observed in plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose or systolic and diastolic BP between groups. However, plasma HDL-C was higher (p < 0.01) in postmenopausal women and the percentage of women who had low HDL (<50 mg/dL) was higher (p < 0.01) among premenopausal women. In addition, negative correlations were found between WC and HDL-C (r = −0.148, p < 0.05) and BMI and HDL-C (r = −0.258, p < 0.01) for all subjects indicating that increases in weight and abdominal fat have a deleterious effect on plasma HDL-C. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma HDL-C (r = 0.237 p < 0.01). The results from this study suggest that although HDL is decreased by visceral fat and overall weight, low HDL is not a main characteristic of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Further, HDL appears to increase, not decrease, with age. PMID:27417608

  9. Postmenopausal Women Have Higher HDL and Decreased Incidence of Low HDL than Premenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Maria Luz; Murillo, Ana Gabriela

    2016-03-16

    It is well known that plasma lipids, waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) increase following menopause. In addition, there is a perceived notion that plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations also decrease in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated plasma lipids, fasting glucose, anthropometrics and BP in 88 post and 100 pre-menopausal women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. No differences were observed in plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose or systolic and diastolic BP between groups. However, plasma HDL-C was higher (p < 0.01) in postmenopausal women and the percentage of women who had low HDL (<50 mg/dL) was higher (p < 0.01) among premenopausal women. In addition, negative correlations were found between WC and HDL-C (r = -0.148, p < 0.05) and BMI and HDL-C (r = -0.258, p < 0.01) for all subjects indicating that increases in weight and abdominal fat have a deleterious effect on plasma HDL-C. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma HDL-C (r = 0.237 p < 0.01). The results from this study suggest that although HDL is decreased by visceral fat and overall weight, low HDL is not a main characteristic of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Further, HDL appears to increase, not decrease, with age.

  10. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  11. A big role for small RNAs in HDL homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins play a central role in systemic cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating the efflux of excess cellular cholesterol and transporting it to the liver for biliary excretion. HDL has long been touted as the “good cholesterol” because of the strong inverse correlation of plasma HDL cholesterol levels with coronary heart disease. However, the disappointing outcomes of recent clinical trials involving therapeutic elevations of HDL cholesterol have called this moniker into question and revealed our lack of understanding of this complex lipoprotein. At the same time, the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate HDL biogenesis and function have led to a surge in our understanding of the posttranscriptional mechanisms regulating plasma levels of HDL. Furthermore, HDL has recently been shown to selectively transport miRNAs and thereby facilitate cellular communication by shuttling these potent gene regulators to distal tissues. Finally, that miRNA cargo carried by HDL may be altered during disease states further broadened our perspective of how this lipoprotein can have complex effects on target cells and tissues. The unraveling of how these tiny RNAs govern HDL metabolism and contribute to its actions promises to reveal new therapeutic strategies to optimize cardiovascular health. PMID:23509405

  12. ACAT inhibition reverses LCAT deficiency and improves plasma HDL in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Liang, K

    2004-11-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with increased risk of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease and profound alteration of plasma lipid profile. Uremic dyslipidemia is marked by increased plasma concentration of ApoB-containing lipoproteins and impaired high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. These abnormalities are, in part, due to acquired LCAT deficiency and upregulation of hepatic acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). ACAT catalyzes intracellular esterification of cholesterol, thereby promoting hepatic production of ApoB-containing lipoproteins and constraining HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in the peripheral tissues. In view of the above considerations, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of ACAT may ameliorate CRF-induced dyslipidemia. 5/6 Nephrectomized rats were treated with either ACAT inhibitor IC-976 (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or placebo for 6 wk. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Key cholesterol-regulating enzymes, plasma lipids, and creatinine clearance were measured. The untreated CRF rats exhibited increased plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very LDL (VLDL) cholesterol, unchanged plasma HDL cholesterol, elevated total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio, reduced liver microsomal free cholesterol, and diminished creatinine clearance. This was accompanied by reduced plasma LCAT, increased hepatic ACAT-2 mRNA, ACAT-2 protein and ACAT activity, and unchanged hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase. ACAT inhibitor raised plasma HDL cholesterol, lowered LDL and VLDL cholesterol, and normalized total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio without changing total cholesterol concentration (hence, a shift from ApoB-containing lipoproteins to HDL). This was accompanied by normalizations of hepatic ACAT activity and plasma LCAT. In conclusion, inhibition of ACAT reversed LCAT deficiency and improved plasma HDL level in CRF rats. Future studies are needed to explore

  13. HDL Cholesterol: How to Boost Your 'Good' Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  14. The pleiotropic role of HDL in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Parra, Sandra; Castro, Antoni; Masana, Luis

    2015-01-01

    As is widely known, the classic function of HDL is reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), thus removing cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Early epidemiological studies, such as Framingham's, stated that increased HDL levels were associated with a significant decrease in relative risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. However, those with heightened expectations in recent years for the development of therapeutic targets to increase HDL levels have been disappointed, because efforts have demonstrated the opposite effect on cardiovascular and global mortality. However, in contrast, studies have highlighted the complexity and the intriguing role of HDL in different pathological conditions, such as infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune diseases. In this review an attempt is made to summarize some biological pathways that link HDL function with the immune system, and its possible clinical repercussions in autoimmune diseases.

  15. HDL measures, particle heterogeneity, proposed nomenclature, and relation to atherosclerotic cardiovascular events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing body of evidence from epidemiological data, animal studies, and clinical trials supports HDL as the next target to reduce residual cardiovascular risk in statin-treated, high-risk patients. For more than 3 decades, HDL cholesterol has been employed as the principal clinical measure of HDL ...

  16. Therapeutic applications of reconstituted HDL: When structure meets function.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Maryam; Guillas-Baudouin, Isabelle; Le Goff, Wilfried; Chapman, M John; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-01-01

    Reconstituted forms of HDL (rHDL) are under development for infusion as a therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic vascular disease and to reduce cardiovascular risk following acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke. Currently available rHDL formulations developed for clinical use contain apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and one of the major lipid components of HDL, either phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. Recent data have established that quantitatively minor molecular constituents of HDL particles can strongly influence their anti-atherogenic functionality. Novel rHDL formulations displaying enhanced biological activities, including cellular cholesterol efflux, may therefore offer promising prospects for the development of HDL-based, anti-atherosclerotic therapies. Indeed, recent structural and functional data identify phosphatidylserine as a bioactive component of HDL; the content of phosphatidylserine in HDL particles displays positive correlations with all metrics of their functionality. This review summarizes current knowledge of structure-function relationships in rHDL formulations, with a focus on phosphatidylserine and other negatively-charged phospholipids. Mechanisms potentially underlying the atheroprotective role of these lipids are discussed and their potential for the development of HDL-based therapies highlighted.

  17. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  18. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: "Herniated" HDL, a common feature in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-18

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects.

  19. HDL and Atherosclerosis Regression: Evidence from Pre-clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    High density lipoprotein particles (HDL) transport, among other molecules, cholesterol (HDL-C). In epidemiologic studies, plasma HDL-C levels have an inverse relationship to the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has been assumed that this reflects the protective functions of HDL, which include their ability to promote cholesterol efflux. Yet, a number of recent pharmacological and genetic studies have failed to demonstrate that increased plasma levels of HDL-C resulted in decreased CVD risk, giving rise to a controversy over whether plasma levels of HDL-C reflect HDL function, or that HDL is even as protective as assumed. On balance, the evidence from pre-clinical and (limited) clinical studies show that HDL can promote the regression of atherosclerosis when the levels of functional particles are increased from endogenous or exogenous sources. The data show that regression results from a combination of reduced plaque lipid and macrophage contents, as well as from a reduction in its inflammatory state. While more research will be needed on basic mechanisms and to establish that these changes translate clinically to reduced CVD events, that HDL can regress plaques suggests that the recent trial failures do not eliminate HDL from consideration as an atheroprotective agent, but emphasizes the important distinction between HDL function and plasma levels of HDL-C. PMID:24385513

  20. A type 1 cholecystokinin receptor mutant that mimics the dysfunction observed for wild type receptor in a high cholesterol environment.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2014-06-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates the type 1 CCK receptor (CCK1R) to elicit satiety after a meal. Agonists with this activity, although potentially useful for treatment of obesity, can also have side effects and toxicities of concern, making the development of an intrinsically inactive positive allosteric modulator quite attractive. Positive allosteric modulators also have the potential to correct the defective receptor-G protein coupling observed in the high membrane cholesterol environment described in metabolic syndrome. Current model systems to study CCK1R in such an environment are unstable and expensive to maintain. We now report that the Y140A mutation within a cholesterol-binding motif and the conserved, class A G protein-coupled receptor-specific (E/D)RY signature sequence results in ligand binding and activity characteristics similar to wild type CCK1R in a high cholesterol environment. This is true for natural CCK, as well as ligands with distinct chemistries and activity profiles. Additionally, the Y140A construct also behaved like CCK1R in high cholesterol in regard to its internalization, sensitivity to a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and anisotropy of a bound fluorescent CCK analog. Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs that systematically changed the residues in the allosteric ligand-binding pocket were studied in the presence of Y140A. This established increased importance of unique residues within TM3 and reduced the importance of TM2 for binding in the presence of this mutation, with the agonist trigger likely pulled away from its Leu(356) target on TM7. The distinct conformation of this intramembranous pocket within Y140A CCK1R provides an opportunity to normalize this by using a small molecule allosteric ligand, thereby providing safe and effective correction of the coupling defect in metabolic syndrome.

  1. Evaluation of HDL-modulating interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction using a systems pharmacology approach.

    PubMed

    Gadkar, Kapil; Lu, James; Sahasranaman, Srikumar; Davis, John; Mazer, Norman A; Ramanujan, Saroja

    2016-01-01

    The recent failures of cholesteryl ester transport protein inhibitor drugs to decrease CVD risk, despite raising HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, suggest that pharmacologic increases in HDL-C may not always reflect elevations in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the process by which HDL is believed to exert its beneficial effects. HDL-modulating therapies can affect HDL properties beyond total HDL-C, including particle numbers, size, and composition, and may contribute differently to RCT and CVD risk. The lack of validated easily measurable pharmacodynamic markers to link drug effects to RCT, and ultimately to CVD risk, complicates target and compound selection and evaluation. In this work, we use a systems pharmacology model to contextualize the roles of different HDL targets in cholesterol metabolism and provide quantitative links between HDL-related measurements and the associated changes in RCT rate to support target and compound evaluation in drug development. By quantifying the amount of cholesterol removed from the periphery over the short-term, our simulations show the potential for infused HDL to treat acute CVD. For the primary prevention of CVD, our analysis suggests that the induction of ApoA-I synthesis may be a more viable approach, due to the long-term increase in RCT rate.

  2. Nicotinic Acid Accelerates HDL Cholesteryl Ester Turnover in Obese Insulin-Resistant Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Le Bloc'h, Jérôme; Leray, Véronique; Nazih, Hassan; Gauthier, Olivier; Serisier, Samuel; Magot, Thierry; Krempf, Michel; Nguyen, Patrick; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Aim Nicotinic acid (NA) treatment decreases plasma triglycerides and increases HDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms involved in these change are not fully understood. A reduction in cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity has been advanced to explain most lipid-modulating effects of NA. However, due to the central role of CETP in reverse cholesterol transport in humans, other effects of NA may have been hidden. As dogs have no CETP activity, we conducted this study to examine the specific effects of extended-release niacin (NA) on lipids and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl ester (CE) turnover in obese Insulin-Resistant dogs with increase plasma triglycerides. Methods HDL kinetics were assessed in fasting dogs before and four weeks after NA treatment through endogenous labeling of cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI by simultaneous infusion of [1,2 13C2] acetate and [5,5,5 2H3] leucine for 8 h. Kinetic data were analyzed by compartmental modeling. In vitro cell cholesterol efflux of serum from NA-treated dogs was also measured. Results NA reduced plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and very-low-density lipoprotein TG concentrations (p < 0.05). The kinetic study also showed a higher cholesterol esterification rate (p < 0.05). HDL-CE turnover was accelerated (p < 0.05) via HDL removal through endocytosis and selective CE uptake (p < 0.05). We measured an elevated in vitro cell cholesterol efflux (p < 0.05) with NA treatment in accordance with a higher cholesterol esterification. Conclusion NA decreased HDL cholesterol but promoted cholesterol efflux and esterification, leading to improved reverse cholesterol transport. These results highlight the CETP-independent effects of NA in changes of plasma lipid profile. PMID:26366727

  3. Volumetric determination of apolipoprotein stoichiometry of circulating HDL subspecies1[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Cheung, Marian C.; Jones, Martin K.

    2013-01-01

    Although HDL is inversely correlated with coronary heart disease, elevated HDL-cholesterol is not always protective. Additionally, HDL has biological functions that transcend any antiatherogenic role: shotgun proteomics show that HDL particles contain 84 proteins (latest count), many correlating with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HDL. ApoA-I has been suggested to serve as a platform for the assembly of these protein components on HDL with specific functions - the HDL proteome. However, the stoichiometry of apoA-I in HDL subspecies is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of immunoaffinity chromatography data and volumetric analysis to evaluate the size and stoichiometry of LpA-I and LpA-I,A-II particles. We conclude that there are three major LpA-I subspecies: two major particles, HDL[4] in the HDL3 size range (d = 85.0 ± 1.2 Å) and HDL[7] in the HDL2 size range (d = 108.5 ± 3.8 Å) with apoA-I stoichiometries of 3 and 4, respectively, and a small minor particle, HDL[1] (d = 73.8 ± 2.1Å) with an apoA-I stoichiometry of 2. Additionally, we conclude that the molar ratio of apolipoprotein to surface lipid is significantly higher in circulating HDL subspecies than in reconstituted spherical HDL particles, presumably reflecting a lack of phospholipid transfer protein in reconstitution protocols. PMID:23883582

  4. Why Targeting HDL Should Work as a Therapeutic Tool, but Hasn’t

    PubMed Central

    Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Thomas, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death and disability in US today despite the availability of statins which reduce hyperlipidemia, a risk factor that predisposes individuals to this disease. Epidemiology of human populations has overwhelmingly demonstrated an inverse correlation between the concentration of plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Decades of observations and mechanistic studies suggest that one protective function of HDL is its central role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In this pathway the ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) releases intracellular cholesterol, which is packaged by apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) into nascent HDL (nHDL) particles and released from the plasma membrane. Further lipidation and maturation of HDL occurs in plasma with the eventual uptake by the liver where cholesterol is removed. It is generally accepted that CVD risk can be reduced if plasma HDL-C levels are elevated. Several different pharmacological approaches have been tried, the most popular approach targets the movement of cholesteryl ester from HDL to triglyceride rich particles by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Inhibition of CETP increases plasma HDL-C concentration, however, beneficial effects have yet to be demonstrated, likely the result of off-target effects. These revelations have led to a reevaluation of how elevating HDL concentration could decrease risk. A recent, landmark study showed that the inherent cholesterol efflux capacity of an individual’s plasma was a better predictor of CVD status than overall HDL-C concentration. Even more provocative are recent studies showing that apoA-I, the principle protein component of HDL, functions as a modulator of cellular inflammation and oxidation. The following will review all of these potential routes explaining how HDL apoA-I can reduce the risk of CVD. PMID:23743767

  5. High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) – Nature’s Multi-Functional Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Rui; Li, Dan; Chen, Y. Eugene; Moon, James J.; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are endogenous nanoparticles involved in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. HDL is well known as the ―good‖ cholesterol because it not only removes excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic plaques but also has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, which protect the cardiovascular system. Circulating HDL also transports endogenous proteins, vitamins, hormones, and microRNA to various organs. Compared with other synthetic nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, inorganic and polymeric nanoparticles, HDL has unique features that allow them to deliver cargo to specific targets more efficiently. These attributes include their ultra-small size (8-12 nm in diameter), high tolerability in humans (up to 8 g of protein per infusion), long circulating half-life (12-24 hours), and intrinsic targeting properties to different recipient cells. Various recombinant ApoA proteins and ApoA mimetic peptides have been recently developed for the preparation of reconstituted HDL that exhibits properties similar to endogenous HDL and has a potential for industrial scale-up. In this review, we will summarize: a) clinical pharmacokinetics and safety of reconstituted HDL products, b) comparison of HDL with inorganic and other organic nanoparticles, c) the rationale for using HDL as drug delivery vehicles for important therapeutic indications, d) the current state-of-the-art in HDL production, and e) HDL-based drug delivery strategies for small molecules, peptides/proteins, nucleic acids, and imaging agents targeted to various organs. PMID:26889958

  6. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  7. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  8. Thyroid Dysfunction and Associated Risk Factors among Nepalese Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwada, Saroj; KC, Rajendra; Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khan, Seraj Ahmed; Chaudhari, Rajendra Kumar; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess thyroid function and associated risk factors in Nepalese diabetes mellitus patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 419 diabetes mellitus patients at B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Information on demographic and anthropometric variables and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction was collected. Blood samples were analysed to measure thyroid hormones, blood sugar, and lipid profile. Results. Prevalence rate of thyroid dysfunction was 36.03%, with subclinical hypothyroidism (26.5%) as the most common thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid dysfunction was much common in females (42.85%) compared to males (30.04%) (p = 0.008) and in type 1 diabetes (50%) compared to type 2 diabetes mellitus (35.41%) (p = 0.218). Diabetic patients with thyroid dysfunction had higher total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol in comparison to patients without thyroid dysfunction. Significant risk factors for thyroid dysfunction, specifically hypothyroidism (overt and subclinical), were smoking (relative risk of 2.56 with 95% CI (1.99–3.29, p < 0.001)), family history of thyroid disease (relative risk of 2.57 with 95% CI (2.0–3.31, p < 0.001)), and female gender (relative risk of 1.44 with 95% CI (1.09–1.91, p = 0.01)). Conclusions. Thyroid dysfunction is common among Nepalese diabetic patients. Smoking, family history of thyroid disease, and female gender are significantly associated with thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26435714

  9. Cooperation between hepatic cholesteryl ester hydrolase and scavenger receptor BI for hydrolysis of HDL-CE.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Ghosh, Shobha

    2013-11-01

    Liver is the sole organ responsible for the final elimination of cholesterol from the body either as biliary cholesterol or bile acids. High density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived cholesterol is the major source of biliary sterols and represents a mechanism for the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissues including artery wall-associated macrophage foam cells. Via selective uptake through scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), HDL-cholesterol is thought to be directly secreted into bile, and HDL cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) enter the hepatic metabolic pool and need to be hydrolyzed prior to conversion to bile acids. However, the identity of hepatic CE hydrolase (CEH) as well as the role of SR-BI in bile acid synthesis remains elusive. In this study we examined the role of human hepatic CEH (CES1) in facilitating hydrolysis of SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs. Over-expression of CEH led to increased hydrolysis of HDL-[³H]CE in primary hepatocytes and SR-BI expression was required for this process. Intracellular CEH associated with BODIPY-CE delivered by selective uptake via SR-BI. CEH and SR-BI expression enhanced the movement of [³H]label from HDL-[³H]CE to bile acids in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that SR-BI-delivered HDL-CEs are hydrolyzed by hepatic CEH and utilized for bile acid synthesis.

  10. Observations of HDL components in female probands following an ultra-long distance run of 100 miles.

    PubMed

    Schriewer, H; Jung, K; Emke, F; Assmann, G

    1985-01-01

    The serum concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides as well as the cholesterol, phosphatidyl choline, and apolipoprotein components of HDL were tested in 19 participants immediately before and immediately after a 100-mile run. After the run, taking into account any alterations in total protein, the following changes were observed: a decrease in total cholesterol (p less than 0.001), as well as in triglycerides (p less than 0.05), and an increase in HDL cholesterol (p less than 0.05), and HDL phosphatidyl choline (p less than 0.01). The concentrations of HDL apolipoprotein A-I and HDL apolipoprotein A-II were not affected. The results indicate a change in composition of HDL following extreme prolonged physical exercise in women.

  11. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  12. HDL/ApoA-1 infusion and ApoA-1 gene therapy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K.

    2015-01-01

    The HDL hypothesis stating that simply raising HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) may produce cardiovascular benefits has been questioned recently based on several randomized clinical trials using CETP inhibitors or niacin to raise HDL-C levels. However, extensive pre-clinical data support the vascular protective effects of administration of exogenous ApoA-1 containing preβ-HDL like particles. Several small proof-of-concept clinical trials using such HDL/ApoA-1 infusion therapy have shown encouraging results but definitive proof of efficacy must await large scale clinical trials. In addition to HDL infusion therapy an alternative way to exploit beneficial cardiovascular effects of HDL/ApoA-1 is to use gene transfer. Preclinical studies have shown evidence of benefit using this approach; however clinical validation is yet lacking. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the aforementioned strategies. PMID:26388776

  13. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  14. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  15. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA–HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA–HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers. PMID:25650634

  16. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers.

  17. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  18. Oxidative modification and poor protective activity of HDL on LDL oxidation in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Unchern, Supeenun; Laohareungpanya, Narumon; Sanvarinda, Yupin; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Tanratana, Pansakorn; Chantharaksri, Udom; Sibmooh, Nathawut

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported in thalassemia, which is a consequence of oxidative stress. However, the levels of oxidized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in thalassemia have not been evaluated and it is unclear whether HDL oxidation may be linked to LDL oxidation. In this study, the levels of total cholesterol, iron, protein, conjugated diene (CD), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) were determined in HDL from healthy volunteers and patients with beta-thalassemia intermedia with hemoglobin E (beta-thal/Hb E). The protective activity of thalassemic HDL on LDL oxidation was also investigated. The iron content of HDL(2) and HDL(3) from beta-thal/HbE patients was higher while the cholesterol content was lower than those in healthy volunteers. Thalassemic HDL(2) and HDL(3) had increased levels of lipid peroxidation markers i.e., conjugated diene, LOOH, and TBARs. Thalassemic HDL had lower peroxidase activity than control HDL and was unable to protect LDL from oxidation induced by CuSO(4). Our findings highlight the oxidative modification and poor protective activity of thalassemic HDL on LDL oxidation which may contribute to cardiovascular complications in thalassemia.

  19. SR-BI mediates high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced anti-inflammatory effect in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Seong-Min; Park, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Jihoe; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-30

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), mediates selective cholesteryl ester uptake from lipoproteins into the liver as well as cholesterol efflux from macrophages to HDL. Recently, strong evidence has demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of HDL, although the mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that the anti-inflammatory effects of HDL are dependent on SR-BI expression in THP-1 macrophages. Consistent with earlier findings, pretreatment of macrophages with HDL abolished LPS-induced TNFα production. HDL also inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation. In addition, knockdown of SR-BI or inhibition of SR-BI ligand binding abolished the anti-inflammatory effect of HDL. SR-BI is a multi-ligand receptor that binds to modified lipoproteins as well as native HDL. Since modified lipoproteins have pro-inflammatory properties, it is unclear whether SR-BI activated by modified HDL has an anti- or pro-inflammatory effect. Glycated HDL induced NF-κB activation and cytokine production in macrophages in vitro, suggesting a pro-inflammatory effect for modified HDL. Moreover, inhibition of SR-BI function or expression potentiated glycated HDL-induced TNF-α production, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect for SR-BI. In conclusion, SR-BI plays an important function in regulating HDL-mediated anti-inflammatory response in macrophages.

  20. Significance of the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity and total cholesterol efflux capacity in patients with or without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Norimatsu, Kenji; Kuwano, Takashi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Tomohiko; Shiga, Yuhei; Suematsu, Yasunori; Miyase, Yuiko; Adachi, Sen; Nakamura, Ayumi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Uehara, Yoshinari; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that cholesterol efflux capacity is more useful than the lipid profile as a marker of the presence and the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, we investigated the associations between the presence and the severity of CAD and both the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity and total cholesterol efflux capacity and the lipid profile including the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level in patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). The subjects consisted of 204 patients who were clinically suspected to have CAD and underwent CTA. We isolated HDL from plasma by ultracentrifugation and measured the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity using (3)H-cholesterol-labeled J774 macrophage cells and calculated total cholesterol efflux capacity as follows: the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity/100× HDL-C levels. While the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity was not associated with the presence or the severity of CAD, total cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-C in patients with CAD were significantly lower than those in patients without CAD. In addition, total cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-C, but not the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity, significantly decreased as the number of coronary arteries with significant stenosis increased. Total cholesterol efflux capacity was positively correlated with HDL-C, whereas the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity showed only weak association. In a logistic regression analysis, the presence of CAD was independently associated with total cholesterol efflux capacity, in addition to age and gender. Finally, a receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the areas under the curves for total cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-C were similar. In conclusion, the percentage of cholesterol efflux capacity using the fixed amount of isolated HDL was not associated with CAD. On the other hand, the calculated total

  1. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  2. sHDL Nanoparticles: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy for Adrenocortical Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Chitra; Kuai, Rui; Zhu, Qing; White, Peter; Moon, James; Schwendeman, Anna; Cohen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemotherapeutic strategies for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) carry significant toxicities. Cholesterol is critical for ACC cell growth and steroidogenesis and ACC cells over-express scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) that uptakes cholesterol from circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL). We hypothesize that cholesterol-free synthetic-HDL nanoparticles (sHDL) will deplete cholesterol and synergize with chemotherapeutics to achieve enhanced anticancer effects at lower (less toxic) drug levels. Methods Anti proliferative efficacy of ACC cells for the combinations of sHDL with chemotherapeutics was tested by cell-Titer Glo. Cortisol levels were measured from the culture media. Effect on steroidogenesis was measured by RT-PCR. Induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results Combination-Index (CI) for sHDL and either etoposide(E), cisplatin(P) or mitotane(M) demonstrated synergy (CI<1) for anti-proliferation. sHDL alone or in combination with chemo drugs was able to reduce cortisol production by 70-90% compared to cisplatin alone or controls (p<0.01). RT-PCR indicated significant inhibition of steroidogenic enzymes for sHDL (p<0.01 vs. no sHDL). Combination therapy with sHDL increased apoptosis by 30-50% compared to drug or sHDL alone (p<0.03) confirmed by mitochondrial potential decrease. Conclusion sHDL can act synergistically and lower the amount of M/E/P needed for anticancer efficacy in ACC in part due to cholesterol starvation. This novel treatment strategy warrants further investigation translationally. PMID:26582501

  3. Glycoxidized HDL, HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids and HDL from diabetic patients inhibit platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Lê, Quang Huy; El Alaoui, Meddy; Véricel, Evelyne; Ségrestin, Bérénice; Soulère, Laurent; Guichardant, Michel; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Calzada, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Context High-density lipoproteins (HDL) possess atheroprotective properties including anti-thrombotic and antioxidant effects. Very few studies relate to the functional effects of oxidized HDL on platelets in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Objective The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of in vitro glycoxidized HDL, and HDL from T2D patients on platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid signaling cascade. At the same time, the contents of hydroxylated fatty acids were assessed in HDL. Results Compared to control HDL, in vitro glycoxidized HDL had decreased proportions of linoleic (LA) and arachidonic (AA) acids in phospholipids and cholesteryl esters, and increased concentrations of hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (9-HODE and 13-HODE) and 15-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), derived from LA and AA respectively, especially hydroxy derivatives esterified in phospholipids. Glycoxidized HDL dose-dependently decreased collagen-induced platelet aggregation by binding to SR-BI. Glycoxidized HDL prevented collagen-induced increased phosphorylation of platelet p38 MAPK and cytosolic phospholipase A2, as well as intracellular calcium mobilization. HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids, namely PC(16:0/13-HODE) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation. Increased concentrations of 9-HODE, 13-HODE and 15-HETE in phospholipids (2.1, 2.1 and 2.4-fold increase respectively) were found in HDL from patients with T2D, and these HDL also inhibited platelet aggregation via SR-BI. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that in vitro glycoxidized HDL as well as HDL from T2D patients inhibit platelet aggregation, and suggest that oxidized LA-containing phospholipids may contribute to the anti-aggregatory effects of glycoxidized HDL and HDL from T2D patients. PMID:25794249

  4. microRNA control of HDL Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Katey J; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of microRNAs (miRNAs) that control HDL abundance and function have expanded our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating this important lipoprotein subclass. miRNAs have been shown to regulate gene networks that control HDL biogenesis and uptake, as well as discrete steps in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Furthermore, HDL itself has been shown to selectively transport miRNAs in health and disease, offering new possibilities of how this lipoprotein may alter gene expression in distal target cells and tissues. Collectively, these discoveries offer new insights into the mechanisms governing HDL metabolism and function, and open new avenues for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24385511

  5. Defective functionality of HDL particles in familial apoA-I deficiency: relevance of alterations in HDL lipidome and proteome[S

    PubMed Central

    Rached, Fabiana; Santos, Raul D.; Camont, Laurent; Miname, Marcio H.; Lhomme, Marie; Dauteuille, Carolane; Lecocq, Sora; Serrano, Carlos V.; Chapman, M. John; Kontush, Anatol

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate functional and compositional properties of HDL in subjects from a kindred of genetic apoA-I deficiency, two homozygotes and six heterozygotes, with a nonsense mutation at APOA1 codon -2, Q[-2]X, were recruited together with age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 11). Homozygotes displayed undetectable plasma levels of apoA-I and reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoC-III (5.4% and 42.6% of controls, respectively). Heterozygotes displayed low HDL-C (21 ± 9 mg/dl), low apoA-I (79 ± 24 mg/dl), normal LDL-cholesterol (132 ± 25 mg/dl), and elevated TG (130 ± 45 mg/dl) levels. Cholesterol efflux capacity of ultracentrifugally isolated HDL subpopulations was reduced (up to −25%, P < 0.01, on a glycerophospholipid [GP] basis) in heterozygotes versus controls. Small, dense HDL3 and total HDL from heterozygotes exhibited diminished antioxidative activity (up to −48%, P < 0.001 on a total mass basis) versus controls. HDL subpopulations from both homozygotes and heterozygotes displayed altered chemical composition, with depletion in apoA-I, GP, and cholesteryl ester; enrichment in apoA-II, free cholesterol, and TG; and altered phosphosphingolipidome. The defective atheroprotective activities of HDL were correlated with altered lipid and apo composition. These data reveal that atheroprotective activities of HDL particles are impaired in homozygous and heterozygous apoA-I deficiency and are intimately related to marked alterations in protein and lipid composition. PMID:25341944

  6. The WWOX Gene Modulates HDL and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iatan, Iulia; Choi, Hong Y.; Ruel, Isabelle; Linga Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Kil, Hyunsuk; Lee, Jaeho; Abu Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Abu-Remaileh, Muhannad; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Civelek, Mete; Awan, Zuhier; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Pajukanta, Päivi; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; Genest, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) constitutes a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recent studies from our group reported a genetic association between the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene and HDL-C levels. Here, through next-generation resequencing, in vivo functional studies and gene microarray analyses, we investigated the role of WWOX in HDL and lipid metabolism. Methods and Results Using next-generation resequencing of the WWOX region, we first identified 8 variants significantly associated and perfectly segregating with the low-HDL trait in two multi-generational French Canadian dyslipidemic families. To understand in vivo functions of WWOX, we used liver-specific Wwoxhep−/− and total Wwox−/− mice models, where we found decreased ApoA-I and ABCA1 levels in hepatic tissues. Analyses of lipoprotein profiles in Wwox−/−, but not Wwox hep−/− littermates, also showed marked reductions in serum HDL-C concentrations, concordant with the low-HDL findings observed in families. We next obtained evidence of a gender-specific effect in female Wwoxhep−/− mice, where an increase in plasma triglycerides and altered lipid metabolic pathways by microarray analyses were observed. We further identified a significant reduction in ApoA-I and LPL, and upregulation in Fas, Angptl4 and Lipg, suggesting that the effects of Wwox involve multiple pathways, including cholesterol homeostasis, ApoA-I/ABCA1 pathway, and fatty acid biosynthesis/triglyceride metabolism. Conclusions Our data indicate that WWOX disruption alters HDL and lipoprotein metabolism through several mechanisms and may account for the low-HDL phenotype observed in families expressing the WWOX variants. These findings thus describe a novel gene involved in cellular lipid homeostasis, which effects may impact atherosclerotic disease development. PMID:24871327

  7. Protective Effects of HDL Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Calabresi, Laura; Franceschini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that, besides being a strong independent predictor of the occurrence of primary coronary events, a low plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is also associated with short- and long-term unfavorable prognosis in patients, who have recovered from a myocardial infarction, suggesting a direct detrimental effect of low HDL on post-ischemic myocardial function. Experiments performed in ex vivo and in vivo models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury have clearly shown that HDL are able to preserve cardiac function when given before ischemia or at reperfusion; the protective effects of HDL against I/R injury have been also confirmed in other tissues and organs, as brain and hind limb. HDL were shown to act on coronary endothelial cells, by limiting the increase of endothelium permeability and promoting vasodilation and neoangiogenesis, on white blood cells, by reducing their infiltration into the ischemic tissue and the release of pro-inflammatory and matrix-degrading molecules, and on cardiomyocytes, by preventing the activation of the apoptotic cascade. Synthetic HDL retains the cardioprotective activity of plasma-derived HDL and may become a useful adjunctive therapy to improve clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes or undergoing coronary procedures.

  8. Total and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Service NCHS Total and High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, ... 2012, 12.9% of adults had high total cholesterol, 17.4% had low HDL cholesterol, and 69. ...

  9. HDL as a target in the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Tall, Alan R

    2005-03-01

    Lipid abnormalities are among the key risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Indeed, lipid-modifying drugs - in particular, the statins, which primarily lower plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol - considerably reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, leading to their widespread use. Nevertheless, it seems that there might be limits to the degree of benefit that can be achieved by lowering LDL-cholesterol levels alone, which has led to increased interest in targeting other lipid-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. In this article, we first consider the mechanisms that underlie the protective effect of HDL cholesterol, and then discuss several strategies that have recently emerged to increase levels of HDL cholesterol to treat cardiovascular disease, including nuclear receptor modulation, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and infusion of apolipoprotein/phospholipid complexes.

  10. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What's Cholesterol? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cholesterol? Print A A ... thing for food to be low in it? Cholesterol and Your Body Cholesterol (say: kuh-LES-tuh- ...

  11. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Cholesterol? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cholesterol? A A A ... thing for food to be low in it? Cholesterol and Your Body Cholesterol (say: kuh-LES-tuh- ...

  12. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Millar, John S.; Vickers, Kasey C.; Rader, Daniel J.; Phillips, Michael C.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  13. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Andrea J; Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M; Millar, John S; Vickers, Kasey C; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Mirkin, Chad A; Thaxton, C Shad

    2015-05-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1.

  14. Improving Reconstituted HDL Composition for Efficient Post-Ischemic Reduction of Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brulhart-Meynet, Marie-Claude; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Brinck, Jonas; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Prost, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, Aurelien; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Pedretti, Sarah; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Mach, François; Lecour, Sandrine; James, Richard W.; Frias, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background New evidence shows that high density lipoproteins (HDL) have protective effects beyond their role in reverse cholesterol transport. Reconstituted HDL (rHDL) offer an attractive means of clinically exploiting these novel effects including cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). However, basic rHDL composition is limited to apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) and phospholipids; addition of bioactive compound may enhance its beneficial effects. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the role of rHDL in post-ischemic model, and to analyze the potential impact of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in rHDL formulations. Methods and Results The impact of HDL on IRI was investigated using complementary in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro IRI models. Acute post-ischemic treatment with native HDL significantly reduced infarct size and cell death in the ex vivo, isolated heart (Langendorff) model and the in vivo model (-48%, p<0.01). Treatment with rHDL of basic formulation (apoAI + phospholipids) had a non-significant impact on cell death in vitro and on the infarct size ex vivo and in vivo. In contrast, rHDL containing S1P had a highly significant, protective influence ex vivo, and in vivo (-50%, p<0.01). This impact was comparable with the effects observed with native HDL. Pro-survival signaling proteins, Akt, STAT3 and ERK1/2 were similarly activated by HDL and rHDL containing S1P both in vitro (isolated cardiomyocytes) and in vivo. Conclusion HDL afford protection against IRI in a clinically relevant model (post-ischemia). rHDL is significantly protective if supplemented with S1P. The protective impact of HDL appears to target directly the cardiomyocyte. PMID:25781943

  15. Implication of low HDL-c levels in patients with average LDL-c levels: a focus on oxidized LDL, large HDL subpopulation, and adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Marado, Daniela; Palavra, Filipe; Pinto, Rui; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) on patients with LDL-c average levels, focusing on oxidative, lipidic, and inflammatory profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) and control subjects (n = 73) were divided into 2 subgroups, one of normal HDL-c and the other of low HDL-c levels. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized LDL, total HDL-c and subpopulations (small, intermediate, and large), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF- α , adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. In the control subgroup with low HDL-c levels, significantly higher values of BP and TGs and lower values of PON1 activity and adiponectin were found, versus control normal HDL-c subgroup. However, differences in patients' subgroups were clearly more pronounced. Indeed, low HDL-c subgroup presented increased HbA1c, TGs, non-HDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, VEGF, and small HDL-c and reduced adiponectin and large HDL. In addition, Ox-LDL, large-HDL-c, and adiponectin presented interesting correlations with classical and nonclassical markers, mainly in the normal HDL-c patients' subgroup. In conclusion, despite LDL-c average levels, low HDL-c concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, which is better evidenced by traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including Ox-LDL, large HDL-c, and adiponectin.

  16. Sericin reduces serum cholesterol in rats and cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Limpeanchob, Nanteetip; Trisat, Kanittaporn; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Tiyaboonchai, Waree; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote

    2010-12-08

    A cholesterol lowering effect of sericin was investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Rats were dosed with cholesterol with and without sericin for 14 days. Non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total serum cholesterols were reduced in rats fed high-cholesterol diet with all three tested doses of sericin (10, 100, and 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). The potential mechanism of actions was determined by measuring the uptake of radiolabeled cholesterol into differentiated Caco-2 cells and cholesterol solubility in mixed lipid micelles. Concentration of sericin as low as 25 and 50 μg/mL inhibited 30% of cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells whereas no effect was found at higher concentration. Cholesterol micellar solubility was reduced in the presence of sericin. This study suggests the cholesterol lowering effect of sericin results from its inhibition of cholesterol absorption in intestinal cells and its reduction of cholesterol solubility in lipid micelles.

  17. Molecular mechanism of reverse cholesterol transport: reaction of pre-beta-migrating high-density lipoprotein with plasma lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Kotite, Leila; Gan, Yonghong; Spencer, Thomas A; Fielding, Christopher J; Fielding, Phoebe E

    2004-11-23

    A 70-75 kDa high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle with pre-beta-electrophoretic migration (pre-beta(1)-HDL) has been identified in several studies as an early acceptor of cell-derived cholesterol. However, the further metabolism of this complex has not been determined. Here we sought to identify the mechanism by which cell-derived cholesterol was esterified and converted to mature HDL as part of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Human plasma selectively immunodepleted of pre-beta(1)-HDL was used to study factors regulating pre-beta(1)-HDL production. A major role for phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in the recycling of pre-beta(1)-HDL was identified. Cholesterol binding, esterification by lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and transfer by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) were measured using (3)H-cholesterol-labeled cell monolayers. LCAT bound to (3)H-free cholesterol (FC)-labeled pre-beta(1)-HDL generated cholesteryl esters at a rate much greater than the rest of HDL. The cholesteryl ester produced in pre-beta(1)-HDL in turn became the preferred substrate of CETP. Selective LCAT-mediated reactivity with pre-beta(1)-HDL represents a novel mechanism increasing the efficiency of RCT.

  18. Beneficial Effect of Higher Dietary Fiber Intake on Plasma HDL-C and TC/HDL-C Ratio among Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Workers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Jie; Wang, Jia-Ji; Lu, Chu-Hong; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2015-04-29

    Research has shown that high-dose supplemental dietary fiber intake has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. To clarify such a relationship, we examined the association between daily dietary fiber intake and plasma lipids using a cross-sectional design including 1034 (M 502, F 532) rural-to-urban workers in China. We found a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intakes and increase of HDL cholesterol in male workers. There was also a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intake and decreased total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio in both male and female workers, after adjusting for potential confounders (p for trend, all p < 0.05). When the average dietary fiber intake increased from less than 18 g/day to over 30 g/day, the average HDL cholesterol level increased by 10.1%, and the TC/HDL-C ratio decreased by 14.4% for males (p = 0.020) and by 11.1% for females (p = 0.048). In conclusion, higher daily dietary fiber consumption is associated with beneficial effect on cholesterol for rural-to-urban workers in China, suggesting its potential beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Beneficial Effect of Higher Dietary Fiber Intake on Plasma HDL-C and TC/HDL-C Ratio among Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Jie; Wang, Jia-Ji; Lu, Chu-Hong; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that high-dose supplemental dietary fiber intake has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. To clarify such a relationship, we examined the association between daily dietary fiber intake and plasma lipids using a cross-sectional design including 1034 (M 502, F 532) rural-to-urban workers in China. We found a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intakes and increase of HDL cholesterol in male workers. There was also a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intake and decreased total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio in both male and female workers, after adjusting for potential confounders (p for trend, all p < 0.05). When the average dietary fiber intake increased from less than 18 g/day to over 30 g/day, the average HDL cholesterol level increased by 10.1%, and the TC/HDL-C ratio decreased by 14.4% for males (p = 0.020) and by 11.1% for females (p = 0.048). In conclusion, higher daily dietary fiber consumption is associated with beneficial effect on cholesterol for rural-to-urban workers in China, suggesting its potential beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25938914

  20. Effect of alcohol on hepatic receptor of high density lipoproteins (HDL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.C.; Miller, B.M. V.A. Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN )

    1991-03-11

    Moderate alcohol intake has been shown to increase HDL cholesterol and proteins. The seemingly protective effect' of moderate alcohol drinking against cardiovascular diseases has been attributed to an increase in serum HDL. In this study, the authors show that a receptor for HDL is present in rat liver. Rat liver membrane was prepared by stepwise ultracentrifugation. Apo Al was iodinated using {sup 125}I-NaI and IODO-beads. HDL was labeled by incubating with {sup 125}I-apo Al then refloated be centrifugation. Binding of {sup 125}I-HDL to rat liver membrane reached equilibrium by 2-3 h and was saturable at 37C. The binding was inhibited 80% by excess unlabeled HDL, but was inhibited only 25% by excess LDL. It could also be inhibited by preincubating HDL with anti-apo Al or anti-apo E antisera but not with anti-apo AIV or control sera. The binding affinity of HDL to the liver membrane of rats fed alcohol for 5 wk was 50% that of their pair-fed controls. Thus a decrease in the binding of HDL to liver membrane due to alcohol-drinking may result in a slower clearance of HDL by the liver and consequently a higher HDL concentration in the serum.

  1. Advances in the Study of the Antiatherogenic Function and Novel Therapies for HDL

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peiqiu; Pan, Haitao; Xiao, Tiancun; Zhou, Ting; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zhengquan

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels could improve the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is facing challenges. There is multitudinous clear clinical evidence that the latest failures of HDL-C-raising drugs show no clear association with risks for CVD. At the genetic level, recent research indicates that steady-state HDL-C concentrations may provide limited information regarding the potential antiatherogenic functions of HDL. It is evident that the newer strategies may replace therapeutic approaches to simply raise plasma HDL-C levels. There is an urgent need to identify an efficient biomarker that accurately predicts the increased risk of atherosclerosis (AS) in patients and that may be used for exploring newer therapeutic targets. Studies from recent decades show that the composition, structure and function of circulating HDL are closely associated with high cardiovascular risk. A vast amount of data demonstrates that the most important mechanism through which HDL antagonizes AS involves the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process. Clinical trials of drugs that specifically target HDL have so far proven disappointing, so it is necessary to carry out review on the HDL therapeutics. PMID:26225968

  2. Cellular cholesterol efflux and cholesterol loading capacity of serum: effects of LDL-apheresis[S

    PubMed Central

    Adorni, M. P.; Zimetti, F.; Puntoni, M.; Bigazzi, F.; Sbrana, F.; Minichilli, F.; Bernini, F.; Ronda, N.; Favari, E.; Sampietro, T.

    2012-01-01

    High LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) characterizes familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). LDL-apheresis, used in these patients to reduce LDL-C levels, has been shown to also affect HDL levels and composition. We studied LDL-apheresis effects on six FH and nine FCH subjects’ serum capacity to modulate cellular cholesterol efflux, an index of HDL functionality, and to load macrophages with cholesterol. Serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) and macrophage cholesterol loading capacity (CLC) were measured before, immediately after, and two days after LDL-apheresis. The procedure reduced total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, and apoB plasma levels (−69%, −80% and −74%, respectively), parameters only partially restored two days later. HDL-C and apoA-I plasma levels, reduced after LDL-apheresis (−27% and −16%, respectively), were restored to almost normal levels two days later. LDL-apheresis reduced serum aqueous diffusion (AD) CEC, SR-BI-CEC, and ABCA1-CEC. AD and SR-BI were fully restored whereas ABCA1-CEC remained low two days later. Sera immediately and two days after LDL-apheresis had a lower CLC than pre-LDL-apheresis sera. In conclusion, LDL-apheresis transiently reduces HDL-C levels and serum CEC, but it also reduces also serum capacity to deliver cholesterol to macrophages. Despite a potentially negative effect on HDL levels and composition, LDL-apheresis may counteract foam cells formation. PMID:22414482

  3. The Predictive Role of Serum Triglyceride to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio According to Renal Function in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong Shin; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun Gyoo; Kim, Yang Gyoon; Moon, Joo Young; Lee, Sang Ho; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Kyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective A high serum triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio has been reported as an independent predictor for cardiovascular events in the general population. However, the prognostic value of this ratio in patients with renal dysfunction is unclear. We examined the association of the TG/HDL-C ratio with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) according to renal function in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Method This study was based on the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry database. Of 13,897 patients who were diagnosed with AMI, the study population included the 7,016 patients with available TG/HDL-C ratio data. Patients were stratified into three groups according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and the TG/HDL-C ratio was categorized into tertiles. We investigated 12-month MACEs, which included cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and repeated percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results During the 12-month follow up period, 593 patients experienced MACEs. There was a significant association between the TG/HDL-C ratio and MACEs (p<0.001) in the entire study cohort. Having a TG/HDL-C ratio value in the highest tertile of TG/HDL-C ratio was an independent factor associated with increased risk of MACEs (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26–1.93; p<0.001). Then we performed subgroup analyses according to renal function. In patients with normal renal function (eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73m2) and mild renal dysfunction (eGFR ≥ 60 to < 90ml/min/1.73m2), a higher TG/HDL-C ratio was significantly associated with increased risk of MACEs (HR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.04–2.60; p = 0.035; and HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.14–2.12; p = 0.005, respectively). However, in patients with moderate renal dysfunction (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2), TG/HDL-C ratio lost its predictive value on the risk of MACEs (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.82–1.83; p = 0.317). Conclusions In

  4. Food combinations for cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Harland, Janice I

    2012-12-01

    Reducing elevated LDL-cholesterol is a key public health challenge. There is substantial evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) that a number of foods and food components can significantly reduce LDL-cholesterol. Data from RCT have been reviewed to determine whether effects are additive when two or more of these components are consumed together. Typically components, such as plant stanols and sterols, soya protein, β-glucans and tree nuts, when consumed individually at their target rate, reduce LDL-cholesterol by 3-9 %. Improved dietary fat quality, achieved by replacing SFA with unsaturated fat, reduces LDL-cholesterol and can increase HDL-cholesterol, further improving blood lipid profile. It appears that the effect of combining these interventions is largely additive; however, compliance with multiple changes may reduce over time. Food combinations used in ten 'portfolio diet' studies have been reviewed. In clinical efficacy studies of about 1 month where all foods were provided, LDL-cholesterol is reduced by 22-30 %, whereas in community-based studies of >6 months' duration, where dietary advice is the basis of the intervention, reduction in LDL-cholesterol is about 15 %. Inclusion of MUFA into 'portfolio diets' increases HDL-cholesterol, in addition to LDL-cholesterol effects. Compliance with some of these dietary changes can be achieved more easily compared with others. By careful food component selection, appropriate to the individual, the effect of including only two components in the diet with good compliance could be a sustainable 10 % reduction in LDL-cholesterol; this is sufficient to make a substantial impact on cholesterol management and reduce the need for pharmaceutical intervention.

  5. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  6. Evaluation of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol protective effect against atherogenesis in rabbits fed cholesterol supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Neuman, M P; Neuman, J; Mosso, H E; Ibarra, R; Rodríguez, S; Scavini, L M; Achille, A; Pecorini, V

    1990-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was evaluated in 15 rabbits fed cholesterol supplemented diets to assess its protective effect on the atherogenic process. From a baseline level of 29 +/- 11 mg/dl (mean +/- SD) the maximum attained for HDL-C was twofold in only three rabbits, whereas total cholesterol (TC) increased 20 fold. Plasma TC/HDL-C ratio rose 80 fold from the baseline (2.4 +/- 0.9) and it was the best parameter that correlated with aortic cholesterol accumulation and pathological scores. Aortic TC content increased 10 fold and free cholesterol/cholesterol esters ratio decreased 20 fold. Pathological studies showed that aortic lesion scores rose from 0 to 4. It can be concluded that the high correlations obtained when TC/HDL-C ratio was plotted against both aortic cholesterol deposition and lesion scores, support the theory of the reverse cholesterol transport and the effectiveness of this index to predict the degree of the atherogenic process. On the other hand, the poor response of HDL-C in this model encourages future research using drugs to increase this parameter in order to normalize TC/HDL-C ratio and avoid lesions.

  7. The mouse plasma PAF acetylhydrolase: II. It consists of two enzymes both associated with the HDL.

    PubMed

    Tsaoussis, V; Vakirtzi-Lemonias, C

    1994-05-01

    The PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) of mouse plasma was characterised as to its lipoprotein subclass and apolipoprotein association. Association with plasma lipoproteins was established by cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose affinity chromatography while electrophoretic and electrofocusing studies demonstrated almost exclusive association with the HDL-VHDL. Fractionation of [4-14C]cholesterol-labelled plasma on a Bio-Gel A-5m column established that 1% of the enzymic activity was associated with the VLDL-LDL, 4.5% with the HDL1, 80% with the HDL2-HDL3 and 15% with the VHDL. Electrophoresis of the solubilised, HDL2-HDL3 bound enzyme gave two peaks of activity with mobilities of 0.29 and 0.49 and a distribution of the recovered activity of 78 and 22%, respectively. The VHDL associated activity on similar analysis gave a 25 and 75% distribution. These findings showed that two enzymes, both associated with the HDL and VHDL fractions, constitute the PAF-AH activity of mouse plasma. Further fractionation of the HDL2-HDL3 bound activity on heparin-agarose established that 70% of the recovered activity was bound to the apo-E containing HDL.

  8. Therapeutic approaches to the regulation of metabolism of high-density lipoprotein. Novel HDL-directed pharmacological intervention and exercise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Kawachi, Emi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Uehara, Yoshinari; Matsunaga, Akira; Kuroki, Masahide; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles transport cholesterol in plasma and play an important role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, which influences cell function. The risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) associated with high levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) can be reduced by treatment with statins, which reduce LDL-C levels by inhibiting cellular cholesterol synthesis. However, patients who are treated with high doses of statins, especially secondary CAD prevention, regardless of their resulting LDL-C levels, are still at high risk of CAD. Therefore, there has been growing interest in HDL-directed therapies. Inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) substantially increase HDL-C levels (by 31-138%). However, it is still unclear whether or not CETP inhibitors can reduce the risk of CAD associated with low HDL-C levels, while reconstituted HDL or apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides increase the functionality of HDL. Low levels of HDL-C are often complicated with metabolic disorders, including hypertriglyceridemia, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and lifestyle changes are effective for correcting these conditions. Physical activity and exercise training increase HDL-C levels, especially HDL2-C levels, by multiple mechanisms. Therefore, although using HDL-directed therapies that increase HDL-C levels and/or improve the function of HDL is a reasonable approach for reducing the residual risk of CAD as a complement to LDL-C-lowering therapy, lifestyle modifications including exercise to improve metabolic disorders should be considered as the first option.

  9. Large HDL Subfraction But Not HDL-C Is Closely Linked With Risk Factors, Coronary Severity and Outcomes in a Cohort of Nontreated Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Cui, Chuan-Jue; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Xu, Rui-Xia; Liu, Geng; Dong, Qian; Sun, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is highly heterogeneous in its size and composition. Till now, the link of HDL subfractions to coronary risk is less clear. We aimed to investigate the associations of HDL subfractions with traditional risk factors (RFs), coronary severity, and outcomes in a cohort of nontreated patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We prospectively enrolled 591 eligible patients. Baseline HDL subfractions were separated by Lipoprint system. HDL subfractions (large, medium, and small) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were dichotomized into low and high group according to the 50 percentile. Coronary severity was evaluated by SYNTAX, Gensini, and Jeopardy scoring systems. Patients were followed up annually for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Cox proportional hazards’ models were used to evaluate the risk of HDL subfractions on MACEs. Patients with high large HDL-C levels had a decreased number of RFs. Significantly, large HDL-C levels were negatively associated with coronary severity assessed by SYNTAX and Gensini score (both P < 0.05). New MACEs occurred in 67 (11.6%) patients during a median 17.0 months follow-up. Moreover, the log-rank test revealed that there was a significant difference between high and low large HDL-C groups in event-free survival analysis (P = 0.013), but no differences were observed in total HDL-C groups and medium or small HDL-C groups (both P > 0.05). In particular, the multivariate Cox-proportional hazards model revealed that high large HDL-C was associated with lower MACEs risk (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.531 [0.295–0.959]) independent of potential confounders. Higher large HDL-C but not medium, small, or total HDL-C is associated with lower cardiovascular risk, highlighting the potential beneficial of HDL subfractionation. PMID:26825910

  10. Cholesterol Metabolism in CKD.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna; De Leon, Joshua; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mattana, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a substantial risk of developing coronary artery disease. Traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia do not adequately explain the high prevalence of CVD in CKD. Both CVD and CKD are inflammatory states and inflammation adversely affects lipid balance. Dyslipidemia in CKD is characterized by elevated triglyceride levels and high-density lipoprotein levels that are both decreased and dysfunctional. This dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein becomes proinflammatory and loses its atheroprotective ability to promote cholesterol efflux from cells, including lipid-overloaded macrophages in the arterial wall. Elevated triglyceride levels result primarily from defective clearance. The weak association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and coronary risk in CKD has led to controversy over the usefulness of statin therapy. This review examines disrupted cholesterol transport in CKD, presenting both clinical and preclinical evidence of the effect of the uremic environment on vascular lipid accumulation. Preventative and treatment strategies are explored.

  11. Longitudinal study of alcohol consumption and HDL concentrations: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shue; Li, Junjuan; Shearer, Gregory C; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Zheng, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuntao; Jin, Cheng; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Background: In cross-sectional studies and short-term clinical trials, it has been suggested that there is a positive dose-response relation between alcohol consumption and HDL concentrations. However, prospective data have been limited.Objective: We sought to determine the association between total alcohol intake, the type of alcohol-containing beverage, and the 6-y (2006-2012) longitudinal change in HDL-cholesterol concentrations in a community-based cohort.Design: A total of 71,379 Chinese adults (mean age: 50 y) who were free of cardiovascular diseases and cancer and did not use cholesterol-lowering agents during follow-up were included in the study. Alcohol intake was assessed via a questionnaire in 2006 (baseline), and participants were classified into the following categories of alcohol consumption: never, past, light (women: 0-0.4 servings/d; men: 0-0.9 servings/d), moderate (women: 0.5-1.0 servings/d; men: 1-2 servings/d), and heavy (women: >1.0 servings/d; men: >2 servings/d). HDL-cholesterol concentrations were measured in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. We used generalized estimating equation models to examine the associations between baseline alcohol intake and the change in HDL-cholesterol concentrations with adjustment for age, sex, smoking, physical activity, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, liver function, and C-reactive protein concentrations.Results: An umbrella-shaped association was observed between total alcohol consumption and changes in HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Compared with never drinkers, past, light, moderate, and heavy drinkers experienced slower decreases in HDL cholesterol of 0.012 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1) (95% CI: 0.008, 0.016 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1)), 0.013 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1) (95% CI: 0.010, 0.016 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1)), 0.017 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1) (95% CI: 0.009, 0.025 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1)), and 0.008 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1) (95% CI: 0.005, 0.011 mmol · L(-1) · y(-1)), respectively (P < 0.0001 for all), after adjustment for

  12. F2-Isoprostanes in HDL are bound to neutral lipids and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Barden, Anne E; Croft, Kevin D; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Bultel-Poncé, Valérie; Giera, Martin; Mori, Trevor A

    2016-12-01

    Low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, interventions that raise HDL-C have failed to reduce cardiovascular events. We previously reported that HDL is the main carrier of plasma F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) that are markers of oxidative stress formed upon oxidation of arachidonic acid. F2-IsoPs are predominantly associated with phospholipids. However, there is evidence that F2-IsoPs in the liver of rats treated with carbon tetrachloride associate with the neutral lipids. To date it is not known whether F2-IsoPs are found in the neutral lipids in HDL in humans. Possible candidate neutral lipids include cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, and monoglycerides. This study aimed to identify the lipid classes within native and oxidized HDL that contain F2-IsoPs. We showed that F2-IsoPs in HDL are bound to neutral lipids as well as phospholipids. HDL-3 contained the highest concentration of F2-IsoPs in all lipid classes before and after in vitro oxidation. Using targeted LC/MS and high resolution MS, we were unable to provide conclusive evidence for the presence of the synthesized standards 15(R)-15-F2t-isoP cholesterol and 1-ent-15(RS)-15-F2t-isoprostanoyl-sn-glycerol in the neutral lipids of HDL. Our findings show that oxidized lipids such as F2-IsoPs are found in the core and surface of HDL. However, the exact molecular species remain to be definitively characterized. Future studies are required to determine whether the presence of F2-IsoPs in neutral lipids alters HDL function.

  13. Xanthophylls, phytosterols and pre-β1-HDL are differentially affected by fenofibrate and niacin HDL-raising in a cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Niesor, Eric J; Gauthamadasa, Kekulawalage; Silva, R A Gangani D; Suchankova, Gabriela; Kallend, David; Gylling, Helena; Asztalos, Bela; Damonte, Elisabetta; Rossomanno, Simona; Abt, Markus; Davidson, W Sean; Benghozi, Renee

    2013-12-01

    Fenofibrate and extended-release (ER) niacin similarly raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration but their effects on levels of potent plasma antioxidant xanthophylls (lutein and zeaxanthin) and phytosterols obtained from dietary sources, and any relationship with plasma lipoproteins and pre-β1-HDL levels, have not been investigated. We studied these parameters in 66 dyslipidemic patients treated for 6 week with fenofibrate (160 mg/day) or ER-niacin (0.5 g/day for 3 week, then 1 g/day) in a cross-over study. Both treatments increased HDL-C (16 %) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (7 %) but only fenofibrate increased apoA-II (28 %). Lutein and zeaxanthin levels were unaffected by fenofibrate but inversely correlated with percentage change in apoB and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and positively correlated with end of treatment apoA-II. ApoA-II in isolated HDL in vitro bound more lutein than apoA-I. Xanthophylls were increased by ER-niacin (each ~30 %) without any correlation to lipoprotein or apo levels. Only fenofibrate markedly decreased plasma markers of cholesterol absorption; pre-β1-HDL was significantly decreased by fenofibrate (-19 %, p < 0.0001), with little change (3.4 %) for ER-niacin. Although fenofibrate and ER-niacin similarly increased plasma HDL-C and apoA-I, effects on plasma xanthophylls, phytosterols and pre-β1-HDL differed markedly, suggesting differences in intestinal lipidation of HDL. In addition, the in vitro investigations suggest an important role of plasma apoA-II in xanthophyll metabolism.

  14. Relation between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease in asymptomatic men

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.S.; Troxler, R.G.; Hickman, J.R. Jr.; Clark, D.

    1981-11-01

    The well established inverse relation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and the risk of coronary artery disease was tested in a cross-sectional group of 572 asymptomatic aircrew members who were being screened for risk of coronary artery disease. A battery of tests was performed, including determinations of fasting serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides and performance of a maximal symptom-limited exercise tolerance test. Of the 572 patients, 132 also had an abnormal S-T segment response to exercise testing or were otherwise believed to have an increased risk of organic heart disease and subsequently underwent coronary angiography. Significant coronary artery disease was found in 16 men and minimal or subcritical coronary disease in 14; coronary angiograms were normal in the remaining 102 men. The remaining 440 men, who were believed to have a 1 percent chance of having coronary artery disease by sequential testing of risk factors and treadmill testing, had a mean cholesterol level of 213 mg/100 ml, a mean HDL cholesterol of 51 mg/100 ml and a mean cholesterol/HDL ratio of 4.4. The mean values of cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and cholesterol/HDL cholesterol did not differ significantly in men with normal angiographic finding and those with subcritical coronary disease. However, 14 of 16 men with coronary artery disease had a cholesterol/HDL ratio of 6.0 or more whereas only 4 men with normal coronary arteries had a ratio of 6.0 or more. Of the classical coronary risk factors evaluated, the cholesterol/HDL ratio of 6.0 or more had the highest odds ratio (172:1). It appears that determination of HDL cholesterol level helps to identify asymptomatic persons with a greater risk of having coronary artery disease.

  15. From evolution to revolution: miRNAs as pharmacological targets for modulating cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    There has been strong evolutionary pressure to ensure that an animal cell maintains levels of cholesterol within tight limits for normal function. Imbalances in cellular cholesterol levels are a major player in the development of different pathologies associated to dietary excess. Although epidemiological studies indicate that elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, recent genetic evidence and pharmacological therapies to raise HDL levels do not support their beneficial effects. Cholesterol efflux as the first and probably the most important step in reverse cholesterol transport is an important biological process relevant to HDL function. Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), post-transcriptional control different aspects of cellular cholesterol homeostasis including cholesterol efflux. miRNA families miR-33, miR-758, miR-10b, miR-26 and miR-106b directly modulates cholesterol efflux by targeting the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Pre-clinical studies with anti-miR therapies to inhibit some of these miRNAs have increased cellular cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport and reduce pathologies associated to dyslipidemia. Although miRNAs as therapy have benefits from existing antisense technology, different obstacles need to be solved before we incorporate such research into clinical care. Here we focus on the clinical potential of miRNAs as therapeutic target to increase cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport as a new alternative to ameliorate cholesterol-related pathologies.

  16. Cholesterol loading re-programs the miR-143/145-myocardin axis to convert aortic smooth muscle cells to a dysfunctional macrophage-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Nishi, Hitoo; Long, Xiaochun; Ouimet, Mireille; Savji, Nazir; Martinez, Fernando O.; Cassella, Courtney P.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Ramsey, Stephen A.; Miano, Joseph M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously showed that cholesterol loading in vitro converts mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from a contractile state to one resembling macrophages. In human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques it has become appreciated that ~40% of cells classified as macrophages by histological markers may be of VSMC origin. We therefore sought to gain insight into the molecular regulation of this clinically relevant process. Approach and Results VSMC of mouse (or human) origin were incubated with cyclodextrin-cholesterol complexes for 72 hours, at which time the expression at the protein and mRNA levels of contractile-related proteins were reduced and of macrophage markers increased. Concurrent was down regulation of miR-143/145, which positively regulate the master VSMC-differentiation transcription factor myocardin (MYOCD). Mechanisms were further probed in mouse VSMC. Maintaining the expression of MYOCD or miR-143/145 prevented and reversed phenotypic changes caused by cholesterol loading. Reversal was also seen when cholesterol efflux was stimulated after loading. Notably, despite expression of macrophage markers, bioinformatic analyses showed that cholesterol-loaded cells remained closer to the VSMC state, consistent with impairment in classical macrophage functions of phagocytosis and efferocytosis. In apoE-deficient atherosclerotic plaques, cells positive for VSMC and macrophage markers were found lining the cholesterol-rich necrotic core. Conclusions Cholesterol loading of VSMC converts them to a macrophage–appearing state by downregulating the miR-143/145-myocardin axis. Though these cells would be classified by immunohistochemistry as macrophages in human and mouse plaques, their transcriptome and functional properties imply that their contributions to atherogenesis would not be those of classical macrophages. PMID:25573853

  17. Pleiotropy and genotype by diet interaction: A multivariate genetic analysis of HDL-C subfractions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, M.C.; Blangero, J.; Comuzzie, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in humans. Both major genes and major genotype by diet interaction have been reported for HDL-C, but the genetics of the HDL-C subfractions are less well known. In a baboon model for human atherosclerosis, we investigated the pleiotropic effects of genes on normal quantitative variation in three HDL-C subfractions (HDL{sub 1}-C, HDL{sub 2}-C, and HDL{sub 3}-C) in two dietary environments -- a basal diet and a 7 week high cholesterol, saturated fat (HCSF) diet. We analyzed data on serum HDL-C subfraction levels, quantified by gradient gel eletrophoresis, for 942 baboons (Papo hamadryas, sensu lato) from 17 pedigrees. We used multivariate maximum likelihood methods to simultaneously estimate phenotypic means, standard deviations, and heritabilities (h{sup 2}); effects of sex, age-by-sex, age{sup 2}-by-sex, percent subspecies admixture, and infant feeding modality; plus estimated significant h{sup 2} values for all three subfractions on both diets. When tested within dietary environments, we obtained significant genetic correlations between all three subfractions [i.e., P({rho}{sub G} = 0) < 0.001] and evidence of complete pleiotropy [i.e., P({vert_bar}{rho}{sub G}{vert_bar} = 1.0) > 0.1] between HDL{sub 1}-C and HDL{sub 3}-C ({rho}{sub G} = 0.81) on the basal diet. On the HCSF diet, only the genetic correlation between HDL{sub 1}-C and HDL{sub 3}-C ({rho}{sub g} = 0.61) was significant (p > 0.1). Complete pleiotropy was observed for each of the three subfractions between both diets. Given these results, we reject genotype by diet interaction for HDL{sub 1}-C, HDL{sub 2}-C or HDL{sub 3}-C; i.e., the same genes influence variation in each subfraction to the same degree on either diet. However, the apparent disruption of pleiotropy between HDL{sub 2}-C and the other two subfractions needs to be investigated further.

  18. The Role of Dietary Cholesterol in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Related Metabolic Abnormalities: A Mini-review.

    PubMed

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Goulet, Amy; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2016-10-25

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in cell biology. Dietary cholesterol or "exogenous" cholesterol accounts for approximately one-third of the pooled body cholesterol, and the remaining 70% is synthesized in the body (endogenous cholesterol). Increased dietary cholesterol intake may result in increased serum cholesterol in some individuals, while other subjects may not respond to dietary cholesterol. However, diet-increased serum cholesterol levels do not increase the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL) cholesterol ratio, nor do they decrease the size of LDL particles or HDL cholesterol levels. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and small, dense LDL particles are independent risk factors for coronary artery disease. Dietary cholesterol is the primary approach for treatment of conditions such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Recent studies have highlighted mechanisms for absorption of dietary cholesterol. These studies have help understand how dietary and/or pharmaceutical agents inhibit cholesterol absorption and thereby reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations. In this article, various aspects of cholesterol metabolism, including dietary sources, absorption, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism, have been summarized and discussed.

  19. Effects of Carbohydrate and Dietary Fiber Intake, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on HDL Metabolism in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

    2014-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with the development of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CAD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences which suggest a significant association between low HDL-C and cardiovascular diseases, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. There may be interracial differences in effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism. Here we reviewed published articles about effects of carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), on HDL-C metabolism, regarding meta-analyses and clinical studies performed in Asian population as important articles. Low carbohydrate intake, GI and GL may be beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Dietary fiber intake may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism in Asian populations.

  20. Hepatic aberrant glycosylation by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V accelerates HDL assembly.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yoshihiro; Kida, Sachiho; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Akira; Hashimoto, Chikako; Kimura, Akihiro; Sato, Motoya; Fujii, Hironobu; Sobajima, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ebisutani, Yusuke; Takamatsu, Shinji; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamada, Makoto; Nagasaka, Hironori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2016-11-01

    Glycosylation is involved in various pathophysiological conditions. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), catalyzing β1-6 branching in asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, is one of the most important glycosyltransferases involved in cancer and the immune system. Recent findings indicate that aberrant N-glycan structure can modify lipid metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of aberrant glycosylation by GnT-V on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) assembly. We used GnT-V transgenic (Tg) mice and GnT-V Hep3B cell (human hepatoma cell line) transfectants. The study also included 96 patients who underwent medical health check-ups. Total serum cholesterol levels, particularly HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, were significantly increased in Tg vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Hepatic expression of apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI) and ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), two important factors in HDL assembly, were higher in Tg mice compared with WT mice. ApoAI and ABCA1 were also significantly elevated in GnT-V transfectants compared with mock-transfected cells. Moreover, ApoAI protein in the cultured media of GnT-V transfectants was significantly increased. Finally, we found a strong correlation between serum GnT-V activity and HDL-C concentration in human subjects. Multivariate logistic analyses demonstrated that GnT-V activity was an independent and significant determinant for serum HDL-C levels even adjusted with age and gender differences. Further analyses represented that serum GnT-V activity had strong correlation especially with the large-size HDL particle concentration. These findings indicate that enhanced hepatic GnT-V activity accelerated HDL assembly and could be a novel mechanism for HDL synthesis.

  1. Outdoor temperature is associated with serum HDL and LDL

    PubMed Central

    Halonen, Jaana I.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background While exposures to high and low air temperatures are associated with cardiovascular mortality, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). We investigated whether temperature was associated with changes in circulating lipid levels, and whether this might explain part of the association with increased cardiovascular events. Methods The study cohort consisted of 478 men in the greater Boston area with a mean age of 74.2 years. They visited the clinic every 3–5 years between 1995–2008 for physical examination and to complete questionnaires. We excluded from analyses all men taking statin medication and all days with missing data, resulting in a total of 862 visits. Associations between three temperature variables (ambient, apparent, and dew point temperature) and serum lipid levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides) were studied with linear mixed models that included possible confounders such as air pollution and a random intercept for each subject. Results We found that HDL decreased −1.76% (95% CI: −3.17 – −0.32, lag 2 days), and −5.58% (95% CI: −8.87 – −2.16, moving average of 4 weeks) for each 5°C increase in mean ambient temperature. For the same increase in mean ambient temperature, LDL increased by 1.74% (95% CI: 0.07 – 3.44, lag 1 day) and 1.87% (95% CI: 0.14 – 3.63, lag 2 days). These results were also similar for apparent and dew point temperatures. No changes were found in total cholesterol or triglycerides in relation to temperature increase. Conclusions Changes in HDL and LDL levels associated with an increase in ambient temperature may be among the underlying mechanisms of temperature-related cardiovascular mortality. PMID:21172696

  2. 6-mo aerobic exercise intervention enhances the lipid peroxide transport function of HDL.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Sanna; Luoto, Riitta; Ahotupa, Markku; Raitanen, Jani; Vasankari, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    During acute exercise, the concentration of oxidized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) lipids (ox-HDL) is reported to increase suggesting that HDL may function in decreasing the concentration of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lipids. However, the effect of exercise intervention on the lipid peroxide transport function of HDL is unknown. A randomized controlled trial with sedentary women (N = 161), aged 43-63, with no current use of hormone therapy, were randomized into a 6-month (mo) exercise group and a control group. During the 6-mo intervention, the concentration of ox-HDL increased in the exercise group by 5% and decreased in the control group by 2% (p = .003). Also, the ratio of ox-HDL to HDL-cholesterol increased by 5% in the exercise group and decreased by 1.5% in the control group (p = .036). The concentrations of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and adiponectin did not change during the intervention. The concentration of serum triglycerides trended to decrease by 6% in the intervention group (p = .051). We found that the concentration of ox-HDL increased during the 6-mo aerobic exercise intervention, but the increase was not related to changes in the levels of CETP or adiponectin. These results, together with earlier studies, suggest that HDL has an active role in the reverse transport of lipid peroxides.

  3. Effect of extended-release niacin on serum lipids and on endothelial function in adults with sickle cell anemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Scoffone, Heather M; Krajewski, Megan; Zorca, Suzana; Bereal-Williams, Candice; Littel, Patricia; Seamon, Catherine; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Footman, Eleni; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Sachdev, Vandana; Machado, Roberto F; Cuttica, Michael; Shamburek, Robert; Cannon, Richard O; Remaley, Alan; Minniti, Caterina P; Kato, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Through bound apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase, inducing vasodilation. Because patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have low apoA-I and endothelial dysfunction, we conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to test whether extended-release niacin (niacin-ER) increases apoA-I-containing HDL-C and improves vascular function in SCD. Twenty-seven patients with SCD with levels of HDL-C <39 mg/dl or apoA-I <99 mg/dl were randomized to 12 weeks of niacin-ER, increased in 500-mg increments to a maximum of 1,500 mg/day, or placebo. The primary outcome was the absolute change in HDL-C level after 12 weeks, with endothelial function assessed before and at the end of treatment. Niacin-ER-treated patients trended to greater increase in HDL-C level compared with placebo treatment at 12 weeks (5.1 ± 7.7 vs 0.9 ± 3.8 mg/dl, 1-tailed p = 0.07), associated with significantly greater improvements in the ratios of low-density lipoprotein to HDL-C levels (1.24 vs 1.95, p = 0.003) and apolipoprotein B to apoA-I levels (0.46 vs 0.58, p = 0.03) compared with placebo-treated patients. No improvements were detected in 3 independent vascular physiology assays of endothelial function. Thus, the relatively small changes in HDL-C levels achieved by the dose of niacin-ER used in our study are not associated with improved vascular function in patients with SCD with initially low levels of apoA-I or HDL-C.

  4. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  5. Macrophage apoAI protects against dyslipidemia-induced dermatitis and atherosclerosis without affecting HDL.

    PubMed

    Tavori, Hagai; Su, Yan Ru; Yancey, Patricia G; Giunzioni, Ilaria; Wilhelm, Ashley J; Blakemore, John L; Zabalawi, Manal; Linton, MacRae F; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Fazio, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Tissue cholesterol accumulation, macrophage infiltration, and inflammation are features of atherosclerosis and some forms of dermatitis. HDL and its main protein, apoAI, are acceptors of excess cholesterol from macrophages; this process inhibits tissue inflammation. Recent epidemiologic and clinical trial evidence questions the role of HDL and its manipulation in cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of ectopic macrophage apoAI expression on atherosclerosis and dermatitis induced by the combination of hypercholesterolemia and absence of HDL in mice. Hematopoietic progenitor cells were transduced to express human apoAI and transplanted into lethally irradiated LDL receptor(-/-)/apoAI(-/-) mice, which were then placed on a high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Macrophage apoAI expression reduced aortic CD4(+) T-cell levels (-39.8%), lesion size (-25%), and necrotic core area (-31.6%), without affecting serum HDL or aortic macrophage levels. Macrophage apoAI reduced skin cholesterol by 39.8%, restored skin morphology, and reduced skin CD4(+) T-cell levels. Macrophage apoAI also reduced CD4(+) T-cell levels (-32.9%) in skin-draining lymph nodes but had no effect on other T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages compared with control transplanted mice. Thus, macrophage apoAI expression protects against atherosclerosis and dermatitis by reducing cholesterol accumulation and regulating CD4(+) T-cell levels, without affecting serum HDL or tissue macrophage levels.

  6. Complex genetic control of HDL levels in mice in response to an atherogenic diet. Coordinate regulation of HDL levels and bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Machleder, D; Ivandic, B; Welch, C; Castellani, L; Reue, K; Lusis, A J

    1997-01-01

    Inbred strains of mice differ in susceptibility to atherogenesis when challenged with a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholic acid. Studies of recombinant inbred (RI) strains derived from the susceptible strain C57BL/6J (B6) and the resistant strains C3H/HeJ (C3H) and BALB/cJ have revealed an association between fatty streak lesion size and a decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels on the diet. To better understand the genetic factors contributing to HDL metabolism and atherogenesis in response to the diet, we studied mice derived from an intercross between B6 and C3H using a complete linkage map approach. A total of 185 female progeny were typed for 134 genetic markers spanning the mouse genome, resulting in an average interval of about 10 cM between markers. A locus on distal chromosome 1 containing the apolipoprotein AII gene was linked to HDL-cholesterol levels on both the chow and the atherogenic diets, but this locus did not contribute to the decrease in HDL-cholesterol in response to the diet. At least three distinct genetic loci, on chromosomes 3, 5, and 11, exhibited evidence of linkage to a decrease in HDL-cholesterol after a dietary challenge. Since a bile acid (cholic acid) is required for the diet induced changes in HDL levels and for atherogenesis in these strains, we examined cholesterol-7-alpha hydroxylase (C7AH) expression. Whereas B6 mice exhibited a large decrease in C7AH mRNA levels in response to the diet, C3H showed an increase. Among the intercross mice, multiple loci contributed to the regulation of C7AH mRNA levels in response to the diet, the most notable of which coincided with the loci on chromosomes 3, 5, and 11 controlling HDL levels in response to the diet. None of these loci were linked to the C7AH structural gene which we mapped to proximal chromosome 4. These studies reveal coordinate regulation of C7AH expression and HDL levels, and they indicate that the genetic factors controlling HDL levels are more

  7. Lipid transfer to HDL is higher in marathon runners than in sedentary subjects, but is acutely inhibited during the run.

    PubMed

    Vaisberg, Mauro; Bachi, André L L; Latrilha, Conceição; Dioguardi, Giuseppe S; Bydlowski, Sergio P; Maranhão, Raul C

    2012-07-01

    Although exercise increases HDL-cholesterol, exercise-induced changes in HDL metabolism have been little explored. Lipid transfer to HDL is essential for HDL's role in reverse cholesterol transport. We investigated the effects of acute exhaustive exercise on lipid transfer to HDL. We compared plasma lipid, apolipoprotein and cytokine levels and in vitro transfer of four lipids from a radioactively labeled lipid donor nanoemulsion to HDL in sedentary individuals (n = 28) and in marathon runners (n = 14) at baseline, immediately after and 72 h after a marathon. While HDL-cholesterol concentrations and apo A1 levels were higher in marathon runners, LDL-cholesterol, apo B and triacylglycerol levels were similar in both groups. Transfers of non-esterified cholesterol [6.8 (5.7-7.2) vs. 5.2 (4.5-6), p = 0.001], phospholipids [21.7 (20.4-22.2) vs. 8.2 (7.7-8.9), p = 0.0001] and triacylglycerol [3.7 (3.1-4) vs. 1.3 (0.8-1.7), p = 0.0001] were higher in marathon runners, but esterified-cholesterol transfer was similar. Immediately after the marathon, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol concentrations and apo A1 levels were unchanged, but apo B and triacylglycerol levels increased. Lipid transfer of non-esterified cholesterol [6.8 (5.7-7.2) vs. 5.8 (4.9-6.6), p = 0.0001], phospholipids [21.7 (20.4-22.2) vs. 19.1 (18.6-19.3), p = 0.0001], esterified-cholesterol [3.2 (2.2-3.8) vs. 2.3 (2-2.9), p = 0.02] and triacylglycerol [3.7 (3.1-4) vs. 2.6 (2.1-2.8), p = 0.0001] to HDL were all reduced immediately after the marathon but returned to baseline 72 h later. Running a marathon increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels, but after 72 h these values returned to baseline. Lipid transfer, except esterified-cholesterol transfer, was higher in marathon runners than in sedentary individuals, but the marathon itself acutely inhibited lipid transfer. In light of these novel observations, further study is required to clarify how these metabolic changes can influence HDL composition and

  8. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  9. Effect of HDL composition and particle size on the resistance of HDL to the oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To study the resistance of HDL particles to direct oxidation in respect to the distribution of HDL particles. Design and Methods We studied HDL composition, subclass distribution, and the kinetics of CuSO4-induced oxidation of total HDL and HDL3 in vitro in 36 low-HDL-C subjects and in 41 control subjects with normal HDL-C. Results The resistance of HDL3 to oxidation, as assessed from the propagation rate was significantly higher than that of total HDL. The propagation rate and diene formation during HDL oxidation in vitro was attenuated in HDL derived from low-HDL-C subjects. Propagation rate and maximal diene formation during total HDL oxidation correlated significantly with HDL mean particle size. The propagation rate of total HDL oxidation in vitro displayed a significant positive association with HDL2 particle mass and HDL mean particle size by multiple regression analyses. Conclusions These observations highlight that the distribution of HDL subpopulations has important implications for the potential of HDL as an anti-oxidant source. PMID:20863394

  10. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-09-07

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages.

  11. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  12. Effect of honey on serum cholesterol and lipid values.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Hoffmann, Sven; Hauenschild, Annette; Bülte, Michael; von Georgi, Richard; Hackethal, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Small studies have suggested that honey benefits patients with high cholesterol concentrations. The present study aimed to confirm this finding in a larger group of subjects. Sixty volunteers with high cholesterol, stratified according to gender and hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) treatment (yes/no), were randomized to receive 75 g of honey solution or a honey-comparable sugar solution once daily over a period of 14 days. Baseline measurements, including body mass index (BMI) and lipid profile, were obtained, and subjects also completed dietary questionnaires and the Inventory for the Assessment of Negative Bodily Affect-Trait form (INKA-h) questionnaire. Measurements were repeated 2 weeks later. BMI and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol values were significantly correlated (r = -0.487; P < .001) as were BMI and a lower ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (r = 0.420; P < .001), meaning that subjects with a high BMI had a lower HDL cholesterol value. INKA-h scores and LDL cholesterol values were also significantly correlated (r = 0.273, P = .042). Neither solution influenced significantly cholesterol or triglyceride values in the total group; in women, however, the LDL cholesterol value increased in the sugar solution subgroup but not in the women taking honey. Although ingesting honey did not reduce LDL cholesterol values in general, women may benefit from substituting honey for sugar in their diet. Reducing the BMI lowers the LDL cholesterol value, and psychological interventions also seem important and merit further investigation.

  13. Macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and metabolic diseases: critical role of cholesteryl ester mobilization.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shobha

    2011-03-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia, including low HDL levels, is the major contributor of residual risk of cardiovascular disease that remains even after aggressive statin therapy to reduce LDL-cholesterol. Currently, distinction is not made between HDL-cholesterol and HDL, which is a lipoprotein consisting of several proteins and a core containing cholesteryl esters (CEs). The importance of assessing HDL functionality, specifically its role in facilitating cholesterol efflux from foam cells, is relevant to atherogenesis. Since HDLs can only remove unesterified cholesterol from macrophages while cholesterol is stored as CEs within foam cells, intracellular CE hydrolysis by CE hydrolase is vital. Reduction in macrophage lipid burden not only attenuates atherosclerosis but also reduces inflammation and linked pathologies such as Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Targeting reduction in macrophage CE levels and focusing on enhancing cholesterol flux from peripheral tissues to liver for final elimination is proposed.

  14. Intake of heat-expanded amaranth grain reverses endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Caselato-Sousa, Valeria Maria; Ozaki, Michiko Regina; de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2014-12-01

    This study reports the new functional property of amaranth grain against diet-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbits. Twenty-seven New Zealand rabbits were fed either a standard diet (SD/G1) or a hypercholesterolemic diet (Hichol) for 28 days. On day 29, the Hichol group was subdivided into four groups and begun receiving the following diets for 21 days: G2: SD + amaranth, G3: Hichol + amaranth, G4: SD alone, and G5: Hichol alone, while G1 continued to receive SD for 21 days. Amaranth intake restored endothelial function (G2, G3) to nearly normal during the 21-day recovery besides substantially lowering total and LDL blood cholesterol levels. This effect was not seen by simply correcting the diet (G4). Upon continuance of Hichol, however, amaranth supplementation did show some contribution to the cholesterol-lowering effect (G4 vs. G3). On day 49, feeding Hichol without the help of amaranth, harm was further magnified by lowering HDL-cholesterol (G5). Fecal cholesterol was found increased in groups that ingested amaranth (G2, G3), but no significant impact from either supplementation or diet reversal was found in fecal bile acids. Amaranth supplementation granted some protection against tissue cholesterol (G5) and tissue peroxidation (G3). It is concluded that even in concurrence with a hypercholesterolemic diet, intake of heat-expanded amaranth can revert an associated endothelial dysfunction besides incrementing fecal cholesterol excretion and lowering blood and tissue cholesterol oxidation in dyslipidemic rabbits. These results supported the notion of a lipid peroxidation process occurring with high cholesterol intakes.

  15. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Show Altered Lipoprotein Profiles with Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoproteins that Can Exacerbate Inflammatory and Atherogenic Process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Eun-Young; Park, Jin Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to identify putative biomarkers in lipoprotein, we compared lipid and lipoprotein properties between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and control with similar age. Methods We analyzed four classes of lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, HDL2, HDL3) from both male (n = 8, 69±4 year-old) and female (n = 25, 53±7 year-old) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as well as controls with similar age (n = 13). Results Although RA group showed normal levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and glucose, however, the RA group showed significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-C level and ratio of HDL-C/TC. The RA group showed significantly elevated levels of blood triglyceride (TG), uric acid, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The RA group also showed elevated levels of advanced glycated end (AGE) products in all lipoproteins and severe aggregation of apoA-I in HDL. As CETP activity and TG contents were 2-fold increased in HDL from RA group, paraoxonase activity was reduced upto 20%. Electron microscopy revealed that RA group showed much less HDL2 particle number than control. LDL from the RA group was severely oxidized and glycated with greater fragmentation of apo-B, especially in female group, it was more atherogenic via phagocytosis. Conclusion Lipoproteins from the RA patients showed severely altered structure with impaired functionality, which is very similar to that observed in coronary heart patients. These dysfunctional properties in lipoproteins from the RA patients might be associated with high incidence of cardiovascular events in RA patients. PMID:27736980

  16. Cowpea protein reduces LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B concentrations, but does not improve biomarkers of inflammation or endothelial dysfunction in adults with moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Frota, Karoline de Macedo Gonçalves; dos Santos Filho, Raul Dias; Ribeiro, Valdenir Queiroz; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: Los riesgos de las enfermedades cardiovasculares, la principal causa de muerte en el mundo, pueden ser reducidos con la dieta. Proteína caupí en hámsters redujo el colesterol total, LDL-colesterol, así como la esteatosis hepática de manera significativa. Objetivo: Este estudio de prueba de concepto fue verificar si el consumo de proteína de frijol mejora el perfil de lípidos y actúa sobre los biomarcadores de inflamación y disfunción endotelial en pacientes con hipercolesterolemia moderada. Métodos: En un diseño aleatorio doble ciego cruzado, 38 sujetos con hipercolesterolemia (colesterol-LDL = 182,5 ± 2,7 mg/dL) consumieron 25 g / día de aislado de proteína de frijol o 25 g / día de caseína (grupo control) durante seis semanas cada uno, y un intervalo de lavado de cuatro semanas Se recogieron muestras de sangre en ayunas al comienzo y al final de cada período de dieta. Los lípidos (colesterol total, LDL-colesterol, triglicéridos, HDL-colesterol) se determinaron por métodos enzimáticos, apolipoproteínas (apoA-I y apoB) por inmunoensayos normalizados, biomarcadores de inflamación (proteína C reactiva) por turbidimetría y los biomarcadores de disfunción endotelial (molecule-1 de adhesión intercelular y de molécula-1 de adhesión celular vascular) por técnicas de ensayo de inmunoabsorción ligados a enzimas. Resultados y discusión: El consumo de proteínas caupí redujo significativamente el colesterol total (12%), el colesterol LDL (18,9%), colesterol no HDL (16%), apoB (14%), y aumentó el colesterol HDL (2,7%). No se observaron diferencias significativas relacionadas con el grupo de tratamiento para cualquiera de los biomarcadores inflamatorios y de disfunción endotelial. Conclusión: Los presentes hallazgos demostraron el efecto favorable del consumo de proteína caupí en lípidos séricos pro-aterogénicas y apoB en sujetos con hipercolesterolemia moderada, de manera similar a lo observado en un trabajo previo con

  17. Macrophage Independent Regulation of Reverse Cholesterol Transport by Liver X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Breevoort, Sarah R.; Angdisen, Jerry; Schulman, Ira G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The ability of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles to accept cholesterol from peripheral cells such as lipid-laden macrophages and to transport cholesterol to the liver for catabolism and excretion in a process termed reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is believed to underlie the beneficial cardiovascular effects of elevated HDL. The liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) regulate RCT by controlling the efflux of cholesterol from macrophages to HDL and the excretion, catabolism and absorption of cholesterol in the liver and intestine. Importantly, treatment with LXR agonists increases RCT and decreases atherosclerosis in animal models. Nevertheless, LXRs are expressed in multiple tissues involved in RCT and their tissue specific contributions to RCT are still not well defined. Approach and Results Utilizing tissue-specific LXR deletions together with in vitro and in vivo assays of cholesterol efflux and fecal cholesterol excretion we demonstrate that macrophage LXR activity is neither necessary nor sufficient for LXR agonist-stimulated RCT. In contrast, the ability of LXR agonists primarily acting in the intestine to increase HDL mass and HDL function appears to underlie the ability of LXR agonists to stimulate RCT in vivo. Conclusions We demonstrate that activation of LXR in macrophages makes little or no contribution to LXR agonist-stimulated RCT. Unexpectedly our studies suggest that the ability of macrophages to efflux cholesterol to HDL in vivo is not regulated by macrophage activity but is primarily determined by the quantity and functional activity of HDL. PMID:24947527

  18. Loss of Cathepsin B and L Leads to Lysosomal Dysfunction, NPC-Like Cholesterol Sequestration and Accumulation of the Key Alzheimer's Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Stjepko; Kosicek, Marko; Mladenovic-Djordjevic, Aleksandra; Smiljanic, Kosara; Kanazir, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of lysosomes is particularly important in neurons, as they cannot dilute accumulated toxic molecules and aggregates by cell division. Thus, impairment of lysosomal function plays an important role in neuronal degeneration and in the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. In this work we analyzed how inhibition and/or loss of the major lysosomal proteases, the cysteine cathepsins B and L (CtsB/L), affects lysosomal function, cholesterol metabolism and degradation of the key Alzheimer's disease (AD) proteins. Here, we show that cysteine CtsB/L, and not the aspartyl cathepsin D (CtsD), represent a major lysosomal protease(s) that control lysosomal function, intracellular cholesterol trafficking and AD-like amyloidogenic features. Intriguingly, accumulation of free cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes upon CtsB/L inhibition resembled a phenotype characteristic for the rare neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). CtsB/L inhibition and not the inhibition of CtsD led to lysosomal impairment assessed by decreased degradation of EGF receptor, enhanced LysoTracker staining and accumulation of several lysosomal proteins LC3II, NPC1 and NPC2. By measuring the levels of NPC1 and ABCA1, the two major cholesterol efflux proteins, we showed that CtsB/L inhibition or genetic depletion caused accumulation of the NPC1 in lysosomes and downregulation of ABCA1 protein levels and its expression. Furthermore, we revealed that CtsB/L are involved in degradation of the key Alzheimer’s proteins: amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and C-terminal fragments of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and in degradation of β-secretase (BACE1). Our results imply CtsB/L as major regulators of lysosomal function and demonstrate that CtsB/L may play an important role in intracellular cholesterol trafficking and in degradation of the key AD proteins. Our findings implicate that enhancing the activity or levels of CtsB/L could provide a promising and a common

  19. Cell lipid metabolism modulators 2-bromopalmitate, D609, monensin, U18666A and probucol shift discoidal HDL formation to the smaller-sized particles: implications for the mechanism of HDL assembly.

    PubMed

    Quach, Duyen; Vitali, Cecilia; La, Fiona M; Xiao, Angel X; Millar, John S; Tang, Chongren; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Lyssenko, Nicholas N

    2016-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates formation of disc-shaped high-density lipoprotein (HDL) from cell lipid and lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I). Discoidal HDL particles are heterogeneous in physicochemical characteristics for reasons that are understood incompletely. Discoidal lipoprotein particles similar in characteristics and heterogeneity to cell-formed discoidal HDL can be reconstituted from purified lipids and apo A-I by cell-free, physicochemical methods. The heterogeneity of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) is sensitive to the lipid composition of the starting lipid/apo A-I mixture. To determine whether the heterogeneity of cell-formed HDL is similarly sensitive to changes in cell lipids, we investigated four compounds that have well-established effects on cell lipid metabolism and ABCA1-mediated cell cholesterol efflux. 2-Bromopalmitate, D609, monensin and U18666A decreased formation of the larger-sized, but dramatically increased formation of the smaller-sized HDL. 2-Bromopalmitate did not appear to affect ABCA1 activity, subcellular localization or oligomerization, but induced dissolution of the cholesterol-phospholipid complexes in the plasma membrane. Arachidonic and linoleic acids shifted HDL formation to the smaller-sized species. Tangier disease mutations and inhibitors of ABCA1 activity wheat germ agglutinin and AG 490 reduced formation of both larger-sized and smaller-sized HDL. The effect of probucol was similar to the effect of 2-bromopalmitate. Taking rHDL formation as a paradigm, we propose that ABCA1 mutations and activity inhibitors reduce the amount of cell lipid available for HDL formation, and the compounds in the 2-bromopalmitate group and the polyunsaturated fatty acids change cell lipid composition from one that favors formation of the larger-sized HDL particles to one that favors formation of the smaller-sized species.

  20. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  1. Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like nanoemulsion and lipid transfer to HDL in subjects with glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bertato, Marina P; Oliveira, Carolina P; Wajchenberg, Bernardo L; Lerario, Antonio C; Maranhão, Raul C

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucose intolerance is frequently associated with an altered plasma lipid profile and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Nonetheless, lipid metabolism is scarcely studied in normolipidemic glucose-intolerant patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether important lipid metabolic parameters, such as the kinetics of LDL free and esterified cholesterol and the transfer of lipids to HDL, are altered in glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids. METHODS: Fourteen glucose-intolerant patients and 15 control patients were studied; none of the patients had cardiovascular disease manifestations, and they were paired for age, sex, race and co-morbidities. A nanoemulsion resembling a LDL lipid composition (LDE) labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester and 3H-free cholesterol was intravenously injected, and blood samples were collected over a 24-h period to determine the fractional clearance rate of the labels by compartmental analysis. The transfer of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids from the LDE to HDL was measured by the incubation of the LDE with plasma and radioactivity counting of the supernatant after chemical precipitation of non-HDL fractions. RESULTS: The levels of LDL, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apo A1 and apo B were equal in both groups. The 14C-esterified cholesterol fractional clearance rate was not different between glucose-intolerant and control patients, but the 3H-free- cholesterol fractional clearance rate was greater in glucose-intolerant patients than in control patients. The lipid transfer to HDL was equal in both groups. CONCLUSION: In these glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids, a faster removal of LDE free cholesterol was the only lipid metabolic alteration detected in our study. This finding suggests that the dissociation of free cholesterol from lipoprotein particles occurs in normolipidemic glucose intolerance and may participate in atherogenic

  2. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  3. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  4. Longitudinal Trajectories of Cholesterol from Midlife through Late Life according to Apolipoprotein E Allele Status

    PubMed Central

    Downer, Brian; Estus, Steven; Katsumata, Yuriko; Fardo, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous research indicates that total cholesterol levels increase with age during young adulthood and middle age and decline with age later in life. This is attributed to changes in diet, body composition, medication use, physical activity, and hormone levels. In the current study we utilized data from the Framingham Heart Study Original Cohort to determine if variations in apolipoprotein E (APOE), a gene involved in regulating cholesterol homeostasis, influence trajectories of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and total: HDL cholesterol ratio from midlife through late life. Methods: Cholesterol trajectories from midlife through late life were modeled using generalized additive mixed models and mixed-effects regression models. Results: APOE e2+ subjects had lower total cholesterol levels, higher HDL cholesterol levels, and lower total: HDL cholesterol ratios from midlife to late life compared to APOE e3 and APOE e4+ subjects. Statistically significant differences in life span cholesterol trajectories according to gender and use of cholesterol-lowering medications were also detected. Conclusion: The findings from this research provide evidence that variations in APOE modify trajectories of serum cholesterol from midlife to late life. In order to efficiently modify cholesterol through the life span, it is important to take into account APOE allele status. PMID:25325355

  5. Physical inactivity interacts with an endothelial lipase polymorphism to modulate high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is highly heritable but is also modifiable by environmental factors including physical activity. HDL-C response to exercise varies among individuals, and this variability may be associated with genetic polymorphism...

  6. Protective associations of HDL with blood-brain barrier injury in multiple sclerosis patients[S

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Kelly; Uher, Tomas; Browne, Richard W.; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Horakova, Dana; Posova, Helena; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Krasensky, Jan; Tyblova, Michaela; Havrdova, Eva; Zivadinov, Robert; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the associations of serum cholesterol and apolipoproteins with measures of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and CNS inflammation following the first clinical demyelinating event. This study included 154 patients [67% female; age, 29.5 ± 8.2 years (mean ± SD)] enrolled in a multi-center study of interferon β1-a treatment following the first demyelinating event. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained at screening prior to treatment. A comprehensive serum lipid profile and multiple surrogate markers of BBB breakdown and CNS immune activity were obtained. Higher levels of serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and ApoA-I were associated with lower CSF total protein level, CSF albumin level, albumin quotient, and CSF IgG level (all P ≤ 0.001 for HDL-C and all P < 0.01 for ApoA-I). HDL-C was also associated with CSF CD80+ (P < 0.001) and with CSF CD80+CD19+ (P = 0.007) cell frequencies. Higher serum HDL is associated with lower levels of BBB injury and decreased CD80+ and CD80+CD19+ cell extravasation into the CSF. HDL may potentially inhibit the initiation and/or maintenance of pathogenic BBB injury following the first demyelinating event. PMID:26243484

  7. Control of Angiogenesis by AIBP-mediated Cholesterol Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Choi, Soo-Ho; Baek, Ji Sun; Liu, Chao; Almazan, Felicidad; Ulrich, Florian; Wiesner, Philipp; Taleb, Adam; Deer, Elena; Pattison, Jennifer; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Li, Andrew C.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural component of the cell, indispensable for normal cellular function, but its excess often leads to abnormal proliferation, migration, inflammatory responses and/or cell death. To prevent cholesterol overload, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate cholesterol efflux from the cells to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) and to the ApoA-I-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)1-3. Maintaining efficient cholesterol efflux is essential for normal cellular function4-6. However, the role of cholesterol efflux in angiogenesis and the identity of its local regulators are poorly understood. Here we show that ApoA-I binding protein (AIBP) accelerates cholesterol efflux from endothelial cells (EC) to HDL and thereby regulates angiogenesis. AIBP/HDL-mediated cholesterol depletion reduces lipid rafts, interferes with VEGFR2 dimerization and signaling, and inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and mouse aortic neovascularization ex vivo. Remarkably, Aibp regulates the membrane lipid order in embryonic zebrafish vasculature and functions as a non-cell autonomous regulator of zebrafish angiogenesis. Aibp knockdown results in dysregulated sprouting/branching angiogenesis, while forced Aibp expression inhibits angiogenesis. Dysregulated angiogenesis is phenocopied in Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos, and cholesterol levels are increased in Aibp-deficient and Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos. Our findings demonstrate that secreted AIBP positively regulates cholesterol efflux from EC and that effective cholesterol efflux is critical for proper angiogenesis. PMID:23719382

  8. Increased HDL Size and Enhanced Apo A-I Catabolic Rates Are Associated With Doxorubicin-Induced Proteinuria in New Zealand White Rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-Olmos, Victoria; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Luna-Luna, María; Flores-Castillo, Cristobal; Martínez-Ramírez, Miriam; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Franco, Martha; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Roldán, Francisco-Javier; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Vega, Mónica; Fragoso, José-Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    The catabolism and structure of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) may be the determining factor of their atheroprotective properties. To better understand the role of the kidney in HDL catabolism, here we characterized HDL subclasses and the catabolic rates of apo A-I in a rabbit model of proteinuria. Proteinuria was induced by intravenous administration of doxorubicin in New Zealand white rabbits (n = 10). HDL size and HDL subclass lipids were assessed by electrophoresis of the isolated lipoproteins. The catabolic rate of HDL-apo A-I was evaluated by exogenous radiolabelling with iodine-131. Doxorubicin induced significant proteinuria after 4 weeks (4.47 ± 0.55 vs. 0.30 ± 0.02 g/L of protein in urine, P < 0.001) associated with increased uremia, creatininemia, and cardiotoxicity. Large HDL2b augmented significantly during proteinuria, whereas small HDL3b and HDL3c decreased compared to basal conditions. HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3a subclasses were enriched with triacylglycerols in proteinuric animals as determined by the triacylglycerol-to-phospholipid ratio; the cholesterol content in HDL subclasses remained unchanged. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) of [(131)I]-apo A-I in the proteinuric rabbits was faster (FCR = 0.036 h(-1)) compared to control rabbits group (FCR = 0.026 h(-1), P < 0.05). Apo E increased and apo A-I decreased in HDL, whereas PON-1 activity increased in proteinuric rabbits. Proteinuria was associated with an increased number of large HDL2b particles and a decreased number of small HDL3b and 3c. Proteinuria was also connected to an alteration in HDL subclass lipids, apolipoprotein content of HDL, high paraoxonase-1 activity, and a rise in the fractional catabolic rate of the [(131)I]-apo A-I.

  9. Proteome profiles of HDL particles of patients with chronic heart failure are associated with immune response and also include bacteria proteins.

    PubMed

    Oberbach, Andreas; Adams, Volker; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Kullnick, Yvonne; Lehmann, Stefanie; Lehmann, Sven; Feder, Stefan; Correia, Joao Carlos; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Völker, Uwe; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-01-30

    Besides modulation of reverse cholesterol transport, high density lipoprotein (HDL) is able to modulate vascular function by stimulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Recently, it could be documented that this function of HDL was significantly impaired in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated alterations in the HDL proteome in CHF patients. Therefore, HDL was isolated from 5 controls (HDLhealthy) and 5 CHF patients of NYHA-class IIIb (HDLCHF). Proteome analysis of HDL particles was performed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SCX/RP LC-MS/MS). In total, we identified 494 distinct proteins, of which 107 proteins were commonly found in both groups (HDLCHF and HDLhealthy) indicating a high inter-subject variability across HDL particles. Several important proteins (e.g. ITGA2, APBA1 or A2M) varied in level. Functional analysis revealed regulated pathways. A minor proportion of bacteria-derived proteins were also identified in the HDL-particles. The extension of the list of HDL-associated proteins allows besides their mere description new insights into alterations in HDL function in diseases. In addition, the detection of bacterial proteins bound to HDL will broaden our view of HDL not only as a cholesterol carrier but also as a carrier of proteins.

  10. Identifying and attaining LDL-C goals: mission accomplished? Next target: new therapeutic options to raise HDL-C levels.

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kakafika, Anna I; Karagiannis, Asterios; Hatzitolios, Apostolos; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Ganotakis, Emmanuel S; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Elisaf, Moses

    2007-03-01

    Currently, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are the main, if not the only, lipid target in the effort to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. Several primary and secondary CVD prevention trials with statins shaped current guidelines and provided detailed targets across a range of CVD risk categories. These targets can be attained using effective statins or combination therapy. However, the net benefit in CVD risk reduction may be improved if we address other lipid risk factors. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) emerges from epidemiological studies as the most promising target. This review links the increase in HDL-C levels with clinical benefit from "old" (e.g. sustained release niacin) and new treatment options. Synthetically produced recombined apolipoprotein A-I Milano administered intravenously seems to have a marked effect in reducing the atheroma burden. The anti-cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) vaccine (CETi-1) produces auto-antibodies against CETP thus increasing the cholesterol ester content in HDL particles. CETP inhibitors (e.g. JTT-705 and torcetrapib) seem to be the most promising regimen to increase HDL-C levels. Torcetrapib (already in phase IIIa studies) can substantially increase HDL-C levels (up to 106%), alone or in combination with atorvastatin. HDL-C strategies, in combination with effective statins, are a new drug target aimed at a further reduction in CVD morbidity and mortality compared with statin monotherapy.

  11. The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Finelli, C; Crispino, P; Gioia, S; La Sala, N; D'amico, L; La Grotta, M; Miro, O; Colarusso, D

    2016-01-01

    Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings.

  12. The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, C.; Crispino, P.; Gioia, S.; La Sala, N.; D'amico, L.; La Grotta, M.; Miro, O.; Colarusso, D.

    2016-01-01

    Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings. PMID:27103896

  13. Asymptomatic individuals with high HDL-C levels overexpress ABCA1 and ABCG1 and present miR-33a dysregulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, D Z; Zago, V H S; Parra, E S; Avansini, S; Panzoldo, N B; Alexandre, F; Baracat, J; Nakandakare, E R; Quintão, E C R; de Faria, E C

    2015-10-01

    Considering the growing knowledge and perspectives on microRNAs (miRNAs) that control high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and metabolism, this study aimed at evaluating whether hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-128a are differentially expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from asymptomatic individuals with low and high HDL-C, as well as at investigating the potential relationships with ATP binding cassete transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression, cholesterol efflux capacity and other parameters related with reverse cholesterol transport. In addition, the associations with cardiovascular risk were investigated by carotid-intima media thickness (cIMT). Asymptomatic volunteers of both genders (n=51) were classified according to HDL-C (mg/dL) in hypoalphalipoproteinemics (hypo, HDL-C ≤3 9), hyperalphalipoproteinemics (hyper, HDL-C ≥ 68) and controls (CTL, HDL-C ≥ 40<68). cIMT, lipids, lipoproteins, HDL size and volume, C reactive protein and insulin were determined, as well as the activities of several proteins and enzymes related to HDL metabolism. In a subgroup of 19 volunteers the cellular cholesterol efflux and HDL composition were determined. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for relative quantification experiments. Hypo volunteers presented significantly higher levels of triglycerides, VLDL-C and insulin; in addition, HDL size and volume decreased when compared with CTL and hyper. Regarding gene expression analysis, the hyper group presented a decrease of 72% in hsa-miR-33a and higher mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 when compared with CTL. No significant differences in hsa-miR-128a expression, cholesterol efflux, cIMT or plaques were found. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the complex miRNA network, regulating cellular cholesterol homeostasis in humans and its clinical repercussions.

  14. Piperine prevents cholesterol gallstones formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiu-Yun; Xu, Shuang; Hu, Jin-Feng; Tang, Jia; Chu, Shi-Feng; Liu, Hang; Han, Ning; Li, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Ming; Li, Yue-Ting; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2015-03-15

    Biliary cholesterol may contribute to the formation of cholesterol gallstones, and regulation of these levels could be a useful therapeutic strategy for gallstones disease. Piperine (PA) is a potential cholesterol lowering agent. In this study, we assessed the effect and mechanism of PA in preventing cholesterol gallstones formation induced by feeding lithogenic diet containing high cholesterol levels to mice. C57BL/6 inbred mice were fed lithogenic or chow diets for 10 weeks, with or without PA (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, 60 mg/kg) administration. Cholesterol, phospholipids and crystals in bile, the lipid in serum, pathological changes and proteins expression in liver were analyzed. The results showed that PA could decrease the cholesterol potency and crystals in bile, reduce total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and increase high-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) levels in serum. Furthermore, PA treatment reduced liver lipid peroxidation and protected hepatobiliary cells from liver injury by decreasing malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, PA inhibited the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/8 (ABCG5/8) and liver X receptor (LXR) in liver, and reduced cholesterol transport from the hepatocytes to the gallbladder. It may be the mechanism of PA in preventing cholesterol gallstones formation. PA as a potential drug for prevention cholesterol gallstones merits further investigation.

  15. Vasculoprotective Effects of Apolipoprotein Mimetic Peptides: An Evolving Paradigm In Hdl Therapy (Vascular Disease Prevention, In Press.).

    PubMed

    White, C Roger; Datta, Geeta; Mochon, Paulina; Zhang, Zhenghao; Kelly, Ollie; Curcio, Christine; Parks, Dale; Palgunachari, Mayakonda; Handattu, Shaila; Gupta, Himanshu; Garber, David W; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2009-01-01

    Anti-atherogenic effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major protein component apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) are principally thought to be due to their ability to mediate reverse cholesterol transport. These agents also possess anti-oxidant properties that prevent the oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-inflammatory properties that include inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression. Results of the Framingham study revealed that a reduction in HDL levels is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Accordingly, there has been considerable interest in developing new therapies that specifically elevate HDL cholesterol. However, recent evidence suggests that increasing circulating HDL cholesterol levels alone is not sufficient as a mode of HDL therapy. Rather, therapeutic approaches that increase the functional properties of HDL may be superior to simply raising the levels of HDL per se. Our laboratory has pioneered the development of synthetic, apolipoprotein mimetic peptides which are structurally and functionally similar to apoA-I but possess unique structural homology to the lipid-associating domains of apoA-I. The apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F inhibits atherogenic lesion formation in murine models of atherosclerosis. This effect is related to the ability of 4F to induce the formation of pre-β HDL particles that are enriched in apoA-I and paraoxonase. 4F also possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties that are independent of its effect on HDL quality per se. Recent studies suggest that 4F stimulates the expression of the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase and superoxide dismutase and inhibits superoxide anion formation in blood vessels of diabetic, hypercholesterolemic and sickle cell disease mice. The goal of this review is to discuss HDL-dependent and -independent mechanisms by which apoA-I mimetic peptides reduce vascular injury in experimental animal models.

  16. A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa preβHDL (Lp1-AI) particle

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Yang, Yunhuang; Neville, T.; Hoyt, David W.; Sparks, Daniel L.; Wang, Jianjun

    2007-06-12

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI, 243-residues) is the major protein component of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) that has been a hot subject of interests because of its anti-atherogenic properties. This important property of apoAI is related to its roles in reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Upon lipid-binding, apoAI undergoes conformational changes from lipid-free to several different HDL-associated states (1). These different conformational states regulate HDL formation, maturation and transportation. Two initial conformational states of apoAI are lipid-free apoAI and apoAI/preβHDL that recruit phospholipids and cholesterol to form HDL particles. In particular, lipid-free apoAI specifically binds to phospholipids to form lipid-poor apoAI, including apoAI/preβ-HDL (~37 kDa). As a unique class of lipid poor HDL, both in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that apoAI/preβ-HDLs are the most effective acceptors specifically for free cholesterol in human plasma and serves as the precursor of HDL particles (2). Here we report a complete backbone spectral assignment of human apoAI/preβHDL. Secondary structure prediction using backbone NMR parameters indicates that apoAI/preβHDL displays a two-domain structure: the N-terminal four helix-bundle domain (residues 1-186) and the C-terminal flexible domain (residues 187-243). A structure of apoAI/preβ-HDL is the first lipid-associated structure of apoAI and is critical for us to understand how apoAI recruits cholesterol to initialize HDL formation. BMRB deposit with accession number: 15093.

  17. Good vs. Bad Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Good vs. Bad Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 Cholesterol can't dissolve ... test . View an animation of cholesterol . LDL (Bad) Cholesterol LDL cholesterol is considered the “bad” cholesterol because ...

  18. Pharmacogenomics of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol-raising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Straka, Robert J.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Claas, Steven A.; Arnett, Donna K.

    2017-01-01

    High levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) have traditionally been linked to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, prompting the search for effective and safe HDL-C raising pharmaceutical agents. Although drugs such as niacin and fibrates represent established therapeutic approaches, HDL-C response to such therapies is variable and heritable, suggesting a role for pharmacogenomic determinants. Multiple genetic polymorphisms, located primarily in genes encoding lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, transporters and CYP450 genes have been shown to associate with HDL-C drug response in vitro and in epidemiologic studies. However, few of the pharmacogenomic findings have been independently validated, precluding the development of clinical tools that can be used to predict HDL-C response and leaving the goal of personalized medicine to future efforts. PMID:23469915

  19. Macrophage ABCA5 deficiency influences cellular cholesterol efflux and increases susceptibility to atherosclerosis in female LDLr knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Dan; Meurs, Illiana; Ohigashi, Megumi; Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Habets, Kim L.L.; Zhao, Ying; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-05-07

    Objectives: To determine the role of macrophage ATP-binding cassette transporter A5 (ABCA5) in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerotic lesion development. Methods and results: Chimeras with dysfunctional macrophage ABCA5 (ABCA5{sup -M/-M}) were generated by transplantation of bone marrow from ABCA5 knockout (ABCA5{sup -/-}) mice into irradiated LDLr{sup -/-} mice. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages from ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras exhibited a 29% (P < 0.001) decrease in cholesterol efflux to HDL, whereas a 21% (P = 0.07) increase in cholesterol efflux to apoA-I was observed. Interestingly, expression of ABCA1, but not ABCG1, was up-regulated in absence of functional ABCA5 in macrophages. To induce atherosclerosis, the transplanted LDLr{sup -/-} mice were fed a high-cholesterol Western-type diet (WTD) for 6, 10, or 18 weeks, allowing analysis of effects on initial as well as advanced lesion development. Atherosclerosis development was not affected in male ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras after 6, 10, and 18 weeks WTD feeding. However, female ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras did develop significantly (P < 0.05) larger aortic root lesions as compared with female controls after 6 and 10 weeks WTD feeding. Conclusions: ABCA5 influences macrophage cholesterol efflux, and selective disruption of ABCA5 in macrophages leads to increased atherosclerotic lesion development in female LDLr{sup -/-} mice.

  20. Should we take high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at face value?

    PubMed

    Leite, Jose Oyama; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2010-01-01

    The inverse correlation between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and cardiovascular disease has driven several investigators to target the increase in this lipoprotein to prevent atherosclerosis and its complications. However, many reports have demonstrated that the use of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a means to prevent and treat atherosclerosis has mainly resulted in negative outcomes. These findings may help to increase our knowledge of HDL metabolism and its protective effect. There is evidence that the mechanism by which HDL-C levels are raised has a great impact on cardiovascular outcomes. When the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to greater synthesis, a strong beneficial effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is observed. Even small increases in HDL-C levels induce a marked reduction in cardiovascular events; this has been observed during treatment with fibrates. In contrast, when the increase in HDL-C levels is secondary to a reduction in HDL catabolism, unexpectedly, the opposite effects are usually noted. Even dramatic increases in HDL-C levels are not associated with better cardiovascular outcomes. In fact, these increases have been related to a greater number of cardiovascular-related deaths. This became clear from the results of trials that tested inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). We suggest that increases in reverse cholesterol transport are more important than HDL-C levels. Strong evidence is provided by individuals that express apolipoprotein (apo)A-I Milano. These individuals have extremely low HDL-C levels due to greater catabolism of the lipoprotein. However, reverse cholesterol transport is increased in these individuals and, as a consequence, they have a low incidence of cardiovascular diseases. We reinforce that, in clinical practice, the currently recommended levels of HDL-C should still be a major target to be aimed for. However, in the research field, we emphasize the need to look for other

  1. Work, sleep, and cholesterol levels of U.S. long-haul truck drivers

    PubMed Central

    LEMKE, Michael K.; APOSTOLOPOULOS, Yorghos; HEGE, Adam; WIDEMAN, Laurie; SÖNMEZ, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Long-haul truck drivers in the United States experience elevated cardiovascular health risks, possibly due to hypercholesterolemia. The current study has two objectives: 1) to generate a cholesterol profile for U.S. long-haul truck drivers; and 2) to determine the influence of work organization characteristics and sleep quality and duration on cholesterol levels of long-haul truck drivers. Survey and biometric data were collected from 262 long-haul truck drivers. Descriptive analyses were performed for demographic, work organization, sleep, and cholesterol measures. Linear regression and ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine for possible predictive relationships between demographic, work organization, and sleep variables, and cholesterol outcomes. The majority (66.4%) of drivers had a low HDL (<40 mg/dL), and nearly 42% of drivers had a high-risk total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio. Sleep quality was associated with HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, and daily work hours were associated with LDL cholesterol. Workday sleep duration was associated with non-HDL cholesterol, and driving experience and sleep quality were associated with cholesterol ratio. Long-haul truck drivers have a high risk cholesterol profile, and sleep quality and work organization factors may induce these cholesterol outcomes. Targeted worksite health promotion programs are needed to curb these atherosclerotic risks. PMID:28049935

  2. Work, sleep, and cholesterol levels of U.S. long-haul truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Michael K; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hege, Adam; Wideman, Laurie; Sönmez, Sevil

    2017-04-07

    Long-haul truck drivers in the United States experience elevated cardiovascular health risks, possibly due to hypercholesterolemia. The current study has two objectives: 1) to generate a cholesterol profile for U.S. long-haul truck drivers; and 2) to determine the influence of work organization characteristics and sleep quality and duration on cholesterol levels of long-haul truck drivers. Survey and biometric data were collected from 262 long-haul truck drivers. Descriptive analyses were performed for demographic, work organization, sleep, and cholesterol measures. Linear regression and ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine for possible predictive relationships between demographic, work organization, and sleep variables, and cholesterol outcomes. The majority (66.4%) of drivers had a low HDL (<40 mg/dL), and nearly 42% of drivers had a high-risk total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio. Sleep quality was associated with HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, and daily work hours were associated with LDL cholesterol. Workday sleep duration was associated with non-HDL cholesterol, and driving experience and sleep quality were associated with cholesterol ratio. Long-haul truck drivers have a high risk cholesterol profile, and sleep quality and work organization factors may induce these cholesterol outcomes. Targeted worksite health promotion programs are needed to curb these atherosclerotic risks.

  3. NASH Resolution is Associated with Improvements in HDL and Triglyceride Levels But Not Improvement in LDL or Non-HDL-C Levels

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Kathleen E.; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Wilson, Laura A.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Aim To determine the relationship between resolution of NASH and dyslipidemia. Methods Individuals in the Pioglitazone versus Vitamin E versus Placebo for the Treatment of Nondiabetic Patients with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (PIVENS) trial with paired liver biopsies and fasting lipid levels were included (N=222). In the PIVENS trial individuals were randomized to pioglitazone 30mg, vitamin E 800IU or placebo for 96 weeks. Change in lipid levels at 96 weeks was compared between those with and without NASH resolution. Results Dyslipidemia at baseline was frequent, with low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (<40mg/dL in men or <50 mg/dL in women) in 63%, hypertriglyceridemia (≥150 mg/dL) in 46%, hypercholesterolemia (≥200 mg/dL) in 47%, and triglycerides (TG)/HDL>5.0 in 25%. Low-density lipoprotein (LD) ≥ 160 mg/dL was found in 16% and elevated non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C) (≥130 mg/dL) in 73%. HDL increased with NASH resolution but decreased in those without resolution (2.9mg/dL vs. −2.5mg/dL, P<0.001). NASH resolution was associated with significant decreases in TG and TG/HDL ratio compared to those without resolution (TG: −21.1 vs. −2.3mg/dL, P=0.03 and TG/HDL: −0.7 vs 0.1, P=0.003). Non-HDL-C, LDL and cholesterol decreased over 96 weeks in both groups but there was no significant difference between groups. Treatment group did not impact lipids. Conclusions NASH resolution is associated with improvements in TG and HDL but not in other CVD risk factors including LDL and non-HDL-C levels. Individuals with resolution of NASH may still be at increased risk of CVD. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00063622 PMID:25429853

  4. Lipoprotein products of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Ellerbe, P

    1982-09-14

    High-density lipoprotein substrates and products of human plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase have been labelled with radioisotopic cholesteryl esters in order to facilitate identification. [3H]Cholesteryl esters were formed by endogenous HDL3/VHDL enzyme (d greater than 1.125 g/ml) following incubation with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, unesterified cholesterol and 3H-labelled unesterified cholesterol. Transfer of labelled esters to acceptor lipoproteins (VLDL+LDL, d less than 1.063 g/ml) was employed to distinguish a hypothetical transfer complex. Separation of labelled HDL3/VHDL was by gel-permeation chromatography. The results indicate that a subpopulation of labelled HDL3/VHDL cholesteryl esters (43-61% of total) were removed by VLDL/LDL during a 3 h transfer period and these derive from the smaller lipoproteins of the spectrum. HDL carrying non-transferable [3H]cholesteryl esters localize to the larger HDL3. Transfer rates were proportional to ratios of acceptor to donor lipoproteins. Net transfer of cholesteryl esters from the smaller HDL3 also occurred, but was smaller in magnitude (about 10.5% of total). Acyltransferase assays indicated that enzyme distribution is skewed to larger-sized HDL3, suggesting that the non-transferable components might be lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-containing parent complexes, while the smaller transfer products contain little acyltransferase. The results fit the hypothesis that a parent HDL3-lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase complex generates a smaller-sized lipoprotein product which is active in cholesteryl ester transport.

  5. Effects of selective breeding on the cholesterolemic responses to dietary saturated fat and cholesterol in baboons.

    PubMed

    McGill, H C; McMahan, C A; Mott, G E; Marinez, Y N; Kuehl, T J

    1988-01-01

    Positive assortative mating of baboons (Papio sp.) based on elevation of serum cholesterol concentrations in response to a cholesterol- and saturated fat-enriched diet produced 64 progeny (30 high line; 34 low line). When the animals were 3 to 4 years of age, we tested their lipoprotein cholesterol responses to dietary cholesterol and fat in a factorial experiment with two levels of dietary cholesterol (1.7 and less than 0.01 mg/kcal) and two types of fat, coconut oil (P/S 0.1) and corn oil (P/S 3.5), each providing 40% of total calories from fat; we also tested their responses to chow. The high line animals had significantly higher very low density plus low density lipoprotein (VLDL + LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels on all diets. The effects of dietary cholesterol on VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations were greater in high line animals than in low line animals, but dietary cholesterol's effects on HDL cholesterol were similar in both lines. The effects of saturated fat, compared to unsaturated fat, on both VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol levels were similar in both lines. Selective breeding produced lines diverging in lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations by acting on several different genetically mediated processes that control serum lipoprotein levels. At least one of these processes involves responsiveness of serum VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentration to dietary cholesterol.

  6. Is High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Causally Related to Kidney Function?

    PubMed Central

    Coassin, Stefan; Friedel, Salome; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective— A recent observational study with almost 2 million men reported an association between low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and worse kidney function. The causality of this association would be strongly supported if genetic variants associated with HDL cholesterol were also associated with kidney function. Approach and Results— We used 68 genetic variants (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) associated with HDL cholesterol in genome-wide association studies including >188 000 subjects and tested their association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using summary statistics from another genome-wide association studies meta-analysis of kidney function including ≤133 413 subjects. Fourteen of the 68 SNPs (21%) had a P value <0.05 compared with the 5% expected by chance (Binomial test P=5.8×10−6). After Bonferroni correction, 6 SNPs were still significantly associated with eGFR. The genetic variants with the strongest associations with HDL cholesterol concentrations were not the same as those with the strongest association with kidney function and vice versa. An evaluation of pleiotropy indicated that the effects of the HDL-associated SNPs on eGFR were not mediated by HDL cholesterol. In addition, we performed a Mendelian randomization analysis. This analysis revealed a positive but nonsignificant causal effect of HDL cholesterol–increasing variants on eGFR. Conclusions— In summary, our findings indicate that HDL cholesterol does not causally influence eGFR and propose pleiotropic effects on eGFR for some HDL cholesterol–associated SNPs. This may cause the observed association by mechanisms other than the mere HDL cholesterol concentration. PMID:27687604

  7. Iatrogenic severe depression of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Mymin, D; Dembinski, T; Friesen, M H

    2009-07-01

    The authors present 5 cases of paradoxical depression of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol induced by fibrate drugs. In a 24-month review of all cases seen in one physician's practice at the Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre Lipid Clinic, 492 patients made a total of 1187 visits. Sixty-eight of them were given a fibrate drug (14%). Ten patients had HDL cholesterol levels that were less than 0.5 mmol/L (2%), and of these, 5 cases were due to exposure to fenofibrate (1%). These 5 cases comprised 7.4% of the 68 patients who were given any fibrate drug during that period. Mean levels were as follows: HDL cholesterol on fenofibrate 0.27, off fenofibrate 1.0 mmol/L and apo A1 on fenofibrate 0.41, off fenofibrate 1.17 g/L. A literature review revealed documented cases in 37 patients involving fibrates alone or in combination with other drugs known to cause decreased HDL cholesterol levels. In 13 patients, exposure was to fibrate therapy alone; in those exposed to combinations, the effect was clearly attributable to fibrates in 9; in 14, the nonfibrates (mostly rosiglitazone) were the attributable drugs; and in 1, it was impossible to tell. Thus, fibrate therapy should always be suspected as a cause of profoundly depressed HDL cholesterol.

  8. [High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP): role in lipid metabolism and clinical meaning].

    PubMed

    Kleber, M E; Grammer, T B; März, W

    2010-07-01

    Large epidemiological studies have consistently shown that plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) correlate inversely with cardiovascular risk. The apparent cardioprotective role of HDL has primarily been attributed to its participation in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) but there is also substantial evidence that supports the concept of HDL and apoA-I preventing oxidative damage, inhibiting systemic inflammation, promoting vascular integrity and preventing thrombosis. Besides conventional therapy to increase HDL like physical exercise, weight loss and dietary changes new strategies to intervene at various steps of its metabolism have been proposed and are in development. One of the most promising approaches is inhibiting cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)which plays a central role in RCT by transferring cholesteryl esters from HDL to apoB containing lipoproteins in exchange for triglycerides. The failure of the CETP inhibitor torcetrapib, however, to cause any benefit on cardiovascular outcomes despite significantly increased HDL levels in several clinical trials casted doubts upon the concept of CETP inhibition. Meanwhile, off target toxicity could be shown for torcetrapib and a new generation of CETP inhibitors stands ready to be tested in large clinical trials. This article describes the formation and remodeling of HDL, how HDL is thought to be beneficial for the vasculature and what options we have today to increase HDL levels with a special focus on CETP inhibition.

  9. Effect of cigarette smoke and dietary cholesterol on plasma lipoprotein composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hojnacki, J.L.; Mulligan, J.J.; Cluette, J.E.; Kew, R.R.; Stack, D.J.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Pigeons were assigned to four treatment groups: 1) Controls fed a chow diet ad libitum and retained in their cages; 2) Sham pigeons fed a cholesterol-saturated fat diet and exposed to fresh air by the Lorillard smoking machine; 3) Low nicotine-low carbon monoxide (LoLo) animals also fed the cholesterol diet and exposed to low concentrations of cigarette smoke; and 4) High nicotine-high carbon monoxide (HiHi) birds fed the cholesterol diet and subjected to high concentrations of inhalants. Plasma very low density (VLDL), low density (LDL), and high density (HDL) lipoproteins were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Smoke-related differences appeared in HiHi HDL which contained relatively more free and esterified cholesterol and total lipid, but less total protein than HDL from Sham-smoked pigeons. VLDL from birds exposed to cigarette smoke (LoLo and HiHi) contained relatively more total lipid, but less total protein than VLDL from Sham pigeons. Inhalation smoke produced a marked depression in the HDL2/HDL3 ratio resulting from an increased proportion of the HDL3 subfraction relative to HDL2. Pigeons fed the cholesterol-saturated fat diet circulated HDL with greater free and esterified cholesterol mass than Controls. Diet also altered the type of cholesteryl ester present in HDL with cholesteryl linoleate representing the predominant form in Control pigeons and cholesteryl oleate in cholesterol-fed birds. These results demonstrate that cigarette smoking can mediate alterations in lipoprotein composition independent of changes induced by dietary cholesterol and saturated fat.

  10. Effects of high density lipoprotein subfractions on cholesterol homeostasis in human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Oram, J F

    1983-01-01

    Ultracentrifugally isolated high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles of d greater than 1.125 g/ml promote net transport of cholesterol from cultured cells. Consequently, when cultured human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells were incubated with HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml) and "very high" density lipoprotein (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25 g/ml), low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity was induced and the rate of LDL degradation by the cells was increased. Enhancement of LDL degradation by HDL3 and VHDL was sustained over incubation periods of 5 days at medium LDL concentrations greater than needed to saturate the LDL receptors. Even during these long-term incubations with LDL, HDL3 and VHDL caused marked reductions in cellular cholesterol content. Thus, an increase in the rate of cholesterol transport from cells may lead to a steady-state decrease in cellular cholesterol content and a sustained increase in the rate of clearance of LDL from the extracellular fluid. In contrast to the effects of HDL3 and VHDL, the major subclasses of HDL2 (HDL2b, d = 1.063-1.100 g/ml; HDL2a, d = 1.100-1.125 g/ml) did not promote net cholesterol transport from cells. Moreover, by apparent direct blockage of the effects that HDL3 and VHDL had on cholesterol transport, HDL2 reversed the increased rate of LDL degradation induced by HDL3 and VHDL. These results suggest that the relative proportion of HDL subfractions in the extracellular fluid may be an important determinant of both the rate of cholesterol transport from cells and the rate of receptor-mediated catabolism of LDL.

  11. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  12. Pleiotropic effects on subclasses of HDL, adiposity and glucose metabolism in adult Alaskan Eskimos

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, ME; Voruganti, VS; Cai, G; Cole, SA; Laston, S; Wenger, CR; MacCluer, JW; Dyke, B; Devereux, R; Ebbesson, SO; Fabsitz, RR; Howard, BV; Comuzzie, AG

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the heritability and the presence of pleiotropic effects on subfractions of high density lipoproteins (HDLs) as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), parameters for adiposity and glucose metabolism in adult Alaskan Eskimos. The present family study included 1214 adult Alaskan Eskimos (537 male/677 female). Body weight, height, circumferences, selected skinfolds and blood pressure were measured in all participants. Blood samples were collected under fasting conditions for isolation of plasma. Glucose, insulin, subclasses and size of lipoproteins, triglycerides, total and HDL cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) were measured in plasma. HbA1c was measured in total blood. Univariate and bivariate quantitative genetic analyses were conducted between HDL subclasses and size and the anthropometric and biochemical measures using the variance decomposition approach. Variation in all the analyzed traits exhibits a significant genetic component. Heritabilities ranged between 0.18 ± 0.11 for LDL2 (intermediate) to 0.89 ± 0.07 for small HDL. No common genetic effects were found on the HDL subclasses (small, intermediate and large). Small HDL particles were genetically correlated with LDL particles and HbA1c. Negative genetic correlations were observed between intermediate and large HDL subfractions and HDL size and measures of adiposity, LDL and parameters for glucose metabolism (HbA1, insulin). These observations confirm the presence of possible pleiotropic effects on HDL, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors and provide novel insight on the relationship between HDL subclasses, adiposity and glucose regulation. PMID:19950191

  13. High Blood Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cholesterol? To understand high blood cholesterol (ko-LES-ter- ... cholesterol from your body. What Is High Blood Cholesterol? High blood cholesterol is a condition in which ...

  14. From Evolution to Revolution: miRNAs as Pharmacological Targets for Modulating Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    There has been strong evolutionary pressure to ensure that an animal cell maintain levels of cholesterol within tight limits for normal function. Imbalances in cellular cholesterol levels are a major player in the development of different pathologies associated to dietary excess. Although epidemiological studies indicate that elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, recent genetic evidence and pharmacological therapies to raise HDL levels do not support their beneficial effects. Cholesterol efflux as the first and probably the most important step in reverse cholesterol transport is an important biological process relevant to HDL function. Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), post-transcriptional control different aspects of cellular cholesterol homeostasis including cholesterol efflux. miRNA families miR-33, miR-758, miR-10b, miR-26 and miR-106b directly modulates cholesterol efflux by targeting the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Pre-clinical studies with anti-miR therapies to inhibit some of these miRNAs have increased cellular cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport and reduce pathologies associated to dyslipidemia. Although miRNAs as therapy have benefits from existing antisense technology, different obstacles need to be solved before we incorporate such research into clinical care. Here we focus on the clinical potential of miRNAs as therapeutic target to increase cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport as a new alternative to ameliorate cholesterol-related pathologies. PMID:23435093

  15. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:28170429

  16. Total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Margaret D; Kit, Brian K; Lacher, David A; Yoon, Sung Sug

    2013-10-01

    High levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the "good cholesterol") are risk factors for coronary heart disease (1–5). To identify persons who may be at risk for developing coronary heart disease, adults are advised to have their cholesterol checked at least once every 5 years (i.e., to be screened for cholesterol) (6). A previous study reported declining trends in the percentage of adults with high total cholesterol during 1999–2010 (7). This report presents estimates of the percentages of adults aged 20 and over with high total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, and screened for cholesterol, based on data from 2011–2012, and compares them with corresponding estimates from 2009–2010. Analysis is based on measured cholesterol only and does not take into account whether lipid-lowering medications were taken.

  17. Genetic variants in ABCA1 promoter affect transcription activity and plasma HDL level in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiao-yong; Chu, Wei-wei; Shi, Heng-chuan; Yu, Shi-gang; Han, Hai-yin; Gu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-25

    Excess accumulation of cholesterol in plasma may result in coronary artery disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to apolipoproteins, a process necessary for plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. Higher plasma levels of HDL are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies of human disease and animal models had shown that an increased hepatic ABCA1 activity relates to an enhanced plasma HDL level. In this study, we hypothesized that functional mutations in the ABCA1 promoter in pigs may affect gene transcription activity, and consequently the HDL level in plasma. The promoter region of ABCA1 was comparatively scanned by direct sequencing with pool DNA of high- and low-HDL groups (n=30 for each group). Two polymorphisms, c. - 608A>G and c. - 418T>A, were revealed with reverse allele distribution in the two groups. The two polymorphisms were completely linked and formed only G-A or A-T haplotypes when genotyped in a larger population (n=526). Furthermore, we found that the G-A/G-A genotype was associated with higher HDL and ABCA1 mRNA level than A-T/A-T genotype. Luciferase assay also revealed that G-A haplotype promoter had higher activity than A-T haplotype. Single-nucleotide mutant assay showed that c.-418T>A was the causal mutation for ABCA1 transcription activity alteration. Conclusively, we identified two completely linked SNPs in porcine ABCA1 promoter region which have influence on the plasma HDL level by altering ABCA1 gene transcriptional activity.

  18. Extremely high HDL levels in a patient with multiple symmetric lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Deiana, L; Pes, G M; Carru, C; Campus, G V; Tidore, M G; Cherchi, G M

    1993-12-31

    An extreme form of hyperalphalipoproteinemia was studied in a patient affected by multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL); four relatives and three MSL controls were also evaluated. Plasma lipids and apolipoproteins were measured and overall lipoprotein profile was assessed by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The patient showed a plasma HDL-cholesterol of 138 mg/dl and an apo A-I of 218 mg/dl; moreover significantly high HDL levels were found in two unaffected relatives. The hypobetalipoproteinemia trait was also found both in the patient and in one of his daughters. We suggest that some pre-existing conditions may enhance lipoprotein metabolism alterations in this lipid storage disease.

  19. Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Scharnagl, Hubert; Kist, Manfred; Grawitz, Andrea Busse; Koenig, Wolfgang; Wieland, Heinrich; März, Winfried

    2004-01-15

    We examined the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication on lipids and apolipoproteins in 87 patients with duodenal ulcers. A significant increase was observed in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (+24.7%, p <0.001), apolipoprotein AI (+9.0%, p <0.001), and apolipoprotein AII (+11.7%, p <0.001) after eradication. Minor increases occurred in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained unchanged. Our results suggest that chronic H. pylori infection reduces plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and that eradication improves the lipoprotein pattern.

  20. Relation Between Cigarette Smoking, Body Fat Distribution and Density of Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Cholesterol in Women Linda R. Beson, Major AFIT Student Attending: University of Florida AFIT/CI/CIA-92-085 DTIC Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-6583 ELECTE 1...CIGARETTE SMOKING, BODY FAT DISTRIBUTION AND DENSITY OF LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL IN WOMEN By W: , LINDA R. BESON " Di t A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE...12 Cholesterol and Serum Lipoproteins ......... .. 14 Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Cholesterol . . . 18 High Density Lipoprotein (HDL

  1. Interrelationships among HDL metabolism, aging, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    HDL plasma concentrations decline with age in prospective studies. Decline in HDL concentration and function may occur secondary because of hormonal changes, inflammatory processes, and diabetes mellitus. Beyond these effects specific aging processes may be involved. Replicative aging, the telomere-driven loss of divisional capacity, is a species-specific aging mechanism that may decrease HDL concentration and function. Cross-sectionally, by contrast, HDL levels do not change much or even slightly increase with age, suggesting that only people with still high HDL concentrations survive. A selection bias by HDL lowering genetic variation may explain why HDL deficiency is extremely rare among centenarians. Vice versa, HDL may modulate the aging process, not only by its well-known antiatherogenic effects, eg, its ability to remove cellular lipids and by antiatherogenic pleiotropic effects on cell survival, but possibly also by direct interfering with aging signaling or survival factor KLOTHO. Most of the current findings, however, are based on cell culture and selected animal experiments and await further confirmation by appropriate in vivo models.

  2. High-density lipoprotein-mediated transcellular cholesterol transport in mouse aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-09-18

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition of PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt.

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein-Mediated Transcellular Cholesterol Transport in Mouse Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCA1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt. PMID:26255968

  4. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and alcohol consumption in US white and black adults: data from NHANES II.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, S; Carroll, M; Johnson, C; Fulwood, R; Kalsbeek, W; Briefel, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is known to be positively related to moderate alcohol consumption from studies in selected populations. This study describes the association in a representative sample of the US adult population. METHODS. Stratification and multivariate regression analyses were used to examine HDL cholesterol levels and alcohol consumption. RESULTS. Fewer women than men reported consumption of alcohol at any frequency. Similar percentages of Whites and Blacks reported alcohol consumption. Age-adjusted mean HDL cholesterol levels were higher among alcohol drinkers than among nondrinkers in all sex-race strata. Mean HDL cholesterol levels of Whites and Blacks of both sexes increased consistently with increased frequency of consumption of beer, wine, and liquor. With age, education, body mass index, smoking, and physical activity controlled for, there were higher age-adjusted HDL cholesterol levels with increasing reported quantities of alcohol consumed. Daily or weekly use of alcohol led to an increase of 5.1 mg/dL in mean HDL cholesterol level, whereas consumption of 1 g of alcohol led to an increase of 0.87 mg/dL. CONCLUSION. Even if there is a causal association between alcohol consumption and higher HDL cholesterol levels, it is suggested that efforts to reduce coronary heart disease risks concentrate on the cessation of smoking and weight control. PMID:8498617

  5. Coincubation of PON1, APO A1, and LCAT increases the time HDL is able to prevent LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hine, David; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike

    2012-02-01

    The inhibition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a major antiatherogenic property of this lipoprotein. This activity is due, in part, to HDL associated proteins. However, whether these proteins interact in the antioxidant activity of HDL is unknown. LDL was incubated with apolipoprotein A1 (apo A1), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) alone or in combination, in the presence or absence of HDL under oxidizing conditions. LDL lipid peroxide concentrations were determined. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 all inhibit LDL oxidation in the absence of HDL and enhance the ability of HDL to inhibit LDL oxidation. Their effect was additive rather than synergistic; the combination of these proteins significantly enhanced the length of time LDL was protected from oxidation. This seemed to be due to the ability of PON1 to prevent the oxidative inactivation of LCAT. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 can all contribute to the antioxidant activity of HDL in vitro. The combination of apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 prolongs the time that HDL can prevent LDL oxidation, due, at least in part, to the prevention LCAT inactivation.

  6. The Association of Elevated HDL Levels With Carotid Atherosclerosis in Middle-Aged Women With Untreated Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidi, Helen; Pavlidis, George; Trivilou, Paraskevi; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Tzortzis, Stavros; Xenogiannis, Iosif; Schoinas, Antonios; Lekakis, John

    2015-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a negative risk factor, is positively associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease. We investigated the association between high HDL-C levels and target organ damage (TOD) in never treated women with hypertension. We measured HDL-C levels in 117 women followed by estimation of TODs, that is, pulse wave velocity, microalbuminuria, left ventricular mass index, coronary flow reserve, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Women were divided into 2 groups (HDLH and HDLL), regarding HDL-C quartiles (upper quartile vs the first 3 lower quartiles). In HDLH group : HDL ≥70 mg/dL), cIMT was nonindependently, negatively related to HDL-C (ρ = -.42, P < .05). Using receiver -operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis in the HDLH group, we concluded that the cutoff value of HDL ≥76.5 mg/dL moderately predicted the absence of carotid atherosclerosis (area under the curve: 0.77, P = .02; confidence interval: 0.57-0.97; sensitivity 73% and specificity 67%). Increased HDL-C may predict the absence of carotid atherosclerosis in middle-age women with untreated essential hypertension and consequently contribute to total cardiovascular risk estimation and treatment planning.

  7. NMR Structure of the C-Terminal Transmembrane Domain of the HDL Receptor, SR-BI, and a Functionally Relevant Leucine Zipper Motif.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Hanson, Paul J; Lange, Philip T; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2017-03-07

    The interaction of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), is critical for lowering plasma cholesterol levels and reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease. The HDL/SR-BI complex facilitates delivery of cholesterol into cells and is likely mediated by receptor dimerization. This work describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to generate the first high-resolution structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI. This region of SR-BI harbors a leucine zipper dimerization motif, which when mutated impairs the ability of the receptor to bind HDL and mediate cholesterol delivery. These losses in function correlate with the inability of SR-BI to form dimers. We also identify juxtamembrane regions of the extracellular domain of SR-BI that may interact with the lipid surface to facilitate cholesterol transport functions of the receptor.

  8. HDL to verification logic translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Windley, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The increasingly higher number of transistors possible in VLSI circuits compounds the difficulty in insuring correct designs. As the number of possible test cases required to exhaustively simulate a circuit design explodes, a better method is required to confirm the absence of design faults. Formal verification methods provide a way to prove, using logic, that a circuit structure correctly implements its specification. Before verification is accepted by VLSI design engineers, the stand alone verification tools that are in use in the research community must be integrated with the CAD tools used by the designers. One problem facing the acceptance of formal verification into circuit design methodology is that the structural circuit descriptions used by the designers are not appropriate for verification work and those required for verification lack some of the features needed for design. We offer a solution to this dilemma: an automatic translation from the designers' HDL models into definitions for the higher-ordered logic (HOL) verification system. The translated definitions become the low level basis of circuit verification which in turn increases the designer's confidence in the correctness of higher level behavioral models.

  9. WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase is associated with low plasma HDL-C levels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jenny C; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Kyttälä, Mira; Dastani, Zari; Cantor, Rita M; Sobel, Eric M; Plaisier, Christopher L; Engert, James C; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; Kane, John P; Malloy, Mary J; Pullinger, Clive R; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; de Bruin, Tjerk W A; Aouizerat, Bradley E; van der Kallen, Carla C J; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I; Marcil, Michel; Viikari, Jorma S A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Genest, Jacques; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2008-08-01

    Low serum HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. We performed targeted genotyping of a 12.4 Mb linked region on 16q to test for association with low HDL-C by using a regional-tag SNP strategy. We identified one SNP, rs2548861, in the WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene with region-wide significance for low HDL-C in dyslipidemic families of Mexican and European descent and in low-HDL-C cases and controls of European descent (p = 6.9 x 10(-7)). We extended our investigation to the population level by using two independent unascertained population-based Finnish cohorts, the cross-sectional METSIM cohort of 4,463 males and the prospective Young Finns cohort of 2,265 subjects. The combined analysis provided p = 4 x 10(-4) to 2 x 10(-5). Importantly, in the prospective cohort, we observed a significant longitudinal association of rs2548861 with HDL-C levels obtained at four different time points over 21 years (p = 0.003), and the T risk allele explained 1.5% of the variance in HDL-C levels. The rs2548861 resides in a highly conserved region in intron 8 of WWOX. Results from our in vitro reporter assay and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay demonstrate that this region functions as a cis-regulatory element whose associated rs2548861 SNP has a specific allelic effect and that the region forms an allele-specific DNA-nuclear-factor complex. In conclusion, analyses of 9,798 subjects show significant association between HDL-C and a WWOX variant with an allele-specific cis-regulatory function.

  10. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  11. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kang, Jun-Myung; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2010). A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1) WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2) fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3) fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4) HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5) SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026). However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005–1.820) only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women. PMID:26859830

  12. Association between serum cholesterol and eating behaviours during early childhood: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Navindra; Maguire, Jonathon L.; Lebovic, Gerald; Carsley, Sarah; Khovratovich, Marina; Randall Simpson, Janis A.; McCrindle, Brian W.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Birken, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Modifiable behaviours during early childhood may provide opportunities to prevent disease processes before adverse outcomes occur. Our objective was to determine whether young children’s eating behaviours were associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Methods: In this cross-sectional study involving children aged 3–5 years recruited from 7 primary care practices in Toronto, Ontario, we assessed the relation between eating behaviours as assessed by the NutriSTEP (Nutritional Screening Tool for Every Preschooler) questionnaire (completed by parents) and serum levels of non–high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, a surrogate marker of cardiovascular risk. We also assessed the relation between dietary intake and serum non-HDL cholesterol, and between eating behaviours and other laboratory indices of cardiovascular risk (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, HDL cholesterol and apoliprotein A1). Results: A total of 1856 children were recruited from primary care practices in Toronto. Of these children, we included 1076 in our study for whom complete data and blood samples were available for analysis. The eating behaviours subscore of the NutriSTEP tool was significantly associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol (p = 0.03); for each unit increase in the eating behaviours subscore suggesting greater nutritional risk, we saw an increase of 0.02 mmol/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.002 to 0.05) in serum non-HDL cholesterol. The eating behaviours subscore was also associated with LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B, but not with HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein A1. The dietary intake subscore was not associated with non-HDL cholesterol. Interpretation: Eating behaviours in preschool-aged children are important potentially modifiable determinants of cardiovascular risk and should be a focus for future studies of screening and behavioural interventions. PMID:23775611

  13. Bone marrow-derived HL mitigates bone marrow-derived CETP-mediated decreases in HDL in mice globally deficient in HL and the LDLr.

    PubMed

    Hime, Neil J; Black, Audrey S; Bonnet, David J; Curtiss, Linda K

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the combined effects of HL and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), derived exclusively from bone marrow (BM), on plasma lipids and atherosclerosis in high-fat-fed, atherosclerosis-prone mice. We transferred BM expressing these proteins into male and female double-knockout HL-deficient, LDL receptor-deficient mice (HL(-/-)LDLr(-/-)). Four BM chimeras were generated, where BM-derived cells expressed 1) HL but not CETP, 2) CETP and HL, 3) CETP but not HL, or 4) neither CETP nor HL. After high-fat feeding, plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) was decreased in mice with BM expressing CETP but not HL (17 ± 4 and 19 ± 3 mg/dl, female and male mice, respectively) compared with mice with BM expressing neither CETP nor HL (87 ± 3 and 95 ± 4 mg/dl, female and male mice, respectively, P < 0.001 for both sexes). In female mice, the presence of BM-derived HL mitigated this CETP-mediated decrease in HDL-C. BM-derived CETP decreased the cholesterol component of HDL particles and increased plasma cholesterol. BM-derived HL mitigated these effects of CETP. Atherosclerosis was not significantly different between BM chimeras. These results suggest that BM-derived HL mitigates the HDL-lowering, HDL-modulating, and cholesterol-raising effects of BM-derived CETP and warrant further studies to characterize the functional properties of these protein interactions.

  14. Do Mutations Causing Low HDL-C Promote Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael; Rhyne, Jeffrey; Hong, Seung Ho; Friel, Gina; Dolinar, Christina; Riley, Ward

    2007-01-01

    Background Although observational data support an inverse relationship between high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic HDL deficiency states often do not correlate with premature CHD. Methods Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measurements were obtained in cases comprising 10 different mutations in LCAT, ABCA1 and APOA1 to further evaluate the relationship between low HDL resulting from genetic variation and early atherosclerosis. Results In a 1:2 case-control study of sex and age-related (± 5 y) subjects (n=114), cIMT was nearly identical between cases (0.66 ± 0.17 cm) and controls (0.65 ± 0.18 cm) despite significantly lower HDL cholesterol (0.67 vs 1.58 mmol/l) and apolipoprotein A-I levels (96.7 vs. 151.4 mg/dl) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Genetic variants identified in the present study may be insufficient to promote early carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:17113061

  15. Cholesterol and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cholesterol and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Cholesterol and ... child's risk of developing heart disease later. About Cholesterol Cholesterol is a waxy substance produced by the ...

  16. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... 2014. Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  17. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol Updated:Apr 3,2017 Cholesterol can be both ... misconceptions about cholesterol. Click on each misconception about cholesterol to see the truth: My choices about diet ...

  18. Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Lifestyle Changes and Cholesterol Updated:Sep 26,2016 As part of a ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  19. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  20. Effects of acute exercise on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein subfractions in moderately trained females

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P. M.; Fowler, S.; Warty, V.; Danduran, M.; Visich, P.; Keteyian, S.

    1998-01-01

    Increases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels have previously been reported after moderate exercise bouts lasting less than two hours in men. Little information exists, however, on HDL-C responses after moderate duration exercise in women. Post-exercise HDL- C modifications may appear differently in women because of higher baseline HDL-C concentrations and differences in lipolytic activity. To determine the influence of exercise on acute HDL-C responses in women, 12 trained premenopausal women (22 (4) years old; mean (SD)) who ran 24- 48 km a week exercised on a motor driven treadmill at 75% VO2MAX until 3.34 MJ (800 kcal) were expended (72 (9) min). Subjects were all tested during the early follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Fasting blood samples were obtained before exercise (baseline), immediately after (IPE), one hour after (1 h PE), 24 hours after (24 h PE), and 48 hours after (48 h PE) exercise. Plasma was analysed for HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C. A significant increase in HDL-C was observed 48 h PE (p<0.05). HDL3-C increased IPE (p<0.01) but returned to baseline at 1 h PE. In contrast, HDL2-C was not significantly different from baseline at any time point. The rise in HDL-C, however, was attributed to an increase in both HDL2 and HDL3. Moreover, at 48 h PE, the increase in HDL-C correlated highly with changes in HDL2-C (r = 0.92). Thus it appears that exercise of moderate duration can elicit similar post- exercise increases in HDL-C in women to those previously reported in men. However, the changes in HDL subfractions leading to the rise in HDL-C may be different in women. 


 PMID:9562167

  1. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin release of primary human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Krautbauer, Sabrina; Neumeier, Markus; Eisinger, Kristina; Hader, Yvonne; Dada, Ashraf; Schmitz, Gerd; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Buechler, Christa

    2013-12-01

    Adipocytes in obesity have inappropriately low cholesterol while adiponectin release is reduced. Cholesterol shortage may contribute to low adiponectin and 3T3-L1 cells treated with lovastatin have diminished adiponectin in cell supernatants. LDL and HDL deliver cholesterol to adipocytes. LDL but not HDL increases adiponectin in cell supernatants of primary human adipocytes. The effect of LDL is not blocked by receptor associated protein suggesting that members of the LDL-receptor family are not involved. To evaluate whether these in vitro observations translate into changes in systemic adiponectin, adiponectin was measured in serum of three patients before, immediately after and 3d after LDL-apheresis. Whereas circulating lipoproteins are reduced immediately after apheresis adiponectin is not changed. Therefore, acute lowering of lipoproteins does not affect systemic adiponectin also excluding that plenty of adiponectin is bound to lipoprotein particles. Accordingly, levels of adiponectin in purified lipoproteins are quite low. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a rare disorder associated with low plasma LDL. Serum adiponectin is, however, similar compared to healthy controls. Thus, neither LDL nor HDL directly contributes to circulating adiponectin concentrations.

  2. The strange case of Dr HDL and Mr HDL: does a NO's story illuminate the mystery of HDL's dark side uncovered by Dr HDL's drug targeting CETP?

    PubMed

    Duriez, Patrick; Bordet, Régis; Berthelot, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the first large-scale morbidity and mortality trial (ILLUMINATE) to evaluate the cardiovascular end points of a CETP inhibitor (torcetrapib) has been prematurely stopped because the mortality was significantly increased in the treated group. Why torcetrapib caused excess death is not known. Based on the fact that HDL interacts with endothelial nitric oxyde synthase (eNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) secretion, which partly controlled blood pressure and than torcetrapib could increase blood pressure among some patients, we hypothesize that CETP inhibition could have significantly inhibit eNOS. CETP inhibition would have enlarged HDL size resulting in a deficit in the interaction between HDL and the Scavenger Receptor class B type I (SR-BI), which is an important link between HDL and eNOS activation. We suggest than the deficit in NO secretion would have been sufficient among all patients to induce a destabilization of the plaques of atheroma, but could have induced a pathogenic increase in blood pressure only in patients whose eNOS activity was naturally weak due to genetic polymorphisms of this enzyme. We also hypothesize that the increase in HDL levels, induced by CETP inhibition, coupled with the capacity of HDL to induce endothelin-1 secretion would have aggravated the cardiovascular risks under this CETP inhibitor treatment.

  3. The LDL-HDL Profile Determines the Risk of Atherosclerosis: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the leading death in the United State, is a disease in which a plaque builds up inside the arteries. As the plaque continues to grow, the shear force of the blood flow through the decreasing cross section of the lumen increases. This force may eventually cause rupture of the plaque, resulting in the formation of thrombus, and possibly heart attack. It has long been recognized that the formation of a plaque relates to the cholesterol concentration in the blood. For example, individuals with LDL above 190 mg/dL and HDL below 40 mg/dL are at high risk, while individuals with LDL below 100 mg/dL and HDL above 50 mg/dL are at no risk. In this paper, we developed a mathematical model of the formation of a plaque, which includes the following key variables: LDL and HDL, free radicals and oxidized LDL, MMP and TIMP, cytockines: MCP-1, IFN-γ, IL-12 and PDGF, and cells: macrophages, foam cells, T cells and smooth muscle cells. The model is given by a system of partial differential equations with in evolving plaque. Simulations of the model show how the combination of the concentrations of LDL and HDL in the blood determine whether a plaque will grow or disappear. More precisely, we create a map, showing the risk of plaque development for any pair of values (LDL,HDL). PMID:24621857

  4. The LDL-HDL profile determines the risk of atherosclerosis: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the leading death in the United State, is a disease in which a plaque builds up inside the arteries. As the plaque continues to grow, the shear force of the blood flow through the decreasing cross section of the lumen increases. This force may eventually cause rupture of the plaque, resulting in the formation of thrombus, and possibly heart attack. It has long been recognized that the formation of a plaque relates to the cholesterol concentration in the blood. For example, individuals with LDL above 190 mg/dL and HDL below 40 mg/dL are at high risk, while individuals with LDL below 100 mg/dL and HDL above 50 mg/dL are at no risk. In this paper, we developed a mathematical model of the formation of a plaque, which includes the following key variables: LDL and HDL, free radicals and oxidized LDL, MMP and TIMP, cytockines: MCP-1, IFN-γ, IL-12 and PDGF, and cells: macrophages, foam cells, T cells and smooth muscle cells. The model is given by a system of partial differential equations with in evolving plaque. Simulations of the model show how the combination of the concentrations of LDL and HDL in the blood determine whether a plaque will grow or disappear. More precisely, we create a map, showing the risk of plaque development for any pair of values (LDL,HDL).

  5. Protection from Cardiovascular Disease Due to Increased High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in African Black Populations: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Woudberg, Nicholas J; Goedecke, Julia H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2016-10-20

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in sub-Saharan Africa has increased over the last decade. Despite this, African Black populations present with relatively low incidences of coronary heart disease and ischemic heart disease, which may be attributed to their lower total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, compared with White populations. Commensurate with these lower lipid levels, it was believed that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations would be higher in Black populations compared with their White counterparts. This is based on data from previous studies of African and African American populations; however, recent studies conducted in Africa found similar or lower HDL-C concentrations in Black compared with White individuals. Current research, therefore, suggests that HDL-C may not be a good indicator of cardiovascular risk and future research should focus on HDL quality (vs quantity), by measuring HDL functionality and subclass.

  6. Defective removal of cellular cholesterol and phospholipids by apolipoprotein A-I in Tangier Disease.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, G A; Knopp, R H; Oram, J F

    1995-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare genetic disorder characterized by extremely low plasma levels of HDL and apo A-I, deposition of cholesteryl esters in tissues, and a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the possibility that HDL apolipoprotein-mediated removal of cellular lipids may be defective in Tangier disease. With fibroblasts from normal subjects, purified apo A-I cleared cells of cholesteryl esters, depleted cellular free cholesterol pools available for esterification, and stimulated efflux of radiolabeled cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. With fibroblasts from two unrelated Tangier patients, however, apo A-I had little or no effect on any of these lipid transport processes. Intact HDL also was unable to clear cholesteryl esters from Tangier cells even though it promoted radiolabeled cholesterol efflux to levels 50-70% normal. Passive desorption of radiolabeled cholesterol or phospholipids into medium containing albumin or trypsinized HDL was normal for Tangier cells. Binding studies showed that the interaction of apo A-I with high-affinity binding sites on Tangier fibroblasts was abnormal. These results indicate that apo A-I has an impaired ability to remove cholesterol and phospholipid from Tangier fibroblasts, possibly because of a defective interaction of apo A-I with cell-surface binding sites. Failure of apo A-I to acquire cellular lipids may account for the rapid catabolism of nascent HDL particles and the low plasma HDL levels in Tangier disease. Images PMID:7615839

  7. Assimilation (in vitro) of cholesterol by yogurt bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dilmi-Bouras, Abdelkader

    2006-01-01

    A considerable variation is noticed between the different species studied and even between the strains of the same species, in the assimilation of cholesterol in synthetic media, in presence of different concentrations of bile salts and under anaerobiosis conditions. The obtained results show that certain strains of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus resist bile salts and assimilate appreciable cholesterol quantities in their presence. The study of associations shows that only strains assimilating cholesterol in a pure state remain active when they are put in associations, but there is no additional effect. However, the symbiotic effect between Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus of yogurt, with regard to bile salts, is confirmed. The lactic fermenters of yogurt (Y2) reduce the levels of total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, in a well-balanced way. In all cases, the assimilated quantity of HDL-cholesterol is lower than that of LDL-cholesterol. Moreover, yogurt Y2 keeps a significant number of bacteria, superior to 10(8) cells ml(-1), and has a good taste 10 days after its production.

  8. LIPC variants in the promoter and intron 1 modify HDL-C levels in a sex-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Mary F; Myers, Richard H; Pankow, James S; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2009-05-01

    We previously reported linkage for plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on 15q21 in Caucasian families from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study (NHLBI FHS). Hepatic lipase gene (LIPC), which has a major role in lipoprotein metabolism, resides within the linkage region and constitutes an obvious candidate gene. While hepatic lipase is a known player in HDL metabolism, the relationship between common LIPC variants and HDL-C levels remains unclear. In the current study, we employed population-based and family-based tests of association with both quantitative HDL-C levels and a dichotomous dyslipidemia trait (affected men: HDL<40 mg/dL and women: HDL<50 mg/dL, denoted as low HDL). We genotyped 19 tag-SNPs spanning 139.9 kb around the LIPC in the 591 families (2238 subjects). Strong association in a proxy-promoter 5' SNP (rs261342) and HDL-C levels was detected in women, but not in men. The less common allele was associated with an increase of approximately 14% in HDL-C levels, and a decrease of approximately 30% in risk of low HDL. In addition, strong association in women of an intron 1 SNP (rs12593008) and low HDL and moderate association in men (rs8028759) with both HDL-C levels and low HDL phenotype were found and may represent either functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), or more likely, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with functional variants. Because of the association of lipid abnormalities with diabetes, and other lifestyle parameters, we also performed association analyses using different covariate adjustments as well as strategically selected sub-samples. The sex-specific association of rs261342, rs12593008 or rs8028759 remained substantially the same through these analyses. Finally, we found that a common haplotype was overtransmitted to offspring with low HDL-C. The sex-specific associations found in our study could be due to the interactions with the endogenous hormonal environment, lifestyle

  9. miRNA Modulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the roles of the SREBP1 and SREBP2 transcription factors in regulating fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis and uptake have been known for some time, it was recently discovered that two related microRNAs, miR-33a and miR-33b, are embedded in these genes. Studies indicate that miR-33a and miR-33b act with their host genes, Srebp2 and Srebp1, respectively, to reciprocally regulate cholesterol homeostasis and fatty acid metabolism in a negative feedback loop. miR-33 has been shown to post-transcriptionally repress key genes involved in cellular cholesterol export and HDL metabolism (Abca1, Abcg1, Npc1), fatty acid oxidation (Crot, Cpt1a, Hadhb, Ampk), and glucose metabolism (Sirt6, Irs2). Delivery of inhibitors of miR-33 in vitro and in vivo relieves repression of these genes resulting in up-regulation of the associated metabolic pathways. In mouse models, miR-33 antagonism has proven has proven to be an effective strategy for increasing plasma HDL cholesterol and fatty acid oxidation, and protecting from atherosclerosis. These exciting findings have opened up promising new avenues for the development of therapeutics to treat dyslipidemia and other metabolic disorders. PMID:22011750

  10. Adding monounsaturated fatty acids to a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David J.A.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Wong, Julia M.W.; Kendall, Cyril; Lewis, Gary F.; Vidgen, Edward; Connelly, Philip W.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Lamarche, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Background Higher intake of monounsaturated fat may raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol without raising low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. We tested whether increasing the monounsaturated fat content of a diet proven effective for lowering LDL cholesterol (dietary portfolio) also modified other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, specifically by increasing HDL cholesterol, lowering serum triglyceride and further reducing the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol. Methods Twenty-four patients with hyperlipidemia consumed a therapeutic diet very low in saturated fat for one month and were then randomly assigned to a dietary portfolio low or high in monounsaturated fatty acid for another month. We supplied participants’ food for the two-month period. Calorie intake was based on Harris–Benedict estimates for energy requirements. Results For patients who consumed the dietary portfolio high in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol rose, whereas for those consuming the dietary portfolio low in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol did not change. The 12.5% treatment difference was significant (0.12 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05 to 0.21, p = 0.003). The ratio of total to HDL cholesterol was reduced by 6.5% with the diet high in monounsaturated fat relative to the diet low in monounsaturated fat (−0.28, 95% CI −0.59 to −0.04, p = 0.025). Patients consuming the diet high in monounsaturated fat also had significantly higher concentrations of apolipoprotein AI, and their C-reactive protein was significantly lower. No treatment differences were seen for triglycerides, other lipids or body weight, and mean weight loss was similar for the diets high in monounsaturated fat (−0.8 kg) and low in monounsaturated fat (−1.2 kg). Interpretation Monounsaturated fat increased the effectiveness of a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio, despite statin-like reductions in LDL cholesterol. The potential benefits for cardiovascular risk were

  11. Some observations on the cholesterol esterifying and cholesterol ester hydrolyzing activities in dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kamo-Yamada, F; Cho, S; Sugano, M

    1980-05-01

    Cholesterol esterification and cholesterol ester hydrolysis in dog plasma were investigated. Esterification proceeded linearly for 60 min, and the amounts of cholesterol esterified were in the range of 0.13-0.18 mumol/ml/h. No change of acyl composition had occurred in newly formed cholesterol esters during incubation. With the addition of Na taurocholate (10 mM), complete inhibition of the esterifying activity and maximal activation of the hydrolase activity were observed. Approximately 50% of cholesterol esters present in plasma was hydrolyzed in 10 min of incubation, and the reaction was completed within 60 min. The maximal rate of hydrolysis was estimated to be 4.0-5.4 mumol/ml/h, and polyunsaturated esters were hydrolyzed more rapidly than saturated ones. The esterifying activity was detected in high density (HDL) and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL), while the hydrolytic activity was found only in VHDL. Each lipoprotein fraction served as a good substrate for hydrolysis, while HDL was the sole substrate for esterification. The optimal pH of the hydrolytic activity in VHDL lay in a broad range between 6.8 and 7.2 and the apparent Km was determined as 12.5 x 10(-3) mM for cholesteryl oleate.

  12. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  13. Variants with large effects on blood lipids and the role of cholesterol and triglycerides in coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Helgadottir, Anna; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hjartarson, Eirikur; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Magnusdottir, Audur; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Kristjansson, Helgi; Sulem, Patrick; Oddsson, Asmundur; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rafnar, Thorunn; Masson, Gisli; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Daneshpour, Maryam S; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun; Swinkels, Dorine W; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Levey, Allan I; Patel, Riyaz S; Hayek, Salim S; Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjorg J; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-06-01

    Sequence variants affecting blood lipids and coronary artery disease (CAD) may enhance understanding of the atherogenicity of lipid fractions. Using a large resource of whole-genome sequence data, we examined rare and low-frequency variants for association with non-HDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in up to 119,146 Icelanders. We discovered 13 variants with large effects (within ANGPTL3, APOB, ABCA1, NR1H3, APOA1, LIPC, CETP, LDLR, and APOC1) and replicated 14 variants. Five variants within PCSK9, APOA1, ANGPTL4, and LDLR associate with CAD (33,090 cases and 236,254 controls). We used genetic risk scores for the lipid fractions to examine their causal relationship with CAD. The non-HDL cholesterol genetic risk score associates most strongly with CAD (P = 2.7 × 10(-28)), and no other genetic risk score associates with CAD after accounting for non-HDL cholesterol. The genetic risk score for non-HDL cholesterol confers CAD risk beyond that of LDL cholesterol (P = 5.5 × 10(-8)), suggesting that targeting atherogenic remnant cholesterol may reduce cardiovascular risk.

  14. Utility of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Laura; González, Ana I; Elbert, Alicia; Berg, Gabriela; Wikinski, Regina

    2004-08-01

    Non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) is proposed as a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Measuring non-HDL-C, as total cholesterol minus HDL-C, is convenient for routine practice because, among other advantages, fasting is not required. There are limited data of non-HDL-C in end-stage renal disease patients. We applied non-HDL-C calculation to 50 chronic renal patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and 20 healthy subjects, apart from measurement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) HDL, intermediate-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (IDL-C), apoprotein (apo) B, and triglycerides. HD patients presented higher plasma triglycerides and IDL-C and lower HDL-C than the control group, even after adjustment for age (P < .05). VLDL-C increased in HD patients (P < .001) while differences in non-HDL-C did not reach significance (P = .08). To detect which parameter constitutes a better marker of CVD risk among HD patients, a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed considering HD patients in the highest risk group for CVD. In the ROC graphic, the plots of VLDL and IDL-C exhibited the greater observed accuracy and the best performance, while non-HDL-C showed a curve close to the 45 degrees line indicating that this parameter is a poor discriminator for evaluating CVD risk among HD patients. Non-HDL-C calculation, expressing all apo B-containing lipoproteins, may miss the significant contribution of each atherogenic lipoprotein, such as increase in IDL. This observation would not be in agreement with the currently proposed application of non-HDL-C a useful tool for risk assessment among HD patients.

  15. Bidirectional flux of cholesterol between cells and lipoproteins. Effects of phospholipid depletion of high density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.; Bamberger, M.J.; Latta, R.A.; Rapp, P.E.; Phillips, M.C.; Rothblat, G.H.

    1986-05-05

    The bidirectional surface transfer of free cholesterol (FC) between Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and human high density lipoprotein (HDL) was studied. Cells and HDL were prelabeled with (4-/sup 14/C)FC and (7-/sup 3/H)FC, respectively. Influx and efflux of FC were measured simultaneously from the appearance of /sup 3/H counts in cells and /sup 14/C counts in medium. Results were analyzed by a computerized procedure which fitted sets of kinetic data to a model assuming that cell and HDL FC populations each formed a single homogeneous pool and that together the pools formed a closed system. This analysis yielded values for the first-order rate constants of FC influx and efflux (ki and ke), from which influx and efflux of FC mass (Fi and Fe) could be calculated. With normal HDL, the uptake and release of FC tracers conformed well to the above-described model; Fi and Fe were approximately equal, suggesting an exchange of FC between cells and HDL. HDL was depleted of phospholipid (PL) by treatment with either phospholipase A2 or heparin-releasable rat hepatic lipase, followed by incubation with bovine serum albumin. PL depletion of HDL had little or no effect on ki, but reduced ke, indicating that PL-deficient HDL is a relatively poor acceptor of cell cholesterol. The reduction in ke resulted in initial Fi greater than Fe and, thus, in net uptake of FC by the cells. This result explained previous results demonstrating net uptake of FC from PL-depleted HDL. In the presence of an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase, the steady state distribution of FC mass between cells and HDL was accurately predicted by the ratio of rate constants for FC flux. This result provided additional validation for describing FC flux in terms of first-order rate constants and homogeneous cell and HDL FC pools.

  16. Recombinant human serum amyloid A (apoSAAp) binds cholesterol and modulates cholesterol flux.

    PubMed

    Liang, J S; Sipe, J D

    1995-01-01

    During acute inflammation, the serum amyloid A (apoSAA) proteins apoSAA1 and apoSAA2 are transiently associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) in concentrations of as much as 1000-fold more than their concentrations during homeostasis; however, their effect on HDL function is unclear. Recombinant apoSAAp, a hybrid of the closely related human apoSAA1 and apoSAA2 isoforms, was found to exhibit a high affinity for cholesterol. The adsorption of apoSAAp to polystyrene microtiter wells at physiological pH, temperature, and salt concentration was inhibited and reversed by cholesterol. ApoSAAp, to a greater extent than apoA-I, albumin, or fetal bovine serum, enhanced diffusion of cholesterol from HDL across a membrane that retained molecules > 3.5 kDa. Cholesterol from 25 nM to 125 microM inhibited binding of [3H]cholesterol to 167 nM apoSAAp. A cholesterol binding assay was developed to determine the dissociation constant for binding of [3H]cholesterol to apoSAAp; Kd = 1.7 +/- 0.3 x 10(-7) M and the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) is 1.1 +/- 0.1 mol/mol. After binding cholesterol, the apparent size of apoSAAp as determined by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-100 was increased from 12 to 23 kDa. ApoSAAp enhanced free [14C]cholesterol uptake from tissue culture medium by HepG2 cells, an effect that was dose dependent and blocked by polyclonal antibodies to human apoSAA1 and apoSAA2. ApoSAAp, unlike apoA-I, was taken up from serum-free medium by HepG2 cells and appeared to be degraded by cell-associated enzymes. Unlike peritoneal exudate cells, human HepG2 hepatoma cells do not secrete an enzyme that degrades apoSAAp. These results suggest that apoSAA can potentially serve as a transient cholesterol-binding protein.

  17. Metabolic syndrome in South Asian immigrants: more than low HDL requiring aggressive management.

    PubMed

    Dodani, Sunita; Henkhaus, Rebecca; Wick, Jo; Vacek, James; Gupta, Kamal; Dong, Lei; Butler, Merlin G

    2011-03-16

    Aggressive clinical and public health interventions have resulted in significant reduction in coronary artery disease (CAD) worldwide. However, South Asian immigrants (SAIs) exhibit the higher prevalence of CAD and its risk factors as compared with other ethnic populations. The objective of the current study is to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS), its association with high density Lipoprotein (HDL) function, Apo lipoprotein A-I (APOA1) gene polymorphisms, and sub-clinical CAD using common carotid intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) as a surrogate marker. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted on SAIs aged 35-65 years. Dysfunctional/pro-inflammatory (Dys-HDL) was determined using novel cell free assay and HDL inflammatory index. Six intronic APOA1 gene polymorphisms were analyzed by DNA sequencing. According to the International Diabetes Federation definition, MS prevalence was 29.7% in SAIs without CAD and 26% had HDL inflammatory index ≥ 1 suggesting pro-inflammatory Dys-HDL. Six novel APOA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed with logistic regression, three SNPs (G2, G3, and G5) were found to be significantly associated with MS (p = 0.039, p = 0.038, p = 0.054). On multi-variate analysis, MS was significantly associated with BMI > 23 (P = 0.005), Apo-A-I levels (p = 0.01), and Lp [a] (p < 0.0001). SAIs are known to be at a disproportionately high risk for CAD that may be attributed to a high burden for MS. There is need to explore and understand non-traditional risk factors with special focus on Dys-HDL, knowing that SAIs have low HDL levels. Large prospective studies are needed to further strengthen current study results.

  18. A High Throughput Biochemical Fluorometric Method for Measuring Lipid Peroxidation in HDL

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Roberts, Christian K.; Huynh, Diana; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Currier, Judith S.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Yang, Otto O.

    2014-01-01

    Current cell-based assays for determining the functional properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have limitations. We report here the development of a new, robust fluorometric cell-free biochemical assay that measures HDL lipid peroxidation (HDLox) based on the oxidation of the fluorochrome Amplex Red. HDLox correlated with previously validated cell-based (r = 0.47, p<0.001) and cell-free assays (r = 0.46, p<0.001). HDLox distinguished dysfunctional HDL in established animal models of atherosclerosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) patients. Using an immunoaffinity method for capturing HDL, we demonstrate the utility of this novel assay for measuring HDLox in a high throughput format. Furthermore, HDLox correlated significantly with measures of cardiovascular diseases including carotid intima media thickness (r = 0.35, p<0.01) and subendocardial viability ratio (r = −0.21, p = 0.05) and physiological parameters such as metabolic and anthropometric parameters (p<0.05). In conclusion, we report the development of a new fluorometric method that offers a reproducible and rapid means for determining HDL function/quality that is suitable for high throughput implementation. PMID:25368900

  19. What Is Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cholesterol KidsHealth > For Teens > Cholesterol Print A A A ... High Cholesterol? en español ¿Qué es el colesterol? Cholesterol Is a Fat in the Blood Cholesterol (kuh- ...

  20. What Is Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cholesterol KidsHealth > For Teens > Cholesterol A A A What's ... High Cholesterol? en español ¿Qué es el colesterol? Cholesterol Is a Fat in the Blood Cholesterol (kuh- ...

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Transport Proteins in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Joseph G. S.; Yung, Susan; Chau, Mel K. M.; Shiu, Sammy W. M.; Chan, Tak Mao; Tan, Kathryn C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid accumulation has been shown to accelerate renal injury, and the intracellular accumulation of lipids may be caused by alterations in synthesis as well as lipid uptake and efflux. We have investigated the role of cellular cholesterol transport proteins including adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), G1 (ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in diabetic nephropathy. Methods Protein expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI was determined in human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells cultured under normal or high glucose conditions. Renal expression of these cholesterol transporters was examined in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. Results ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI were expressed in both human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells, and mediated cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI and HDL. In vitro, hyperglycemia reduced the expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of all three cholesterol transporters (p<0.05). In vivo studies showed that intra-renal accumulation of lipids was increased in diabetic mice, particularly in mice with nephropathy. This was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI in the kidneys. These changes were already seen in diabetic mice without nephropathy and preceded the development of nephropathy. Diabetic mice with nephropathy had the lowest level of these cholesterol transporters. Conclusion Inducing diabetes with streptozotocin significantly reduced renal expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI. Defects in cholesterol export pathway in renal cells could therefore promote cholesterol accumulation and might contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25181357

  2. Regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerotic lesions: a comparison of LDL lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Craeyveld, Eline; Gordts, Stephanie C; Nefyodova, Elena; Jacobs, Frank; De Geest, Bart

    2011-06-01

    Both reductions in atherogenic lipoproteins and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels may affect atherosclerosis regression. Here, the relative potential of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lowering and HDL raising gene transfer strategies to induce regression of complex murine atherosclerotic lesions was directly compared. Male C57BL/6 LDL receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice were fed an atherogenic diet (1.25% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil) to induce advanced atherosclerotic lesions. A baseline group was killed after 6 months and remaining mice were randomized into a control progression (Adnull or saline), an apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (AdA-I), an LDLr (AdLDLr), or a combined apo A-I/LDLr (AdA-I/AdLDLr) adenoviral gene transfer group and followed-up for another 12 weeks with continuation of the atherogenic diet. Gene transfer with AdLDLr decreased non-HDL cholesterol levels persistently by 95% (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. This drastic reduction of non-HDL cholesterol levels induced lesion regression by 28% (p < 0.001) in the aortic root and by 25% (p < 0.05) in the brachiocephalic artery at 12 weeks after transfer. Change in lesion size was accompanied by enhanced plaque stability, as evidenced by increased collagen content, reduced lesional macrophage content, a drastic reduction of necrotic core area, and decreased expression of inflammatory genes. Elevated HDL cholesterol following AdA-I transfer increased collagen content in lesions, but did not induce regression. Apo A-I gene transfer on top of AdLDLr transfer resulted in additive effects, particularly on inflammatory gene expression. In conclusion, drastic lipid lowering induced by a powerful gene transfer strategy leads to pronounced regression and stabilization of advanced murine atherosclerosis.

  3. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity from human THP-1 macrophages is reduced in HIV-infected patients: impact of HAART[S

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Petra; Ghislain, Mathilde; Villard, Elise F.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Yeni, Patrick; Meyer, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile; Guerin, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to remove cholesterol from macrophages is inversely associated with the severity of angiographic coronary artery disease. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or its treatment on the ability of HDL particles to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages has never been studied. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma and isolated HDL particles from HIV-infected subjects (n = 231) and uninfected controls (n = 200), as well as in a subset of 41 HIV subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to mediate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity was reduced (−12%; P = 0.001) in HIV patients as compared with controls. HIV infection reduced by 27% (P < 0.05) the capacity of HDL subfractions to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages. We observed a reduced ABCA1-dependent efflux capacity of plasma (−27%; P < 0.0001) from HIV-infected subjects as a result of a reduction in the efflux capacity of HDL3 particles. HAART administration restored the capacity of plasma from HIV patients to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages (9.4%; P = 0.04). During HIV infection, the capacity of whole plasma to remove cholesterol from macrophages is reduced, thus potentially contributing to the increased coronary heart disease in the HIV population. HAART administration restored the removal of cholesterol from macrophages by increasing HDL functionality. PMID:25573889

  4. Dietary capsanthin, the main carotenoid in paprika (Capsicum annuum), alters plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and hepatic gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Koichi; Inakuma, Takahiro

    2009-12-01

    The effects of dietary capsanthin, the main carotenoid in paprika (Capsicum annuum), on lipid metabolism were examined. Young male Wistar rats were fed diets containing paprika powder, paprika organic solvent extract, residue of paprika extract, and purified capsanthin. Administration of purified capsanthin for 2 weeks resulted in a significant increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05) without detectable differences in plasma total cholesterol and TAG concentrations. A statistically significant correlation (r 0.567; P < 0.001) was found between dietary capsanthin concentrations and plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Animals receiving diets containing two different capsanthin concentrations exhibited dose-dependent increases in plasma HDL-cholesterol (r 0.597; P < 0.005). While capsanthin was absent in the liver of animals fed the basal diet, it increased markedly in capsanthin-fed animals (P < 0.001). Quantitative analyses of hepatic mRNA levels revealed that capsanthin administration resulted in up-regulation of mRNA for apoA5 and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), without significant differences in other mRNA levels related to HDL-cholesterol metabolism. These results suggest that capsanthin had an HDL-cholesterol-raising effect on plasma, and the potential to increase cholesterol efflux to HDL particles by increasing apoA5 levels and/or enhancement of LCAT activity.

  5. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... Checked Print This Topic En español Get Your Cholesterol Checked Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cholesterol Test ... How often do I need to get my cholesterol checked? The general recommendation is to get your ...

  6. Cholesterol Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program High Cholesterol Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir As ... the facts about high cholesterol [PDF-281K] . High Cholesterol in the United States 73.5 million adults ( ...

  7. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 7 March 2017. + ... saturated fat found in red meat. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a fatlike substance that’s found in ...

  8. [Relation between paraoxonase activity, other HDL components and inflammatory state in hemodialyzed patients].

    PubMed

    González, Ana I; Brites, Fernando; Elbert, Alicia; Gómez-Rosso, Leonardo; Berg, Gabriela; Wikinski, Regina; Schreier, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Chronic Renal Disease (CKD) is closely associated with a pro-inflammatory condition, with an increase in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and decrease in HDL level. HDL contains antioxidant enzymes such as paraoxonase (PON), whose activity is diminished in CKD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between PON activity with HDL cholesterol, apo A1 and hs-CRP levels, which are known to be inflammatory markers in hemodialyzed patients. Forty-two patients were studied; age, median (range) = 50 (25-67) years old, gender M/F = 22/20, duration of hemodialysis = 4.4 ± 0.5 years, BMI: 23 ± 0.5 kg/m2. After a 12 h fast, a blood sample was obtained and classic components of lipid profile were determined, as well as apoproteins A1 and B, PON by means of its arylsterase activity and hs-CRP levels. On the basis of the latter, patients were divided into two groups: hs-CRP ≤ 1 (low risk, range: 0.1 to 1.0 mg/l) and > 1 mg/l (moderate and high risk, 1.1 to 10.7 mg/l). No difference was found in triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and apo B in the groups. Patients with hs-CRP > 1 showed lower HDL cholesterol (40 ± 2 mg/dl) and apo A1 (118 ± 4 mg/dl) than patients with hs-CRP ≤ 1 (50 ± 4 and 133 ± 5, respectively); p < 0.05. PON was lower in hs-CRP > 1 = 90.5 ± 24.0 µmol/ml.min than in hs-CRP ≤ 1 = 105.2 ± 18.0. Consequently, inverse correlations were obtained between apo A1 and hs-CRP, r = -0.381, p = 0.013 and between PON and hs-CRP, r = -0.32, p = 0.042. Furthermore, increase in hs-CRP correlated positively with BMI r = 0.318, p = 0.042. Since apo A1 has an anti-inflammatory role and PON an antioxidant activity, the decrease in HDL and its components, cholesterol, apo A1 and PON, in subjects with higher chronic inflammatory condition might explain, in part, the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients.

  9. [Role of the ABC transporters A1 and G1, key reverse cholesterol transport proteins, in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Demina, E P; Miroshnikova, V V; Schwarzman, A L

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death worldwide. Epidemiology studies firmly established an inverse relationship between atherogenesis and distorted lipid metabolism, in particular, higher levels of total cholesterol, an accumulation of CH-laden macrophages (foam cells), and lower plasma levels of antiatherogenic high density lipoprotein (HDL). It is believed that the reverse cholesterol transport, a process that removes excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues/cells including macrophages to circulating HDL, is one of the main mechanisms responsible for anti-atherogenic properties of HDL. The key proteins of reverse cholesterol transport-ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1)-mediate the cholesterol efflux from macrophages and prevent their transformation into foam cells. This review focuses on the role of ABC transporters A1 and G1 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  10. Cell Cholesterol Homeostasis: Mediation by Active Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Theodore L.; Lange, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the major pathways mediating cell cholesterol homeostasis respond to a common signal: active membrane cholesterol. Active cholesterol is that fraction which exceeds the complexing capacity of the polar bilayer lipids. Increments in plasma membrane cholesterol exceeding this threshold have an elevated chemical activity (escape tendency) and redistribute via diverse transport proteins to both circulating plasma lipoproteins and intracellular organelles. Active cholesterol prompts several feedback responses thereby. It is the substrate for its own esterification and for the synthesis of regulatory side-chain oxysterols. It also stimulates manifold pathways that down-regulate the biosynthesis, curtail the ingestion and increase the export of cholesterol. Thus, the abundance of cholesterol is tightly coupled to that of its polar lipid partners through active cholesterol. PMID:20843692

  11. Reduction in cholesterol absorption is enhanced by stearate-enriched plant sterol esters in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Guderian, David M; Wray, Curtis A; Dussault, Patrick H; Schlegel, Vicki L; Carr, Timothy P

    2006-11-01

    Consumption of plant sterol esters reduces plasma LDL cholesterol concentration by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Commercially available plant sterol esters are prepared by esterifying free sterols to fatty acids from edible plant oils such as canola, soybean, and sunflower. To determine the influence of the fatty acid moiety on cholesterol metabolism, plant sterol esters were made with fatty acids from soybean oil (SO), beef tallow (BT), or purified stearic acid (SA) and fed to male hamsters for 4 wk. A control group fed no plant sterol esters was also included. Hamsters fed BT and SA had significantly lower cholesterol absorption and decreased concentrations of plasma non-HDL cholesterol and liver esterified cholesterol, and significantly greater fecal sterol excretion than SO and control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was lowest in hamsters fed SA (7.5%), whereas it was 72.9% in control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was correlated with fecal sterol excretion (r = -0.72, P < 0.001), liver cholesterol concentration (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration (r = 0.85, P < 0.001). A multiple regression model that included each sterol ester type vs. cholesterol absorption indicated that intake of steryl stearate was the only dietary component that contributed significantly to the model (R2 = -0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, our results demonstrate that BT and SA are more effective than SO in reducing cholesterol absorption, liver cholesterol, and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration, suggesting that cardioprotective benefits can be achieved by consuming stearate-enriched plant sterol esters.

  12. Association between cholesterol efflux capacity and coronary restenosis after successful stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Takata, Kohei; Takamiya, Yosuke; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) functionality could be useful for identifying patients who have an increased risk of coronary restenosis after stent implantation. In the present study, we elucidates whether HDL functionality can predict restenosis. The participants included 48 consecutive patients who had stable angina and were successfully implanted with a drug-eluting stent (DES) or bare-metal stent. Follow-up coronary angiography was performed after 6-8 months of stenting. Cholesterol efflux and the anti-inflammatory capacity of HDL were measured before stenting (at baseline) and at follow-up. The mean age was 64 ± 11 years and the body mass index was 24 ± 3 kg/m(2). While HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) significantly increased from baseline to follow-up, there was no significant association between HDL-C level at baseline and in-stent late loss. Cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly increased from baseline to follow-up. The efflux capacity at baseline was negatively correlated with in-stent late loss, whereas the anti-oxidative activity of HDL at baseline was not associated with in-stent late loss. We analyzed the predictors of in-stent late loss using independent variables (efflux capacity and anti-oxidative capacity at baseline in addition to age, gender, HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at baseline, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, lesion length and DES implantation, history of myocardial infarction and prior percutaneous coronary intervention) by a multiple regression analysis. The efflux capacity at baseline was only independently associated with in-stent late loss. In conclusion, cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline could predict coronary restenosis in patients with successful stent implantation.

  13. Antihyperlipidemic effect of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) protein isolate in rats fed a normal and high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arundhati; Dhar, Pubali; Ghosh, Santinath

    2010-01-01

    The dietary influence of sesame protein isolate (protein content 91.5%), produced from dehulled, defatted sesame meal, on blood and tissue lipid profile and lipid peroxidation has been assessed in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. To evaluate their hypocholesterolemic and antioxidative activity in vivo, we fed 18% sesame protein isolate with or without 2% cholesterol in comparison with casein to rats for 28 d. We determined plasma total protein, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triacylglycerol as well as susceptibility of plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid to oxidation ex vivo. Liver tissue lipid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and lipid peroxidations were also determined. The total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were significantly reduced in the sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group than the corresponding control casein groups. HDL-cholesterol level was also increased in sesame protein isolate (41%) and protein isolate containing cholesterol group (38%) than the corresponding control casein and casein containing cholesterol groups. There was 49% and 64% lowering of plasma lipid peroxidation as well as 36% and 56% lowering of lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility (LOS) in the 2 experimental groups (sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group) than the corresponding control (casein and casein containing cholesterol) groups. There was significant lowering of erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation (68% and 63% lowering in sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol groups) and liver lipid peroxidation (61% and 76% lowering in the 2 experimental groups than the corresponding control casein groups). Therefore, our results indicate that sesame protein isolate decreases cholesterol concentration in plasma, increases HDL-cholesterol, and also decreases plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation with or

  14. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  15. ABCA1-dependent sterol release: sterol molecule specificity and potential membrane domain for HDL biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shinji; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells synthesize various sterol molecules, including the C30 sterol, lanosterol, as cholesterol precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum. The build-up of precursor sterols, including lanosterol, displays cellular toxicity. Precursor sterols are found in plasma HDL. How these structurally different sterols are released from cells is poorly understood. Here, we show that newly synthesized precursor sterols arriving at the plasma membrane (PM) are removed by extracellular apoA-I in a manner dependent on ABCA1, a key macromolecule for HDL biogenesis. Analysis of sterol molecules by GC-MS and tracing the fate of radiolabeled acetate-derived sterols in normal and mutant Niemann-Pick type C cells reveal that ABCA1 prefers newly synthesized sterols, especially lanosterol, as the substrates before they are internalized from the PM. We also show that ABCA1 resides in a cholesterol-rich membrane domain resistant to the mild detergent, Brij 98. Blocking ACAT activity increases the cholesterol contents of this domain. Newly synthesized C29/C30 sterols are transiently enriched within this domain, but rapidly disappear from this domain with a half-life of less than 1 h. Our work shows that substantial amounts of precursor sterols are transported to a certain PM domain and are removed by the ABCA1-dependent pathway. PMID:26497474

  16. Prognostic Usefulness of Serum Cholesterol Efflux Capacity in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Jia; Wang, Jingfeng; Wu, Changhao; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yueguo; Deng, Fengfeng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Xuhua; Wu, Mengzuo; Chen, Yangxin

    2016-02-15

    Cholesterol efflux capacity has been shown to have an inverse relation with coronary artery disease (CAD) and may overcome the limitations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels as a predictor for CAD risks. We investigated the predictive value of cholesterol efflux capacity for the prognosis of CAD. Serum cholesterol efflux capacity in 313 patients newly diagnosed with CAD by coronary angiography was measured, and all patients completed a 3-year follow-up. The primary clinical end points were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and cardiovascular mortality. The secondary clinical end points were class IV heart failure requiring hospitalization and coronary artery revascularization. Cholesterol efflux capacity was lower in patients with CAD compared with control group, and decreased cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with an increased risk of acute coronary syndrome (odds ratios, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.46; p <0.01). There was no association between cholesterol efflux capacity and serum HDL cholesterol levels. Follow-up data showed that patients with CAD with lower cholesterol efflux capacity had higher primary clinical end point events (26 of 158 vs 8 of 155, p <0.01). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis further showed that a decreased cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with an increased risk of the primary end point events regardless of adjustment. There was no association between cholesterol efflux capacity and the secondary end point events. In conclusion, the results provide the important clinical evidence that cholesterol efflux capacity is a predictive index for plaque stability and the prognosis of CAD, independent of HDL cholesterol levels.

  17. Separation of the principal HDL subclasses by iodixanol ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Nicola L.; Griffin, Bruce A.; Davies, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    HDL subclasses detection, in cardiovascular risk, has been limited due to the time-consuming nature of current techniques. We have developed a time-saving and reliable separation of the principal HDL subclasses employing iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation (IxDGUC) combined with digital photography. HDL subclasses were separated in 2.5 h from prestained plasma on a three-step iodixanol gradient. HDL subclass profiles were generated by digital photography and gel scan software. Plasma samples (n = 46) were used to optimize the gradient for the resolution of HDL heterogeneity and to compare profiles generated by IxDGUC with gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE); further characterization from participants (n = 548) with a range of lipid profiles was also performed. HDL subclass profiles generated by IxDGUC were comparable to those separated by GGE as indicated by a significant association between areas under the curve for both HDL2 and HDL3 (HDL2, r = 0.896, P < 0.01; HDL3, r = 0.894, P < 0.01). The method was highly reproducible, with intra- and interassay coefficient of variation percentage < 5 for percentage area under the curve HDL2 and HDL3, and < 1% for peak Rf and peak density. The method provides time-saving and cost-effective detection and preparation of the principal HDL subclasses. PMID:23690506

  18. Banana Blossom (Musa acuminate Colla) Incorporated Experimental Diets Modulate Serum Cholesterol and Serum Glucose Level in Wistar Rats Fed with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Gunasegaram, Saranya; Jayathilake, Chathuni; Weththasinghe, Pabodha; Jayawardana, Barana Chaminda; Vidanarachchi, Janak Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Hypocholesterolaemic and hypoglycaemic effect of banana blossom were studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. Experimental groups were fed for 4 weeks, with casein as the basal diet (CN), in comparison with two diets containing 0.5% cholesterol (CD) and 0.5% cholesterol + 21% banana blossom powder (CDB). Serum total cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol level, and serum glucose concentrations were lower in CDB fed group compared with CD fed group. Lower serum cholesterol and glucose level (P < 0.05) in CDB fed group were followed by higher faecal weight, caecal weight, caecal Lactobacilli, and Bifidobacteria population in CDB fed group compared to CD diet fed group. Lower serum AST level in banana blossom fed rats showed the reduction in oxidative stress induced by high cholesterol diet. Based on these data, it could be speculated that banana blossom incorporated experimental diets may modulate the hypocholesterolaemic and hypoglycaemic responses in Wistar rats. PMID:28042480

  19. Lipoprotein metabolism mediates the association of MTP polymorphism with beta-cell dysfunction in healthy subjects and in nondiabetic normolipidemic patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Cassader, Maurizio

    2010-09-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) predicts incident diabetes independently of insulin resistance, adiposity and metabolic syndrome through unclear mechanisms. Dietary fat consumption and lipoperoxidative stress predispose to diabetes in the general population and to liver injury in NASH. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) polymorphism modulates lipoprotein metabolism in the general population and liver disease in NASH; a functional MTP polymorphism recently predicted incident diabetes independently of insulin resistance in the general population. We simultaneously assessed the impact of MTP polymorphism, diet, adipokines and lipoprotein metabolism, on glucose homeostasis in NASH. MTP -493G/T polymorphism, dietary habits, adipokines and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) responses to an oral fat load, were cross-sectionally correlated to oral glucose tolerance test- and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test-derived Minimal Model indexes of glucose homeostasis in 40 nondiabetic normolipidemic patients with NASH and 40 age-,sex- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Despite comparable insulin resistance, fasting lipids, adipokines and dietary habits, MTP GG genotype had significantly more severe beta-cell dysfunction; higher plasma Tg, FFA, intestinal and hepatic very low-density lipoprotein 1 subfractions and oxLDL responses and deeper HDL-C fall than GT/TT carriers in patients and controls. Postprandial HDL-C and oxLDL responses independently predicted beta-cell dysfunction and mediated the effect of MTP polymorphism on beta-cell function. In nondiabetic normolipidemic NASH, MTP -493G/T polymorphism modulates beta-cell function, an effect mediated by postprandial HDL-C and oxLDL metabolism. The impact of this polymorphism on the risk of diabetes and the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapies in restoring beta-cell function in NASH

  20. Cooking for Lower Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cooking for Lower Cholesterol Updated:Oct 28,2016 A heart-healthy eating ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  1. Kidney Function as a Determinant of HDL and Triglyceride Concentrations in the Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael; Ray, Udayan; Yu, Richard; Hudspeth, Andrew; Smillie, Michael; Jordan, Neville; Bartle, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a potent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD risk increases in a stepwise manner with increasing kidney impairment and is significantly reduced by kidney transplantation, suggesting a causal relationship. Dyslipidemia, a well recognised CVD risk factor, is highly prevalent in CKD. While dyslipidemia is a risk factor for CKD, kidney impairment can also induce a dyslipidemic state that may contribute to the excess burden of CVD in CKD. We utilised a multipronged approach to determine whether a causal relationship exists. Materials and Methods: Retrospective case-control analysis of 816 patients admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital in 2008–2009 with different degrees of kidney impairment and retrospective before-after cohort analysis of 60 patients who received a transplanted kidney between 1999 and 2009. Results: Decreased estimated GFR (eGFR) was independently associated with decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL, p < 0.0001) and increased triglyceride concentrations (p < 0.01) in multivariate analysis. There was no significant relationship between eGFR and low density lipoprotein (LDL) or total cholesterol in multivariate analysis. Kidney transplantation increased HDL (p < 0.0001) and decreased triglyceride (p = 0.007) concentration, whereas there was no significant change in LDL and total cholesterol. These effects were dependent on maintenance of graft function, statin therapy (those who were on) if graft failure occurred then HDL again decreased and triglycerides increased. Conclusions: Kidney transplantation ameliorated alterations in plasma lipoprotein profile associated with kidney impairment, an effect that was dependent on the maintenance of graft function. These data suggest that kidney function is a determinant of HDL and triglyceride concentrations in patients with CKD. PMID:27005668

  2. A new model of reverse cholesterol transport: enTICEing strategies to stimulate intestinal cholesterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention.

  3. Xanthohumol Prevents Atherosclerosis by Reducing Arterial Cholesterol Content via CETP and Apolipoprotein E in CETP-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Shuichi; Ozaki, Moeko; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice) to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. Methodology/Principal Findings Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type), were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w) xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 weeks. In CETP-Tg mice, xanthohumol significantly decreased accumulated cholesterol in the aortic arch and increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) when compared to the control group (without xanthohumol). Xanthohumol had no significant effect in wild-type mice. CETP activity was significantly decreased after xanthohumol addition in CETP-Tg mice compared with the control group and it inversely correlated with HDL-C (%) (P<0.05). Furthermore, apolipoprotein E (apoE) was enriched in serum and the HDL-fraction in CETP-Tg mice after xanthohumol addition, suggesting that xanthohumol ameliorates reverse cholesterol transport via apoE-rich HDL resulting from CETP inhibition. Conclusions Our results suggest xanthohumol prevents cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic regions by HDL-C metabolism via CETP inhibition leading to apoE enhancement. PMID:23166663

  4. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ (PPARG)–responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68+ macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr−/− mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr−/− mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  5. The very-high-density lipoprotein fraction of rabbit plasma is rich in tissue-derived cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Nanjee, M N; Miller, N E

    1991-11-05

    When plasma from rabbits, which several weeks earlier had been infused with [3H]cholesterol, was subjected to equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation, the specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) fraction (d 1.22-1.32 g/ml) was three to 8-fold greater (mean, 5.5-fold; P less than 0.001) than that in high-density lipoproteins (HDL; d 1.06-1.21 g/ml). On size exclusion chromatography of plasma, no increase in specific radioactivity was seen in particles smaller than HDL. These findings suggest that those apolipoprotein-lipid complexes that dissociate from HDL during ultracentrifugation to form the VHDL fraction contain proportionately more tissue-derived cholesterol than do those that are more tightly bound to HDL.

  6. HDL in sepsis - risk factor and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Morin, Emily E; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40-70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis.

  7. HDL in sepsis – risk factor and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Emily E.; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40–70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis. PMID:26557091

  8. Attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits by allicin.

    PubMed

    El-Sheakh, Ahmed R; Ghoneim, Hamdy A; Suddek, Ghada M; Ammar, El Sayed M

    2015-08-14

    Allicin, the active substance of garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have potential therapeutic applications. The present study was designed to investigate the possible beneficial effects of allicin against oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Male New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Rabbits randomly received 1 of the following treatments: normal chow diet for 4 weeks, 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD), HCD plus allicin (10 mg/kg/day), or HCD plus atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected at the end of experimental diets for measurement of serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), C-reactive protein (CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). In addition, the aorta was removed for measurement of vascular reactivity, histopathological changes, intima/media (I/M) ratio, and immunohistochemical staining of both tumor necrosis-alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. HCD induced significant increases in serum TC, TGs, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), CRP, and MDA. Moreover, HCD caused significant decrease in serum GSH and SOD. In addition, aortic relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic specimens from HCD-fed rabbits revealed high expression levels of both TNF-α and the oxidant-induced transcription factor, NF-κB. Allicin supplementation significantly decreased serum MDA and CRP, increased serum HDL-C, GSH, and SOD levels while nonsignificantly affecting HCD-induced elevations in serum TC and LDL-C. Additionally, allicin significantly protected against HCD-induced attenuation of rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh and elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by histopathological examination of the aorta. Moreover, allicin has substantially

  9. Innovative pharmaceutical interventions in cardiovascular disease: Focusing on the contribution of non-HDL-C/LDL-C-lowering versus HDL-C-raising: A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant preclinical studies and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kühnast, Susan; Fiocco, Marta; van der Hoorn, José W A; Princen, Hans M G; Jukema, J Wouter

    2015-09-15

    Non-HDL-cholesterol is well recognised as a primary causal risk factor in cardiovascular disease. However, despite consistent epidemiological evidence for an inverse association between HDL-C and coronary heart disease, clinical trials aimed at raising HDL-C (AIM-HIGH, HPS2-THRIVE, dal-OUTCOMES) failed to meet their primary goals. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of established and novel treatment strategies, specifically targeting HDL, on inhibition of atherosclerosis in cholesteryl ester transfer protein-expressing animals, and the prevention of clinical events in randomised controlled trials. Linear regression analyses using data from preclinical studies revealed associations for TC and non-HDL-C and lesion area (R(2)=0.258, P=0.045; R(2)=0.760, P<0.001), but not for HDL-C (R(2)=0.030, P=0.556). In clinical trials, non-fatal myocardial infarction risk was significantly less in the treatment group with pooled odd ratios of 0.87 [0.81; 0.94] for all trials and 0.85 [0.78; 0.93] after excluding some trials due to off-target adverse events, whereas all-cause mortality was not affected (OR 1.05 [0.99-1.10]). Meta-regression analyses revealed a trend towards an association between between-group differences in absolute change from baseline in LDL-C and non-fatal myocardial infarction (P=0.066), whereas no correlation was found for HDL-C (P=0.955). We conclude that the protective role of lowering LDL-C and non-HDL-C is well-established. The contribution of raising HDL-C on inhibition of atherosclerosis and the prevention of cardiovascular disease remains undefined and may be dependent on the mode of action of HDL-C-modification. Nonetheless, treatment strategies aimed at improving HDL function and raising apolipoprotein A-I may be worth exploring.

  10. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  11. Add-on memantine to valproate treatment increased HDL-C in bipolar II disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Shan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I. Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Memantine is a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist. As an augmenting agent, it has an antidepressant-like and mood-stabilizing effect. Memantine also reduces binge eating episodes and weight. We investigated whether memantine added on to valproate (VPA) is more effective than VPA alone for treating BP-II depression and improving the patient’s metabolic profile. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled study. BP-II patients undergoing regular VPA treatments were randomly assigned to one of two groups: VPA plus either add-on [1] memantine (5 mg/day) (n = 62) or [2] placebo (n = 73) for 12 weeks. The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) were used to evaluate clinical response. Height, weight, fasting serum glucose, fasting total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides were followed regularly. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to analyze the effects of memantine on clinical performance. There were no significant differences in pre- and post-treatment YMRS and HDRS scores between the VPA + memantine and VPA + placebo groups. Although there were no significant differences in the pre- and post-treatment values of most metabolic indices between the two groups, there was a significant increase of HDL-C (p = 0.009) in the VPA + memantine group compared with the VPA + placebo group. This increase remained significant even after controlling for body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.020). We conclude that add-on memantine plus VPA treatment of BP-II depression increases the blood level of HDL-C even in the absence of change in affective symptoms. PMID:23870798

  12. PPARγ activation redirects macrophage cholesterol from fecal excretion to adipose tissue uptake in mice via SR-BI

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Sue-Anne; Millar, John S.; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Fuki, Ilia; Naik, Snehal U.; Macphee, Colin; Walker, Max; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    PPARγ agonists, used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, can raise HDL-cholesterol, therefore could potentially stimulate macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We aimed to test whether PPARγ activation promotes macrophage RCT in vivo. Macrophage RCT was assessed in mice using cholesterol loaded/3H-cholesterol labeled macrophages. PPARγ agonist GW7845 (20 mg/kg/day) did not change 3H-tracer plasma appearance, but surprisingly decreased fecal 3H-free sterol excretion by 43% (P < 0.01) over 48 h. Total free cholesterol efflux from macrophages to serum (collected from control and GW7845 groups) was not different, although ABCA1-mediated efflux was significantly higher with GW7845. To determine the effect of PPARγ activation on HDL cholesterol uptake by different tissues, the metabolic fate of HDL labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (CE) was also measured. We observed two-fold increase in HDL derived 3H-CE uptake by adipose tissue (P < 0.005) with concomitant 22% decrease in HDL derived 3H-CE uptake by the liver (P < 0.05) in GW7845 treated wild type mice. This was associated with a significant increase in SR-BI protein expression in adipose tissue, but not liver. The same experiment in SR-BI knockout mice, showed no difference in HDL derived 3H-CE uptake by adipose tissue or liver. In conclusion, PPARγ activation decreases the fecal excretion of macrophage derived cholesterol in mice. This is not due to inhibition of cholesterol efflux from macrophages, but rather involves redirection of effluxed cholesterol from liver towards adipose tissue uptake via SR-BI. This represents a novel mechanism for regulation of RCT and may extend the therapeutic implications of these ligands. PMID:21291868

  13. Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75 years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism is inextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. The aim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affected by the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model of cholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biological system. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of the model was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterol feeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible for maintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responder to cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly. The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype, conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotype reflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated the importance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing.

  14. Printed Circuit Board Design with HDL Designer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkert, Thomas K.; LaFourcade, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Staying up to date with the latest CAD tools both from a cost and time perspective is difficult. Within a given organization there may be experts in Printed Circuit Board Design tools and experts in FPGA/VHDL tools. Wouldn't it be great to have someone familiar with HDL Designer be able to design PCBs without having to learn another tool? This paper describes a limited experiment to do this.

  15. Cigarette smoking, exercise and high density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Stamford, B A; Matter, S; Fell, R D; Sady, S; Papanek, P; Cresanta, M

    1984-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with depressed levels of HDL-C, whereas exercise is associated with elevated levels of HDL-C. The purpose was to determine effects of smoking and exercise on blood lipids and lipoproteins in middle-aged males. It was hypothesized that smoking may attenuate the effects of exercise to elevate HDL-C. A total of 269 males (70 smokers) met all criteria for inclusion in the study population. Age, height, weight, body fatness via hydrostatic weighing, daily caloric consumption and alcohol intake, and smoking habits and history were determined. Interviews concerning physical activity patterns were conducted and cardiovascular responses to treadmill exercise were determined. Subjects were grouped as sedentary (low activity), participants in vigorous recreational activities (moderate activity) and joggers/runners (high activity). Analysis of covariance with adjustments for factors which may affect blood lipids and lipoproteins was employed. Smokers demonstrated lower HDL-C and higher total cholesterol levels than nonsmokers. High activity subjects demonstrated significantly higher HDL-C levels than the low and moderate groups which did not differ. High activity smokers did not differ from low activity nonsmokers with respect to HDL-C. This supports the proposed hypothesis. Nonsmokers were higher in weight and body fatness than smokers even though smokers consumed 288 more calories per day on the average. This suggests that smoking may account for a significant number of calories through altered metabolism or some other means.

  16. Liver LXRα expression is crucial for whole body cholesterol homeostasis and reverse cholesterol transport in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Breevoort, Sarah R.; Angdisen, Jerry; Fu, Mingui; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Holmstrom, Sam R.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Schulman, Ira G.

    2012-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) are important regulators of cholesterol and lipid metabolism, and their activation has been shown to inhibit cardiovascular disease and reduce atherosclerosis in animal models. Small molecule agonists of LXR activity are therefore of great therapeutic interest. However, the finding that such agonists also promote hepatic lipogenesis has led to the idea that hepatic LXR activity is undesirable from a therapeutic perspective. To investigate whether this might be true, we performed gene targeting to selectively delete LXRα in hepatocytes. Liver-specific deletion of LXRα in mice substantially decreased reverse cholesterol transport, cholesterol catabolism, and cholesterol excretion, revealing the essential importance of hepatic LXRα for whole body cholesterol homeostasis. Additionally, in a pro-atherogenic background, liver-specific deletion of LXRα increased atherosclerosis, uncovering an important function for hepatic LXR activity in limiting cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, synthetic LXR agonists still elicited anti-atherogenic activity in the absence of hepatic LXRα, indicating that the ability of agonists to reduce cardiovascular disease did not require an increase in cholesterol excretion. Furthermore, when non-atherogenic mice were treated with synthetic LXR agonists, liver-specific deletion of LXRα eliminated the detrimental effect of increased plasma triglycerides, while the beneficial effect of increased plasma HDL was unaltered. In sum, these observations suggest that therapeutic strategies that bypass the liver or limit the activation of hepatic LXRs should still be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22484817

  17. Injected phytosterols/stanols suppress plasma cholesterol levels in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vanstone, C A.; Raeini-Sarjaz, M; Jones, P J.H.

    2001-10-01

    Although plant sterols are known to suppress intestinal cholesterol absorption, whether plasma and hepatic lipid levels are influenced through non-gut related internal mechanisms has not been established. To examine this question 50 male hamsters were divided into 5 groups and fed semi-purified diets containing 20% energy as fat and 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol ad libitum for 60 days. The control group (i) received diet alone, while four additional groups consumed the diet plus one of four equivalent phytosterol mixtures (5 mg/kg/day) given either as (ii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols mixed with diet (oralSA), (iii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols subcutaneously injected (subSA), (iv) soybean oil phytosterols alone mixed with diet (oralSE), or (v) soybean oil subcutaneous injected phytosterols alone (subSE). The control group and both orally supplemented groups also received placebo subcutaneous sham injections. Neither food consumption, body weight, nor liver weight differed across treatment groups. Subcutaneous administration of SA and SE decreased plasma total cholesterol levels by 21% and 23% (p < 0.0001) and non-apolipoprotein-A cholesterol concentrations by 22% and 15% (p < 0.0002), respectively, compared to control. HDL cholesterol and TG concentrations remained unchanged across all groups, except for a decline of 25% (p < 0.0001) in HDL concentration in the subSE group versus control. Plasma campesterol levels were lower (p < 0.05) in the subSA group relative to all other groups. Plasma campesterol:cholesterol and campesterol:sitosterol ratios were, however, higher (p < 0.0001) for both the oral and subSE groups. Hepatic cholesterol levels were higher (p < 0.0001) in the oral and subSE phytosterol groups by 30% and 31%, respectively, relative to control. We conclude that low doses of subcutaneously administered plant sterols reduce circulating cholesterol levels through mechanisms other than inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  18. An enzyme thermistor-based assay for total and free cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, V; Ramanathan, K; Sundaram, P V; Danielsson, B

    1999-11-01

    A method to evaluate the free (FC) and total cholesterol (TC) in human serum, bile and gallstone extract using an enzyme thermistor (ET)-based flow injection analysis (FIA) is presented. The cholesterol in high-density (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) have also been evaluated. A heparin functionalized Sepharose column was employed for the isolation of HDL and LDL fractions from serum. The estimation of cholesterol and its esters was based on their reaction with cholesterol oxidase (CO), cholesterol esterase (CE) and catalase (CAT). Three different enzyme columns, i.e. co-immobilized CO/CAT (column A), only CE (column B) and co-immobilized CO/CE/CAT (column C) were prepared by cross-linking the enzymes on glass beads using glutaraldehyde. Column A was used for estimating FC and column C was used for estimating total cholesterol (cholesterol plus esterified cholesterol). Column B was used as a pre-column which could be switched 'in' or 'out' in conjunction with column A for the estimation of TC or FC, respectively. A calibration between 1.0 and 8.0 mmol/l for FC and 0. 25 and 4.0 mmol/l for TC was obtained. For more than 2000 assays with the ET device a C.V. of less than 4% was obtained. The assay time was approximately 4 min per assay. The cholesterol estimations on the ET correlated well with similar estimations using a commercially available cholesterol diagnostic kit.

  19. Cholesterol acceptor capacity is preserved by different mechanisms in preterm and term fetuses.

    PubMed

    Pecks, Ulrich; Mohaupt, Markus G; Hütten, Matthias C; Maass, Nicolai; Rath, Werner; Escher, Geneviève

    2014-02-01

    Fetal serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations differ between preterm and term born neonates. An imbalance of the flow of cholesterol from the sites of synthesis or efflux from cells of peripheral organs to the liver, the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), is linked to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Preterm delivery is a risk factor for the development of CVD. Thus, we hypothesized that RCT is affected by a diminished cholesterol acceptor capacity in preterm as compared to term fetuses. Cholesterol efflux assays were performed in RAW264.7, HepG2, and HUVEC cell lines. In the presence and absence of ABC transporter overexpression by TO-901317, umbilical cord sera of preterm and term born neonates (n = 28 in both groups) were added. Lipid components including high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein E were measured and related to fractional cholesterol efflux values. We found overall, fractional cholesterol efflux to remain constant between the study groups, and over gestational ages at delivery, respectively. However, correlation analysis revealed cholesterol efflux values to be predominantly related to HDL concentration at term, while in preterm neonates, cholesterol efflux was mainly associated with LDL In conclusion cholesterol acceptor capacity during fetal development is kept in a steady state with different mechanisms and lipid fractions involved at distinct stages during the second half of fetal development. However, RCT mechanisms in preterm neonates seem not to be involved in the development of CVD later in life suggesting rather changes in the lipoprotein pattern causative.

  20. Apo A-II participates in HDL-liposome interaction by the formation of new pre-β mobility particles and the modification of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Małgorzata; Czyżewska, Marta; Wolska, Anna; Kortas-Stempak, Barbara; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    Interaction between high density lipoproteins (HDL) and liposomes results in both a structural modification of HDL and the generation of new pre-β HDL-like particles. Here, phosphatidylcholine liposomes and human HDL were incubated at liposomal phospholipid/HDL phospholipid (L-PL/HDL-PL) ratios of 1:1, 3:1 and 5:1 with a subsequent assessment of the distribution of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, apo A-II, free cholesterol (FC) and PL between newly generated pre-β mobility lipoproteins and non-disrupted liposomes. Both at L-PL/HDL-PL ratios of 3:1 and 5:1 the fraction of liposomal-derived PL associated with pre-β fraction was significantly higher than those accepted by α-HDL. We found that 78% of apo A-I released from HDL was incorporated into pre-β mobility fraction. The relative contents of PL and apo A-I in pre-β fraction were constant irrespective of the initial L-PL/HDL-PL ratio in the incubation mixture and accounted for approximately 83 and 11%, respectively. Apo A-II was detached from HDL to a similar extent as apo A-I and distributed evenly between pre-β fraction and non-disrupted liposomes. Apo A-II constituted approximately 1%, by weight, in these fractions at all L-PL/HDL-PL ratios investigated. It corresponded approximately to 10% of pre-β fraction protein mass. Both liposomes and pre-β fraction accepted comparable amounts of FC released from HDL. This data indicated that during the interaction between human HDL and phosphatidylcholine liposome apo A-II participates both in structural modification of liposomes and in the generation of pre-β mobility fraction of constant content of PL, apo A-I and apo A-II. Involvement of apo A-II in HDL-liposome interaction may influence the anti-atherogenic properties of liposomes.

  1. Overweight status is associated with extensive signs of microvascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sunni R.; Bellary, Srikanth; Karimzad, Said; Gherghel, Doina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate if overweight individuals exhibit signs of vascular dysfunction associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One hundred lean and 100 overweight participants were recruited for the present study. Retinal microvascular function was assessed using the Dynamic Retinal Vessel Analyser (DVA), and systemic macrovascular function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Investigations also included body composition, carotid intimal-media thickness (c-IMT), ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (BP), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides (TG), cholesterol levels (HDL-C and LDL-C), and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overweight individuals presented with higher right and left c-IMT (p = 0.005 and p = 0.002, respectively), average 24-h BP values (all p < 0.001), plasma glucose (p = 0.008), TG (p = 0.003), TG: HDL-C ratio (p = 0.010), and vWF levels (p = 0.004). Moreover, overweight individuals showed lower retinal arterial microvascular dilation (p = 0.039) and baseline-corrected flicker (bFR) responses (p = 0.022), as well as, prolonged dilation reaction time (RT, p = 0.047). These observations emphasise the importance of vascular screening and consideration of preventive interventions to decrease vascular risk in all individuals with adiposity above normal range. PMID:27578554

  2. High density lipoprotein plasma fractions inhibit aortic fatty streaks in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Badimon, J J; Badimon, L; Galvez, A; Dische, R; Fuster, V

    1989-03-01

    The effects of in vivo administration of high density lipoprotein-very high density lipoprotein (HDL-VHDL) on the development of aortic fatty streaks were studied in cholesterol-fed rabbits. The rabbits received a 0.5% cholesterol-rich diet for 8 weeks. During this period, the HDL-VHDL group was intravenously administered with 50 mg/week of homologous HDL-VHDL protein; the control group received normal saline (0.9% NaCl). HDL-VHDL fraction was obtained at density range 1.063 to 1.25 gm/ml by ultracentrifugation of normal rabbit plasma. Along the study, plasma lipid levels followed a similar profile in both groups. At the completion of the study, atherosclerotic-like lipid-rich lesions covered 37.9 +/- 6% (X +/- SEM) of the intimal aortic surface in the control group, and 14.9 +/- 2.1% in the treated group (p less than 0.001). The values of total and free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, and phospholipids deposited within vessel wall were significantly lower in the aortas of the HDL-VHDL treated group than those in the control group. Cholesterol accumulation in the livers was also significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in the treated group than in the control. We concluded that administration of homologous HDL-VHDL lipoprotein fraction to cholesterol-fed rabbits, dramatically inhibited the extent of aortic fatty streaks and lowered lipid deposition in the arterial wall and liver without modification of the plasma lipid levels.

  3. Expression and purification of recombinant apolipoprotein A-I Zaragoza (L144R) and formation of reconstituted HDL particles.

    PubMed

    Fiddyment, Sarah; Barceló-Batllori, Sílvia; Pocoví, Miguel; García-Otín, Angel-Luis

    2011-11-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I Zaragoza (L144R) (apo A-I Z), has been associated with severe hypoalphalipoproteinemia and an enhanced effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL) reverse cholesterol transport. In order to perform further studies with this protein we have optimized an expression and purification method of recombinant wild-type apo A-I and apo A-I Z and produced mimetic HDL particles with each protein. An pET-45 expression system was used to produce N-terminal His-tagged apo A-I, wild-type or mutant, in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which was subsequently purified by affinity chromatography in non-denaturing conditions. HDL particles were generated via a modified sodium cholate method. Expression and purification of both proteins was verified by SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF MS and immunochemical procedures. Yield was 30mg of purified protein (94% purity) per liter of culture. The reconstituted HDL particles checked via non-denaturing PAGE showed high homogeneity in their size when reconstituted both with wild-type apo A-I and apo A-I Z. An optimized system for the expression and purification of wild-type apo A-I and apo A-I Z with high yield and purity grade has been achieved, in addition to their use in reconstituted HDL particles, as a basis for further studies.

  4. Association between genetic loci linked to HDL-C levels and Indian patients with CAD: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Ashley; Ponde, C K; Rajani, R M; Ashavaid, T F

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between loci linked to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods A pilot study consisting of age-matched and gender-matched angiographically confirmed CAD cases (n=150) and non-CAD controls (n=150) was performed to test an association. Illumina's Human Cardio-Metabo BeadChip containing 3112 variants associated with HDL-C levels was used for genotyping. Results A preliminary analysis identified 36 variants from 16 genes that were statistically significant (p<0.05) between cases and controls. However, none of the variants remained statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. Besides, variants rs11039159 (MADD), rs749067 (MADD), rs367070 (LILRA3) and rs330921 (PPP1R3B) showed modest association with HDL-C levels. Conclusions None of the HDL-C associated loci included in this study were found to be a significant risk factor for CAD. However, the study could replicate the findings of four variants influencing HDL-C levels. PMID:28123455

  5. The cholesterol lowering property of coriander seeds (Coriandrum sativum): mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Dhanapakiam, P; Joseph, J Mini; Ramaswamy, V K; Moorthi, M; Kumar, A Senthil

    2008-01-01

    Coriandrum sativum (Coriander) has been documented as a traditional treatment for cholesterol and diabetes patients. In the present study, coriander seeds incorporated into diet and the effect of the administration of coriander seeds on the metabolism of lipids was studied in rats, fed with high fat diet and added cholesterol. The seeds had a significant hypolipidemic action. In the experimental group of rats (tissue) the level of total cholesterol and triglycerides increased significantly There was significant increase in beta-hydroxy, beta-methyl glutaryl CoA reductase and plasma lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase activity were noted in the experimental group. The level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) + very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol decreased while that of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol increased in the experimental group compared to the control group. The increased activity of plasma LCAT enhanced degradation of cholesterol to fecal bile acids and neutral sterols appeared to account for its hypocholesterolemic effect.

  6. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol as a predictor of poor survival in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Na; Bao, Liu-Bin; Tang, Lin-Quan; Ou, Jing-Song; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Xiao-Zhong; Xu, Yan; Ma, Jun; Chan, Anthony T.; Chen, Ming; Xia, Yun-Fei; Liu, Wan-Li; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Ji; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to assess the prognostic value of pretreatment high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and investigate the possible biological effects of these lipoproteins on NPC cells in vitro. Experimental Design We examined the prognostic value of pretreatment HDL-C levels in 2443 patients with non-metastatic NPC from three independent institutions. The Cox proportional hazard model and log-rank test were used to analyze the correlation between HDL-C levels and overall survival (OS). Cell growth, colony formation, and apoptotic assays were used to determine the biological functions of HDL on NPC cells in vitro. All of the statistical tests were two-sided. Results OS was decreased in patients with high pretreatment HDL-C levels compared with those with low HDL-C levels (P < 0.05). Similarly, a decreased OS was noted in advanced stage (stage III-IV), NPC patients with high pretreatment HDL-C levels (P < 0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that HDL-C was an independent prognostic factor associated with shorter OS in training cohorts. These findings were confirmed in both independent validation cohorts (P < 0.01). In vitro experiments demonstrated that HDL could increase cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation, which were largely dependent on the expression of its receptor SR-B1. Finally, HDL could enhance chemoresistance by protecting cancer cells from apoptosis. Conclusions Pretreatment HDL-C is a poor prognostic factor for patients with NPC. This effect may be associated with the ability of HDL to enhance proliferation, colony formation, migration, and chemoresistance in NPC cells. PMID:27304186

  7. Age-related changes in total and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol in elderly Dutch men.

    PubMed Central

    Weijenberg, M P; Feskens, E J; Kromhout, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated changes in total and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) concentrations with age and time in elderly men. METHODS: A cohort of men born between 1900 and 1920 from the Dutch town of Zutphen was examined in 1977 and 1978 (n = 571), 1985 (n = 885), 1990 (n = 555), and 1993 (n = 345). Linear regression analysis and random-effects models were used to assess cross-sectional and longitudinal age- and time-related changes in cholesterol concentrations. RESULTS: In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, total cholesterol decreased by 0.04 mmol/L a year with age. The longitudinal change was observed in the entire population as well as in men who participated in all four examinations (n = 135) and in a subgroup of men who were free of common chronic diseases, were not on cholesterol-lowering medication or a prescribed diet, and rated themselves as being "healthy" (n = 64). HDL cholesterol did not change significantly with age neither on a cross-sectional nor on a longitudinal basis. CONCLUSIONS: Among elderly men, total cholesterol diminishes with age both on a cross-sectional and on a longitudinal basis; HDL cholesterol does not vary with age in any way. PMID:8659652

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase 8 degrades apolipoprotein A-I and reduces its cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Aino; Åström, Pirjo; Metso, Jari; Soliymani, Rabah; Salo, Tuula; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Various cell types in atherosclerotic lesions express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8. We investigated whether MMP-8 affects the structure and antiatherogenic function of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL particles. Furthermore, we studied serum lipid profiles and cholesterol efflux capacity in MMP-8-deficient mouse model. Incubation of apoA-I (28 kDa) with activated MMP-8 yielded 22 kDa and 25 kDa apoA-I fragments. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that apoA-I was cleaved at its carboxyl-terminal part. Treatment of apoA-I and HDL with MMP-8 resulted in significant reduction (up to 84%, P < 0.001) in their ability to facilitate cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-loaded THP-1 macrophages. The cleavage of apoA-I by MMP-8 and the reduction in its cholesterol efflux capacity was inhibited by doxycycline. MMP-8-deficient mice had significantly lower serum triglyceride (TG) levels (P = 0.003) and larger HDL particles compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, no differences were observed in the apoA-I levels or serum cholesterol efflux capacities between the mouse groups. Proteolytic modification of apoA-I by MMP-8 may impair the first steps of reverse cholesterol transport, leading to increased accumulation of cholesterol in the vessel walls. Eventually, inhibition of MMPs by doxycycline may reduce the risk for atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  9. Serum IF1 concentration is independently associated to HDL levels and to coronary heart disease: the GENES study[S

    PubMed Central

    Genoux, Annelise; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Ferrières, Jean; Combes, Guillaume; Lichtenstein, Laeticia; Pons, Véronique; Laffargue, Muriel; Taraszkiewicz, Dorota; Carrié, Didier; Elbaz, Meyer; Perret, Bertrand; Martinez, Laurent O.

    2013-01-01

    HDL is strongly inversely related to cardiovascular risk. Hepatic HDL uptake is controlled by ecto-F1-ATPase activity, and potentially inhibited by mitochondrial inhibitor factor 1 (IF1). We recently found that IF1 is present in serum and correlates with HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C). Here, we have evaluated the relationship between circulating IF1 and plasma lipoproteins, and we determined whether IF1 concentration is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Serum IF1 was measured in 648 coronary patients ages 45–74 and in 669 matched male controls, in the context of a cross-sectional study on CHD. Cardiovascular risk factors were documented for each participant, including life-style habits and biological and clinical markers. In controls, multivariate analysis demonstrated that IF1 was independently positively associated with HDL-C and apoA-I (r = 0.27 and 0.28, respectively, P < 0.001) and negatively with triglycerides (r = −0.23, P < 0.001). Mean IF1 concentration was lower in CHD patients than in controls (0.43 mg/l and 0.53 mg/l, respectively, P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, following adjustments on cardiovascular risk factors or markers, IF1 was negatively related to CHD (P < 0.001). This relationship was maintained after adjustment for HDL-C or apoA-I. This study identifies IF1 as a new determinant of HDL-C that is inversely associated with CHD. PMID:23794714

  10. A high LDL-C to HDL-C ratio predicts poor prognosis for initially metastatic colorectal cancer patients with elevations in LDL-C.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fangxin; He, Wenzhuo; Jiang, Chang; Yin, Chenxi; Guo, Guifang; Chen, Xuxian; Qiu, Huijuan; Rong, Yuming; Zhang, Bei; Xu, Dazhi; Xia, Liangping

    2015-01-01

    Although lipid disequilibrium has been documented for several types of cancer including colorectal cancer (CRC), it remains unknown whether lipid parameters are associated with the outcome of metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients. Here, we retrospectively examined the lipid profiles of 453 mCRC patients and investigated whether any of the lipid parameters correlated with the outcome of mCRC patients. Pretreatment serum lipids, including triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), were collected in 453 initially mCRC patients. The LDL-C to HDL-C ratio (LHR) was calculated and divided into the first, second, and third tertiles. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of lipids on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Nearly two-fifths of the patients (41.3%) exhibited elevations in LDL-C while most patients (88.3%) showed normal HDL-C levels. Decreased HDL-C (P=0.542) and increased LDL-C (P=0.023) were prognostic factors for poor OS, while triglyceride (P=0.542) and cholesterol (P=0.215) were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that LDL-C (P=0.031) was an independent prognostic factor. Triglyceride, cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C did not correlate with PFS. Among patients with elevations in LDL-C levels, patients in the third tertile of the LHR had a markedly shorter median OS compared to those in the first or second tertile (P=0.012). Thus, increased LDL-C level is an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in mCRC patients, and a high LHR predicts poor prognosis for initially mCRC patients with elevations in LDL-C.

  11. High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Counter-Regulates Serum Amyloid A (SAA)-Induced sPLA2-IIE and sPLA2-V Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Angelina; Wong, Sarabeth; Bao, Guoqiang; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; D’Angelo, John

    2016-01-01

    Human serum amyloid A (SAA) has been demonstrated as a chemoattractant and proinflammatory mediator of lethal systemic inflammatory diseases. In the circulation, it can be sequestered by a high-density lipoprotein, HDL, which carries cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and apolipoproteins (Apo-AI). The capture of SAA by HDL results in the displacement of Apo-AI, and the consequent inhibition of SAA’s chemoattractant activities. It was previously unknown whether HDL similarly inhibits SAA-induced sPLA2 expression, as well as the resultant HMGB1 release, nitric oxide (NO) production and autophagy activation. Here we provided compelling evidence that human SAA effectively upregulated the expression and secretion of both sPLA2-IIE and sPLA2-V in murine macrophages, which were attenuated by HDL in a dose-dependent fashion. Similarly, HDL dose-dependently suppressed SAA-induced HMGB1 release, NO production, and autophagy activation. In both RAW 264.7 cells and primary macrophages, HDL inhibited SAA-induced secretion of several cytokines (e.g., IL-6) and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and RANTES) that were likely dependent on functional TLR4 signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that HDL counter-regulates SAA-induced upregulation and secretion of sPLA2-IIE/V in addition to other TLR4-dependent cytokines and chemokines in macrophage cultures. PMID:27898742

  12. Reference Ranges of Cholesterol Sub-Fractions in Random Healthy Adults in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Koumaré, Alice T. C. R. Kiba; Sakandé, Linda P. L.; Kabré, Elie; Sondé, Issaka; Simporé, Jacques; Sakandé, Jean

    2015-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, the values that serve as clinical chemistry reference ranges are those provided by European manufacturers’ insert sheets based on reference of the Western population. However, studies conducted so far in some African countries reported significant differences in normal laboratory ranges compared with those of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to determine reference values of cholesterol fractions in apparently normal adults in Burkina Faso that could be used to better assess the risks related to cardiovascular diseases. Study population was 279 healthy subjects aged from 15 to 50 years including 139 men and 140 women recruited at the Regional Center of Blood Transfusion of Ouagadougou, capital city of Burkina Faso (West Africa). Exclusion criteria based on history and clinical examination were used for defining reference individuals. The dual-step precipitation of HDL cholesterol sub-fractions using dextran sulfate was performed according to the procedure described by Hirano. The medians were calculated and reference values were determined at 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. The median and upper ranges for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total HDL cholesterol and HDL2 cholesterol were observed to be higher in women in comparison to men (p <0.05). These reference ranges were similar to those derived from other African countries but lower than those recorded in France and in USA. This underscores the need for such comprehensible establishment of reference values for limited resources countries. Our study provides the first cholesterol sub-fractions (HDL2 and HDL3) reference ranges for interpretation of laboratory results for cardiovascular risk management in Burkina Faso. PMID:25611320

  13. HDL efflux capacity, HDL particle size, and high-risk carotid atherosclerosis in a cohort of asymptomatic older adults: the Chicago Healthy Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Mutharasan, R Kannan; Thaxton, C Shad; Berry, Jarett; Daviglus, Martha L; Yuan, Chun; Sun, Jie; Ayers, Colby; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Wilkins, John T

    2017-03-01

    HDL efflux capacity and HDL particle size are associated with atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) events in middle-aged individuals; however, it is unclear whether these associations are present in older adults. We sampled 402 Chicago Healthy Aging Study participants who underwent a dedicated carotid MRI assessment for lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC) plaque. We measured HDL particle size, HDL particle number, and LDL particle number with NMR spectroscopy, as well as HDL efflux capacity. We quantified the associations between HDL particle size and HDL efflux using adjusted linear regression models. We quantified associations between the presence of LRNC and HDL and LDL particle number, HDL particle size, and HDL efflux capacity using adjusted logistic regression models. HDL efflux capacity was directly associated with large (β = 0.037, P < 0.001) and medium (β = 0.0065, P = 0.002) HDL particle concentration and inversely associated with small (β = -0.0049, P = 0.018) HDL particle concentration in multivariable adjusted models. HDL efflux capacity and HDL particle number were inversely associated with prevalent LRNC plaque in unadjusted models (odds ratio: 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.26, 0.96), but not after multivariable adjustment. HDL particle size was not associated with prevalent LRNC. HDL particle size was significantly associated with HDL efflux capacity, suggesting that differences in HDL efflux capacity may be due to structural differences in HDL particles. Future research is needed to determine whether HDL efflux is a marker of ASCVD risk in older populations.

  14. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  15. Controlling Cholesterol with Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Controlling Cholesterol with Statins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... not, the following tips can help keep your cholesterol in check: Talk with your healthcare provider about ...

  16. Cholesterol - drug treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000314.htm Cholesterol - drug treatment To use the sharing features on ... treatment; Hardening of the arteries - statin Statins for Cholesterol Statins reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, ...

  17. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from cells and back to the liver. saturated fat and cholesterol in the food you eat can ... care professionals advise a program of reduced dietary saturated fat and cholesterol, together with physical activity and weight ...

  18. Predictive and Prognostic Value of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Young Male Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Huang, Ji; Li, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Background: The level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an important risk indicator and used in risk factor counting and quantitative risk assessment; however, the effect of HDL-C in young male patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HDL-C in young male patients. Methods: We recruited 267 consecutive young male patients (≤44 years) diagnosed with AMI. Other 247 participants free from coronary heart disease were enrolled as controls. HDL-C levels of AMI patients and controls were evaluated to analyze the predictive value on AMI. According to the cutoff point of 1.04 mmol/L HDL-C, patients of AMI were divided into two subgroups (normal HDL-C group and low HDL-C group) and were followed up for 2 years. Clinical end points included all major adverse coronary events (MACEs): the main cause of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, readmissions for acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmias, or revascularization. The prognostic value of HDL-C was evaluated using Cox regression according to MACE. Results: Patients of AMI had decreased proportion in normal HDL-C group compared to controls (47.2% vs. 57.9%; P = 0.017). Logistic regression analysis showed that there was an inverse relationship between HDL-C and AMI in young males. In the low HDL-C subgroup of AMI patients (n = 141), 34 (24.1%) patients experienced a MACE during the 2-year follow-up, compared with 15 (11.9%) patients in normal HDL-C subgroup (n = 126). The Cox regression analysis showed that HDL-C was an independent predictor of a MACE during the follow-up period (hazard ratio = 0.354, P = 0.006). Conclusion: HDL-C was an important parameter for predicting the risk and the clinical outcomes of AMI in young male patients. PMID:28051027

  19. Prospective multicentre study of the effect of voluntary plasmapheresis on plasma cholesterol levels in donors

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Bray, M; Wisdom, C; Wada, S; Johnson, BR; Grifols-Roura, V; Grifols-Lucas, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives LDL apheresis is used to treat patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia, and low-volume plasmapheresis for plasma donation may similarly lower cholesterol levels in some donors. This study was designed to assess the effect of plasmapheresis on total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels in a plasma donor population. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, unblinded longitudinal cohort study in which a blood sample was obtained for analysis before each donation. Data from 663 donors were analysed using a multivariable repeated measures regression model with a general estimating equations approach with changes in cholesterol as the primary outcome measure. Results The model predicted a significant decrease in total and LDL cholesterol for both genders and all baseline cholesterol levels (P < 0·01). The greatest total cholesterol decreases (women, −46·8 mg/dL; men, −32·2 mg/dL) were associated with high baseline levels and 2–4 days between donations. Small but statistically significant increases (P ≤ 0·01) in HDL cholesterol were predicted for donors with low baseline levels. Conclusions These results suggest that, in donors with elevated baseline cholesterol levels, total and LDL cholesterol levels may decrease during routine voluntary plasmapheresis. PMID:23517282

  20. All about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 6 All About Cholesterol Managing your cholesterol and other blood fats (also called blood lipids) can help you prevent health problems. ... it’s likely that your cholesterol may be off. All of these are risk factors for diabetes, heart ...

  1. Cholesterol and Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, E. J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    There is a widespread belief among the public and even among chemist that plants do not contain cholesterol. This wrong belief is the result of the fact that plants generally contain only small quantities of cholesterol and that analytical methods for the detection of cholesterol in this range were not developed until recently.

  2. Detecting Elevated Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, H.L.; Elford, R.W.; Shumak, S.

    1991-01-01

    To assess accuracy of blood cholesterol measurements in the office, fingerprick blood cholesterol assays by a dry reagent chemistry analyzer were compared in 151 patients with simultaneous venipuncture cholesterol assays by standard laboratory methods. Compared with the laboratory assay, seven of eight analyzers had total absolute biases less than 5%. Variability in results was comparable to that of community laboratories. PMID:21229050

  3. Management of dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome: recommendations of the Spanish HDL-Forum.

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan; Gonzalez Santos, Pedro; Hernandez Mijares, Antonio; Mangas Rojas, Alipio; Masana, Luis; Millan, Jesus; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Perez Jimenez, Francisco; Pintó, Xavier; Plaza, Ignacio; Rubiés, Juan; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize the metabolic syndrome it becomes necessary to establish a number of diagnostic criteria. Because of its impact on cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, considerable attention has been focussed on the dyslipidemia accompanying the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this review is to highlight the fundamental aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and the treatment of the metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia with recommendations to clinicians. The clinical expression of the metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In addition, metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is associated with high levels of apolipoprotein (apo) B-100-rich particles of a particularly atherogenic phenotype (small dense low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C]. High levels of triglyceride-rich particles (very low-density lipoprotein) are also evident both at baseline and in overload situations (postprandial hyperlipidemia). Overall, the 'quantitative' dyslipidemia characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of HDL-C and the 'qualitative' dyslipidemia characterized by high levels of apo B-100- and triglyceride-rich particles, together with insulin resistance, constitute an atherogenic triad in patients with the metabolic syndrome. The therapeutic management of the metabolic syndrome, regardless of the control of the bodyweight, BP, hyperglycemia or overt diabetes mellitus, aims at maintaining optimum plasma lipid levels. Therapeutic goals are similar to those for high-risk situations because of the coexistence of multiple risk factors. The primary goal in treatment should be achieving an LDL-C level of <100 mg/dL (or <70 mg/dL in cases with established ischemic heart disease or risk equivalents). A further goal is increasing the HDL-C level to >or=40 mg/dL in men or 50 mg/dL in women. A non-HDL-C goal of 130 mg/dL should also be aimed at in cases of hypertriglyceridemia

  4. HDL and glucose metabolism: current evidence and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Andrew L; Heywood, Sarah Elizabeth; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its principal apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) have now been convincingly shown to influence glucose metabolism through multiple mechanisms. The key clinically relevant observations are that both acute HDL elevation via short-term reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusion and chronically raising HDL via a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor reduce blood glucose in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). HDL may mediate effects on glucose metabolism through actions in multiple organs (e.g., pancreas, skeletal muscle, heart, adipose, liver, brain) by three distinct mechanisms: (i) Insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, (ii) Insulin-independent glucose uptake, (iii) Insulin sensitivity. The molecular mechanisms appear to involve both direct HDL signaling actions as well as effects secondary to lipid removal from cells. The implications of glucoregulatory mechanisms linked to HDL extend from glycemic control to potential anti-ischemic actions via increased tissue glucose uptake and utilization. Such effects not only have implications for the prevention and management of diabetes, but also for ischemic vascular diseases including angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, cerebral ischemia and even some forms of dementia. This review will discuss the growing evidence for a role of HDL in glucose metabolism and outline related potential for HDL therapies.

  5. HDL and glucose metabolism: current evidence and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, Andrew L.; Heywood, Sarah Elizabeth; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its principal apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) have now been convincingly shown to influence glucose metabolism through multiple mechanisms. The key clinically relevant observations are that both acute HDL elevation via short-term reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusion and chronically raising HDL via a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor reduce blood glucose in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). HDL may mediate effects on glucose metabolism through actions in multiple organs (e.g., pancreas, skeletal muscle, heart, adipose, liver, brain) by three distinct mechanisms: (i) Insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, (ii) Insulin-independent glucose uptake, (iii) Insulin sensitivity. The molecular mechanisms appear to involve both direct HDL signaling actions as well as effects secondary to lipid removal from cells. The implications of glucoregulatory mechanisms linked to HDL extend from glycemic control to potential anti-ischemic actions via increased tissue glucose uptake and utilization. Such effects not only have implications for the prevention and management of diabetes, but also for ischemic vascular diseases including angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, cerebral ischemia and even some forms of dementia. This review will discuss the growing evidence for a role of HDL in glucose metabolism and outline related potential for HDL therapies. PMID:26582989

  6. HDL-related mechanisms of olive oil protection in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M; Fitó, Montse; Covas, María-Isabel; Farràs, Marta; Osada, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    The low incidence of cardiovascular disease in countries bordering the Mediterranean basin, where olive oil is the main source of dietary fat, and the negative association between this disease with high density lipoproteins has stimulated interest. This review summarizes the current knowledge gathered from human and animal studies regarding olive oil and high density lipoproteins. Cumulative evidence suggests that high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and its main apolipoprotein A1, may be increased by consuming olive oil when compared with carbohydrate and low fat diets in humans. Conflicting results have been found in many studies when olive oil diets were compared with other sources of fat. The role of virgin olive oil minor components on its protective effect has been demonstrated by a growing number of studies although its exact mechanism remains to be elucidated. Dietary amount of olive oil, use of virgin olive oil, cholesterol intake, and physiopathological states such as genetic background, sex, age, obesity or fatty liver are variables that may offset those effects. Further studies in this field in humans and in animal models are warranted due to the complexity of HDL particles.

  7. Novel Relationship of Serum Cholesterol with Asthma and Wheeze in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.; Massing, Mark W.; Spruell, Brian; Jaramillo, Renee; Draper, David W.; Madenspacher, Jennifer H.; Arbes, Samuel J.; Calatroni, Agustin; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholesterol exerts complex effects upon inflammation. There has been little investigation of whether serum cholesterol is associated with asthma, an inflammatory airways disease with great public health impact. Objective To determine relationships between levels of three serum cholesterol measures (total cholesterol [TC], high density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], and non-HDL-C), and asthma/wheeze in a sample representative of the U.S. population. Methods Cross-sectional study of 7,005 participants aged ≥6 years from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results Serum TC and non-HDL-C were lower in current asthmatics than in subjects without current asthma in the overall population (TC: 188.5 vs. 192.2 mg/dL; non-HDL-C: 133.9 vs. 137.7 mg/dL; p<.05 for both), whereas HDL-C was not different. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) from multivariate logistic regression per 1-standard deviation increase of TC and non-HDL-C for current asthma were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86–0.98) and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.85–0.98), respectively. Upon racial/ethnic stratification, these relationships reflect marked reductions unique to Mexican Americans (MAs)(TC: 171.4 vs. 189.3 mg/dL [p<.001], OR 0.62 [95% CI, 0.48–0.80]; non-HDL-C: 119.8 vs. 137.9 mg/dL [p<.001], OR 0.62 [95% CI, 0.48–0.79]). Among MAs, the adjusted OR for wheeze requiring medical attention was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.43–0.75) for TC and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33–0.85) for non-HDL-C. Relationships between cholesterol and asthma/wheeze were independent of body mass index and serum C-reactive protein, and similar between atopic and non-atopic participants. Conclusion Serum TC and non-HDL-C are inversely related to asthma in the U.S. population, chiefly reflecting a relationship among MAs. PMID:19800678

  8. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Apr 3,2017 Keeping your ... content was last reviewed on 04/21/2014. Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  9. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) ...

  10. Exercise attenuates the increase in plasma monounsaturated fatty acids and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol but not high-density lipoprotein 2b cholesterol caused by high-oleic ground beef in women.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L Anne; Crouse, Stephen F; Carbuhn, Aaron; Klooster, Jennifer; Calles, José Antonio Elias; Meade, Thomas; Smith, Stephen B

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and exercise increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) by independent mechanisms, so there would be additive effects between a single, intensive session of exercise and high-MUFA ground beef on HDL-C and blood risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Seventeen postmenopausal women completed a 2-way crossover design in which they consumed five 114-g ground beef patties per week for two 6-week periods separated by a 4-week washout (habitual diet) period. The ground beef patties contained 21% total fat with either 9.97 (low-MUFA) or 12.72 (high-MUFA) g total MUFA. Blood was taken at entry, at the end of each 6-week diet period, after the 4-week washout period, and 24 hours after aerobic exercise sessions (75% VO₂peak, 2.07 MJ). After the ground beef intervention, the high-MUFA ground beef increased plasma palmitoleic acid and oleic acid, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle density, HDL-C, and HDL2b-C (all P < .05), whereas the low-MUFA ground beef increased LDL density. After the washout (habitual diet) period, the single exercise session increased serum LDL cholesterol, HDL-C, and HDL2a and decreased TAG and oleic acid. After the low-MUFA ground beef diet, exercise increased LDL size and HDL density and decreased LDL density and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but had no effect on HDL-C fractions. After the high-MUFA ground beef intervention, exercise decreased palmitioleic acid, oleic acid, HDL-C, and HDL2a-C, but not HDL2b-C. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of exercise and a high-MUFA diet were not additive; instead, exercise attenuated the effects of the high-MUFA ground beef on HDL-C and plasma MUFAs. The differential effects of high-MUFA ground beef and exercise on HDL2a-C and HDL2b-C indicate that diet and exercise affect HDL-C by different mechanisms.

  11. Association between periodontal disease and endothelial dysfunction in smoking patients.

    PubMed

    Velosa-Porras, Juliana; Escobar-Arregoces, Francina; Latorre-Uriza, Catalina; Ferro-Camargo, María B; Ruiz, Álvaro J; Uriza-Carrasco, Luis F

    2016-04-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in the impact of oral health on cardiovascular disease, particularly regarding the effects of chronic infections such as periodontitis on the endothelium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in healthy smokers whether there are any significant differences in the frequency of endothelial dysfunction between subjects with chronic moderate to severe periodontal disease and periodontally healthy subjects. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted. The target population was adults older than 40 years of age. Blood tests were performed to determine values of CBC, glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDLC. Periodontal examinations and probing were conducted with a Florida Probe®, and standardized procedures were used to measure flow-mediated dilation. Out of 150 subjects [69 male (46%) and 81 female (54%)], 75 (50%) had chronic periodontitis. The mean value for baseline flow-mediated dilation was 4.04% and the mean value for final flow-mediated dilation was 4.66%, with a 0.62% mean difference showing a statistically significant increase (p<0.001).This study found no significant difference in the flow-mediated dilation values between periodontally healthy subjects and those with periodontitis, in contrast to the literature, which suggests a negative impact of periodontal disease on endothelial function.

  12. Effects of policosanols and phytosterols on lipid levels and cholesterol biosynthesis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Jones, P J H; Pischel, I; Fairow, C

    2003-02-01

    The current study was carried out to examine the effects of policosanols and phytosterols, alone and in combination, on lipid profiles, cholesterol biosynthesis, and tissue histopathological changes in hamsters. Fifty male Golden Syrian hamsters, weighing 100 to 120 g, were fed a regular rodent chow for 2 wk before being randomly assigned into 5 groups of 10 animals each fed semisynthetic diets for 4 wk. Group 1 was given a control diet that contained 0.25% cholesterol and 5% fat with a PUFA to saturated FA ratio of 0.4. Groups 2 to 5 were fed the control diet and given Octa-6 [a policosanol mixture from sugar cane wax, 25 mg/kg body weight (BW)], Ricewax (a policosanol mixture from rice wax with 50% being converted to the corresponding acids, 50 mg/kg BW), phytosterols (Cholestatin; 1,000 mg/kg BW), and Ricewax (50 mg/kg BW) plus phytosterols (1,000 mg/kg BW), respectively. The results showed that there was no difference between Octa-6 and Ricewax treatments in any of the lipid parameters measured, and both had similar levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (T-C), and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) as the control. Octa-6 but not Ricewax increased (P = 0.03) non-HDL-C as compared with the control. Phytosterols reduced T-C (P < 0.0003) and HDL-C (P < 0.004) without a significant effect on TG and non-HDL-C as compared to the control. Ricewax plus phytosterols had effects similar to those with phytosterols alone. Free cholesterol synthetic rates were not different among the treatments. Policosanols or phytosterols did not show any toxic effects in liver, heart, brain, or kidney. Results suggest that, although phytosterols reduce T-C and HDL-C levels, policosanols have no significant favorable effect in changing lipid levels in hamsters.

  13. Apolipoprotein A-I configuration and cell cholesterol efflux activity of discoidal lipoproteins depend on the reconstitution process.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Luz Ángela; Prieto, Eduardo Daniel; Cabaleiro, Laura Virginia; Garda, Horacio Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Discoidal high-density lipoproteins (D-HDL) are critical intermediates in reverse cholesterol transport. Most of the present knowledge of D-HDL is based on studies with reconstituted lipoprotein complexes of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) obtained by cholate dialysis (CD). D-HDL can also be generated by the direct microsolubilization (DM) of phospholipid vesicles at the gel/fluid phase transition temperature, a process mechanistically similar to the "in vivo" apoAI lipidation via ABCA1. We compared the apoA-I configuration in D-HDL reconstituted with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine by both procedures using fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with apoA-I tryptophan mutants and fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants. Results indicate that apoA-I configuration in D-HDL depends on the reconstitution process and are consistent with a "double belt" molecular arrangement with different helix registry. As reported by others, a configuration with juxtaposition of helices 5 of each apoAI monomer (5/5 registry) predominates in D-HDL obtained by CD. However, a configuration with helix 5 of one monomer juxtaposed with helix 2 of the other (5/2 registry) would predominate in D-HDL generated by DM. Moreover, we also show that the kinetics of cholesterol efflux from macrophage cultures depends on the reconstitution process, suggesting that apoAI configuration is important for this HDL function.

  14. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Inhibited sexual excitement; Sex - orgasmic dysfunction; Anorgasmia; Sexual dysfunction - orgasmic; Sexual problem - orgasmic ... of knowledge about sexual function Negative feelings about sex (often learned in childhood or teen years) Shyness ...

  15. High serum total cholesterol--an indicator for monitoring cholesterol lowering efforts: U.S. adults, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Schober, Susan E; Carroll, Margaret D; Lacher, David A; Hirsch, Rosemarie

    2007-12-01

    Elevated serum total cholesterol is a major and modifiable risk factor for heart disease, the lead-ing cause of death in the United States (1,2). Reducing mean total serum cholesterol levels among adults to less than 200 mg/dL and reducing the proportion who have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher to less than 17% are national Healthy People 2010 objectives (3). Age-adjusted mean serum cholesterol levels among adults aged 20-74 years declined from 222 mg/dL in 1960-1962 to 203 mg/dL in 1999-2002 (4). Among adults aged 20 years and older, the percent of the population with high serum total cholesterol levels (240 mg/dL or higher) declined from 20% during 1988-1994 to 17% during 1999-2002 (4). In individual patients, a high serum total cholesterol level indicates a potential increased risk for heart disease, but further evaluation of other risk factors and the specific components of cholesterol provide the basis for determining the need for initiating therapeutic lifestyle changes or treatment with medication (5). Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) is the cholesterol component associated with arterial blockage, and it is the primary clinical target for cholesterol management. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) may help to protect individuals from developing heart disease. In populations, comparisons of total cholesterol levels over time can show if population groups are experiencing improvement in cholesterol levels, and knowledge of trends in levels of total cholesterol can help identify subgroups where additional prevention efforts may be needed.

  16. Increased plasma cholesterol esterification by LCAT reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis in SR-BI knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Seth G; Rousset, Xavier; Esmail, Safiya; Zarzour, Abdalrahman; Jin, Xueting; Collins, Heidi L; Sampson, Maureen; Stonik, John; Demosky, Stephen; Malide, Daniela A; Freeman, Lita; Vaisman, Boris L; Kruth, Howard S; Adelman, Steven J; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-07-01

    LCAT, a plasma enzyme that esterifies cholesterol, has been proposed to play an antiatherogenic role, but animal and epidemiologic studies have yielded conflicting results. To gain insight into LCAT and the role of free cholesterol (FC) in atherosclerosis, we examined the effect of LCAT over- and underexpression in diet-induced atherosclerosis in scavenger receptor class B member I-deficient [Scarab(-/-)] mice, which have a secondary defect in cholesterol esterification. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-null [Lcat(-/-)] mice had a decrease in HDL-cholesterol and a high plasma ratio of FC/total cholesterol (TC) (0.88 ± 0.033) and a marked increase in VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C) on a high-fat diet. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-transgenic (Tg) mice had lower levels of VLDL-C and a normal plasma FC/TC ratio (0.28 ± 0.005). Plasma from Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also showed an increase in cholesterol esterification during in vitro cholesterol efflux, but increased esterification did not appear to affect the overall rate of cholesterol efflux or hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also displayed a 51% decrease in aortic sinus atherosclerosis compared with Scarab(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). In summary, we demonstrate that increased cholesterol esterification by LCAT is atheroprotective, most likely through its ability to increase HDL levels and decrease pro-atherogenic apoB-containing lipoprotein particles.

  17. Hypocholesterolemic effect of sericin-derived oligopeptides in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Lapphanichayakool, Phakhamon; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effect of cholesterol-lowering proteins and/or peptides derived from various dietary sources is continuously reported. A non-dietary protein from silk cocoon, sericin, has also demonstrated cholesterol-lowering activity. A sericin hydrolysate prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis was also expected to posses this effect. The present study was aimed at investigating the cholesterol-lowering effect of sericin peptides, so called "sericin-derived oligopeptides" (SDO) both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that SDO at all three doses tested (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and 200 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) suppressed serum total and non-HDL cholesterol levels in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels were not significantly changed among all groups. The fecal contents of bile acids and cholesterol did not differ among high-cholesterol fed rats. SDO dose-dependently reduced cholesterol solubility in lipid micelles, and inhibited cholesterol uptake in monolayer Caco-2 cells. SDO also effectively bound to all three types of bile salts including taurocholate, deoxytaurocholate, and glycodeoxycholate. Direct interaction with bile acids of SDO may disrupt micellar cholesterol solubility, and subsequently reduce the absorption of dietary cholesterol in intestines. Taking all data together, SDO or sericin peptides exhibit a beneficial effect on blood cholesterol levels and could be potentially used as a health-promoting dietary supplement or nutraceutical product.

  18. Sequential estrogen-progestin replacement therapy in healthy postmenopausal women: effects on cholesterol efflux capacity and key proteins regulating high-density lipoprotein levels.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Natalia; Arteaga, Eugenio; Bustos, Paulina; Durán-Sandoval, Daniel; Schulze, Kim; Castro, Graciela; Jauhiainen, Matti; Fruchart, Jean Charles; Calvo, Carlos

    2002-11-01

    Thirty healthy postmenopausal women were randomized into 2 groups that received a sequential combined hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) (n = 18; conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg/d for 28 days and 5 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate during the last 14 days) or placebo (n = 12). Plasma samples were collected before and during treatment (days 0, 15, 43, 71). High-density lipoprotein (HDL) lipid content, lipoprotein (Lp)A-I and LpA-I:LpA-II concentration, lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase activity (LCAT), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity, and the plasma capacity to carry out cholesterol efflux from Fu5AH cells were measured. Most significant changes were found within the first 15 days after HRT. After 71 days of HRT, we found an increase in LpA-I lipoparticles (27%) and the following HDL lipids: phospholipids (21%), triglycerides (45%), and free cholesterol (43%), as well as an increase in cholesterol efflux (12.5%). PLTP activity, on the other hand, decreased 21% after 71 days of treatment. No significant changes in LCAT activity, HDL-cholesterol ester or LpA-I:LpA-II particles were found. Positive correlation between cholesterol efflux and the variables LpA-I and HDL-phospholipids were observed. PLTP was negatively correlated with apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, LpA-I, and LpA-I:LpA-II. In summary, our study, performed during 3 hormonal cycles, shows that HRT not only modifies HDL-cholesterol level, but also its lipid composition and HDL lipoparticle distribution. HRT enhances the plasma capacity to carry out cholesterol efflux from the Fu5AH system and decreases the activity of PLTP, a key protein regulating HDL levels. Considering the protocol sampling, these results represent mainly the estrogenic effect of HRT.

  19. Appropriate LDL-C-to-HDL-C Ratio Cutoffs for Categorization of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Uygur Adults in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Jie; Lai, Hong-Mei; Chen, Bang-Dang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhai, Hui; He, Chun-Hui; Pan, Shuo; Luo, Jun-Yi; Gao, Jing; Liu, Fen; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2016-02-19

    Elevated LDL-C/HDL-C ratio has been shown to be a marker of lipid metabolism as well as a good predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio is useful for detecting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in general healthy Uygur adults in Xinjiang. A total of 4047 Uygur subjects aged ≥35 years were selected from the Cardiovascular Risk Survey (CRS) study which was carried out from October 2007 to March 2010. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, lipid profile and fasting glucose were measured in all participants. The prevalence, sensitivity, specificity and distance on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of each LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were calculated. The prevalence of high LDL-C and low HDL-C cholesterol was high and positively correlated with higher LDL-C/HDL-C ratio in the Uygur population. In both men and women, we detected a slight apparent trend of high prevalence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia with higher LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. Our study also demonstrated that the discriminatory power of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio for CVD risk factors was slightly stronger in men than in women. Analysis of the shortest distance in the ROC curves for hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, or ≥two of these risk factors suggested a LDL-C/HDL-C ratio cutoff of 2.5 for both men and women. The results of this study showed that a LDL-C/HDL-C ratio cut-off of 2.5 might be used as the predictive marker to detect CVD risk factors among Uygur adults in Xinjiang.

  20. The Level of Cholesterol in COPD Patients with Severe and Very Severe Stage of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova-Ivanovska, Beti; Stojkovikj, Jagoda; Dokikj, Dejan; Anastasova, Sasha; Debresliovska, Angela; Zejnel, Sead; Stojkovikj, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood cholesterol is part of metabolic syndrome and can be caused by medical conditions or bad dietary habits. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia in privies diagnosed patients with the severe and very severe stage of COPD, which were stable. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated 100 subjects, all of them smokers, with smoking status >10 years, stratified into two groups: with severe and very severe stage of the disease. It was clinical, randomized, cross-sectional study. Besides demographic parameters and functional parameters, body mass index, cholesterol, LDL, and HDL were investigated. RESULTS: In the group of patients with very severe COPD were recorded significantly higher average values of cholesterol (6.16 ± 1.5 vs. 5.61 ± 1.1, p = 0.039). As independent significant factors influencing cholesterol in the group with a very severe COPD were confirmed the age of the patients (p = 0.005), LDL (p = 0.004) and HDL (p = 0.002). In the group with severe COPD, only LDL was confirmed as an independent significant factor that has an impact on cholesterol (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The results of our survey demonstrated a high level of blood cholesterol and LDL, and low level of blood HDL in both investigated group’s patients with COPD. PMID:27335600

  1. Relationship between serum cholesterol and indices of erythrocytes and platelets in the US population[S

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.; Rose, Kathryn; Zhang, Yanmei; Jaramillo, Renee; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas dyslipidemia has been associated with leukocytosis, the relationship between serum cholesterol and other hematopoietic lineages is poorly defined. Erythrocytes and platelets, anucleate cells relegated to nonspecific diffusional exchange of cholesterol with serum, have been proposed to have a distinct relationship to cholesterol from leukocytes. We examined the relationship between serum cholesterol and circulating erythrocyte/platelet indices in 4,469 adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005–2006. In linear regression analyses, serum non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) was positively associated with mean erythrocyte number, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, and platelet crit independently of age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, serum folate, and C-reactive protein. The magnitude of the relationship was most marked for platelets, with lowest versus highest non-HDL-C quartile subjects having geometric mean platelet counts of 258,000/μl versus 281,000/μl, respectively (adjusted model, P < 0.001 for trend). These associations persisted in a sensitivity analysis excluding several conditions that affect erythrocyte/platelet and/or serum cholesterol levels, and were also noted in an independent analysis of 5,318 participants from NHANES 2007–2008. As non-HDL-C, erythrocytes, and platelets all impact cardiovascular disease risk, there is a need for advancing understanding of the underlying interactions that govern levels of these three blood components. PMID:23999863

  2. Relationship between serum cholesterol and indices of erythrocytes and platelets in the US population.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Michael B; Rose, Kathryn; Zhang, Yanmei; Jaramillo, Renee; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2013-11-01

    Whereas dyslipidemia has been associated with leukocytosis, the relationship between serum cholesterol and other hematopoietic lineages is poorly defined. Erythrocytes and platelets, anucleate cells relegated to nonspecific diffusional exchange of cholesterol with serum, have been proposed to have a distinct relationship to cholesterol from leukocytes. We examined the relationship between serum cholesterol and circulating erythrocyte/platelet indices in 4,469 adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006. In linear regression analyses, serum non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) was positively associated with mean erythrocyte number, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, and platelet crit independently of age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, serum folate, and C-reactive protein. The magnitude of the relationship was most marked for platelets, with lowest versus highest non-HDL-C quartile subjects having geometric mean platelet counts of 258,000/μl versus 281,000/μl, respectively (adjusted model, P < 0.001 for trend). These associations persisted in a sensitivity analysis excluding several conditions that affect erythrocyte/platelet and/or serum cholesterol levels, and were also noted in an independent analysis of 5,318 participants from NHANES 2007-2008. As non-HDL-C, erythrocytes, and platelets all impact cardiovascular disease risk, there is a need for advancing understanding of the underlying interactions that govern levels of these three blood components.

  3. Sesamin enhances cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Wu, Chongming; Sun, Lizhong; Zheng, Jun; Guo, Peng

    2014-06-06

    Foam cells formation as a result of the uncontrolled cytophagy of modified cholesterol by macrophages plays a key role in the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Sesamin is an active constituent of Sesamum indicum which has been shown to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In this work, we investigated the effects of sesamin on foam cell formation and cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages. Sesamin dose-dependently inhibited the enhanced cholesterol accumulation elicited by oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (oxLDL) in RAW264.7 cells. Treatment with sesamin (10 μM) significantly enhanced cholesterol efflux mediated by high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Realtime quantitative PCR and luciferase assays showed that sesamin significantly increased the mRNA levels of PPARγ, LXRα, and ABCG1, and increased the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. The stimulating effect of sesamin on cholesterol efflux was substantially inhibited by the co-treatment with GW9662, a potent inhibitor of PPARγ. These results suggest that sesamin is a new inhibitor of foam cell formation that may stimulate cholesterol efflux through upregulation of the PPARγ-LXRα-ABCG1 pathway.

  4. Statins, fibrates, nicotinic acid, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, anion-exchange resins, omega-3 fatty acids: which drugs for which patients?

    PubMed

    Drexel, Heinz

    2009-12-01

    Classes of lipid lowering drugs differ strongly with respect to the types of lipids or lipoproteins they predominantly affect. Statins inhibit the de-novo synthesis of cholesterol. Consequently, the liver produces less VLDL, and the serum concentration primarily of LDL cholesterol (but, to a lesser extent, also of triglycerides) is lowered. Further, statins somewhat increase HDL cholesterol. There is abundant evidence that statins lower the rate of cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular risk reduction is the better, the lower the LDL cholesterol values achieved with statin therapy are. Some evidence is available that anion exchange resins which also decrease LDL cholesterol decrease vascular risk, too. This is not the case for the ezetimibe, which strongly lowers LDL cholesterol: its potential to decrease vascular risk remains to be proven. In contrast evidence for cardiovascular risk reduction through the mainly triglyceride lowering fibrates as well as for niacin is available. Niacin is the most potent HDL increasing drug currently available and besides increasing HDL cholesterol efficaciously lowers triglycerides and LDL cholesterol. Large ongoing trials address the decisive question whether treatment with fibrates and niacin provides additional cardiovascular risk reduction when given in addition to statin treatment.

  5. Relation among the plasma triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration ratio, insulin resistance, and associated cardio-metabolic risk factors in men and women.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Espeche, Walter G; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; Balbín, Eduardo; Dulbecco, Carlos A; Aizpurúa, Marcelo; Marillet, Alberto G; Reaven, Gerald M

    2012-06-15

    Results of recent studies using the ratio of plasma triglyceride (TG) to high-density lipoprotein (