Science.gov

Sample records for dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube

  1. Successful gefitinib treatment administration via gastrostomy tube in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Suzumura, Tomohiro; Yonesaka, Kimio; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with dysphagia was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma and metastatic meningeal tumour that impaired the medulla. Owing to a bulky tumour beside the medulla, radiosurgical control of the meningeal tumour was achieved before systemic therapy. Genomic examination of the tumour revealed an existing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion, for which an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as gefitinib was the standard therapy. However, because of dysphagia, the patient was unable to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib was delivered via gastrostomy tube as a suspension after spontaneous dissolution in hot water. One month later, the patient's symptoms, including dysphagia, were drastically improved and she had recovered sufficiently to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib-associated toxicity comprises only mild liver dysfunction and skin rash. CT scanning and MRI detected drastic shrinkage of the primary lung and meningeal tumours. The patient continued to take gefitinib and has remained symptom-free for 9 months. PMID:24626382

  2. Gastrostomy tube dislodgment acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous gastrostomy is well established root for long term feeding of patients who cannot be fed orally. The risks of percutanous gastrostomy insertion are low. Tube related complications often resolved by placing a Foley catheter or other balloon gastrostomy tube as a temporary solution. Gastrostomy tube related gastric, duodenal and billiary obstruction were reported. Gastrostomy tube related pancreatitis is scarcely described. We described a patient who suffered a pancreatitis related to Foley catheter gastrostomy dislodgment. Reviewing all reported cases of gastrostomy related pancreatitis revealed higher incidence in patient with Foley catheter used as gastrostomy and revealed questionable trends in conducting tube replacement. We suggest a proper manner for tube replacement and concluded that should a Foley catheter used as a temporary solution a replacement should be schedule in a timely manner to avoid life threatening complications. PMID:24674106

  3. Foley Catheters as Temporary Gastrostomy Tubes: Experience of a Nurse-Led Service.

    PubMed

    Metussin, Adli; Sia, Rusanah; Bakar, Suriawati; Chong, Vui Heng

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube is the modality of choice for long-term enteral nutrition. In the event that replacement tubes are not available, urinary catheters can be used to maintain patency of the gastrostomy tract. This study reports our experience in a nurse-led service using Foley catheters as temporary gastrostomy tubes and the associated complications. Patients who had used Foley catheter as gastrostomy tube over a 2-year period (Jan 2011 to December 2012) were studied. Twenty-one patients had used Foley catheters as a temporary gastrostomy tube, and 12 (57.4%) did not experience any complications, including three patients who were still using Foley catheters at a median of 15 months (range 3-18). Two patients preferred the Foley catheter as feeding tubes. Six patients had replacements with formal balloon replacement tubes, and two patients did not require replacement. Complications occurred in nine (42.6%) patients: repeated burst Foley catheter balloon with peristomal leakage (n = 4), lumen blockage (n = 1), and catheter migration resulting in small bowel obstruction (n = 4). All complications were successfully managed with tube replacements. We showed that in a nurse-led service, using a Foley catheter as a temporary feeding gastrostomy tube is safe, but requires monitoring for complications.

  4. Comparison of Foley catheter as a replacement gastrostomy tube with commercial replacement gastrostomy tube: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, S C; Cassaday, M; Shaffer, R T

    1994-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) provides a non-surgical alternative to long-term enteral feeding. The gastrostomy tube, however, may deteriorate, malfunction, or be accidentally expelled, requiring replacement. A commercial gastrostomy tube is commonly used for replacement. However, a commercial replacement gastrostomy tube is many times more expensive than a Foley catheter, and the two have never been compared. We compared the efficacy and safety of an all-silicone Foley catheter used as a replacement feeding gastrostomy tube with the effectiveness of a commercial replacement gastrostomy tube in 46 patients undergoing long-term enteral feedings per gastrostomy. Twenty-four patients were randomized to the Foley group and 22 patients to the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube group. The Foley catheter functioned well without need for replacement in 16 (66%) patients for 27.4 +/- 14.8 (mean +/- SD) weeks; the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube functioned in 13 (59%) patients for 24.5 +/- 13.6 weeks (p > 0.05, NS). The Foley catheter needed to be replaced because of malfunction in 8 (34%) patients and the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube in 9 (41%) patients after 21.6 +/- 11.5 weeks and 19.3 +/- 9.3 weeks, respectively (p > 0.05, NS). Neither the Foley catheter nor the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube migrated; this was the most striking finding, in contrast to case reports in the literature. Our data suggest that the Foley catheter can be safely used as a replacement gastrostomy tube; it is considerably cheaper than the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube, and its efficacy and complication rates are similar to those of the commercial replacement gastrostomy tube.

  5. Fluoroscopy-Guided Removal of Pull-Type Gastrostomy Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Christopher M. Schneider, Jens; Lachmann, Ricarda; Herber, Sascha

    2008-11-15

    These case reports demonstrate a radiologic interventional technique for removal of pull-type gastrostomy tubes. This approach proved to be a safe and efficient procedure in two patients. The procedure may be applicable in situations where endoscopic attempts fail.

  6. Prospective evaluation of Foley catheter as a replacement gastrostomy tube.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, S C; Cassaday, M; Shaffer, R T

    1992-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy provides a nonsurgical alternative to enteral feeding. However, the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube may deteriorate, malfunction, or be accidentally expelled from the stomach, requiring replacement. This prospective study was performed to evaluate the use of an all silicone Foley catheter (Foley) as a replacement feeding gastrostomy in 28 patients requiring replacement gastrostomy. A plastic ring and a retention disc were always placed over the Foley prior to replacement. Foley functioned well without replacement in 19 (68%) patients for a mean of 167 days. It needed to be replaced in nine (32%) patients due to malfunction after a mean of 138 days. Lack of migration of Foley was the most striking finding of our study, in contrast to case reports in the literature. These data suggest that Foley can be safely used as replacement gastrostomy tube. A randomized controlled trial comparing the Foley catheter as a replacement tube with other commercially available devices is needed.

  7. Massive reflux and aspiration after radiographically inserted gastrostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Chesoni, Sandra A; Bach, John R; Okamura, Erica Mia

    2015-01-01

    To the authors' knowledge, fatal postgastrostomy aspiration within 2 days of enteral nutrition has not been reported. The authors report consecutive cases of severe postgastrotomy aspiration with one being fatal for a 26-yr-old with Duchenne muscular dystrophy 2 days after initiation of gastrostomy feedings. Previous to these consecutive radiographically inserted gastrostomies, all gastrotomies at the institution were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies or open gastrostomies. Radiographically inserted gastrostomy tubes have an increased likelihood of being oriented toward the esophagus as opposed to the duodenum, which may increase the risk for reflux. Elimination of invasive airway tubes should be delayed until after gastrostomy feedings are documented to be well tolerated. Oximetry and repeated measurements of vital capacity can suggest changes in the status of airway clearance.

  8. Gastrostomy Tube Use after Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-khudari, Samer; Bendix, Scott; Lindholm, Jamie; Simmerman, Erin; Hall, Francis; Ghanem, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate factors that influence gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer. Study Design/Methods. Retrospective review of TORS patients with OP cancer. G-tube presence was recorded before and after surgery at followup. Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazards model evaluated effects of early (T1 and T2) and advanced (T3, T4) disease, adjuvant therapy, and free flap reconstruction on g-tube use. Results. Sixteen patients had tonsillar cancer and 13 tongue base cancer. Of 22 patients who underwent TORS as primary therapy, 17 had T1 T2 stage and five T3 T4 stage. Seven underwent salvage therapy (four T1 T2 and three T3 T4). Nine underwent robotic-assisted inset free flap reconstruction. Seventeen received adjuvant therapy. Four groups were compared: primary early disease (PED) T1 and T2 tumors, primary early disease with adjunctive therapy (PEDAT), primary advanced disease (PAD) T3 and T4 tumors, and salvage therapy. Within the first year of treatment, 0% PED, 44% PEDAT, 40% PAD, and 57% salvage patients required a g-tube. Fourteen patients had a temporary nasoenteric tube (48.3%) postoperatively, and 10 required a g-tube (34.5%) within the first year. Four of 22 (18.2%) with TORS as primary treatment were g-tube dependent at one year and had received adjuvant therapy. Conclusion. PED can be managed without a g-tube after TORS. Similar feeding tube rates were found for PEDAT and PAD patients. Salvage patients have a high rate of g-tube need after TORS. PMID:23936676

  9. A Behavior Analysis Approach toward Chronic Food Refusal in Children with Gastrostomy-Tube Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.; Luiselli, Tracy Evans

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a behavior analysis treatment approach to establishing oral feeding in children with multiple developmental disabilities and gastrostomy-tube dependency. Pretreatment screening, functional assessment, and treatment are reported as implemented within a behavioral consultation model. A case study illustrates the sequence and…

  10. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. Conclusion These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle

  11. Replacement of Mushroom Cage Gastrostomy Tube Using a Modified Technique to Allow Percutaneous Replacement with an Endoscopic Tube in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ammar, Thoraya; Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Sidhu, Paul S.

    2010-06-15

    Radiologic inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is the preferred method in our institution for enteral feeding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Skin-level primary-placed mushroom cage gastrostomy tubes become tight with weight gain. We describe a minimally invasive radiologic technique for replacing mushroom gastrostomy tubes with endoscopic mushroom cage tubes in ALS. All patients with ALS who underwent replacement of a RIG tube were included. Patients were selected for a modified replacement when the tube length of the primary placed RIG tube was insufficient to allow like-for-like replacement. Replacement was performed under local anesthetic and fluoroscopic guidance according to a preset technique, with modification of an endoscopic mushroom cage gastrostomy tube to allow percutaneous placement. Assessment of the success, safety, and durability of the modified technique was undertaken. Over a 60-month period, 104 primary placement mushroom cage tubes in ALS were performed. A total of 20 (19.2%) of 104 patients had a replacement tube positioned, 10 (9.6%) of 104 with the modified technique (male n = 4, female n = 6, mean age 65.5 years, range 48-85 years). All tubes were successfully replaced using this modified technique, with two minor complications (superficial wound infection and minor hemorrhage). The mean length of time of tube durability was 158.5 days (range 6-471 days), with all but one patient dying with a functional tube in place. We have devised a modification to allow percutaneous replacement of mushroom cage gastrostomy feeding tubes with minimal compromise to ALS patients. This technique allows tube replacement under local anesthetic, without the need for sedation, an important consideration in ALS.

  12. Bronchoesophageal Fistula Stenting Using High-Frequency Jet Ventilation and Underwater Seal Gastrostomy Tube Drainage.

    PubMed

    Fokeerah, Nitish; Liu, Xinwei; Hao, Yonggang; Peng, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Managing a patient scheduled for bronchoesophageal fistula repair is challenging for the anesthetist. If appropriate ventilation strategy is not employed, serious complications such as hypoxemia, gastric distension, and pulmonary aspiration can occur. We present the case of a 62-year-old man with a bronchoesophageal fistula in the left main stem bronchus requiring the insertion of a Y-shaped tracheobronchial stent through a rigid bronchoscope, under general anesthesia. We successfully managed this intervention and herein report this case to demonstrate the effectiveness of underwater seal gastrostomy tube drainage used in conjunction with high-frequency jet ventilation during bronchoesophageal fistula stenting. PMID:27672454

  13. Bronchoesophageal Fistula Stenting Using High-Frequency Jet Ventilation and Underwater Seal Gastrostomy Tube Drainage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Managing a patient scheduled for bronchoesophageal fistula repair is challenging for the anesthetist. If appropriate ventilation strategy is not employed, serious complications such as hypoxemia, gastric distension, and pulmonary aspiration can occur. We present the case of a 62-year-old man with a bronchoesophageal fistula in the left main stem bronchus requiring the insertion of a Y-shaped tracheobronchial stent through a rigid bronchoscope, under general anesthesia. We successfully managed this intervention and herein report this case to demonstrate the effectiveness of underwater seal gastrostomy tube drainage used in conjunction with high-frequency jet ventilation during bronchoesophageal fistula stenting. PMID:27672454

  14. Bronchoesophageal Fistula Stenting Using High-Frequency Jet Ventilation and Underwater Seal Gastrostomy Tube Drainage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Managing a patient scheduled for bronchoesophageal fistula repair is challenging for the anesthetist. If appropriate ventilation strategy is not employed, serious complications such as hypoxemia, gastric distension, and pulmonary aspiration can occur. We present the case of a 62-year-old man with a bronchoesophageal fistula in the left main stem bronchus requiring the insertion of a Y-shaped tracheobronchial stent through a rigid bronchoscope, under general anesthesia. We successfully managed this intervention and herein report this case to demonstrate the effectiveness of underwater seal gastrostomy tube drainage used in conjunction with high-frequency jet ventilation during bronchoesophageal fistula stenting.

  15. Gastrostomy Intraperitoneal Bumper Migration in a Three-Year-Old Child: A Rare Complication following Gastrostomy Tube Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Guanà, Riccardo; Lonati, Luca; Barletti, Claudio; Cisarò, Fabio; Casorzo, Ilaria; Carbonaro, Giulia; Lezo, Antonella; Delmonaco, Angelo Giovanni; Mussa, Alessandro; Capitanio, Martina; Cussa, Davide; Lemini, Riccardo; Schleef, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Feeding gastrostomy is used worldwide for adults and children with feeding impairment to obtain long-term enteral nutrition. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion is considered the gold standard, but after the first months requires gastrostomy tube replacement with a low-profile button. The replacement is known as an easy procedure, but several minor and major complications may occur during and after the manoeuvre. We describe intraperitoneal bumper migration in a 3-year-old boy, a rare complication following gastrostomy tube replacement, and we discuss the recent literature regarding similar cases. PMID:25565933

  16. Comparison of two percutaneous radiological gastrostomy tubes in the nutritional management of ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Turner, Martin R; Shaw, Ashley S; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Chris E; Leigh, P Nigel; Sidhu, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Patient care and minimizing complications post gastrostomy have to date received little attention in ALS patients. We compare the complications associated with pigtail and mushroom type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy tubes in this patient group. Patients requiring PRG received either Wills-Oglesby or the skin level Entristar. Retrospective review of the clinical notes was performed capturing demographic data, peristomal infection, tube displacement, tube failure, nutritional status, site of disease onset, and survival. Thirty-five patients (Group 1) had the Wills-Oglesby tube of which 14 (40%) tubes required replacement. The Entristar tube was inserted in 29 patients (Group 2) where 8 (28%) required replacement (NS). The incidence of infection was significantly lower with the Entristar tube, (p<0.001). The mean time to tube removal in Group 2 was 223 days (SD 147; range 71-494 days) due to 'buried bumper syndrome'. We conclude that the Entristar skin level gastrostomy tube is associated with a reduction in peristomal infection, tube failure and blockage compared with the Wills-Oglesby tube.

  17. Topical Corticosteroid for the Treatment of Hypergranulation Tissue at the Gastrostomy Tube Insertion Site: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ae, Ryusuke; Kosami, Koki; Yahata, Shinsuke

    2016-09-01

    Hypergranulation tissue formation around a gastrostomy tube insertion site is a common feeding tube-related complication that affects patients who receive long-term enteral nutrition. Some clinicians recommend use of a topical corticosteroid in patients with gastrostomy tube insertion site hypergranulation. However, documentation is scant regarding appropriate treatment for this condition. This case report describes a 67-year-old bedridden man with spinocerebellar degeneration who presented with hypergranulation at the site of the gastrostomy tube, inserted 1 week earlier. The tissue was raw and inflamed, with bleeding and exudation. The gastrostomy site was gently cleansed with gauze dampened with tap water, and topical 0.05% clobetasol propionate ointment was applied directly to the hypergranulation tissue twice daily. After 4 days of treatment, the hypergranulation tissue almost completely disappeared, redness markedly decreased, and bleeding and exudation ceased, with no recurrence observed during the 6 months of follow-up. This case study supports other reports that short-term corticosteroid treatment may be a safe, quick, noninvasive, and effective treatment for hypergranulation at the gastrostomy tube insertion site. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness, appropriate dosage, and duration of topical corticosteroid for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue. PMID:27668480

  18. MAPLE fabricated Fe3O4@Cinnamomum verum antimicrobial surfaces for improved gastrostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Chirea, Mariana; Grumezescu, Valentina; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV) functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization. PMID:24979402

  19. Fluoroscopy-guided jejunal extension tube placement through existing gastrostomy tubes: analysis of 391 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Qiao, Yujie; Easley, Genevieve; Patrie, James; Lambert, Drew; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fluoroscopically placed jejunal extension tubes (J-arm) in patients with existing gastrostomy tubes. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of 391 J-arm placements performed in 174 patients. Indications for jejunal nutrition were aspiration risk (35%), pancreatitis (17%), gastroparesis (13%), gastric outlet obstruction (12%), and other (23%). Technical success, complications, malfunctions, and patency were assessed. Percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube location, J-arm course, and fluoroscopy time were correlated with success/failure. Failure was defined as inability to exit the stomach. Procedure-related complications were defined as adverse events related to tube placement occurring within seven days. Tube malfunctions and aspiration events were recorded and assessed. RESULTS Technical success was achieved in 91.9% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of new tubes versus 94.2% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of replacements (P = 0.373). Periprocedural complications occurred in three patients (0.8%). Malfunctions occurred in 197 patients (50%). Median tube patency was 103 days (95% CI, 71–134 days). No association was found between successful J-arm placement and gastric PEG tube position (P = 0.677), indication for jejunal nutrition (P = 0.349), J-arm trajectory in the stomach and incidence of malfunction (P = 0.365), risk of tube migration and PEG tube position (P = 0.173), or J-arm length (P = 0.987). A fluoroscopy time of 21.3 min was identified as a threshold for failure. Malfunctions occurred more often in tubes replaced after 90 days than in tubes replaced before 90 days (P < 0.001). A total of 42 aspiration events occurred (OR 6.4, P < 0.001, compared with nonmalfunctioning tubes). CONCLUSION Fluoroscopy-guided J-arm placement is safe for patients requiring jejunal nutrition. Tubes indwelling for longer than 90 days have higher rates of malfunction and aspiration. PMID:26380895

  20. Evaluating the Role of Prophylactic Gastrostomy Tube Placement Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Lau, Derick H.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Stuart, Kerri; Newman, Kathleen; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan M.D.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prophylactic gastrostomy tube (GT) placement on acute and long-term outcome for patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty consecutive patients were treated with chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV head and neck cancer to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 64-74 Gy). The most common primary site was the oropharynx (66 patients). Sixty-seven patients (56%) were treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Seventy patients (58%) received prophylactic GT placement at the discretion of the physician before initiation of chemoradiotherapy. Results: Prophylactic GT placement significantly reduced weight loss during radiation therapy from 43 pounds (range, 0 to 76 pounds) to 19 pounds (range, 0 to 51 pounds), which corresponded to a net change of -14% (range, 0% to -30%) and -8% (range, +1% to -22%) from baseline, respectively (p < 0.001). However, the proportion of patients who were GT-dependent at 6- and 12-months after treatment was 41% and 21%, respectively, compared with 8% and 0%, respectively, for those with and without prophylactic GT (p < 0.001). Additionally, prophylactic GT was associated with a significantly higher incidence of late esophageal stricture compared with those who did not have prophylactic GT (30% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although prophylactic GT placement was effective at preventing acute weight loss and the need for intravenous hydration, it was also associated with significantly higher rates of late esophageal toxicity. The benefits of this strategy must be balanced with the risks.

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Gastrostomy Tube and Tracheostomy Placement in Anoxic/Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathic Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia I.; Lidsky, Karen B.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current prevalence estimates of gastrostomy tube (GT) /tracheostomy placement in hospitalized patients with anoxic/hypoxic ischemic encephalopathic injury (AHIE) post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unknown. We sought, to estimate the prevalence of AHIE in hospitalized patients who had CPR and to identify patient/hospital level factors that predict the performance of GT/tracheostomy in those with AHIE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2004–2010). All patients who developed AHIE following CPR were included. In this cohort the odds of having GT and tracheostomy was computed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Patient and hospital level factors were the independent variables. Results During the study period, a total of 686,578 CPR events occurred in hospitalized patients. Of these, 94,336 (13.7%) patients developed AHIE. In this AHIE cohort, 6.8% received GT and 8.3% tracheostomy. When compared to the 40–49 yrs age group, those aged >70 yrs were associated with lower odds for GT (OR = 0.65, 95% CI:0.53–0.80, p<0.0001). Those aged <18 years & those >60 years were associated with lower odds for having tracheostomy when compared to the 40–49 years group (p<0.0001). Each one unit increase in co-morbid burden was associated with higher odds for having GT (OR = 1.23,p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.17, p<0.0001). Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and other races were associated with higher odds for having GT or tracheostomy when compared to whites (p<0.05). Hospitals located in northeastern regions were associated with higher odds for performing GT (OR = 1.48, p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.63, p<0.0001) when compared to those in Western regions. Teaching hospitals (TH) were associated with higher odds for performing tracheostomy when compared to non-TH (OR = 1.36, 1.20–1.54, p<0.0001). Conclusions AHIE injury occurs in a significant number of in-hospital arrests

  2. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57-93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 {+-} 13 (SD) min (range 24-78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7-812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  3. [Esophageal dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Thumshirn, M

    2007-04-01

    Dysphagia can be caused by a number of disorders such as benign or malignant obstruction of the esophagus, inflammatory alterations of the mucosa or primary esophageal motility disorders. Endoscopic evaluation is recommended for all patients to exclude malignancy and to establish or confirm a diagnosis. This article provides an overview of the most frequent inflammatory and functional esophageal disorders causing dysphagia. Clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic management of primary esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm as well as of GERD and eosinophilic esophagitis are discussed. The diagnosis of achalasia is made by barium swallow with fluoroscopy and by manometry. Therapeutic options for achalasia are pneumatic dilatation of the esophagogastric junction, laparoscopic cardiomyotomy combined with fundoplication and botulinum toxin injection of the lower esophageal sphincter Diffuse esophageal spasm is manometrically characterized by normal peristalsis intermittently interrupted by simultaneous contractions. Potential medical therapies are PPIs for underlying GERD, smooth-muscle relaxants and antidepressant medications. GERD is a multifaceted disease caused by abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to chronic symptoms or mucosal damage. Therapy includes lifestyle modifications, acid suppressive medications mainly by PPI and laparoscopic fundoplication in selected patients. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus diagnosed histologically. The main symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis is dysphagia for solid food with imminent risk of food impaction. Systemic or topical corticosteroids are the therapy of choice.

  4. Dysphagia in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are inherently predisposed to dysphagia predominately because of comorbid health conditions. With the aging of the population in the United States, along with the increased prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease, healthcare providers will increasingly encounter older patients with either oropharyngeal or esophageal disease and complaints of dysphagia. Useful tests to evaluate dysphagia include the videofluoroscopic swallowing study and the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Swallow rehabilitation is useful to help patients compensate for swallowing difficulty and ultimately help strengthen the neuromusculature involved in swallowing. PMID:24772045

  5. [Dysphagia rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Eiichi

    2008-11-01

    Recently, many medical professionals become to realize eating problem affect deeply patient's quality of life (QOL), and they are very interested in dysphagia rehabilitation. I overviewed dysphagia rehabilitation along with the followings; (1) impact of dysphagia, (2) assessment of dysphagia, and (3) management of dysphagia. Eating is the most enjoyable activity. Dysphagia changes this enjoyable activity to the most fearful one. Dysphagia makes three major problems: risk of aspiration pneumonia and suffocation, risk of dehydration and malnutrition, and depriving enjoyable activity. As a recent conceptualization of eating, the Process model is the most important, that reveals eating (chew-swallow) is very different from just chewing plus swallowing in physiologically. In assessment, standardized functional tests such as the Repetitive saliva swallowing test, the Modified water swallowing test, and the Graded food test are used. The most important point in clinical assessment is identifying indication of direct therapy using food or starting period of oral feeding. Videofluorographic and videoendoscopic examinations are used as precise diagnostic and management-oriented assessment tools. In management, exercise, posture adjustment, and modification of food promote eating possibility. Oral care is essential in dysphagic patients. Surgical intervention is effective method if a patient has severe dysphagia. PMID:19198104

  6. Dysphagia associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, D W

    1994-01-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia results from sensorimotor impairment of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing due to a neurologic disorder. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia include drooling, difficulty initiating swallowing, nasal regurgitation, difficulty managing secretions, choke/cough episodes while feeding, and food sticking in the throat. If unrecognized and untreated, neurogenic dysphagia can lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and respiratory complications. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia may be relatively inapparent on account of both compensation for swallowing impairment and diminution of the laryngeal cough reflex due to a variety of factors. Patients with symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia should undergo videofluoroscopy of swallowing, which in the case of neurogenic dysphagia typically reveals impairment of oropharyngeal motor performance and/or laryngeal protection. The many causes of neurogenic dysphagia include stroke, head trauma, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease and myopathy. Evaluation of the cause of unexplained neurogenic dysphagia should include consultation by a neurologist, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, blood tests (routine studies plus muscle enzymes, thyroid screening, vitamin B12 and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies), electromyography/nerve conduction studies, and, in certain cases, muscle biopsy or cerebrospinal fluid examination. Treatment of neurogenic dysphagia involves treatment of the underlying neurologic disorder (if possible), swallowing therapy (if oral feeding is reasonably safe to attempt) and gastrostomy (if oral feeding is unsafe or inadequate).

  7. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOPIC Finding Your Way in the Health Care System Preparing Your Child for Surgery Managing Home Health Care Preparing Your Child for Anesthesia What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital What's It Like ...

  8. Analysis of dysphagia risk using the modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The elderly are susceptible to dysphagia, and complications can be minimized if high-risk groups are screened in early stages and properly rehabilitated. This study provides basic material for the early detection and prevention of dysphagia by investigating the risks of dysphagia and related factors in community-dwelling elders. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 325 community-dwelling elderly people aged 65 or older. The modified dysphagia risk assessment for the community-dwelling elderly was used to assess dysphagia risk. [Results] Approximately 52.6% (n=171) of participants belonged to the high-risk group for dysphagia. After adjusting for confounding variables, people aged 75+, who used dentures, and who needed partial help in daily living had a significantly higher risk of dysphagia. [Conclusion] It is necessary to develop guidelines for dysphagia for early detection and rehabilitation. PMID:27799680

  9. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass. PMID:25266097

  10. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  11. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  12. Dysphagia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abraham; Carmona, Richard; Traube, Morris

    2014-02-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem in the elderly. Based on the initial clinical history and physical examination, the dysphagia is assessed as either primarily oropharyngeal or esophageal in origin. Most oropharyngeal dysphagia is of neurologic origin, and management is coordinated with a clinical swallow specialist in conjunction with an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) physician if warning signs imply malignancy. Several structural and functional esophageal disorders can cause dysphagia. If a patient has likely esophageal dysphagia, a video barium esophagram is a good initial test, and referral to a gastroenterologist is generally warranted leading to appropriate treatment.

  13. Cricopharyngeal myotomy: treatment of dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, R L; Armanini, G B

    1975-01-01

    Six patients are presented who underwent cricopharyngeus myotomy for dysphagia. The clinical history and cine studies appear to be the most useful assessments in defining patients with dysphagia who may improve after a myotomy. Etiological factors which may precipitate poor coordination of the swallowing mechanism and a relative cricopharyngeus muscle obstruction include neuromuscular disorders, radical oral surgery, central nervous disease, and idiopathic disorders, although the exact physiology of the cricopharyngeus muscle in health and disease is not as yet delineated, the muscle is being implicated in many problems as the inciting factor of upper esophageal dysphagia. The operation of cricopharyngeus myotomy is a relatively simple procedure and should be done with little morbidity and mortality in properly selected cases. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1130845

  14. Dysphagia in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, W. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the problem of dysphagia in the elderly so that primary care physicians are better able to recognize and manage it. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Dysphagia, a prevalent problem in the elderly, causes significant morbidity and even mortality. Age-related deterioration of the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing is well documented. Diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia in the elderly is based mainly on clinical experience with large groups of patients. Few controlled clinical trials have been conducted. MAIN FINDINGS: Oropharyngeal dysphagia in the elderly is often due to irreversible neuromuscular disease. These patients benefit from swallowing therapy performed by speech pathologists. Esophageal causes of dysphagia are similar in the elderly and young patients, and the approach to treatment is also similar, although noninvasive forms of therapy play a larger role for elderly patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dysphagia is a common problem that lowers quality of life for the elderly. Primary care physicians must be aware of causes of dysphagia for which specific treatments are available, as well as of the role of nonspecific treatments offered by ancillary health professionals. Images p928-a p930-a PMID:8688695

  15. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  16. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  17. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  18. Rehabilitation Nutrition for Possible Sarcopenic Dysphagia After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Uwano, Rimiko

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by the loss of swallowing muscle mass and function associated with generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this report, the authors describe a patient with possible sarcopenic dysphagia after lung cancer surgery and was treated subsequently by rehabilitation nutrition. A 71-year-old man with lung cancer experienced complications of an acute myocardial infarction and pneumonia after surgery. He was ventilated artificially, and a tracheotomy was performed. The patient received diagnoses of malnutrition, severe sarcopenia, and possible sarcopenic dysphagia. His dysphagia was improved by a combination of dysphagia rehabilitation including physical and speech therapy and an improvement in nutrition initiated by a nutrition support team. Finally, he no longer had dysphagia and malnutrition. Sarcopenic dysphagia should be considered in patients with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Rehabilitation nutrition using a combination of both rehabilitation and nutritional care management is presumptively useful for treating sarcopenic dysphagia. PMID:26829095

  19. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  20. Presbyphagia and Sarcopenic Dysphagia: Association between Aging, Sarcopenia, and Deglutition Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Age-related loss of swallowing muscle mass becomes evident in the geniohyoid muscle and tongue. Elderly subjects with both sarcopenia and dysphagia may have not only disease-related dysphagia but also sarcopenic dysphagia. In cases of aspiration pneumonia, deterioration in activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles may develop into sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of sarcopenic dysphagia includes evaluation of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and a water test combined with pulse oximetry are useful for dysphagia screening. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of sarcopenia including nutritional review is important, because rehabilitation of sarcopenic dysphagia differs depending on its etiology. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation for sarcopenic dysphagia includes treatment of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. The causes of adult malnutrition may also contribute to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Therefore, nutrition management is indispensable for sarcopenic dysphagia rehabilitation. In cases of sarcopenia with numerous complicating causes, treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking.

  1. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  2. Approaches to the rehabilitation of dysphagia in acute poststroke patients.

    PubMed

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Robbins, Joanne

    2013-08-01

    Dysphagia occurs frequently following stroke and may result in serious health consequences including pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, and mortality. Prevention of these negative health outcomes requires early identification and treatment of dysphagia. The speech-language pathologist, as part of a multidisciplinary team, holds the primary responsibility for selection of an effective dysphagia rehabilitation program for these patients. Because much research has focused on patients with chronic dysphagia, this review will focus on treatment of patients within the acute phase of recovery poststroke. Although some acute patients may experience transient dysphagia that resolves spontaneously, many will go on to develop chronic dysphagia that may be prevented with provision of early and intensive treatment. An overview of dysphagia following stroke will be provided with information regarding incidence, complications, evaluation, and causes of dysphagia. A thorough discussion of evidence supporting varying approaches to dysphagia rehabilitation will follow with inclusion of several current, novel, and experimental techniques. The importance of the multidisciplinary team and regular reevaluation will be emphasized as well.

  3. Dysphagia in the elderly: management and nutritional considerations.

    PubMed

    Sura, Livia; Madhavan, Aarthi; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is a prevalent difficulty among aging adults. Though increasing age facilitates subtle physiologic changes in swallow function, age-related diseases are significant factors in the presence and severity of dysphagia. Among elderly diseases and health complications, stroke and dementia reflect high rates of dysphagia. In both conditions, dysphagia is associated with nutritional deficits and increased risk of pneumonia. Recent efforts have suggested that elderly community dwellers are also at risk for dysphagia and associated deficits in nutritional status and increased pneumonia risk. Swallowing rehabilitation is an effective approach to increase safe oral intake in these populations and recent research has demonstrated extended benefits related to improved nutritional status and reduced pneumonia rates. In this manuscript, we review data describing age related changes in swallowing and discuss the relationship of dysphagia in patients following stroke, those with dementia, and in community dwelling elderly. Subsequently, we review basic approaches to dysphagia intervention including both compensatory and rehabilitative approaches. We conclude with a discussion on the positive impact of swallowing rehabilitation on malnutrition and pneumonia in elderly who either present with dysphagia or are at risk for dysphagia.

  4. Dysphagia and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Curl, Charlotte; Boyle, Carole

    2014-06-01

    Dysphagia is defined as a 'difficulty in swallowing' and is commonly found in the general population, particularly in the elderly. This article gives an overview of the more frequently encountered swallowing disorders and provides advice on how to manage the dysphagic patient in the dental surgery. Clinical Relevance: By identifying patients with dysphagia and being aware of the potential problems that the clinician may experience when treating them, the risk of aspiration, choking and healthcare-acquired upper respiratory tract infections may be reduced. PMID:25073222

  5. [Medication-induced dysphagia : A review].

    PubMed

    Schwemmle, C; Jungheim, M; Miller, S; Kühn, D; Ptok, M

    2015-07-01

    As a highly differentiated physiological process, swallowing may be affected by a variety of confounding factors. Primarily described are swallowing disorders caused by mechanical anatomic changes (e. g., alteration of the cervical spine, goiter), surgery for head and neck tumors, thyroid abnormalities, and neuromuscular disorders. Age-related cerebral neurological and blood vessel-associated changes can also cause dysphagia (so-called presbyphagia) or worsen the condition.Medication-associated dysphagia is recognized far less frequently, not paid due attention, or accepted in silence; particularly in older patients. Furthermore, pharmacological interference of different medications is frequently inadequately considered, particularly in the case of polypharmacy.Initial treatment of medication-induced dysphagia includes a critical review of medication status, with the aim of reducing/discontinuing the causative medication by giving precise instructions regarding its administration; as well as antacid medication, diet, and professional oral stimulation or swallowing training.To date, medication-induced dysphagia has not occupied the focus of physicians and therapists. This is despite the fact that many active agents can have a negative effect on swallowing and medication-induced dysphagia caused by polypharmacy is not uncommon, particularly in old age. This article presents an overview of the different classes of drugs in terms of their direct or indirect negative effects on the swallowing function.

  6. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    increased risk of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are: more levels operated, female gender, increased operative time, and older age (usually >60 years). Dysphagic patients can learn compensatory strategies for the safe and effective passage of bolus material. Certain intraoperative and postoperative techniques may decrease the incidence and/or severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS. Conclusions Large, prospective, randomized studies are required to confirm the incidence, prevalence, etiology, mechanisms, long-term natural history, and risk factors for the development of dysphagia after ACSS, as well as to identify prevention measures. Also needed is a universal outcome measurement that is specific, reliable and valid, would include global, functional, psychosocial, and physical domains, and would facilitate comparisons among studies. Results of these studies can lead to improvements in surgical techniques and/or perioperative management, and may reduce the incidence of dysphagia after ACSS. PMID:24436882

  7. [Detection and management of the neurologic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Leemann, Beatrice; Sergi, Sabrina; Sahinpasic, Leila; Schnider, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Neurologic dysphagia is frequent and has consequences which can be severe, such as, denutrition andpneumonia. In most cases, it can be detected with a clinical exam. The management includes some general measures, an adaptation of textures, specific rehabilitation, and nutritional assessment to judge whether complementary enteral nutrition is needed. PMID:27089605

  8. Dysphagia in the elderly: focus on rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Pede, C; Mantovani, M E; Del Felice, A; Masiero, S

    2016-08-01

    Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia among the elderly is high, but underestimated and underdiagnosed. It may give raise to relevant complications impacting on morbidity, hospital length of stay and health care costs. Dysphagia evaluation and management is a multidisciplinary task; it includes a detailed history taking, clinical and instrumental exams, and identification of the risk of aspiration. Long-standing individual abilities and impairments determine the goals of an ad hoc rehabilitation program. Currently there are no standard algorithmic approaches for the management of dysphagia in the elderly. Education of health professionals on early diagnosis and improvement of therapeutic strategies are mainstays to allow maximal recovery potential in this population. This narrative review summarizes the current rehabilitation approaches for dysphagia in the elderly. The aim is to inform the treating health care professionals, whether caring physician, physical medicine doctor, speech/swallowing therapist or nurse, on the state-of-the-art and stimulate discussion in the scientific community. PMID:26589905

  9. Telepractice for Pediatric Dysphagia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger’s Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  10. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    PubMed Central

    Borgström, Anders; Fork, Frans-Thomas; Lövdahl, Eje

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13%) had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69%) had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67%) were symptomatic while 7 (33%) were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended. PMID:18493375

  11. Dysphagia: its nature, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, John

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia impacts on the health and quality of life of individuals and contributes to the cost of health care. This paper summarises current literature regarding the nature, assessment and management of acquired oro-pharyngeal dysphagia in older adults. It examines the aetiology, prevalence and consequences of dysphagia, as well as issues regarding medication administration. Assessment of dysphagia is explored in terms of multidisciplinary screening, speech and language therapist clinical swallowing evaluation and instrumental assessment.

  12. Dysphagia: warning signs and management.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip

    Dysphagia is a condition in which patients have difficulty with some or all parts of the swallowing process. It can lead to penetration of food or drink into the larynx, which can cause aspiration. The prevalence varies but it is thought that 10% of acutely hospitalised elderly patients suffer from dysphagia. There are both obvious and less obvious indicators. Dysphagia is caused by a variety of conditions and can be short term or long term. It affects the patient physically, psychologically and socially. Because nurses spend the most time with patients, they are often the first ones to identify a problem. Therefore, it is sensible for nurses to be trained in how to screen patients for swallowing problems. They can then be referred to speech and language therapists for a formal and thorough assessment. There is a variety of national guidelines available to support health professionals in caring for these patients. PMID:27231737

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Dysphagia in Children with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Arwen; Maybee, Jennifer; Moran, Maura K; Wolter-Warmerdam, Kristine; Hickey, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Aspiration is an often unrecognized comorbidity in children with Down syndrome with serious medical consequences. This retrospective chart review of swallow study reports characterizes oral and pharyngeal phase dysphagia and diet modifications on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A total of 158 pediatric patients (male = 95; female = 63; mean age 2.10 years, SD 3.17 years) received an initial VFSS at a pediatric teaching hospital as part of their medical care. A total of 56.3 % (n = 89) children had pharyngeal phase dysphagia with aspiration and deep laryngeal penetration occurring most frequently. Of the 61 patients who aspirated, 90.2 % (n = 55) did so silently with no cough or overt clinical symptoms. In 76.7 % of cases of pharyngeal phase dysphagia, a functional feeding plan, with use of thickened liquids or change in feeding system to control flow rate and/or bolus size, was able to be established, which allowed children to continue eating by mouth. Thickened liquids (76.7 %, n = 46) were the most effective adaptation, with change in feeding system alone effective in only 8.3 % (n = 5) cases. Oral phase dysphagia was reported in the majority of patients (63.8 %, n = 88/138); however, this was not predictive of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. Age, sex, and reason for referral, including prior clinical symptoms, did not have a statistically significant impact on the presence of dysphagia. This comprehensive review has application to clinical understanding and management of dysphagia in children with Down syndrome.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Dysphagia in Children with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Arwen; Maybee, Jennifer; Moran, Maura K; Wolter-Warmerdam, Kristine; Hickey, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Aspiration is an often unrecognized comorbidity in children with Down syndrome with serious medical consequences. This retrospective chart review of swallow study reports characterizes oral and pharyngeal phase dysphagia and diet modifications on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A total of 158 pediatric patients (male = 95; female = 63; mean age 2.10 years, SD 3.17 years) received an initial VFSS at a pediatric teaching hospital as part of their medical care. A total of 56.3 % (n = 89) children had pharyngeal phase dysphagia with aspiration and deep laryngeal penetration occurring most frequently. Of the 61 patients who aspirated, 90.2 % (n = 55) did so silently with no cough or overt clinical symptoms. In 76.7 % of cases of pharyngeal phase dysphagia, a functional feeding plan, with use of thickened liquids or change in feeding system to control flow rate and/or bolus size, was able to be established, which allowed children to continue eating by mouth. Thickened liquids (76.7 %, n = 46) were the most effective adaptation, with change in feeding system alone effective in only 8.3 % (n = 5) cases. Oral phase dysphagia was reported in the majority of patients (63.8 %, n = 88/138); however, this was not predictive of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. Age, sex, and reason for referral, including prior clinical symptoms, did not have a statistically significant impact on the presence of dysphagia. This comprehensive review has application to clinical understanding and management of dysphagia in children with Down syndrome. PMID:27405422

  15. Dysphagia outcomes in patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Wesling, Michele; Brady, Susan; Jensen, Mary; Nickell, Melissa; Statkus, Donna; Escobar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare functional dysphagia outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation for patients with brain tumors with that of patients following a stroke. Group 1 (n = 24) consisted of consecutive admissions to the brain injury program with the diagnosis of brain tumor and dysphagia. Group 2 (n = 24) consisted of matched, consecutive admissions, with the diagnosis of acute stroke and dysphagia. Group 2 was matched for age, site of lesion, and initial composite cognitive FIM score. The main outcome measures for this study included the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, length of stay, hospital charges, and medical complications. Results showed that swallowing gains made by both groups as evaluated by the admission and discharge ASHA NOMS levels were considered to be statistically significant. The differences for length of stay, total hospital charges, and speech charges between the two groups were not considered to be statistically significant. Three patients in the brain tumor group (12.5%) demonstrated dysphagia complications of either dehydration or pneumonia during their treatment course as compared to 0% in the stroke group. This study confirms that functional dysphagia gains can be achieved for patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and that they should be afforded the same type and intensity of rehabilitation for their swallowing that is provided to patients following a stroke.

  16. [Treatment and rehabilitation of dysphagia following cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    López-Liria, Remedios; Fernández-Alonso, Melodie; Vega-Ramírez, Francisco A; Salido-Campos, M Ángeles; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2014-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Bronchopneumonia is a frequent complication in the first days after a cerebrovascular disease and is linked with a higher rate of mortality. It occurs in patients with an altered level of consciousness or tussigenic reflex, and could be prevented with an early dysphagia rehabilitation programme. AIMS. To review the scientific literature on the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia after suffering a stroke, published between 2002 and 2012. DEVELOPMENT. A search conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL and ENFISPO databases yielded 15 papers that fulfilled eligibility criteria and the initial aims of the study, providing information about 3,212 patients. The different protocols and techniques for re-education in dysphagia are described and include compensatory strategies, orofacial regulation therapy, music therapy, sensory stimulation, lip muscle, tongue, pharynx, larynx and respiratory tract training, Mendelsohn manoeuvre, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS. The studies examined in this research claim that the treatment of dysphagia following a stroke can improve the function of deglutition (coordination, speed, volume), quality of life and people's social relationships. Further work needs to be carried out to establish or define what kind of therapies, techniques, exercises or manoeuvres are the most effective in dysphagia. Generally agreed treatment or rehabilitation protocols also need to be drawn up within units that address stroke in an integrated manner.

  17. Dyskeratosis congenita presenting with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kalpana; Tripathi, Swati; Agarwal, Nidheesh; Bareth, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosiscongenita (DKC) is a genetically heterogeneous disease of defective telomere maintenance that may demonstrate different patterns of inheritance. It is characterized by thetriad of dystrophy of the nails, leukokeratosis of the oral mucosa, and extensive net-like pigmentation of the skin. We report a case ofDKC who presented with a chief complaint of dysphagia. PMID:27559501

  18. Dysphagia lusoria: A late onset presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alice Louise; Cock, Charles; Heddle, Richard; Morcom, Russell Kym

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia lusoria is a term used to describe dysphagia secondary to vascular compression of the oesophagus. The various embryologic anomalies of the arterial brachial arch system often remain unrecognised and asymptomatic, but in 30%-40% of cases can result in tracheo-oesophageal symptoms, which in the majority of cases manifest as dysphagia. Diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria is via barium swallow and chest Computed tomography scan. Manometric abnormalities are variable, but age-related manometric changes may contribute to clinically relevant dysphagia lusoria in patients who present later in life. Our report describes a case of late-onset dysphagia secondary to a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery, which represents a rare variant of dysphagia lusoria. The patient had proven additional oesophageal dysmotility with solid bolus only and a clinical response to dietary modification. PMID:23613640

  19. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  20. Dysphagia: A Short Review of the Current State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koidou, Irene; Kollias, Nikolaos; Sdravou, Katerina; Grouios, George

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is the clinical expression of disruption of the synchronized activity surrounding the normal swallowing mechanism. It results from a large number of causes including neurologic, myopathic, metabolic, inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, structural, iatrogenic, and psychiatric diseases. It can have a significant impact on social and…

  1. Plummer-Vinson syndrome: an unusual cause of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, R; Janakiraman, L; Sathiyasekaran, M

    2008-06-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome, comprising a triad of dysphagia, iron deficiency anaemia and cricoid webs, is rarely reported in children. It is important to identify this condition not only to provide relief of symptoms by iron supplementation but also to include these children in surveillance programmes for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Simpson, Annie N; Ellis, Charles; Mauldin, Patrick; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Simpson, Kit

    2014-10-01

    With the recent emphasis on evidence-based practice and healthcare reform, understanding the cost of dysphagia management has never been more important. It is helpful for clinicians to understand and objectively report the costs associated with dysphagia when they advocate for their services in this economy. Having carefully estimated cost of illness, inputs are needed for cost-effectiveness analyses that help support the value of treatments. This study sought to address this issue by examining the 1-year cost associated with a diagnosis of dysphagia post-stroke in South Carolina. Furthermore, this study investigated whether ethnicity and residence differences exist in the cost of dysphagia post-stroke. Data on 3,200 patients in the South Carolina Medicare database from 2004 who had ICD-9 codes for ischemic stroke, 434 and 436, were retrospectively included in this study. Differences between persons with and without dysphagia post-stroke were compared with respect to age, gender, ethnicity, mortality, length of stay, comorbidity, rurality, discharge disposition, and cost to Medicare. Univariate analyses and a gamma-distributed generalized linear multivariable model with a log link function were completed. We found that the 1-year cost to Medicare for persons with dysphagia post ischemic stroke was $4,510 higher than that for persons without dysphagia post ischemic stroke when controlling for age, comorbidities, ethnicity, and proportion of time alive. Univariate analysis revealed that rurality, ethnicity, and gender were not statistically significantly different in comparisons of individuals with or without dysphagia post-stroke. Post-stroke dysphagia significantly increases post-stroke medical expenses. Understanding the expenditures associated with post-stroke dysphagia is helpful for optimal allocation and use of resources. Such information is needed to conduct cost-effectiveness studies.

  3. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  4. Clinical dysphagia risk predictors after prolonged orotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Gisele Chagas; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Zilberstein, Bruno; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate independent risk factors for dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation. METHODS: The participants were 148 consecutive patients who underwent clinical bedside swallowing assessments from September 2009 to September 2011. All patients had received prolonged orotracheal intubations and were admitted to one of several intensive care units of a large Brazilian school hospital. The correlations between the conducted water swallow test results and dysphagia risk levels were analyzed for statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the 148 patients included in the study, 91 were male and 57 were female (mean age, 53.64 years). The univariate analysis results indicated that specific variables, including extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking, and other signs, were possible significant high-risk indicators of dysphagia onset. The multivariate analysis results indicated that cervical auscultation and coughing were independent predictive variables for high dysphagia risk. CONCLUSIONS: Patients displaying extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking and other signs should benefit from early swallowing evaluations. Additionally, early post-extubation dysfunction recognition is paramount in reducing the morbidity rate in this high-risk population. PMID:24473554

  5. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  6. Evaluation of dysphagia in early stroke patients by bedside, endoscopic, and electrophysiological methods.

    PubMed

    Umay, Ebru Karaca; Unlu, Ece; Saylam, Guleser Kılıc; Cakci, Aytul; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2013-09-01

    We aimed in this study to evaluate dysphagia in early stroke patients using a bedside screening test and flexible fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FFEES) and electrophysiological evaluation (EE) methods and to compare the effectiveness of these methods. Twenty-four patients who were hospitalized in our clinic within the first 3 months after stroke were included in this study. Patients were evaluated using a bedside screening test [including bedside dysphagia score (BDS), neurological examination dysphagia score (NEDS), and total dysphagia score (TDS)] and FFEES and EE methods. Patients were divided into normal-swallowing and dysphagia groups according to the results of the evaluation methods. Patients with dysphagia as determined by any of these methods were compared to the patients with normal swallowing based on the results of the other two methods. Based on the results of our study, a high BDS was positively correlated with dysphagia identified by FFEES and EE methods. Moreover, the FFEES and EE methods were positively correlated. There was no significant correlation between NEDS and TDS levels and either EE or FFEES method. Bedside screening tests should be used mainly as an initial screening test; then FFEES and EE methods should be combined in patients who show risks. This diagnostic algorithm may provide a practical and fast solution for selected stroke patients.

  7. Validation of the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale in various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyong; Oh, Byung-Mo; Kim, Jung Yoon; Lee, Goo Joo; Lee, Seung Ah; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2014-08-01

    The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was developed as an objective predictor of the prognosis of dysphagia after stroke. We evaluated the clinical validity of the VDS for various diseases. We reviewed the medical records of 1,995 dysphagic patients (1,222 men and 773 women) who underwent videofluoroscopic studies in Seoul National University Hospital from April 2002 through December 2009. Their American Speech–Language–Hearing Association’s National Outcome Measurement System (ASHA NOMS) swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale (CDS), and VDS scores were evaluated on the basis of the clinical and/or videofluoroscopic findings by the consensus of two physiatrists. The correlations between the VDS and the other scales were calculated. The VDS displayed significant correlations with the ASHA NOMS swallowing scale and the CDS in every disease group (p < 0.001 in all groups, including central and peripheral nervous system disorders), and these correlations were more apparent for spinal cord injury, peripheral nerve system disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases (correlation coefficients between the VDS and the ASHA NOMS swallowing scale: −0.603, −0.602, and −0.567, respectively). This study demonstrated that the VDS is applicable to dysphagic patients with numerous etiologies that cause dysphagia

  8. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  9. Omission of dysphagia therapies in hospital discharge communications.

    PubMed

    Kind, Amy; Anderson, Paul; Hind, Jacqueline; Robbins, JoAnne; Smith, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Despite the wide implementation of dysphagia therapies, it is unclear whether these therapies are successfully communicated beyond the inpatient setting. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of dysphagia recommendation omissions in hospital discharge summaries for high-risk subacute care (i.e., skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation, long-term care) populations. We performed a retrospective cohort study that included all stroke and hip fracture patients billed for inpatient dysphagia evaluations by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and discharged to subacute care from 2003 through 2005 from a single large academic medical center (N=187). Dysphagia recommendations from final SLP hospital notes and from hospital (physician) discharge summaries were abstracted, coded, and compared for each patient. Recommendation categories included dietary (food and liquid), postural/compensatory techniques (e.g., chin tuck), rehabilitation (e.g., exercise), meal pacing (e.g., small bites), medication delivery (e.g., crush pills), and provider/supervision (e.g., 1-to-1 assist). Forty-five percent of discharge summaries omitted all SLP dysphagia recommendations. Forty-seven percent (88/186) of patients with SLP dietary recommendations, 82% (93/114) with postural, 100% (16/16) with rehabilitation, 90% (69/77) with meal pacing, 95% (21/22) with medication, and 79% (96/122) with provider/supervision recommendations had these recommendations completely omitted from their discharge summaries. Discharge summaries omitted all categories of SLP recommendations at notably high rates. Improved post-hospital communication strategies are needed for discharges to subacute care.

  10. Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method: Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid…

  11. [Dysphagia and Sonography: what Association?].

    PubMed

    Donati, Thierry; Badini, Matteo; Schwarzenbach, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by dysphagia, chest pain, and drug-resistant reflux symptoms. A detailed anamnesis and esophageal manometry are essential tools for a correct diagnosis. We present a case of a 31 years old woman with typical achalasia symptoms misdiagnosed for many years due to a complex background picture. Despite the evolution in medical sciences, this clinical case underlines the cornerstones of medical profession: patient-physician relation and bedside clinical approach. At the same time, it confirms the increasing role of ultrasonography as a simple but essential tool for a complete general-internal medicine evaluation. PMID:27269778

  12. Dysphagia

    MedlinePlus

    ... sounds: Study unveils a key part of animal & human communication University of Utah ( 3/14/2016 ) More News ... Policies Free Publications U.S. Department of Health and ... Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC 2320, Bethesda, MD ...

  13. [Dysphagia: Forestier and Rotes Querol disease].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Ruiz, M A; López-Saúz, M; Padierna-Luna, J L; García-Pescador, D; Franco-Grande, M A; Núñez-Sánchez, A

    2008-01-01

    Inside of the study of Dysphagia, until 38% of the greater patients of 50 years, they present/display cervical Osteophytes like cause of Dysphagia; frequently I diagnose passes for the methods of radiology and endoscopy unnoticed. The disease of Forestier and Rotes better well known Querol or like skeletal hiperostosis diffuse idiophatic it is characterized by the formation of spinal and cervical Osteophytes, ossification of ligaments and muscles for vetebrates of the cervical column. Frequently it produces affectation to medullar that it can pronounce like Dysphagia and crosstalk. We presented/displayed the case of a patient of 78 years with chronic pneumopathy, that presents/displays Dysphagia and progressive crosstalk with pondered loss, in where radiology of the cervical column they show cervical osteofitos with espondilolistesis, rectification of the cervical lordosis and diminution of the intersomatic spaces that they compress the trachea and column of air and an extrinsic compression below the cricopharyngeal is documented by endoscopy.

  14. Dysphagia lusorium in elderly: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarceken, Bulent; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Yuksel, Murvet; Cetinkaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Late unset of dysphagia due to vascular abnormalities is a rare condition. We aimed to present a case of right subclavian artery abnormalities caused dysphagia in the elderly. METHODS: A 68-year-old female was admitted with dysphagia seven months ago. Upper endoscopic procedures and routine examinations could not demonstrate any etiology. Multislice computed thorax tomography was performed for probable extra- esophagial lesions. RESULTS: Multislice computed thorax tomography showed right subclavian artery abnormality and esophagial compression with this aberrant artery. CONCLUSION: Causes of dysphagia in the elderly are commonly malignancies, strictures and/or motility disorders. If routine examinations and endoscopic procedures fail to show any etiology, rare vascular abnormalities can be considered in such patients. Multislice computed tomography is a usefull choice in such conditions. PMID:15285045

  15. Wallenberg's Syndrome: An Unusual Case of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Aurora Loaeza-del; Barahona-Garrido, Josué; Criales, Sergio; Chang-Menéndez, Sergio; Torre, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with sudden-onset oropharyngeal dysphagia and vomiting of central etiology. Neurological evaluation showed uvula deviation to the left, paresis of the mid-right portion of the soft palate, lateralization of gaze to the right side, and dysphonia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infarction in the left lateral medullary region, therefore the diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome was established. The neurological issues along with the dysphagia gradually improved and the patient was discharged. PMID:21487559

  16. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy.

  17. A rare cause of chronic dysphagia: eosinophilic esophagitis†

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Tatar, Zeynep; Erbil, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is attributable to environmental factors, allergens and several immunological causes. The most typical symptoms include dysphagia and sensation of food impingement in the retrosternal area. Although its clinical features resemble those of gastroesophageal reflux, proton pump inhibitors are not effective for its treatment. The diagnosis of EE is dependent on the pathological detection of eosinophilic infiltration in esophageal mucosa. In this study, we evaluated a patient who applied to our clinic with complaints of long-term difficulty in swallowing, sensation of food sticking while eating and weight loss; the patient was diagnosed with EE, following biochemical, radiological, endoscopic and pathological assessments and was treated with steroids. The results show that EE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with dysphagia and food impingement in the retrosternal area, and the diagnosis should be confirmed through multiple esophageal biopsies. PMID:25249002

  18. A rare cause of chronic dysphagia: eosinophilic esophagitis†.

    PubMed

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Tatar, Zeynep; Erbil, Yesim

    2014-09-23

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is attributable to environmental factors, allergens and several immunological causes. The most typical symptoms include dysphagia and sensation of food impingement in the retrosternal area. Although its clinical features resemble those of gastroesophageal reflux, proton pump inhibitors are not effective for its treatment. The diagnosis of EE is dependent on the pathological detection of eosinophilic infiltration in esophageal mucosa. In this study, we evaluated a patient who applied to our clinic with complaints of long-term difficulty in swallowing, sensation of food sticking while eating and weight loss; the patient was diagnosed with EE, following biochemical, radiological, endoscopic and pathological assessments and was treated with steroids. The results show that EE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with dysphagia and food impingement in the retrosternal area, and the diagnosis should be confirmed through multiple esophageal biopsies.

  19. Association of Dysphagia With Supratentorial Lesions in Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the supratentorial area associated with poststroke dysphagia, we assessed the diffusion tensor images (DTI) in subacute stroke patients with supratentorial lesions. Methods We included 31 patients with a first episode of infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Each subject underwent brain DTI as well as a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and patients divided were into the dysphagia and non-dysphagia groups. Clinical dysphagia scale (CDS) scores were compared between the two groups. The corticospinal tract volume (TV), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 11 regions of interest in the supratentorial area—primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, parieto-occipital cortex, insular cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, and basal ganglia (putamen and caudate nucleus). DTI parameters were compared between the two groups. Results Among the 31 subjects, 17 were diagnosed with dysphagia by VFSS. Mean TVs were similar across the two groups. Significant inter-group differences were observed in two DTI values: the FA value in the contra-lesional primary motor cortex and the ADC value in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule (all p<0.05). Conclusion The FA value in the primary motor cortex on the contra-lesional side and the ADC value in the bilateral PLIC can be associated with dysphagia in middle cerebral artery stroke.

  20. Association of Dysphagia With Supratentorial Lesions in Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the supratentorial area associated with poststroke dysphagia, we assessed the diffusion tensor images (DTI) in subacute stroke patients with supratentorial lesions. Methods We included 31 patients with a first episode of infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Each subject underwent brain DTI as well as a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and patients divided were into the dysphagia and non-dysphagia groups. Clinical dysphagia scale (CDS) scores were compared between the two groups. The corticospinal tract volume (TV), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 11 regions of interest in the supratentorial area—primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, parieto-occipital cortex, insular cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, and basal ganglia (putamen and caudate nucleus). DTI parameters were compared between the two groups. Results Among the 31 subjects, 17 were diagnosed with dysphagia by VFSS. Mean TVs were similar across the two groups. Significant inter-group differences were observed in two DTI values: the FA value in the contra-lesional primary motor cortex and the ADC value in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule (all p<0.05). Conclusion The FA value in the primary motor cortex on the contra-lesional side and the ADC value in the bilateral PLIC can be associated with dysphagia in middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:27606270

  1. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G S; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of dysphagia needs to be chosen for the patient. This study aims to discuss the recent trends in palliation of dysphagia with promising results and the most suitable therapy for palliation of dysphagia in a given patient. A total of 64 articles that were published between years 2005 and 2015 on various modes of palliation of dysphagia in carcinoma esophagus were studied, which were mainly randomized and prospective studies. Through this study, we conclude that stents are the first choice of therapy for palliation, which is safe and cost-effective, and they can be combined with either radiotherapy or chemotherapy for long-term palliation of dysphagia with good quality of life. Radiotherapy can be used as a second-line treatment modality. PMID:27279758

  2. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of dysphagia needs to be chosen for the patient. This study aims to discuss the recent trends in palliation of dysphagia with promising results and the most suitable therapy for palliation of dysphagia in a given patient. A total of 64 articles that were published between years 2005 and 2015 on various modes of palliation of dysphagia in carcinoma esophagus were studied, which were mainly randomized and prospective studies. Through this study, we conclude that stents are the first choice of therapy for palliation, which is safe and cost-effective, and they can be combined with either radiotherapy or chemotherapy for long-term palliation of dysphagia with good quality of life. Radiotherapy can be used as a second-line treatment modality. PMID:27279758

  3. Esophageal peristaltic defects in adults with functional dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Hansel, Stephanie L; Umar, Sarah B; Burdick, George E; Ramirez, Francisco C; Fleischer, David E; Harris, Lucinda A; Lacy, Brian E; DiBaise, John K; Crowell, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Functional dysphagia (FD) is characterized by the presence of dysphagia without evidence of mechanical esophageal obstruction, GERD, and histopathology-based esophageal motor disorders. Dysphagia is common in older patients; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the type and frequency of peristaltic abnormalities compared to younger patients. Based on recently validated criteria for classification of weak peristalsis using high-resolution manometry (HRM), we hypothesized that older patients with FD would have more peristaltic defects detected by HRM compared to younger FD patients. A retrospective review of our motility database yielded 65 patients that met inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into two groups based on age (younger: <70 years; older: ≥70 years). Patients were interviewed, completed a quality-of-life questionnaire, and underwent solid-state HRM. The two groups differed in age but in no other demographic characteristics, severity of dysphagia, or quality of life. Dyspeptic symptoms, including nausea (p < 0.001), early satiety (p = 0.01), bloating (p = 0.02), and belching (p = 0.01), were also more prevalent in younger FD patients. Older age was associated with weak peristalsis involving frequent failed peristalsis, small proximal peristaltic defects (2-5 cm), and large proximal peristaltic defects (>5 cm) (p < 0.001). The mean contraction amplitude was also lower in the older group (p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that older patients with FD have a higher frequency of peristaltic abnormalities on HRM compared to younger patients. Older age was associated with increased frequency of weak peristalsis with small and large peristaltic defects.

  4. [TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SPECIFIC FOOD PRODUCTS FOR PATIENTS WITH DYSPHAGIA].

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, Alicia; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Villar Taibo, Rocío; Urioste Fondo, Ana; Cano Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María D

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem among elderly and also in some pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases or tumors. Making an adequate diet for this disease may present some difficulties. The aim of this document is to make a detailed technical report about the characteristics of the products that are available in Spain to hydrate and to feed patients with dysphagia. Food and pharmaceutical industries have developed a range of products designed to ensure homogeneous texture and a suitable viscosity to guaranty an adequate hydration. An adequate nutritional status is also achieved with these products for patients with dysphagia, without compromising their safety. The ingredients used to achieve a suitable viscosity are different types of starches, gums and other substances. It has been developed thickeners and gellified water for hydratation, and in case of food there are purees (dehydrated, lyophilized, pasteurized and sterilized), fruit purees, fruit pudding, and dehydrated cereal. Patients who do not meet their nutritional needs have also oral supplements with different viscosities. The industry offers extensive information about the technical characteristics of the products, except for viscosity. It would be recommended for the manufacturers to include in detail the technical specifications of the used methodology and the measurement and the results obtained in the analysis of viscosity that can be consulted by professionals of the Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Units who treat these patients. PMID:26545499

  5. [TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SPECIFIC FOOD PRODUCTS FOR PATIENTS WITH DYSPHAGIA].

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, Alicia; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Villar Taibo, Rocío; Urioste Fondo, Ana; Cano Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María D

    2015-10-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem among elderly and also in some pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases or tumors. Making an adequate diet for this disease may present some difficulties. The aim of this document is to make a detailed technical report about the characteristics of the products that are available in Spain to hydrate and to feed patients with dysphagia. Food and pharmaceutical industries have developed a range of products designed to ensure homogeneous texture and a suitable viscosity to guaranty an adequate hydration. An adequate nutritional status is also achieved with these products for patients with dysphagia, without compromising their safety. The ingredients used to achieve a suitable viscosity are different types of starches, gums and other substances. It has been developed thickeners and gellified water for hydratation, and in case of food there are purees (dehydrated, lyophilized, pasteurized and sterilized), fruit purees, fruit pudding, and dehydrated cereal. Patients who do not meet their nutritional needs have also oral supplements with different viscosities. The industry offers extensive information about the technical characteristics of the products, except for viscosity. It would be recommended for the manufacturers to include in detail the technical specifications of the used methodology and the measurement and the results obtained in the analysis of viscosity that can be consulted by professionals of the Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Units who treat these patients.

  6. A Meta-Analysis of the Incidence of Patient-Reported Dysphagia After Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion with the Zero-Profile Implant System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ma, Litai; Liu, Hao; Xu, MangMang

    2016-04-01

    Dysphagia is a well-known complication following anterior cervical surgery. It has been reported that the Zero-profile Implant System can decrease the incidence of dysphagia following surgery, however, dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Zero-profile Implant System remains controversial. Previous studies only focus on small sample sizes. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of dysphagia after ACDF with the Zero-profile Implant System. Studies were collected from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and the China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database using the keywords "Zero-profile OR Zero-p) AND (dysphagia OR [swallowing dysfunction]". The software STATA (Version 13.0) was used for statistical analysis. Statistical heterogeneity across the various trials, a test of publication bias and sensitivity analysis was performed. 30 studies with a total of 1062 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The occurrence of post-operative transient dysphagia ranged from 0 to 76 % whilst the pooled incidence was 15.6 % (95 % CI, 12.6, 18.5 %). 23 studies reported no persistent dysphagia whilst seven studies reported persistent dysphagia ranging from 1 to 7 %). In summary, the present study observed a low incidence of both transient and persistent dysphagia after ACDF using the Zero-profile Implant System. Most of the dysphagia was mild and gradually decreased during the following months. Moderate or severe dysphagia was uncommon. Future randomized controlled multi-center studies and those focusing on the mechanisms of dysphagia and methods to reduce its incidence are required.

  7. Clinical prognostic indicators of dysphagia following prolonged orotracheal intubation in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of postextubation swallowing dysfunction is well documented in the literature with high prevalence in most studies. However, there are relatively few studies with specific outcomes that focus on the follow-up of these patients until hospital discharge. The purpose of our study was to determine prognostic indicators of dysphagia in ICU patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation (OTI). Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study from 2010 to 2012 of all patients over 18 years of age admitted to a university hospital ICU who were submitted to prolonged OTI and subsequently received a bedside swallow evaluation (BSE) by a speech pathologist. The prognostic factors analyzed included dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment and at hospital discharge, age, time to initiate oral feeding, amount of individual treatment, number of orotracheal intubations, intubation time and length of hospital stay. Results After we excluded patients with neurologic diseases, tracheostomy, esophageal dysphagia and those who were submitted to surgical procedures involving the head and neck, our study sample size was 148 patients. The logistic regression model was used to examine the relationships between independent variables. In the univariate analyses, we found that statistically significant prognostic indicators of dysphagia included dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment, time to initiate oral feeding and amount of individual treatment. In the multivariate analysis, we found that dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment remained associated with good treatment outcomes. Conclusions Studies of prognostic indicators in different populations with dysphagia can contribute to the design of more effective procedures when evaluating, treating, and monitoring individuals with this type of disorder. Additionally, this study stresses the importance of the initial assessment

  8. Dysphagia in Crohn's disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, C; Netzer, P; Scheurer, U; Seibold, F

    2002-09-01

    Dysphagia is a rare manifestation in a patient with Crohn's disease. We report on the case of a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease who developed progressive dysphagia over 3 years. Endoscopy showed minimal distal oesophagitis with non-specific histological findings. Further investigation with cinematography, barium swallow and manometry established an achalasia-like motility disorder. Biopsies obtained from the oesophagus were non-specific. Balloon dilatation was performed. Initial success was followed by recurrent dysphagia. At repeat endoscopy, an oesophageal fistula was detected. An attempt at conservative medical management failed and oesophagectomy was successfully performed. Pathology results of the resected specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of oesophageal Crohn's disease. Even if achalasia is suspected in a Crohn's patient, it should be taken into consideration that the motility disorder could be the result of a transmural inflammation with or without fibrosis caused by Crohn's disease. PMID:12405254

  9. Psychometric characteristics of health-related quality-of-life questionnaires in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Angelique A; Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Klijn-Zwijnenberg, Iris R

    2014-04-01

    Dysphagia can have severe consequences for the patient's health, influencing health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sound psychometric properties of HRQoL questionnaires are a precondition for assessing the impact of dysphagia, the focus of this study, resulting in recommendations for the appropriate use of these questionnaires in both clinical practice and research contexts. We performed a systematic review starting with a search for and retrieval of all full-text articles on the development of HRQoL questionnaires related to oropharyngeal dysphagia and/or their psychometric validation from the electronic databases PubMed and Embase published up to June 2011. Psychometric properties were judged according to quality criteria proposed for health status questionnaires. Eight questionnaires were included in this study. Four are aimed solely at HRQoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia: the deglutition handicap index (DHI), dysphagia handicap index (DHI'), M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), and SWAL-QOL, while the EDGQ, EORTC QLQ-STO 22, EORTC QLQ-OG 25 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 focus on other primary diseases resulting in dysphagia. The psychometric properties of the DHI, DHI', MDADI, and SWAL-QOL were evaluated. For appropriate applicability of HRQoL questionnaires, strong scores on the psychometric criteria face validity, criterion validity, and interpretability are prerequisites. The SWAL-QOL has the strongest ratings for these criteria, while the DHI' is the most easy to apply given its 25 items and the use of a uniform scoring format. For optimal use of HRQoL questionnaires in diverse settings, it is necessary to combine psychometric and utility approaches.

  10. A single-subject study to evaluate the inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with traditional dysphagia therapy in patients with post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ghelichi, Leila; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Jalaie, Shohreh; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Forogh, Bijan; Mehrpour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Methods: In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5th, 10th, 15th treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18th session). Results: The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5th treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7). The dysphagia was resolved after 10th treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5th treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10th treatment session. Conclusion: The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended.

  11. A single-subject study to evaluate the inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with traditional dysphagia therapy in patients with post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ghelichi, Leila; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Jalaie, Shohreh; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Forogh, Bijan; Mehrpour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Methods: In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA). Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5th, 10th, 15th treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18th session). Results: The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5th treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7). The dysphagia was resolved after 10th treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5th treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10th treatment session. Conclusion: The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended. PMID:27648175

  12. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Khilnani, G C; Kumar, A; Gupta, S Datta; Surendranath, A; Sharma, S

    2003-05-01

    We describe a middle aged, non-smoking female who presented with dysphagia and underwent repeated endoscopies and oesophageal dilatation for a period of six months without any response. On imaging she was found to be having a lobulated mass with a radiological differential diagnosis of malignancy, lymphoma or a rare inflammatory lesion. After an inconclusive CT guided biopsy the patient underwent thoracoscopy on which an unresectable mass was found. The biopsy from the mass revealed pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG). To best of our knowledge this is the first case of PHG presenting as dysphagia reported in the English Literature. Literature on this rare entity is reviewed. PMID:12974440

  13. Relationship between Dysphagia and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Steidl, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Carla Simone; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele; Fernandes, Natália; Antunes, Vívian; Mancopes, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The literature presents studies correlating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to dysphagia and suggesting that the aspiration laryngeal phenomenon related to changes in the pharyngeal phase contributes significantly to the exacerbation of symptoms of lung disease. Objectives This study aimed to conduct a literature review to identify the relation between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Data Synthesis We found 21 studies and included 19 in this review. The few studies that related to the subject agreed that the presence of dysphagia, due to lack of coordination between swallowing and breathing, may be one of the triggering factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Conclusions The review noted that there is a relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by studies demonstrating that the difficulties associated with swallowing may lead to exacerbation of the disease. There was difficulty in comparing studies by their methodological differences. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, making it possible to develop multiprofessional treatment strategies for these patients, catered to specific needs due to the systemic manifestations of the disease. PMID:25992155

  14. The relationship between limit of Dysphagia and average volume per swallow in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Belo, Luciana Rodrigues; Gomes, Nathália Angelina Costa; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; de Souza, Elizabete Santos; Moura, Danielle Albuquerque Alves; Asano, Amdore Guescel; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain the limit of dysphagia and the average volume per swallow in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) but without swallowing complaints and in normal subjects, and to investigate the relationship between them. We hypothesize there is a direct relationship between these two measurements. The study included 10 patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was recorded over the suprahyoid muscle group. The limit of dysphagia was obtained by offering increasing volumes of water until piecemeal deglutition occurred. The average volume per swallow was calculated by dividing the time taken by the number of swallows used to drink 100 ml of water. The PD group showed a significantly lower dysphagia limit and lower average volume per swallow. There was a significantly moderate direct correlation and association between the two measurements. About half of the PD patients had an abnormally low dysphagia limit and average volume per swallow, although none had spontaneously related swallowing problems. Both measurements may be used as a quick objective screening test for the early identification of swallowing alterations that may lead to dysphagia in PD patients, but the determination of the average volume per swallow is much quicker and simpler.

  15. Acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yokoyama, K; Takei, Y; Furuya, N; Nakamichi, Y; Ihara, Y; Takahashi, K; Groher, M E

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to investigate the acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia. Forty-nine patients with complaints of swallow difficulty received a videofluorographic (VF) examination. They were divided into three groups: nine who did not have any apparent disease (Group N), 22 patients with head and neck cancer (Group H&N) and 18 patients with other diseases including cerebrovascular disease (Group OD). After liquid barium swallows, they exhaled voluntarily without voicing. Videofluorographic findings were classified into four groups: normal (Normal), acceptable swallow (Acceptable), swallow with residue (Resid) and swallows with penetration or aspiration (Pen/Asp). The duration of expiratory sounds was measured on the time waveform. Frequency characteristics of expiratory sounds were obtained using one-third octave band analysis ranging from 62·5 to 2000·0 Hz of central frequency. The averaged level of the 1000·0-Hz band was chosen as the reference band level (RB level). The revised averaged level of each band was obtained by subtracting the RB level from the averaged level of each band. Zero decibel of the revised magnitude of the 125·0-Hz band was set as the critical value to differentiate dysphagia (Resid or Pen/Asp) from no dysphagia (Normal or Acceptable). Comparison of this assessment with VF findings showed a significant percentage agreement (85·4%). These results suggest that frequency characteristics of post-swallow expiratory sounds can differentiate dysphagia from no dysphagia among multiple dysphagic patient groups.

  16. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  17. Comparison of endoscopy and barium swallow with marshmallow in dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Thompson, G

    1986-06-01

    Forty-four patients with dysphagia were examined both by endoscopy and by barium swallow with a marshmallow bolus. In these patients 36 stenoses were found: 34 by radiology and 30 by endoscopy. The radiologic criteria for stenosis included arrest of the marshmallow in a manner to support a column of barium and reproduction of the patient's symptoms at the time this occurred. Radiologic false negative findings were partly due to an inability by patients to swallow an adequate marshmallow bolus; endoscopic failures were associated with small endoscopes and mild stenoses.

  18. Validation of the Caregiver Mealtime and Dysphagia Questionnaire (CMDQ).

    PubMed

    Colodny, Nancy

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Caregiver Mealtime and Dysphagia Questionnaire (CMDQ). The validation procedures included the following: (a) assessment of internal consistency reliability, (b) testing of approximations to normality, and (c) assessments of convergent and discriminant validity. Study participants were 85 noncompliant and 50 compliant caregivers. Factor analytical techniques revealed three interpretable scales: Quality of Life (QOL), Disagreement with the SLP (DSLP), and Avoidance (AV). All scales were internally consistent. The QOL and DSLP scales showed evidence of convergent and discriminant validity. The AV scale evidenced a floor effect, limiting its discriminating power.

  19. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  20. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  1. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  2. Decreased tongue pressure is associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the association between tongue pressure and factors related to sarcopenia such as aging, activities of daily living, nutritional state, and dysphagia. One-hundred-and-four patients without a history of treatment of stroke and without a diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease (36 men and 68 women), with a mean age of 84.1 ± 5.6 years, hospitalized from May 2013 to June 2013 were included in this study. Maximum voluntary tongue pressure against the palate (MTP) was measured by a device consisting of a disposable oral balloon probe. Nutritional and anthropometric parameters such as serum albumin concentration, Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, arm muscle area (AMA), and others and presence of sarcopenia and dysphagia were analyzed to evaluate their relationships. Correlation analysis and univariate or multivariate analysis were performed. Simple correlation analysis showed that MTP correlated with Barthel index (BI), MNA-SF, serum albumin concentration, body mass index, and AMA. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that sarcopenia, BI, MNA-SF, and age were the independent explanatory factors for decreased MTP, and the propensity score for dysphagia, including causes of primary or secondary sarcopenia, and the presence of sarcopenia were significantly associated with the presence of dysphagia. Decreased MTP and dysphagia were related to sarcopenia or the causes of sarcopenia in the studied population. Furthermore, the clinical condition of sarcopenic dysphagia may be partially interpreted as the presence of sarcopenia and causal factors for sarcopenia.

  3. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  4. Identification of dysphagia using the Toronto Bedside Swallowing Screening Test (TOR-BSST©): are 10 teaspoons of water necessary?

    PubMed

    Martino, Rosemary; Maki, Ellen; Diamant, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Dysphagia screening often includes administration of water. This study assessed the accuracy in identifying dysphagia with each additional teaspoon of water. The original research of the TOR-BSST(©) permitted this assessment. Trained nurses from acute and rehabilitation facilities prospectively administered the TOR-BSST(©) to 311 eligible stroke inpatients. A sensitivity analysis was conducted for the water item using 10 teaspoons plus a sip as the standard. The proportion of positive screenings was 59.2% in acute and 38.5% in rehabilitation. Of all four items that form the TOR-BSST(©), the water swallow item contributed to the identification of dysphagia in 42.7% in acute and 29.0% in rehabilitation patients. Across all patients, dysphagia accuracy was that five teaspoons resulted in a sensitivity of 79% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 70-86), eight a sensitivity of 92% (95% CI = 85-96) and 10 a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI = 90-99). Although a primary contributor, the water swallow item alone does not identify all patients with dysphagia. For a water swallow to accurately identify dysphagia, it is critical to administer 10 teaspoons. The TOR-BSST(©) water swallow item contributes largely to the total TOR-BSST(©)'s screening score and in making the test highly accurate and reliable.

  5. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  6. Assessment of Pediatric Dysphagia and Feeding Disorders: Clinical and Instrumental Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of infants and children with dysphagia (swallowing problems) and feeding disorders involves significantly more considerations than a clinical observation of a feeding. In addition to the status of feeding in the child, considerations include health status, broad environment, parent-child interactions, and parental concerns.…

  7. [A woman with palpitations and dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Vos, C G Niels; de Bruin, Jorg L; Wisselink, Willem

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old female experienced palpitations and thoracic pain. Coronary angiography showed a right sided aorta. The patient was diagnosed with a Kommerell's diverticulum that compressed the esophagus and trachea. During follow-up she developed dysphagia and she underwent a transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery followed by endovascular treatment of the distal aortic arch and thereby excluding the diverticulum.

  8. [Approach to dysphagia in advanced dementia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Busto, Fernando; Andia, Virginia; Ruiz de Alegria, Loli; Francés, Inés

    2009-11-01

    From the onset, dementia affects the patient's nutritional status, producing anorexia, weight loss, feeding apraxia and dysphagia. Distinct strategies are required in each of the stages of this disease, starting with awareness and knowledge of the problem and its prompt detection. In dementia, dysphagia usually appears in advanced phases, when the patient is often institutionalized. When dysphagia is suspected, the patient's tolerance must be evaluated by the volume/viscosity test, environmental and postural strategies should be introduced, and the texture of the diet should be modified. This is a complex task requiring the involvement of a properly trained interdisciplinary team, able to provide information and alternatives and integrate the family environment in the patient's care. The adapted diet should be based on the traditional diet that can also be combined with artificial supplements to provide a varied diet that increases patients', caregivers' and relatives' satisfaction. Tube feeding has shown no nutritional benefits in patients with advanced dementia. Therefore, we propose assisted oral feeding as the most natural and appropriate form of feeding in these patients, always respecting their previously expressed wishes.

  9. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. Methods: This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Results: Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. Conclusions: There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population.Implications for RehabilitationLittle guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy.Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration.We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of

  10. Health care systems redesign project to improve dysphagia screening.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Virginia S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa M; Plue, Laurie; Russell, Scott; Allen, George; Williams, Linda S; Chumbler, Neale R; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve dysphagia-screening processes in a tertiary Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The dysphagia-screening tool was redesigned on the basis of frontline clinician feedback, clinical guidelines, user satisfaction, and multidisciplinary expertise. The revised tool triggered a speech-language consult for positive screens and demonstrated higher scores in user satisfaction and task efficiency. Systems redesign processes were effective for redesigning the tool and implementing practice changes with clinicians involved in dysphagia screening. PMID:25463001

  11. Predictors of aspiration pneumonia: how important is dysphagia?

    PubMed

    Langmore, S E; Terpenning, M S; Schork, A; Chen, Y; Murray, J T; Lopatin, D; Loesche, W J

    1998-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly who are hospitalized or in nursing homes. Multiple risk factors for pneumonia have been identified, but no study has effectively compared the relative risk of factors in several different categories, including dysphagia. In this prospective outcomes study, 189 elderly subjects were recruited from the outpatient clinics, inpatient acute care wards, and the nursing home care center at the VA Medical Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. They were given a variety of assessments to determine oropharyngeal and esophageal swallowing and feeding status, functional status, medical status, and oral/dental status. The subjects were followed for up to 4 years for an outcome of verified aspiration pneumonia. Bivariate analyses identified several factors as significantly associated with pneumonia. Logistic regression analyses then identified the significant predictors of aspiration pneumonia. The best predictors, in one or more groups of subjects, were dependent for feeding, dependent for oral care, number of decayed teeth, tube feeding, more than one medical diagnosis, number of medications, and smoking. The role that each of the significant predictors might play was described in relation to the pathogenesis of aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia was concluded to be an important risk for aspiration pneumonia, but generally not sufficient to cause pneumonia unless other risk factors are present as well. A dependency upon others for feeding emerged as the dominant risk factor, with an odds ratio of 19.98 in a logistic regression model that excluded tube-fed patients.

  12. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  13. Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical…

  14. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  15. [Dysphagia. Are swallowing sounds diagnostically useful?].

    PubMed

    Kley, C; Biniek, R

    2005-12-01

    The origin and importance of swallowing sounds in dysphagia have been discussed in previous research. Those studies report a general similarity in the sound patterns of different swallowing actions. The current paper confirms this. In addition, the origin of swallowing sound patterns is examined more closely. Finally, we simultaneously analyzed the swallowing sounds of healthy voluntary subjects and patients with swallowing disorders using X-ray cinematography. Videoendoscopy was also done. As expected, we found a variety of sound sequences differing from those of healthy subjects. Patients with tracheal tubes or cannulae constitute a special group whose swallowing sounds give additional information about the act of swallowing. PMID:16133430

  16. Extramedullary plasmacytoma in a horse with ptyalism and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    McConkey, S; López, A; Pringle, J

    2000-05-01

    A Clydesdale mare was examined for weight loss, inappetence, ptyalism, and dysphagia. The main abnormality revealed by serum biochemistry was a marked hyperglobulinemia, and protein electrophoresis revealed a monoclonal gammopathy in the gamma region. The urine was positive for Bence Jones proteins. These findings suggested a plasma cell tumor. The neoplasm could not be located with extensive antemortem examination. At postmortem, neoplastic cells morphologically compatible with plasma cells and positive for equine IgG with imunoperoxidase staining infiltrated the pericardium, mediastinal stromal tissues, adrenal glands, meninges, atrioventricular valves, aorta, abdominal and thoracic fat, and nerves, including the trigeminal nerve. The neoplastic cells invading the cranial nerves were responsible for many of the presenting signs.

  17. Aspiration pneumonia after chemo–intensity-modulated radiation therapy of oropharyngeal carcinoma and its clinical and dysphagia-related predictors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Lee, Oliver E.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Felix Y.; Schipper, Mathew; Worden, Francis; Prince, Mark E.; McLean, Scott A.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess aspiration pneumonia (AsPn) rates and predictors after chemo-irradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods The was a prospective study of 72 patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer treated definitively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) concurrent with weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. AsPn was recorded prospectively and dysphagia was evaluated longitudinally through 2 years posttherapy by observer-rated (Common Toxicity Criteria version [CTCAE]) scores, patient-reported scores, and videofluoroscopy. Results Sixteen patients (20%) developed AsPn. Predictive factors included T classification (p = .01), aspiration detected on videofluoroscopy (videofluoroscopy-asp; p = .0007), and patient-reported dysphagia (p = .02–.0003), but not observer-rated dysphagia (p = .4). Combining T classification, patient reported dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy-asp, provided the best predictive model. Conclusion AsPn continues to be an under-reported consequence of chemo-irradiation for head and neck cancer. These data support using patient-reported dysphagia to identify high-risk patients requiring videofluoroscopy evaluation for preventive measures. Reducing videofluoroscopy-asp rates, by reducing swallowing structures radiation doses and by trials reducing treatment intensity in patients predicted to do well, are likely to reduce AsPn rates. PMID:23729173

  18. Chemo-IMRT of oropharyngeal cancer aiming to reduce dysphagia: Swallowing organs late complication probabilities and dosimetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Haken, Randall K Ten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-IMRT of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing non-involved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results 73 patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four grade ≥2 cases (one of whom feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (VDs), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the VDs for each organ inter-correlated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48±17 Gy in patients with, vs 27±12 in patients without strictures, p=0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, TD50 and TD25 were 63Gy and 56Gy for PC, and 56Gy and 39Gy for GSL, respectively. For both PC and GSL, patient-reported swallowing TDs were substantially higher than VF-based TDs. Conclusions

  19. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade {>=}2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V{sub D}s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V{sub D}s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48{+-}17 Gy in patients with, vs 27{+-}12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs){sub 50} and TD{sub 25} were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For

  20. Type I Chiari malformation presenting with laryngomalacia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O

    2015-08-01

    We describe clinical features of an infant with laryngomalacia and dysphagia caused by type I Chiari malformation (CM-I). A 12-month-old child presented with a 6 month history of progressive stridor, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux. Examination of the airway and swallowing function indicated mild laryngomalacia and aspiration with all consistencies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated CM-I. Symptoms were resolved after posterior fossa decompression. CM-I, typically diagnosed later in life, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngomalacia and dysphagia. High clinical suspicion and thorough search for abnormalities ensure early diagnosis and proper management of children with neurologic variant laryngomalacia. PMID:26031456

  1. Team management of dysphagia in the institutional setting.

    PubMed

    Robbins, JoAnne; Kays, Stephanie; McCallum, Shirley

    2007-01-01

    The capacity to swallow effectively and safely is a basic human need, yet nearly 40% of Americans over age 60 experience dysphagia. Since the resources in acute-care hospitals often are unavailable in institutional settings, the daily involvement of nursing and the dietitian's screening and continuous assessment are critical to timely, effective dysphagia identification, referral, and management. Upon referral, the speech pathologist executes comprehensive evaluation, leading the design and implementation of a team treatment plan. Literature highlighting a sample of dysphagia screening tools and interventions, care transitions and aspiration prevention strategies is reviewed herein to guide current practice and future research.

  2. Use of a Modified Frazier Water Protocol in Critical Illness Survivors With Pulmonary Compromise and Dysphagia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Shari; Loeslie, Vicki; Rabatin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding use of the Frazier free water protocol (FWP) with hospitalized patients who have dysphagia and have survived a critical illness with compromised pulmonary status. This pilot study used a two-group nonequivalent comparison group design to evaluate the FWP in 15 adults admitted to a respiratory care unit (RCU) with dysphagia concerns. Inclusion criteria included recommendation for a modified diet with thickened liquids by a dysphagia therapist and ability to follow the specific free water guidelines. The 15 control participants were chosen from a retrospective chart review of consecutive RCU admissions that met the same inclusion criteria. The intervention group for whom the free water guidelines were implemented did not differ significantly from the control group in rate of development of aspiration pneumonia, χ²(30) = .01, p = 1.00.

  3. Lymphoma Presenting as Acute-Onset Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Daniel B; Bursaw, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with recent Bell's palsy developed acute vocal cord paralysis causing severe dysphagia. CSF analysis showed elevated protein and a normal cell count; contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was normal. He was treated with IVIG for a presumed bulbar-variant AIDP and gradually improved. Six months later, the patient developed rapidly progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Repeat MRI revealed bilateral enhancement of the eighth cranial nerves and a hypercellular mass in the left temporal lobe. Biopsy of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Lymphomatous invasion of the cranial nerves should be considered in cases of relapsing cranial neuropathies. PMID:26635982

  4. Lymphoma Presenting as Acute-Onset Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Daniel B.; Bursaw, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with recent Bell's palsy developed acute vocal cord paralysis causing severe dysphagia. CSF analysis showed elevated protein and a normal cell count; contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was normal. He was treated with IVIG for a presumed bulbar-variant AIDP and gradually improved. Six months later, the patient developed rapidly progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Repeat MRI revealed bilateral enhancement of the eighth cranial nerves and a hypercellular mass in the left temporal lobe. Biopsy of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Lymphomatous invasion of the cranial nerves should be considered in cases of relapsing cranial neuropathies. PMID:26635982

  5. Giant Dermoid Cyst Causing Dysphagia and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahan, Leyla; Dere, Yelda; Sahan, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Dermoid cysts are benign lesions seen in young adults. The second most common localization is the floor of the mouth. They are usually asymptomatic over years but can be symptomatic due to secondary changes or the size. Herein, we report a case of 19-year-old woman who applied to emergency service with dyspnea, dysphagia and enlarging of a mass in the submental region. The patient cannot be entubated because of the mass pushing the tongue base backward closing the laryngeal view. Elective tracheostomy was performed for providing airflow during the operation. After the operation a cystic mass fulfilled with keratin lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in addition to the dermal appendages such as sweat glands and follicular structures were seen histopathologically and the case was diagnosed as dermoid cyst of the submental region. In such patients with quick enlarging of mass causing airway obstructions, the tracheostomy can be the preferable method because of the difficulties in entubation. PMID:26999700

  6. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  7. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  8. Can IMRT or Brachytherapy Reduce Dysphagia Associated With Chemoradiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer? The Michigan and Rotterdam Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Eisbruch, Avraham Levendag, Peter C.; Feng, Felix Y.; Teguh, David; Lyden, Teresa M.A.; Schmitz, Paul I.M.; Haxer, Marc; Noever, Inge; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Heijmen, Ben J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia is a major late complication of intensive chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer. The initial clinical results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or brachytherapy, planned specifically to reduce dysphagia are presented. Patients and Methods: Previous research at Michigan University has suggested that the pharyngeal constrictors and glottic and supraglottic larynx are likely structures whose damage by chemo-RT causes dysphagia and aspiration. In a prospective Michigan trial, 36 patients with oropharyngeal (n = 31) or nasopharyngeal (n = 5) cancer underwent chemo-IMRT. IMRT cost functions included sparing noninvolved pharyngeal constrictors and the glottic and supraglottic larynx. After a review of published studies, the retropharyngeal nodes at risk were defined as the lateral, but not the medial, retropharyngeal nodes, which facilitated sparing of the swallowing structures. In Rotterdam, 77 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were treated with IMRT, three dimensional RT, or conventional RT; also one-half received brachytherapy. The dysphagia endpoints included videofluoroscopy and observer-assessed scores at Michigan and patient-reported quality-of-life instruments in both studies. Results: In both studies, the doses to the upper and middle constrictors correlated highly with the dysphagia endpoints. In addition, doses to the glottic and supraglottic larynx were significant in the Michigan series. In the Rotterdam series, brachytherapy (which reduced the doses to the swallowing structures) was the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The dose-response relationships for the swallowing structures found in these studies suggest that reducing their doses, using either IMRT aimed at their sparing, or brachytherapy, might achieve clinical gains in dysphagia.

  9. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  10. Left ventricular assist device hemolysis leading to dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wuschek, Alexander; Iqbal, Sara; Estep, Jerry; Quigley, Eamonn; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device presented for evaluation of dysphagia and dark urine. He was found to have a significantly elevated L-lactate dehydrogenase and an elevated plasma free hemoglobin consistent with intravascular hemolysis. After the hemolysis ceased, both the black urine and dysphagia resolved spontaneously. Transient esophageal dysfunction, as a manifestation of gastrointestinal dysmotility, is known to occur in the setting of hemolysis. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is another recognized cause of massive hemolysis with gastrointestinal dysmotility occurring in 25%-35% of patients during a paroxysm. Intravascular hemolysis increases plasma free hemoglobin, which scavenges nitric oxide (NO), an important second messenger for smooth muscle cell relaxation. The decrease in NO can lead to esophageal spasm and resultant dysphagia. In our patient the resolution of hemolysis resulted in resolution of dysphagia. PMID:25987800

  11. Dysphagia Secondary to Anterior Osteophytes of the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Egerter, Alexander C; Kim, Eric S; Lee, Darrin J; Liu, Jonathan J; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier disease involves hyperostosis of the spinal column. Hyperostosis involving the anterior margin of the cervical vertebrae can cause dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia. However, the natural history pertaining to the risk factors remain unknown. We present the surgical management of two cases of dysphagia secondary to cervical hyperostosis and discuss the etiology and management of DISH based on the literature review. Methods This is a retrospective review of two patients with DISH and anterior cervical osteophytes. We reviewed the preoperative and postoperative images and clinical history. Results Two patients underwent anterior cervical osteophytectomies due to severe dysphagia. At more than a year follow-up, both patients noted improvement in swallowing as well as their associated pain. Conclusion The surgical removal of cervical osteophytes can be highly successful in treating dysphagia if refractory to prolonged conservative therapy. PMID:26430607

  12. Persistent post-stroke dysphagia treated with cricopharyngeal myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sruthi S.; Surendaran, Arathy Jalaja; Menon, Jayakumar R.; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Sylaja, Padmavathy N.

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke dysphagia is a common problem after stroke. About 8-13% patients have persistent dysphagia and are unable to return to pre-stroke diet even after 6 months of stroke. Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) may be required in these patients, which may be psychologically unacceptable and impair the quality of life. In those with cricopharyngeal dysfunction leading on to refractory post-stroke dysphagia, cricopharyngeal myotomy and injection of botulinum toxin are the treatment options. We present a case of vertebrobasilar stroke who had persistent dysphagia due to cricopharyngeal dysfunction with good recovery of swallowing function following cricopharyngeal myotomy 1.5 years after the stroke. PMID:27293339

  13. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose-response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  14. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature.

  15. Development of the Arabic Version of Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI).

    PubMed

    Farahat, Mohamed; Malki, Khalid H; Mesallam, Tamer A; Bukhari, Manal; Alharethy, Sami

    2014-08-01

    The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is a 25-item self-administered questionnaire. It is a noninvasive tool for measuring the handicapping effect of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of people's lives. The purposes of the present study were to develop an Arabic version of the DHI and to evaluate its validity, consistency, and reliability in the normal Arabic population with oropharyngeal dysphagia. This was a prospective study that was carried out at the Communication and Swallowing Disorders Unit, King Saud University. The generated Arabic DHI was administered to 94 patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia and 98 control subjects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. The results of the patients and the control group were compared. The Arabic DHI showed excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.95). Also, good test-retest reliability was found for the total scores of the Arabic DHI (r = 0.9, p = 0.001). There was a significant difference between the DHI scores of the control group and those of the oropharyngeal dysphagia group (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the Arabic DHI is a valid tool for self-assessment of the handicapping effect of dysphagia on the physical, functional, and emotional aspects of patients and can be used by Arabic language speakers.

  16. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: surveying practice patterns of the speech-language pathologist.

    PubMed

    Martino, Rosemary; Pron, Gaylene; Diamant, Nicholas E

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to obtain a comprehensive view of the dysphagia assessment practice patterns of speech-language pathologists and their opinion on the importance of these practices using survey methods and taking into consideration clinician, patient, and practice-setting variables. A self-administered mail questionnaire was developed following established methodology to maximize response rates. Eight dysphagia experts independently rated the new survey for content validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed with a random sample of 23 participants. The survey was sent to 50 speech-language pathologists randomly selected from the Canadian professional association database of members who practice in dysphagia. Surveys were mailed according to the Dillman Total Design Method and included an incentive offer. High survey (64%) and item response (95%) rates were achieved and clinicians were reliable reporters of their practice behaviors (ICC>0.60). Of all the clinical assessment items, 36% were reported with high (>80%) utilization and 24% with low (<20%) utilization, the former pertaining to tongue motion and vocal quality after food/fluid intake and the latter to testing of oral sensation without food. One-third (33%) of instrumental assessment items were highly utilized and included assessment of bolus movement and laryngeal response to bolus misdirection. Overall, clinician experience and teaching institutions influenced greater utilization. Opinions of importance were similar to utilization behaviors (r = 0.947, p = 0.01). Of all patients referred for dysphagia assessment, full clinical assessments were administered to 71% of patients but instrumental assessments to only 36%. A hierarchical model of practice behavior is proposed to explain this pattern of progressively decreasing item utilization.

  17. Electrophysiological Evaluation of Dysphagia in the Mild or Moderate Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Concept of Subclinical Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Gürgör, Nevin; Çakır, Ahmet; Arıcı, Şehnaz; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Swallowing mechanism and neurogenic dysphagia in MS have been rarely studied by electromyographical (EMG) methods. This study aims to evaluate the presence of subclinical dysphagia in patients with mild multiple sclerosis (MS) using electrophysiological methods. A prospective study of 51 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and 18 age-matched healthy adults was investigated. We used electromyography to measure the activity of the submental muscles during swallowing. Electrophysiological recordings of patients were obtained during relapse, after relapse, and at any time in remission period. Clinical dysphagia was found in 12% of MS patients, while electrophysiological swallowing abnormalities were encountered in 33% of patients. Subclinical dysphagia was determined in 35% of patients during an MS relapse, in 20% of patients after a relapse, and in 25% of all 51 patients in the remission period based on EMG findings. Duration of swallowing signal of submental muscles in all MS patients was found to be longer than in normal subjects (p = 0.001). During swallowing of 50 ml of sequential water, the compensatory respiratory cycles occurred more often in MS patients than normal subjects, especially during a relapse (p = 0.005). This is the first study investigating swallowing abnormalities and subclinical dysphagia from the electrophysiological aspect in MS patients with mild disability. The electrophysiological tests described in this study are useful to uncover subclinical dysphagia since they have the advantage of being rapid, easy to apply, non-invasive, and without risk for the patients.

  18. Clinical application of ICF key codes to evaluate patients with dysphagia following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Zhang, Chang-Jie; Shi, Jie; Deng, Jinggui; Lan, Chun-Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was aimed to identify and evaluate the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) key codes for dysphagia in stroke patients. Thirty patients with dysphagia after stroke were enrolled in our study. To evaluate the ICF dysphagia scale, 6 scales were used as comparisons, namely the Barthel Index (BI), Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test (RSST), Kubota Water Swallowing Test (KWST), Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple regression analysis was performed to quantitate the relationship between the ICF scale and the other 7 scales. In addition, 60 ICF scales were analyzed by the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. A total of 21 ICF codes were identified, which were closely related with the other scales. These included 13 codes from Body Function, 1 from Body Structure, 3 from Activities and Participation, and 4 from Environmental Factors. A topographic network map with 30 ICF key codes was also generated to visualize their relationships. The number of ICF codes identified is in line with other well-established evaluation methods. The network topographic map generated here could be used as an instruction tool in future evaluations. We also found that attention functions and biting were critical codes of these scales, and could be used as treatment targets. PMID:27661012

  19. Clinical application of ICF key codes to evaluate patients with dysphagia following stroke.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Zhang, Chang-Jie; Shi, Jie; Deng, Jinggui; Lan, Chun-Na

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to identify and evaluate the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) key codes for dysphagia in stroke patients. Thirty patients with dysphagia after stroke were enrolled in our study. To evaluate the ICF dysphagia scale, 6 scales were used as comparisons, namely the Barthel Index (BI), Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test (RSST), Kubota Water Swallowing Test (KWST), Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple regression analysis was performed to quantitate the relationship between the ICF scale and the other 7 scales. In addition, 60 ICF scales were analyzed by the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. A total of 21 ICF codes were identified, which were closely related with the other scales. These included 13 codes from Body Function, 1 from Body Structure, 3 from Activities and Participation, and 4 from Environmental Factors. A topographic network map with 30 ICF key codes was also generated to visualize their relationships. The number of ICF codes identified is in line with other well-established evaluation methods. The network topographic map generated here could be used as an instruction tool in future evaluations. We also found that attention functions and biting were critical codes of these scales, and could be used as treatment targets.

  20. Clinical application of ICF key codes to evaluate patients with dysphagia following stroke.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Zhang, Chang-Jie; Shi, Jie; Deng, Jinggui; Lan, Chun-Na

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to identify and evaluate the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) key codes for dysphagia in stroke patients. Thirty patients with dysphagia after stroke were enrolled in our study. To evaluate the ICF dysphagia scale, 6 scales were used as comparisons, namely the Barthel Index (BI), Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test (RSST), Kubota Water Swallowing Test (KWST), Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple regression analysis was performed to quantitate the relationship between the ICF scale and the other 7 scales. In addition, 60 ICF scales were analyzed by the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method. A total of 21 ICF codes were identified, which were closely related with the other scales. These included 13 codes from Body Function, 1 from Body Structure, 3 from Activities and Participation, and 4 from Environmental Factors. A topographic network map with 30 ICF key codes was also generated to visualize their relationships. The number of ICF codes identified is in line with other well-established evaluation methods. The network topographic map generated here could be used as an instruction tool in future evaluations. We also found that attention functions and biting were critical codes of these scales, and could be used as treatment targets. PMID:27661012

  1. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging.We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded.Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms.Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds. PMID:26252275

  2. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A.; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging. We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded. Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms. Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds. PMID:26252275

  3. Repeated adjustment of new dentures for dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Hiromi; Kanai, Yuki; Yamashita, Shuichiro

    2012-01-01

    When multiple tooth loss causes loss of occlusal-masticatory function, functional recovery is normally obtained with the help of removable dentures. After resection of the jawbone or tongue because of tumors, the movement of the tongue and its surrounding tissues is limited, and patients exhibit a more pronounced loss of chewing and swallowing than that observed in other cases of multiple tooth loss. In such cases, it is necessary to take extra care in determining the position of the mandible, arrangement of artificial teeth, and morphology of the palate. In the present case, the left lower jawbone was resected because of a gingival tumor, and when the new denture was manufactured, the intercuspal position was based on the resting position of the mandible. The stability of the lower complete denture was a priority and the artificial teeth were partially arranged on the lingual side. The new denture, however, caused insufficient closing of the mouth aperture and insufficient impact between tongue and palate, resulting in dysphagia. Therefore, the vertical dimension of occlusion was reduced multiple times to improve chewing and swallowing function.

  4. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging.We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded.Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms.Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds.

  5. Manofluorography in the evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Nativ-Zeltzer, Noga; Kahrilas, Peter J; Logemann, Jerilyn A

    2012-06-01

    Manofluorography, that is, the concurrent use of manometry and videofluorography for the evaluation of pharyngeal dysphagia, has not been widely used clinically, partially because of various limitations of conventional manometry. Technological advancements in recent years have led to substantial improvements in manometric devises, which can now overcome many of the shortcomings of standard manometry. In parallel with this, studies examining the utility of high-resolution manometry for the evaluation of pharyngeal disorders of swallowing have begun to emerge. This review summarizes the technological developments in manometry and the existing literature on pharyngeal high-resolution manofluorography with pressure topography. The article also discusses the potential clinical value of high-resolution pharyngeal-esophageal pressure topography and suggests directions for future investigations. Studies conducted so far have shown heterogeneous approaches to utilizing high-resolution manofluorography. These studies have revealed important information regarding its diagnostic potential and researchers have devised innovative methods of measurements. However, substantial research is required to transform manofluorography into a clinically useful tool. There is a need to conduct validation studies, correlating manometric measures with structural changes in the swallow seen on videofluorography and devise diagnostic methods that utilize the advantages of both tools. Furthermore, studies comparing healthy and clinical populations are needed to identify measures most clinically significant in order to develop diagnostic paradigms.

  6. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection.

  7. Cryostimulation improves recovery from oropharyngeal dysphagia after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zart, Patrícia; Levy, Deborah Salle; Bolzan, Geovana de Paula; Mancopes, Renata; da Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Stroke is considered one of the most frequent neurological causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Aim: To determine the effect of cryostimulation on oropharyngeal sensitivity and, subsequently, on the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. Methods: Clinical and experimental study. The study enrolled 7 adult subjects, 6 men and 1 woman ranging from 28 to 64 years of age, with a diagnosis of stroke and current oropharyngeal dysphagia without any other underlying disease. The selected subjects underwent speech-language pathology evaluation and videofluoroscopic assessment of the dysphagia. The subjects were then treated with cryostimulation consisting of 10 applications to each structure (anterior faucial pillar, posterior oropharyngeal wall, soft palate, and back tongue) 3 times a day (for a total of 30 daily applications per structure) for 4 consecutive days. The patients were then re-evaluated based on the same criteria. The pre- and post-cryostimulation results of the clinical and videofluoroscopic evaluations were analyzed descriptively and statistically using Student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Cryostimulation had beneficial effects on oropharyngeal sensitivity in 6 of the 7 subjects. There was also a significant improvement in swallowing and in the premature escape in six subjects. Conclusion: Cryostimulation increased sensitivity and subsequently improved the swallowing reaction and premature escape of food in patients with neurogenic dysphagia after stroke. These effects were evident by both speech-language pathology and videofluoroscopic evaluation. PMID:25991991

  8. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection. PMID:26481206

  9. Dysphagia After Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Dose-Effect Relationships for the Swallowing Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Abbeel, Sarah; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate late dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma, and to examine its correlation with clinical and dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients, treated with radiotherapy (70-72 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks) between 2004 and 2007, were examined. Swallowing was evaluated by four quality-of-life questionnaires: EORTC C30 and H and N35, the Performance Status Scale of List, and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were correlated with late dysphagia. Results: A total of 53 disease-free patients were evaluated; mean follow-up was 20.4 months (range, 6-45 months). The volume of the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.04), the mean dose to this structure (p = 0.02) and to the supraglottic larynx (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with late swallowing problems at univariate analysis, along with tumor localization (p = 0.008), T-classification (p = 0.02), and pretreatment swallowing problems (p = 0.01). Only this last factor significantly correlated with late dysphagia at multivariate analysis. Conclusion: These findings motivate further efforts to reduce the dose to the swallowing structures, especially to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and the larynx. However, clinical parameters are also important and should be included in future prospective trials.

  10. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  11. Identifying vulnerable patients: role of the EAT-10 and the multidisciplinary team for early intervention and comprehensive dysphagia care.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kala; Ekberg, Olle

    2012-01-01

    There is underdiagnosis and low awareness of dysphagia despite that the condition is modifiable and poorly managed symptoms diminish psychological well-being and overall quality of life. Frontline clinicians are in a unique position to be alert to the high prevalence of swallowing difficulty among elderly, evaluate and identify those who need intervention, and assure that individuals receive appropriate care. Proper diagnosis and treatment of oral-pharyngeal dysphagia involves a multidisciplinary healthcare team effort and starts with systematic screening of at-risk patients. The presence of a medical condition such as acute stroke, head and neck cancer, head trauma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, pneumonia or bronchitis is adequate basis for predicting high risk. Systematic screening of dysphagia and resulting malnutrition among at-risk older adults is justified in an effort to avoid pneumonia and is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Systematic screening with a validated method (e.g. the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool, EAT-10) as part of a comprehensive care protocol enables multidisciplinary teams to more effectively manage the condition, reduce the economic and societal burden, and improve patient quality of life. In fact, care settings with a systematic dysphagia screening program attain significantly better patient outcomes including reduced cases of pneumonia (by 55%) and reduced hospital length of stay.

  12. Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Pretreatment Evaluation, Predictive Factors, and Assessment during Radio-Chemotherapy, Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco C.; Russi, Elvio G.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in head and neck cancer (HNC) therapies has improved tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. However, treatment intensification also increases early and late toxicities. Dysphagia is an underestimated symptom in HNC patients. Impairment of swallowing process could cause malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration, and pneumonia. A comprehensive literature review finalized in May 2012 included searches of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CAB abstracts) and scientific societies meetings materials (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Cervico-Cefalica, American Head and Neck Society, and European Society for Medical Oncology). Hand-searches of HNC journals and reference lists were carried out. Approximately one-third of dysphagia patients developed pneumonia requiring treatment. Aspiration pneumonia associated mortality ranged from 20% to 65%. Unidentified dysphagia caused significant morbidity, increased mortality, and decreased the quality of life. In this review we underline definition, causes, predictive factors of dysphagia and report on pretreatment and on-treatment evaluation, suggesting some key points to avoid underestimation. A multi-parameter assessment of swallowing problems may allow an earlier diagnosis. An appropriate evaluation might lead to a better treatment of both symptoms and cancer. PMID:24069513

  13. Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Similarities and Differences in Three Areas of the World

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Marlís; Huckabee, Maggi-Lee; Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Inamoto, Yoko; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Eichii

    2013-01-01

    Although the goal of dysphagia rehabilitation is the same, population needs, clinical practice patterns, availability of resources, and dysphagia research varies greatly around the world. The goal of this review is to introduce the reader to the context in which dysphagia rehabilitation is practiced, to describe practice patterns, and to highlight the dysphagia research being performed in three distinct regions of the world: North America, New Zealand and Australia, and Japan. PMID:24977110

  14. Neural Mechanisms Contributing to Dysphagia in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Hinkel, Cameron J; Sharma, Rishi; Thakkar, Mahesh M; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hopewell, Bridget L; Lever, Teresa E

    2016-08-01

    Investigative research into curative treatments for dysphagia is hindered by our incomplete understanding of the neural mechanisms of swallowing in health and disease. Development of translational research models is essential to bridge this knowledge gap by fostering innovative methodology. Toward this goal, our laboratory has developed a translational research assessment tool to investigate the neural mechanistic control of swallowing in unrestrained, self-feeding mice. Here we describe our initial development of synchronous brainstem neural recordings with a videofluoroscopic swallow study assay in healthy mice across the life span. Refinement of this combined methodology is currently underway. Ultimately, we envision that this assessment tool will permit systematic analysis of therapeutic interventions for dysphagia in preclinical trials with numerous mouse models of human conditions that cause dysphagia, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke, and advanced aging.

  15. A very unusual cause of dysphagia: mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Cerro, Paola; Chios, Anastassios; Andriani, Alessandro; Balsamo, Giuseppina; Francesco, Vincenzo De; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an alarm symptom requiring a prompt investigation. Different benign and malignant diseases may present such a symptom. We describe a case of a 79-year-old patient who complained of fluctuating dysphagia episodes following solid food ingestion in the previous 5 months with mild weight loss. No other gastrointestinal symptoms were present. The patient was referred by the General Practitioner for a videofluoroscopic swallow examination which revealed nodularity of mucosa surface in the oropharynx, esophagus, fundus, and gastric body. Upper endoscopy confirmed the feature, also showing a normal mucosa of the antrum and duodenum. The histological examination revealed a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). A stage III, MCL involving the esophagus and proximal stomach was eventually diagnosed. Esophageal MCL localization is extremely rare, and this is the first report showing a clinical onset with dysphagia. PMID:27366047

  16. Clozapine-induced dysphagia with secondary substantial weight loss.

    PubMed

    Osman, Mugtaba; Devadas, Vekneswaran

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is listed as a 'rare' side effect following clozapine treatment. In this case report, we describe how significant clozapine-induced dysphagia has led to significant reduction of nutritional intake with subsequent substantial weight loss. An 18-year-old single man with an established diagnosis of treatment-resistant paranoid schizophrenia recovered well on a therapeutic dose of clozapine. However, he was noted to lose weight significantly (up to 20% of his original weight) as the dose was uptitrated. This was brought about by development of dysphagia, likely to be due to clozapine. Addition of nutritional supplementary liquids and initiation of a modified behavioural dietary/swallowing programme, while repeatedly mastering the Mendelsohn manoeuvre technique, alleviated the swallowing difficulties and restored his weight. PMID:27543610

  17. Combined neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and traditional swallowing rehabilitation in the treatment of stroke-related dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Sun, Hsien-Pin; Chang, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Jue-Long

    2013-12-01

    Dysphagia is common after stroke. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for the treatment of dysphagia have gained in popularity, but the combined application of these promising modalities has rarely been studied. We aimed to evaluate whether combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation can improve swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate to severe dysphagia. Thirty-two patients with moderate to severe dysphagia poststroke (≥3 weeks) were recruited. Patients received 12 sessions of NMES for 1 h/day, 5 days/week within a period of 2-3 weeks. FEES was done before and after NMES for evaluation and to guide dysphagic therapy. All patients subsequently received 12 sessions of traditional swallowing rehabilitation (50 min/day, 3 days/week) for 4 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). Secondary outcome measures included clinical degree of dysphagia, the patient's self-perception of swallowing ability, and the patient's global satisfaction with therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline, after NMES, at 6-month follow-up, and at 2-year follow-up. Twenty-nine patients completed the study. FOIS, degree of dysphagia, and patient's self-perception of swallowing improved significantly after NMES, at the 6-month follow-up, and at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.001, each compared with baseline). Most patients reported considerable satisfaction with no serious adverse events. Twenty-three of the 29 (79.3 %) patients maintained oral diet with no pulmonary complications at 2-year follow-up. This preliminary case series demonstrated that combined NMES, FEES, and traditional swallowing rehabilitation showed promise for improving swallowing functions in stroke patients with moderate-to-severe dysphagia. The benefits were maintained for up to 2 years. The results are promising enough to justify further studies.

  18. Serving Students with Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power-deFur, Lissa

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the rise of students with dysphagia in schools and addresses issues associated with serving students with dysphagia in the public education setting. The role and preparation of the speech-language pathologist is serving children with dysphagia, and the accompanying continuing education and ethical requirements, are outlined.…

  19. Family Perceptions of Facilitators and Inhibitors of Effective School-Based Dysphagia Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This qualitative study focused on the perceptions of family members of children with dysphagia by asking what the family-identified factors are that facilitate or inhibit effective school-based management of pediatric dysphagia. Method: Semistructured interviews of 7 family members of 6 children with dysphagia, ages 2 through 11 years,…

  20. Dysphagia after radiotherapy: state of the art and prevention.

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Ali, D; Roubieu, C; Durdux, C; Laccourreye, O; Giraud, P

    2015-02-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery or exclusive radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy is a valuable treatment option in the great majority of patients with head and neck cancer. Recent technical progress in radiotherapy has resulted in a decreased incidence of xerostomia. Another common toxicity of radiotherapy is dysphagia, which alters the nutritional status and quality of life of patients in remission. The objective of this review is to describe the physiology of swallowing function, the pathophysiology of radiation-induced dysphagia and the various strategies currently available to prevent this complication.

  1. Tubular duplication of the oesophagus presenting with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Saha, A K; Kundu, A K

    2014-06-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are rare congenital malformations, with the ileum being the most commonly affected site, followed by the oesophagus. Among oesophageal duplications, cystic duplication is the most common and the tubular variety, the rarest. Herein, we report a rare case of tubular oesophageal duplication, complicated by adenosquamous carcinoma at the lower end of the oesophagus, in a 32-year-old man who presented with progressive dysphagia. Although proton pump inhibitors may relieve dysphagia, oesophagectomy and gastric interpositioning should be the first-line treatment for patients with tubular oesophageal duplication, in order to reduce the risk of malignant transformation at the lower end of the oesophagus.

  2. Effects of aural stimulation with capsaicin ointment on swallowing function in elderly patients with non-obstructive dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Eiji; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Ohnishi, Hiroki; Kawata, Ikuji; Nakano, Seiichi; Goda, Masakazu; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Abe, Koji; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Takeda, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the present study, an attempt was made to examine the effects of aural stimulation with ointment containing capsaicin on swallowing function in order to develop a novel and safe treatment for non-obstructive dysphagia in elderly patients. Design A prospective pilot, non-blinded, non-controlled study with case series evaluating a new treatment. Setting Secondary hospitals. Patients and methods The present study included 26 elderly patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. Ointment containing 0.025% capsaicin (0.5 g) was applied to the external auditory canal with a cotton swab under otoscope only once or once a day for 7 days before swallowing of a bolus of colored water (3 mL), which was recorded by transnasal videoendoscopy and evaluated according to the endoscopic swallowing score. Results After a single application of 0.025% capsaicin ointment to the right external auditory canal, the endoscopic swallowing score was significantly decreased, and this effect lasted for 60 minutes. After repeated applications of the ointment to each external auditory canal alternatively once a day for 7 days, the endoscopic swallowing score decreased significantly in patients with more severe non-obstructive dysphagia. Of the eight tube-fed patients of this group, three began direct swallowing exercises using jelly, which subsequently restored their oral food intake. Conclusion These findings suggest that stimulation of the external auditory canal with ointment containing capsaicin improves swallowing function in elderly patients with non-obstructive dysphagia. By the same mechanism used by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors to induce cough reflex, which has been shown to prevent aspiration pneumonia, aural stimulation with capsaicin may reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in dysphagia patients via Arnold’s ear-cough reflex stimulation. PMID:25328387

  3. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  4. Long-Term Gastrostomy Tube Dependence More Likely In Head and Neck Cancer Survivors without Partners

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, J. Scott; Durst, Jennifer; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Carroll, William R.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Locher, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated factors associated with long-term dependence on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes. Methods 154 patients receiving treatment at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between 2002 and 2004 who underwent PEG tube placement were identified through retrospective review of medical records. Using binary logistic regression, we evaluated the association of various factors on long-term dependence on PEG tubes. Results 25.3% of survivors remained PEG tube dependent at 12 months. The odds of long-term PEG-tube dependence were greater for those who did not have partners compared with those who had partners (OR 3.33, p=0.004), for patients who received radiation therapy (OR 6.21, p=0.018), and for those who had a tracheotomy in place for longer than thirty days (OR 4.328, p=0.035). Conclusions Data suggest that interventions targeted at reducing long-term dependence on PEG tubes take into account not only treatment-related factors, but also the important role that social support plays. PMID:22505332

  5. Gastrostomy Tube Placement Without Nasogastric Tube: A Retrospective Evaluation in 85 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Wolf E. Goodwin, Whitney J.; Wood, Clint E.; Yousaf, Muhammad; Culp, William C.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Our study evaluated techniques for percutaneous gastrostomy (G)-tube placement without the use of a nasogastric (NG) tube. Instead, direct puncture of a physiologic air bubble or effervescent-enhanced gastric bubble distention was performed in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO) or psychological objections to NG tubes. Materials and Methods: A total of 886 patients underwent G-tube placement in our department during a period of 7 years. We present our series of 85 (9.6%) consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous G-tube placement without use of an NG tube. Results: Of these 85 patients, fluoroscopic guided access was attempted by direct puncture of a physiologically present gastric air bubble in 24 (28%) cases. Puncture of an effervescent-induced large gastric air bubble was performed in 61 (72%) patients. Altogether, 82 (97%) of 85 G tubes were successfully placed in this fashion. The three failures comprised refusal of effervescent, vomiting of effervescent, and one initial tube misplacement when a deviation from our standard technique occurred. Conclusion: The described techniques compare favorably with published large series on G-tube placement with an NG tube in place. The techniques are especially suited for patients with UDTO due to head, neck, or esophageal malignancies, but they should be considered as an alternative in all patients. Direct puncture of effervescent-enhanced gastric bubble distention is a safe, patient-friendly and effective technique.

  6. Causes of dysphagia among different age groups: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Roden, Dylan F; Altman, Kenneth W

    2013-12-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem that has the potential to result in severe complications such as malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. Based on the complexity of swallowing, there may be many different causes. This article presents a systematic literature review to assess different comorbid disease associations with dysphagia based on age. The causes of dysphagia are different depending on age, affecting between 1.7% and 11.3% of the general population. Dysphagia can be a symptom representing disorders pertinent to any specialty of medicine. This review can be used to aid in the diagnosis of patients presenting with the complaint of dysphagia.

  7. A Descriptive Investigation of Dysphagia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia has rarely been investigated in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) despite being a serious condition affecting health and quality of life. Method: This study collected information about 101 adults with ID, living in community settings, referred for an assessment of their eating and drinking. Ninety-nine people were…

  8. Development of an Interdisciplinary Dysphagia Team in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homer, Emily M.; Bickerton, Cheryl; Hill, Sherry; Parham, Lisa; Taylor, Darlene

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the development of a school-based dysphagia team (swallowing action team (SWAT)) in Louisiana. It addresses how the team was initially formed, the process of identifying students who were exhibiting a swallowing disorder, steps taken for staff development, and problems encountered in seeking administrative approval.…

  9. Chronic dysphagia and trigeminal anesthesia after trichloroethylene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.H.; Partyka, E.K.

    1981-12-01

    A patient is described who inhaled trichloroethylene fumes while working in a closed underground pit. At the time of exposure he developed dysphagia, dysarthria and dyspnea. Assessment of his condition 11 years after the incident indicated major damage of cranial nerves, particularly the trigeminal, chronic involvement of the bulbar cranial nerves, and resultant esophageal and pharnygeal motility impairment. (JMT)

  10. Identification and Management of Dysphagia in the Public Schools: Prologue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.; O'Toole, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article describes following articles (EC 625 128-134) that address processes and issues related to offering care for children with swallowing disorders in the public school. Procedures for screening, assessing, and treatment, issues involved in establishing a dysphagia program in a school system, and legal and ethical issues are…

  11. Identification and Management of Dysphagia in the Public Schools: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.; O'Toole, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    This epilogue to a series of articles on the management of dysphagia in students and the role of speech-pathologists emphasizes the need for a team approach to the management of children with swallowing disorders and the importance of interaction between clinicians in the school setting and clinicians in medical environments. (CR)

  12. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  13. A minor salivary gland tumour presenting with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Tighe, J V

    1999-06-01

    A case is reviewed of a giant benign myoepithelioma of the soft palate presenting in an elderly female patient. Due to the large size of the lesion and its mass effect the patient developed dysphagia with subsequent significant weight loss. The clinico-pathological features of this rare tumour are described and the literature reviewed.

  14. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  15. Hypnobehavioral approaches for school-age children with dysphagia and food aversion: a case series.

    PubMed

    Culbert, T P; Kajander, R L; Kohen, D P; Reaney, J B

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe hypnobehavioral treatment of five school-age children with maladaptive eating behaviors, including functional dysphagia, food aversion, globus hystericus, and conditioned fear of eating (phagophobia). The unique treatment approach described emphasizes the successful use of self-management techniques, particularly hypnosis, by all five children. Common etiological factors, treatment strategies, and proposed mechanisms of change are discussed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case series in the mainstream pediatric literature describing the use of a hypnobehavioral approach for children with these maladaptive eating problems.

  16. Postoperative dysphagia correlates with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs in anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Mummaneni, Praveen V; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) after discectomy and/or corpectomy is a common procedure with traditionally good patient outcomes. Though typically mild, postoperative dysphagia can result in significant patient morbidity. In this study, we examine the relationship between postoperative dysphagia and in-hospital outcomes, readmissions, and overall costs. The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database was utilized to perform a retrospective cohort study of all adults who underwent a principal procedure of ACF of the anterior column (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] procedure code 81.02) between 2013 and 2015. Patients with a diagnosis of dysphagia (ICD-9 78720-78729) were compared to those without. Patient demographics, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmissions, and direct costs were recorded. A total of 49,300 patients who underwent ACF were identified. Mean age was 54.5years and 50.2% were male. Dysphagia was documented in 3,137 patients (6.4%) during their hospital stay. Patients with dysphagia had an average 2.1 comorbidities, while patients without dysphagia had 1.5 (p<0.01). Mean length of stay was 6.38days in patients with dysphagia, and 2.13days in those without (p<0.01). In-hospital mortality was 0.10% in patients without dysphagia, and 0.61% in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Direct costs were $13,099 in patients without dysphagia, and $21,245 in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Thirty-day readmission rate was 2.9% in patients without dysphagia, and 5.3% in those with dysphagia (p=0.01). In summary, dysphagia in patients who undergo ACF correlates with significantly increased length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and in-hospital mortality. Direct costs are similarly increased as a result.

  17. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed objectively by surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Archer, Sally K; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Objective swallowing assessment is indicated in the management of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Surface electromyography (sEMG) provides a non-invasive, objective method of quantifying muscle activity. It was hypothesised that the measurement of sEMG activity during swallowing would distinguish between preserved and disordered swallow function in DMD. This comparative study investigated the peak, duration, and relative timing of muscle activity during swallowing of four muscle groups: orbicularis oris, masseter, submental, and infrahyoid. The study included three groups of participants: Nine DMD patients with dysphagia (mean age = 21.7 ± 4.2 years), six DMD patients with preserved swallow function (21.0 ± 3.0 years), and 12 healthy controls (24.8 ± 3.1 years). Dysphagic DMD participants produced significantly higher normalised peak amplitude measurements than the healthy control group for masseter (61.77 vs. 5.07; p ≤ 0.01) and orbicularis oris muscles (71.87 vs. 26.22; p ≤ 0.05). Intrasubject variability for masseter peak amplitude was significantly greater for dysphagic DMD participants than the other groups (16.01 vs. 5.86 vs. 2.18; p ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in timing measurements between groups. Different characteristic sEMG waveforms were observed for the three groups. sEMG provides useful physiological information for the evaluation of swallowing in DMD patients, justifying further study.

  18. Exploring scale-up, spread, and sustainability: an instrumental case study tracing an innovation to enhance dysphagia care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adoption, adaptation, scale-up, spread, and sustainability are ill-defined, undertheorised, and little-researched implementation science concepts. An instrumental case study will track the adoption and adaptation, or not, of a locally developed innovation about dysphagia as a patient safety issue. The case study will examine a conceptual framework with a continuum of spread comprising hierarchical control or ‘making it happen’, participatory adaptation or ‘help it happen’, and facilitated evolution or ‘let it happen’. Methods This case study is a prospective, longitudinal design using mixed methods. The fifteen-month (October 2012 to December 2013) instrumental case study is set in large, healthcare organisation in England. The innovation refers to introducing a nationally recognised, inter-disciplinary dysphagia competency framework to guide workforce development about fundamental aspects of care. Adoption and adaptation will be examined at an organisational level and along two, contrasting care pathways: stroke and fractured neck of femur. A number of educational interventions will be deployed, including training a cadre of trainers to cascade the essentials of dysphagia management and developing a Dysphagia Toolkit as a learning resource. Mixed methods will be used to investigate scale-up, spread, and sustainability in acute and community settings. A purposive sample of senior managers and clinical leaders will be interviewed to identify path dependency or the context specific particularities of implementation. A pre- and post-evaluation, using mealtime observations and a survey, will investigate the learning effect on staff adherence to patient specific dysphagia recommendations and attitudes towards dysphagia, respectively. Official documents and an ethnographic field journal allow critical junctures, temporal aspects and confounding factors to be explored. Discussion Researching spread and sustainability presents methodological and

  19. Novel neuromuscular electrical stimulation system for treatment of dysphagia after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Keiichi; Matsumoto, Shuji; Kurasawa, Miho; Setoguchi, Haruka; Noma, Tomokazu; Takenaka, Keita; Soeda, Akina; Shimodozono, Megumi; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a novel neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to the effects of conventional treatment in patients with dysphagia after brain injury. In total, 26 patients were non-randomly divided into an experimental group (n = 12) and a control group (n = 14). The experimental group received NMES intervention followed by conventional treatment, including thermaltactile stimulation with intensive repetition of a dry-swallow task. The control group received conventional treatment without NMES. NMES at a fixed pulse duration of 50 μs and a frequency of 50 Hz was delivered over the skin areas above the motor point of the target muscles, i.e., the bilateral geniohyoid, mylohyoid/anterior belly of the digastric, and thyrohyoid muscles, using a high-voltage pulsed-current device. The two groups received 40-min treatments once a day, 5 days per week, for 8 weeks. Outcome, assessed before and 8 weeks after treatment, was evaluated with regard to the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS), the anterior and superior displacement of the hyoid bone and larynx, and the functional oral intake scale. Both groups exhibited improvement, but the experimental group exhibited more significant improvement in the displacement of the hyoid bone and larynx, VDS-total score, and VDS-pharyngeal score than the control group did. The results suggest that NMES combined with conventional treatment is superior to conventional treatment alone in patients with dysphagia following treatment for brain injury. Further investigations are necessary to examine the effects of NMES in patients with more varied types of diseases. PMID:24670314

  20. Assessment and intervention for dysphagia in infants and children: beyond the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bell, Hannah R; Alper, Beth Sheckman

    2007-08-01

    Over the last 10 years, the assessment and intervention for feeding and swallowing problems in infants and children have attracted increased attention on a national and international level. Increases in the population of children with dysphagia are due, in large part, to advances in medical and surgical management of at-risk term infants, improved medical support for viability of younger and smaller preterm infants, and increases in the number of children on the autism spectrum. Because of legislative initiatives, settings in which children are seen for assessment and intervention have shifted, with services provided more often in the natural environments of homes, daycares, preschools, and schools, as well as in hospitals and outpatient clinics in the United States. Assessment of infants and children with dysphagia continues to include clinical and instrumental evaluations with clinical assessment including a specific focus on the feeding environment. Speech-language pathologists are increasingly assuming consultative roles to support the needs of children in all settings. Areas for further research in the era of evidence-based practice include efficacy of oral exercises and other intervention strategies.

  1. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up.

  2. Dysphagia caused by a fibrovascular polyp: a case report.

    PubMed

    Blacha, Marielle Mj; Sloots, Cornelius Ej; Van Munster, Ivo P; Wobbes, Theo

    2008-01-01

    A 73-year old man presented with dysphagia for liquid and solid food. Barium contrast study of the esophagus and esophagoscopy demonstrated a fibrovascular polyp. This, almost 10 cm benign esophageal tumor, was removed surgically by a cervical esophagotomy. A fibrovascular polyp is a rare benign tumor of the esophagus, which, however, may give serious complications as asphyxia resulting from laryngeal obstruction leading to sudden death.

  3. Dysphagia caused by a fibrovascular polyp: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Blacha, Marielle MJ; Sloots, Cornelius EJ; Van Munster, Ivo P; Wobbes, Theo

    2008-01-01

    A 73-year old man presented with dysphagia for liquid and solid food. Barium contrast study of the esophagus and esophagoscopy demonstrated a fibrovascular polyp. This, almost 10 cm benign esophageal tumor, was removed surgically by a cervical esophagotomy. A fibrovascular polyp is a rare benign tumor of the esophagus, which, however, may give serious complications as asphyxia resulting from laryngeal obstruction leading to sudden death. PMID:19019249

  4. The physiology of deglutition and the pathophysiology and complications of oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    The opening session of the 2nd International Conference on Oropharyngeal Dysphagia featured a series of invited talks reviewing the definition of dysphagia, its prevalence and its pathophysiology. The discussion arising from these talks focused heavily on the current underrecognition of dysphagia as a significant concern for older adults, particularly those over 75. The burdens associated with dysphagia in this sector of the population were recognized to be substantial, both in social/psychological terms and in terms of economic consequences for the healthcare system. The importance of developing swallow screening protocols as a routine method for the early identification of dysphagia and aspiration was explored. The idea of launching political initiatives aimed at increasing awareness and the utilization of appropriate dysphagia healthcare codes was also discussed.

  5. Analysis of carbonated thin liquids in pediatric neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lundine, Jennifer P.; Bates, David G.; Yin, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of liquids is a serious complication of neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury or stroke. Carbonated liquids have been examined as a possible alternative to thickened liquids to help reduce aspiration in cases of dysphagia in adults, but no published literature to the best of our knowledge has evaluated this technique in children. If carbonated liquids result in safer swallowing in children, they could provide a preferred alternative to thickened liquids. Objective This pilot study examined whether carbonated thin liquids (CARB) improved swallowing compared to noncarbonated thin liquids (NOCARB) for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Materials and methods Twenty-four children admitted to a level I trauma center for acute neurological injury/disease were evaluated via videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Four descriptive outcome measures were contrasted. Results CARB significantly decreased pooling (P=0.0006), laryngeal penetration/aspiration (P=0.0044) and Penetration-Aspiration Scale scores (P=0.0127) when compared to NOCARB. On average, CARB improved scores on the Penetration-Aspiration Scale by 3.7 points for participants who aspirated NOCARB. There was no significant difference in pharyngeal residue noted between CARB and NOCARB (P=0.0625). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that carbonated thin liquids may provide an alternative to thickened liquids for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25758792

  6. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for dysphagia: a U.S. community study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, So Yang; Choung, Rok Seon; Saito, Yuri A.; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Locke, G. Richard; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is considered an alarm symptom but detailed population-based data on dysphagia are lacking. We aimed to estimate in a representative US Caucasian population the prevalence of dysphagia and potential risk factors. Methods A modified version of the previously validated Bowel Disease Questionnaire was mailed to a population based cohort (n=7640) of Olmsted County, MN. Dysphagia was measured by one validated question “In the last year, how often have you had difficulty swallowing (a feeling that food sticks in your throat or chest)?” The medical records were reviewed for organic causes of dysphagia. The associations of reported frequency of dysphagia with potential risk factors were assessed using logistic regression models. Results The sex-specific, age-adjusted (US White 2000) prevalence for dysphagia experienced at least weekly was 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.2, 3.7) in females and 3.0 % (95% CI: 2.0, 4.0) in males. Those with frequent heartburn [OR=5.9 (4.0, 8.6)] and acid regurgitation [OR=10.6 (6.8, 16.6)] were significantly more likely to report frequent dysphagia. PPI use was significantly associated with frequent (3.1, 95% CI 2.2, 4.4) and infrequent dysphagia (1.5, 955 CI 1.3, 1.8). GERD was the most common diagnosis in those reporting dysphagia on the medical record; other organic explanations were rare and only found in the frequent dysphagia group. Conclusions Frequent dysphagia is not rare in the community (3%), occurs in both women and men across all adult age groups, and is most likely to indicate underlying GERD. PMID:25376877

  8. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation of swallowing: A bedside technique to evaluate ability to swallow pureed diets in elderly patients with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Torao; Horiuchi, Akira; Nakayama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (EES) is not commonly used by gastroenterologists to evaluate swallowing in patients with dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To use transnasal endoscopy to identify factors predicting successful or failed swallowing of pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia. METHODS: EES of pureed foods was performed by a gastroenterologist using a small-calibre transnasal endoscope. Factors related to successful versus unsuccessful swallowing of pureed foods were analyzed with regard to age, comorbid diseases, swallowing activity, saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and airway penetration/aspiration. Unsuccessful swallowing was defined in patients who could not eat pureed foods at bedside during hospitalization. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of swallowing of pureed foods. RESULTS: During a six-year period, 458 consecutive patients (mean age 80 years [range 39 to 97 years]) were considered for the study, including 285 (62%) men. Saliva pooling, vallecular residues, pharyngeal residues and penetration/aspiration were found in 240 (52%), 73 (16%), 226 (49%) and 232 patients (51%), respectively. Overall, 247 patients (54%) failed to swallow pureed foods. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of pharyngeal residues (OR 6.0) and saliva pooling (OR 4.6) occurred significantly more frequently in patients who failed to swallow pureed foods. CONCLUSIONS: Pharyngeal residues and saliva pooling predicted impaired swallowing of pureed foods. Transnasal EES performed by a gastroenterologist provided a unique bedside method of assessing the ability to swallow pureed foods in elderly patients with dysphagia. PMID:23936875

  9. The videofluoroscopic swallowing study shows a sustained improvement of dysphagia in children with Niemann-Pick disease type C after therapy with miglustat.

    PubMed

    Fecarotta, Simona; Amitrano, Michele; Romano, Alfonso; Della Casa, Roberto; Bruschini, Diana; Astarita, Luca; Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso

    2011-03-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by defective intracellular lipid trafficking, with secondary accumulation of free cholesterol, sphingosine, and glycosphingolipids. NPC is clinically characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations with progressive visceral and neurological involvement, including dysphagia. Neurological manifestations represent the most debilitating findings. Swallowing impairment is a frequent cause of morbidity and disability in NPC patients and progressive dysphagia may be considered a marker of neurological progression. Recently substrate reduction therapy with miglustat has been proposed for the treatment of neurological manifestations in NPC patients. This observational study reports on the long-term use of miglustat in four pediatric patients with NPC and shows the efficacy of the treatment to improve or prevent dysphagia, and persistence after 3 years of treatment or more. We used a videofluoroscopic analysis of liquid barium swallowing to provide additional information on patterns of impairment of the swallowing mechanism and to detect aspiration. In three patients showing dysphagia and aspiration we observed the improvement of the swallowing function and the sustained absence of barium aspiration in the airways after miglustat treatment, while the patient with normal swallowing function at baseline did not show any deterioration. We suggest that the videofluoroscopic study of swallowing should be routinely used to monitor the effects of treatment on swallowing ability in NPC patients. PMID:21344635

  10. A novel animal model of dysphagia following stroke.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Naoto; Nishiyama, Eiji; Nishikawa, Yukitoshi; Sasamura, Takashi; Nakade, Shinji; Okawa, Katsumasa; Nagasawa, Tadashi; Yuki, Akane

    2014-02-01

    Patients who have an ischemic stroke are at high risk of swallowing disorders. Aspiration due to swallowing disorders, specifically delayed trigger of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing, predisposes such patients to pneumonia. In the present study, we evaluated swallowing reflex in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), which is one of the most common experimental animal models of cerebral ischemia, in order to develop a novel animal model of dysphagia following ischemic stroke. A swallowing reflex was elicited by a 10-s infusion of distilled water (DW) to the pharyngolaryngeal region in the tMCAO rat model. Swallowing reflex was estimated using the electromyographic activity of the mylohyoid muscle from 1 to 3 weeks after surgery. Two weeks after tMCAO, the number of swallows significantly decreased and the onset latency of the first swallow was prolonged compared with that of the sham group. The number of swallows in rats significantly increased by infusions of 10 mM citric acid and 0.6 μM capsaicin to the pharyngolaryngeal region compared with the number from infusion of DW. It has been reported that sensory stimulation of the pharyngolaryngeal region with citric acid, capsaicin, and L-menthol ameliorates hypofunction of pharyngeal-stage swallowing in dysphagia patients. Therefore, the tMCAO rat model may show some of the symptoms of pharyngeal-stage swallowing disorders, similar to those in patients with ischemic stroke. This rat tMCAO model has the potential to become a novel animal model of dysphagia following stroke that is useful for development of therapeutic methods and drugs.

  11. Development of a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment Learning System Using Responsive Web Design: From e-Learning to m-Learning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing problems have significant affect the health outcome of some residents in long-term care facilities. Nursing staff who care these residents should have the ability of assessing dysphagia. However, nursing continued education to improve the performance of dysphagia assessment is still challenged. To enhance nurses' capability of dysphagia assessment, a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment learning System was developed for nursing staff in long-term care institutions. This system was evaluated by performing a user usability test. PMID:27332279

  12. Development of a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment Learning System Using Responsive Web Design: From e-Learning to m-Learning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing problems have significant affect the health outcome of some residents in long-term care facilities. Nursing staff who care these residents should have the ability of assessing dysphagia. However, nursing continued education to improve the performance of dysphagia assessment is still challenged. To enhance nurses' capability of dysphagia assessment, a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment learning System was developed for nursing staff in long-term care institutions. This system was evaluated by performing a user usability test.

  13. Does the addition of specific acupuncture to standard swallowing training improve outcomes in patients with dysphagia after stroke? a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenguang; Zheng, Chanjuan; Zhu, Suiqiang; Tang, Zhouping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of adding acupuncture to standard swallowing training for patients with dysphagia after stroke. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient and outpatient clinics. Subjects: A total of 124 patients with dysphagia after stroke were randomly divided into two groups: acupuncture and control. Interventions: The acupuncture group received standard swallowing training and acupuncture treatment. In comparison, the control group only received standard swallowing training. Participants in both groups received six days of therapy per week for a four-week period. Main measures: The primary outcome measures included the Standardized Swallowing Assessment and the Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale. The secondary outcome measures included the Modified Barthel Index and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life, which were assessed before and after the four-week therapy period. Results: A total of 120 dysphagic subjects completed the study (60 in acupuncture group and 60 in control group). Significant differences existed in the Standardized Swallowing Assessment, Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale, Modified Barthel Index, and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life scores of each group after the treatment (P < 0.01). After the four-week treatment, the Standardized Swallowing Assessment (mean difference − 2.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) – 5.0 to − 0.81; P < 0.01), Dysphagia Outcome Severity Scale (mean difference 2.3; 95% CI 0.7 to 1.2; P < 0.01), Modified Barthel Index (mean difference 17.2; 95% CI 2.6 to 9.3; P < 0.05) and Swallowing-Related Quality of Life scores (mean difference 31.4; 95% CI 3.2 to 11.4; P < 0.01) showed more significant improvement in the acupuncture group than the control group. Conclusions: Acupuncture combined with the standard swallowing training may be beneficial for dysphagic patients after stroke. PMID:25819076

  14. Evaluation of dysphagia risk, nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly patients with Alzheimer's

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Vanessa Fernanda; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela Billig; de Oliveira, Lilian Oliveira; Hack, Jaqueline; Magro, Marcela; Bonini, Juliana Sartori

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the risk of dysphagia and its relationship with the stage of Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the relationship between the risk of dysphagia and nutritional status and caloric intake in elderly people with Alzheimer's disease. Methods the sample consisted of 30 subjects of both genders with probable Alzheimer's disease. The stage of the disease, nutritional status, energy intake, and risk of dysphagia were assessed. Results it was found that increased risk of dysphagia is associated with the advance in the stages of Alzheimer's disease and that even patients in the early stages of disease have a slight risk of developing dysphagia. No association was found between nutritional status and the risk of dysphagia. High levels of inadequate intake of micronutrients were also verified in the patients. Conclusion an association between dysphagia and the development of Alzheimer's disease was found. The results indicate the need to monitor the presence of dysphagia and the micronutrient intake in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26107841

  15. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  16. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  17. Establishing a Public School Dysphagia Program: A Model for Administration and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homer, Emily M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Many school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are hampered in participating in managing children with dysphagia by their school systems' lack of supportive policies and procedures. A need exists to better define the dysphagia-trained SLP's role and clarify the district's responsibility. The purpose of this article is to address…

  18. Adherence to Eating and Drinking Guidelines for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet

    2003-01-01

    The extent to which 40 individuals with intellectual disorders and dysphagia and their caregivers adhered to speech and language pathology dysphagia guidelines was evaluated across four settings. Although adherence was generally high, there were significant differences across settings, type of guidelines, and between people who were fed by…

  19. Dysphagia Management: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Gerety, Katherine W.; Mulligan, Moira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study (a) gathered information about the kinds of dysphagia management services school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) provide, (b) examined the attitudes of SLPs related to dysphagia management, (c) compared the responses of SLPs on the basis of their experience working in a medical setting, and (d) investigated the…

  20. School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists' Perspectives on Dysphagia Management in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.; Fetzer, Alycia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although provision of dysphagia services is within the scope of practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs), little is known about the perspectives of school-based SLPs in relation to these services. The purpose of this study was to examine SLPs' perspectives related to school-based management of students with dysphagia. Method: Focus…

  1. Palato-pharyngo-laryngeal myoclonus … an unusual cause of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Juby, Angela G; Shandro, Patti; Emery, Derek

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in the elderly patient. Palato-pharyngo-laryngeal myoclonus, however, is a rare cause of this. We report a case of a 78-year-old man with dysphagia due to palato-pharngo-laryngeal myoclonus that was ultimately managed conservatively with a good functional outcome.

  2. Barriers to Caregiver Compliance with Eating and Drinking Recommendations for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet; Burton, Mark H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is scant research on the subject of dysphagia and people with intellectual disabilities. This study explores the barriers which caregivers believe make following Speech and Language Therapists' (SLTs) dysphagia management strategies more difficult. Method: Semi-structured open-ended interviews were conducted with 46 caregivers…

  3. Dysphagia secondary to dermatomyositis treated successfully with intravenous immunoglobulin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Mahmood, Rizwan; Williams, Peter; Kitchen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A 46 year old woman presented with a one month history of rash and mylagia. The history, clinical findings and blood tests all supported a diagnosis of dermatomyositis. The patient later developed dysphagia and was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Investigations and treatment of dysphagia in the context of dermatomyositis are discussed. PMID:18651969

  4. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented. PMID:24262965

  5. Dysphagia Lusoria Caused by an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Carrizo, Gonzalo J.; Marjani, Massoud A.

    2004-01-01

    A 36-year-old, otherwise-healthy woman with a 6-year history of progressive dysphagia underwent an esophagogram that revealed an oblique extrinsic defect with an inferior-to-superior (left-to-right) course consistent with an aberrant right subclavian artery. An aortogram confirmed the diagnosis of aberrant right subclavian artery. She underwent surgical repair, tolerated the procedure well, and was discharged home, symptom free, on postoperative day 3. We found that the right supraclavicular approach provides good exposure and avoids the morbidity of the classically described approach via a median sternotomy or thoracotomy. PMID:15212130

  6. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented.

  7. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  8. Dysautonomia rating scales in Parkinson's disease: sialorrhea, dysphagia, and constipation--critique and recommendations by movement disorders task force on rating scales for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Evatt, Marian L; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Chou, Kelvin L; Cubo, Ester; Hinson, Vanessa; Kompoliti, Katie; Yang, Chengwu; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-04-15

    Upper and lower gastrointestinal dysautonomia symptoms (GIDS)--sialorrhea, dysphagia, and constipation are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and often socially as well as physically disabling for patients. Available invasive quantitative measures for assessing these symptoms and their response to therapy are time-consuming, require specialized equipment, can cause patient discomfort and present patients with risk. The Movement Disorders Society commissioned a task force to assess available clinical rating scales, critique their clinimetric properties, and make recommendations regarding their clinical utility. Six clinical researchers and a biostatistician systematically searched the literature for scales of sialorrhea, dysphagia, and constipation, evaluated the scales' previous use, performance parameters, and quality of validation data (if available). A scale was designated "Recommended" if the scale was used in clinical studies beyond the group that developed it, has been specifically used in PD reports, and clinimetric studies have established that it is a valid, reliable, and sensitive. "Suggested" scales met at least part of the above criteria, but fell short of meeting all. Based on the systematic review, scales for individual symptoms of sialorrhea, dysphagia, and constipation were identified along with three global scales that include these symptoms in the context of assessing dysautonomia or nonmotor symptoms. Three sialorrhea scales met criteria for Suggested: Drooling Severity and Frequency Scale (DSFS), Drooling Rating Scale, and Sialorrhea Clinical Scale for PD (SCS-PD). Two dysphagia scales, the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ) and Dysphagia-Specific Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL), met criteria for Suggested. Although Rome III constipation module is widely accepted in the gastroenterology community, and the earlier version from the Rome II criteria has been used in a single study of PD patients, neither met criteria for Suggested or Recommended

  9. Eosinophilic Esophagitis Causing Dysphagia: A Rare Entity in Adults, A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Waqas; Zavala, Romel P.; Mahmad, Abdul I.; Islam, Mohammed A.; Yousif, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an atopic condition of the esophagus that has become increasingly recognized over the last decade. It is associated with a variety of esophageal symptoms such as dysphagia, food impaction and chest pain. Diagnosis of the disorder is dependent on the patient’s clinical presentation and histological findings on esophageal mucosal biopsies. Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis should be referred to an allergist for optimal management since studies suggest a link between allergies and EE. Management includes modifications of diet, medication therapy and mechanical dilation of the esophagus. This brief report provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and a case from our encounter with a patient with EE.

  10. Investigation of compensatory postures with videofluoromanometry in dysphagia patients

    PubMed Central

    Solazzo, Antonio; Monaco, Luigi; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Tamburrini, Stefania; Iacobellis, Francesca; Berritto, Daniela; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Reginelli, Alfonso; Di Martino, Natale; Grassi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of head compensatory postures to ensure safe oropharyngeal transit. METHODS: A total of 321 dysphagia patients were enrolled and assessed with videofluoromanometry (VFM). The dysphagia patients were classified as follows: safe transit; penetration without aspiration; aspiration before, during or after swallowing; multiple aspirations and no transit. The patients with aspiration or no transit were tested with VFM to determine whether compensatory postures could correct their swallowing disorder. RESULTS: VFM revealed penetration without aspiration in 71 patients (22.1%); aspiration before swallowing in 17 patients (5.3%); aspiration during swallowing in 32 patients (10%); aspiration after swallowing in 21 patients (6.5%); multiple aspirations in six patients (1.9%); no transit in five patients (1.6%); and safe transit in 169 patients (52.6%). Compensatory postures guaranteed a safe transit in 66/75 (88%) patients with aspiration or no transit. A chin-down posture achieved a safe swallow in 42/75 (56%) patients, a head-turned posture in 19/75 (25.3%) and a hyperextended head posture in 5/75 (6.7%). The compensatory postures were not effective in 9/75 (12%) cases. CONCLUSION: VFM allows the speech-language the-rapist to choose the most effective compensatory posture without a trial-and-error process and check the effectiveness of the posture. PMID:22736921

  11. Cervical esophageal dysphagia: indications for and results of cricopharyngeal myotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, F H; Crozier, R E

    1981-01-01

    Twenty patients with cervical esophageal dysphagia were treated by cricopharyngeal myotomy. Of these 20 patients, ten had pharyngoesophageal diverticula, four had a hypertensive upper esophageal sphincter (UES), four had bulbar palsy, and two has miscellaneous forms of cricopharyngeal dysfunction. Preoperative esophageal manometric examination revealed mean UES pressures of 37.2 mmHg +/- 4.8 SEM in patients with diverticula-markedly lower (p = 0.01) than in normal patients (55.9 mmHg +/- 5.0 SEM). In patients with hypertensive UES the mean pressure was 166.2 mmHg +/- 13.4, significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than normal. Incoordination of the deglutitive response of the UES characterised by premature relaxation and contraction was present in all patients with diverticula and in one other patient. Another patient exhibited incomplete sphincteric relaxation (achalasia). A 4-5 cm myotomy of the cricopharyngeus muscle and adjacent esophageal muscle was performed in all patients. On the patients with diverticula two also had diverticulectomy. No patient with bulbar palsy was benefited. All other patients were relieved of dysphagia by the operation, with the exception of one patient with a diverticulum. A subsequent diverticulectomy was required in this patient. Postoperative manometric examination revealed an average decrease in UES pressure of 63% and an average decreased in length of the high pressure zone of 1.4 cm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6791598

  12. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  13. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-03-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as "dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration". Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people.

  14. Older people with dysphagia: transitioning to texture-modified food.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sandra; Crichton, Jonathan

    Older people with dysphagia are at high risk of malnutrition. To maintain safe oral and nutritional intake, solid food may be texture-modified. Little is known about the transition experiences of older people who move from normal to texture-modified foods. The aim of this study was to describe residents' experiences as they transitioned from normal food to texture-modified food. The study used a qualitative descriptive design and individual interviews were conducted with a study group of 28 participants (residents, family members, nursing and care staff, and speech and language therapists). The interviews were thematically analysed. The findings suggest that transition creates the risk of distress, reducing eating to a matter of necessity and hunger, and that the process is perceived as abrupt, and characterised by lack of communication and awareness of the need for change. A key finding is that the language used during transition can be adversely affected by the management of risk. This language promotes a culture of care that emphasises the limitations of residents, reduces their motivation to eat and hinders the delivery of person-centred care. The findings suggest that care facilities for older people need to revisit their dysphagia management protocols to ensure that they support a person-centred approach for recipients of texture-modified food.

  15. [Gelatinous nutritional supplements: a useful alternative in dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Busto, F; Andía Muñoz, V; Sarabia, M; Ruiz de Alegría, L; González de Viñaspre, I; López-Molina, N; Cabo Santillán, N

    2011-01-01

    The oropharingeal dysphagia is a very prevalent syndrome among the elderly, and even more among institutionalized individuals. Dysphagia is frequently caused by neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular conditions, the dementia syndrome being the most common of them, where the latest stages of the process are often accompanied by frequent swallowing problems requiring to incorporate thick foodstuffs in the diet of the elderly, such as the pudding. Nutritional supplements with a puddinglike consistency are not financed by the National Health System. Therefore, when they are needed, patients must either pay their full price for them or thicken the liquid supplements financed by the National Health System. This is normally done in an individualized way, through the powder thickeners in the market. It is a very laborious and highly changeable process regarding the resulting consistency, with a poor homogeneous aspect; thus, it is complicated to implement this method in big community dwelling. We hereby present a different way to use these financed supplements, this is: mixing them up with commercial jelly resulting in a refined product with a homogeneous texture. These supplements will remain stable in their composition and safe to be used within 5 days.

  16. Dysphagia, short-term outcomes, and cost of care after anterior cervical disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Starmer, Heather M; Riley, Lee H; Hillel, Alexander T; Akst, Lee M; Best, Simon R A; Gourin, Christine G

    2014-02-01

    Dysphonia and dysphagia are common complications of anterior cervical discectomy (ACD). We sought to determine the relationship between dysphagia and in-hospital mortality, complications, speech therapy/dysphagia training, length of hospitalization, and costs associated with ACD. Discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1,649,871 patients who underwent ACD of fewer than four vertebrae for benign acquired disease between 2001 and 2010 were analyzed using cross-tabulations and multivariate regression modeling. Dysphagia was reported in 32,922 cases (2.0 %). Speech therapy/dysphagia training was reported in less than 0.1 % of all cases and in only 0.2 % of patients with dysphagia. Dysphagia was significantly associated with age ≥65 years (OR = 1.5 [95 % CI 1.4-1.7], P < 0.001), advanced comorbidity (OR = 2.3 [2.0-2.6], P < 0.001), revision surgery (OR = 2.7 [2.3-3.1], P < 0.001), disc prosthesis placement (OR = 1.5 [1.0-2.0], P = 0.029), and vocal cord paralysis (OR = 11.6 [8.3-16.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia was a significant predictor of aspiration pneumonia (OR = 8.6 [6.7-10.9], P < 0.001), tracheostomy (OR = 2.3 [1.6-3.3], P < 0.001), gastrostomy (OR = 30.9 [25.3-37.8], P < 0.001), and speech therapy/dysphagia training (OR = 32.0 [15.4-66.4], P < 0.001). Aspiration pneumonia was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (OR = 15.9 [11.0-23.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia, vocal cord paralysis, and aspiration pneumonia were significant predictors of increased length of hospitalization and hospital-related costs, with aspiration pneumonia having the single largest impact on length of hospitalization and costs. Dysphagia is significantly associated with increased morbidity, length of hospitalization, and hospital-related costs in ACD patients. Despite the known risk of dysphagia in ACD patients and an established role for the speech-language pathologist in dysphagia management, speech-language pathology

  17. Reconstructive and rehabilitating methods in patients with dysphagia and nutritional disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Motsch, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    As diverse as the causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia can be, as broad is the range of potential therapeutical approaches. In the past two decades, methods of plastic-reconstructive surgery, in particular microsurgically revascularised tissue transfer and minimally invasive, endoscopic techniques of every hue have substantially added to the portfolio of reconstructive surgery available for rehabilitating deglutition. Numerically, reconstructing the pharyngolaryngeal tract following resection of squamous-cell carcinomas in the oral cavity, the pharynx and the larynx has been gaining ground, as has functional deglutitive therapy performed to treat posttherapeutical sequelae. Dysphagia and malnutrition are closely interrelated. Every third patient hospitalised in Germany suffers from malnutrition; ENT tumour patients are not excluded. For patients presenting with advancing malnutrition, the mortality, the morbidity and the individual complication rate have all been observed to increase; also a longer duration of stay in hospital has been noted and a lesser individual toleration of treatment, diminished immunocompetence, impaired general physical and psychical condition and, thus, a less favourable prognosis on the whole. Therefore, in oncological patients, the dietotherapy will have to assume a key role in supportive treatment. It is just for patients, who are expected to go through a long process of deglutitive rehabilitation, that enteral nutrition through percutaneous endoscopically controlled gastrostomy (PEG) performed at an early stage can provide useful and efficient support to the therapeutic efforts. Nutrition and oncology are mutually influencing fields where, sooner or later, a change in paradigms will have to take place, i.e. gradually switching from therapy to prevention. While cancer causes malnutrition, feasible changes in feeding and nutrition-associated habits, including habitual drinking and smoking, might lower the incidence of cancer worldwide by 30

  18. Implementing oral care to reduce aspiration pneumonia amongst patients with dysphagia in a South African setting.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Jaishika; Penn, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Oral care is a crucial routine for patients with dysphagia that, when completed routinely, can prevent the development of aspiration pneumonia. There is no standardised protocol for oral care within government hospitals in South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the outcome of an oral care protocol. Participants were patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, with either stroke or traumatic brain injury as the underlying medical pathology, and nurses. All participants were recruited from one tertiary level government hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. 139 nurses participated in the study and received training on the oral care protocol. There were two groups of participants with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Group one (study group, n = 23) was recruited by consecutive sampling, received regular oral care and were not restricted from drinking water; however, all other liquids were restricted. Group two (comparison group, n = 23) was recruited via a retrospective record review, received inconsistent oral care and were placed on thickened liquids or liquid restricted diets. Results showed that a regimen of regular oral care and free water provision when combined with dysphagia intervention did prevent aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The article highlights two key findings: that regular and routine oral care is manageable within an acute government hospital context and a strict routine of oral care can reduce aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. An implication from these findings is confirmation that teamwork in acute care settings in developing contexts must be prioritised to improve dysphagia management and patient prognosis. PMID:26974243

  19. Malnutrition and Dysphagia in long-term care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Ashwini M; Steele, Catriona M

    2015-01-01

    Determining the co-occurrence of malnutrition and dysphagia is important to understand the extent to which swallowing impairment contributes to poor food intake in long-term care (LTC). This review investigated the impact of dysphagia on malnutrition in LTC by synthesizing the results of published literature. Seven electronic databases were used to search for English-language publications reporting malnutrition and dysphagia in LTC facilities from 1946 to 2013. Fourteen studies were eligible for inclusion. Overall, the literature on the co-occurrence of malnutrition and dysphagia in LTC shows a paucity of high-quality evidence. Articles reviewed lacked consistent definitions for both conditions. Methods used to confirm each diagnosis also differed and were of questionable validity. Based on a review of the literature, evidence of the existence of concurrent concerns with respect to malnutrition and dysphagia emerges. The reported frequency of participants in LTC with dysphagia ranges from 7% to 40%, while the percentage of those who were malnourished ranges from 12% to 54%. Due to discrepancies used to describe and measure these conditions, it is difficult to determine the exact prevalence of either condition separately, or in combination. Consequently, the impact of dysphagia on malnutrition must be considered and studied using valid definitions and measures.

  20. Self-reported dysphagia and its correlates within a prevalent population of people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard W; Dunn, Janet R; Gray, William K

    2011-03-01

    Many people with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience dysphagia; however, the prevalence of dysphagia in people with PD is unknown. We studied a prevalent population of PD cases. All of those who consented to participate were assessed for anxiety, depression, cognitive function, and quality of life using standard rating scales. Anyone who answered "yes" to either one of the two questions: Do you have difficulty swallowing food/liquid or tablets? and Do you cough after eating/drinking? was considered to have dysphagia. Question 7 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was also used to identify dysphagia. Of 106 prevalent PD cases, 75 (38 males) patients consented to examination and assessment. The prevalence of dysphagia was 32.0% (n=24; 11 males). Using the response to UPDRS Question 7 as an indicator of the impact of swallowing problems on the patient, there were significant correlations with cognitive function, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and UPDRS-reported gait disturbance, postural instability and problems with falling. There was no correlation with disease duration, age, or gender. Almost one third of the participants reported dysphagia. There was a strong correlation between dysphagia and gross motor skills; patients reporting such problems should be screened for swallowing problems.

  1. Implementing oral care to reduce aspiration pneumonia amongst patients with dysphagia in a South African setting.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Jaishika; Penn, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Oral care is a crucial routine for patients with dysphagia that, when completed routinely, can prevent the development of aspiration pneumonia. There is no standardised protocol for oral care within government hospitals in South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the outcome of an oral care protocol. Participants were patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, with either stroke or traumatic brain injury as the underlying medical pathology, and nurses. All participants were recruited from one tertiary level government hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. 139 nurses participated in the study and received training on the oral care protocol. There were two groups of participants with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Group one (study group, n = 23) was recruited by consecutive sampling, received regular oral care and were not restricted from drinking water; however, all other liquids were restricted. Group two (comparison group, n = 23) was recruited via a retrospective record review, received inconsistent oral care and were placed on thickened liquids or liquid restricted diets. Results showed that a regimen of regular oral care and free water provision when combined with dysphagia intervention did prevent aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The article highlights two key findings: that regular and routine oral care is manageable within an acute government hospital context and a strict routine of oral care can reduce aspiration pneumonia in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. An implication from these findings is confirmation that teamwork in acute care settings in developing contexts must be prioritised to improve dysphagia management and patient prognosis.

  2. Relapse with Dysphagia in a Case of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Hiroko; Morita, Akihiko; Hara, Makoto; Ninomiya, Satoko; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kamei, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glossopharyngeal and/or vagus nerve involvement is infrequent in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). We herein report the case of a 69-year-old Japanese woman who presented with muscle weakness and numbness of the extremities with dysphagia. The serum anti-ganglioside GM1 immunoglobulin IgM antibody levels were elevated, and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) resulted in a dramatic improvement; the weakness, numbness and dysphagia all resolved. However, relapse comprising dysphagia alone occurred on hospital day 26, and treatment with IVIg again proved extremely effective. IVIg therapy can be effective against cranial nerve involvement in cases of CIDP.

  3. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  4. A rare cause of pediatric dysphagia: posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Rarely do orthopedic injuries in children present with dysphagia. Acute onset dysphagia after falling or getting tackled with subtle symptoms or unremarkable physical examination findings should raise suspicion for posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ). A case is described and used to highlight an uncommon cause of dysphagia in children. It can be easily missed because the presenting symptoms and physical examination findings are subtle. Standard radiographs are not sufficient for diagnosis, and a high degree of suspicion is necessary to pursue further diagnostic studies. Open reduction and internal fixation can be effective for improving their symptoms, often immediately postoperatively.

  5. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia--Kommerell's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Pathik; Nasa, Mukesh; Patil, Sandeep; Patel, Jatin; Bhate, Prasad; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    A right-sided aortic arch with an aneurysm of the aberrant subclavian artery is a rare disease. We report a case of Kommerell's diverticulum of an aberrant left subclavian artery in a patient with a right-sided aortic arch with associated ventricular septal defect. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in literature so far. Our patient presented with short duration of dysphagia without any syncope or left subclavian steal syndrome. The major morbidity was caused by Barrett's oesophagus with reflux and a mixed paraoesophageal and hiatal hernia. There was associated psoriasis. An attempt at repair was not undertaken because of the high operative risk and a small aneurysm. Left thoracotomy for direct repair of Kommerell's diverticulum is a simple and safe method.

  6. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high

  7. Diagnostic Assessment and Management of Dysphagia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Virginia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A growing concern in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is dysphagia, or swallowing impairment, which leads to malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, functional decline and fear of eating and drinking, as well as a decrease in the quality of life. Thus the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with AD is imperative to ensure that they receive effective management, avoiding complications, and reducing comorbidity and mortality in such a growing population. Dysphagia management requires a multidisciplinary approach considering that no single strategy is appropriate for all patients. However, evidence for clinical diagnostic assessment, interventions, and medical management of dysphagia in these patients are still limited: few studies are reporting the evaluation and the management among this group of patients. Here we analyzed the most recent findings in diagnostic assessment and management of swallowing impairment in patients affected by AD. PMID:26836016

  8. The challenges of dysphagia management and rehabilitation after extensive thermal burn injury: a complex case.

    PubMed

    Rumbach, Anna F; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; Bassett, Lynell V; Muller, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The role of the speech pathologist in the burns population is still emerging, with detailed discussion of the assessment and management of dysphagia limited to date. This report describes the case of a 60-year-old man who developed severe contractures of the head and neck and oropharyngeal dysphagia after sustaining 53.5% deep partial- and full-thickness burns. Although some aspects of rehabilitation were confounded by a preexisting mild intellectual disability, the patient was able to participate in an intensive regimen of active and passive exercise to rehabilitate his oropharyngeal dysphagia. Significant oral contractures remained; however, the patient was discharged without tracheostomy and consuming a texture-modified diet with no signs of aspiration. To our knowledge, this is one of a small handful of reports that document speech pathology management of the burns population, and a first that identifies and outlines specific characteristics of, and rehabilitation strategies for, dysphagia in a burned individual.

  9. Thickening agents used for dysphagia management: effect on bioavailability of water, medication and feelings of satiety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is the medical term for difficulty swallowing. Thickened liquids are often used in the management of dysphagia to improve bolus control and to help prevent aspiration. A range of starches and gums has historically been used to thicken liquids. Although thickened liquids improve swallow safety, they appear to have a great potential for unintended physiological consequences. Initial concerns were raised about the impact of thickeners on water binding due to the high prevalence of dehydration amongst individuals with dysphagia. Thankfully, regardless of thickening agent, thickeners do not affect water bioavailability. This effect holds true even for extremely thick fluids. However, bioavailability of medication is impaired with viscous substances. Liquids thickened to as little as 150 mPa.s retards drug release. In addition, feelings of satiety and thirst increase with increasingly viscous fluids. Flavour deteriorates with increasing thickness regardless of thickening agent. Therapeutically clinicians often prescribe small volumes of thickened liquids, consumed often. Yet small volumes of thick substances consumed with a long oral processing time, which is common for individuals with dysphagia, reduces the amount consumed. A combination of poor flavour, and increasing feelings of fullness result in little motivation and poor physiologic drive to consume thickened liquids. This review provides evidence from the dysphagia, pharmaceutical and food technology literature to show unintended side effects of thickened liquids that contribute to dehydration and potential sub-theraputic medication levels for individuals with dysphagia. The physical property of viscosity rather than a particular thickening agent appears to be key. Provision of “spoon-thick” or “extremely thick liquids” is particularly likely to contribute to dehydration and poor bioavailability of solid dose medication. Clinicians are encouraged to prescribe the minimal level of thickness

  10. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  11. Poststroke dysphagia rehabilitation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a noncontrolled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Verin, E; Leroi, A M

    2009-06-01

    Poststroke dysphagia is frequent and significantly increases patient mortality. In two thirds of cases there is a spontaneous improvement in a few weeks, but in the other third, oropharyngeal dysphagia persists. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is known to excite or inhibit cortical neurons, depending on stimulation frequency. The aim of this noncontrolled pilot study was to assess the feasibility and the effects of 1-Hz rTMS, known to have an inhibitory effect, on poststroke dysphagia. Seven patients (3 females, age = 65 +/- 10 years), with poststroke dysphagia due to hemispheric or subhemispheric stroke more than 6 months earlier (56 +/- 50 months) diagnosed by videofluoroscopy, participated in the study. rTMS at 1 Hz was applied for 20 min per day every day for 5 days to the healthy hemisphere to decrease transcallosal inhibition. The evaluation was performed using the dysphagia handicap index and videofluoroscopy. The dysphagia handicap index demonstrated that the patients had mild oropharyngeal dysphagia. Initially, the score was 43 +/- 9 of a possible 120 which decreased to 30 +/- 7 (p < 0.05) after rTMS. After rTMS, there was an improvement of swallowing coordination, with a decrease in swallow reaction time for liquids (p = 0.0506) and paste (p < 0.01), although oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, and laryngeal closure duration were not modified. Aspiration score significantly decreased for liquids (p < 0.05) and residue score decreased for paste (p < 0.05). This pilot study demonstrated that rTMS is feasible in poststroke dysphagia and improves swallowing coordination. Our results now need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study with a larger patient population.

  12. Symptomatic Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Causing Dysphagia: Case Report, Imaging, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kwang; Tharin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are found in 20-30% of elderly patients. Rarely, severe osteophytes can cause dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. Here, we illustrate a case of severe dysphagia caused by a large post-traumatic osteophyte with oropharyngeal swallow study showing a significant mass effect on the pharynx and resolution following osteophytectomy. We also review the literature regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophytes.  PMID:27004150

  13. Quality of life in oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Baijens, Laura W; Vrijenhoef, Femke H; Otters, Elsemieke F; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C

    2011-12-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questionnaires on quality of life related to oropharyngeal dysphagia (the SWAL-QOL, the MDADI, and the DHI) as well as a simple one-item visual analog Dysphagia Severity Scale. None of the quality-of-life questionnaires showed any floor or ceiling effect. The test-retest reliability of the MDADI and the Dysphagia Severity Scale proved to be good. The test-retest reliability of the DHI could not be determined because of insufficient data, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were rather high. The internal consistency proved to be good. However, confirmatory factor analysis could not distinguish the underlying constructs as defined by the subscales per questionnaire. When assessing criterion validity, both the MDADI and the DHI showed satisfactory associations with the SWAL-QOL (reference or gold standard) after having removed the less relevant subscales of the SWAL-QOL. In conclusion, when assessing the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the DHI or the MDADI, not all psychometric properties have been adequately met. In general, because of difficulties in the interpretation of study results when using questionnaires lacking sufficient psychometric quality, it is recommended that researchers strive to use questionnaires with the most optimal psychometric properties.

  14. Validation of the Persian version of the dysphagia handicap index in patients with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barzegar-Bafrooei, Ebrahim; Bakhtiary, Jalal; Khatoonabadi, Ahmad Reza; Fatehi, Farzad; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Fathali, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia as a common condition affecting many aspects of the patient’s life. The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is a reliable self-reported questionnaire developed specifically to measure the impact of dysphagia on the patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to translate the questionnaire to Persian and to measure its validity and reliability in patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods: A formal forward-backward translation of DHI was performed based on the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. A total of 57 patients with neurogenic dysphagia who were referred to the neurology clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, participated in this study. Internal consistency reliability of the DHI was examined using Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability of the scale was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The internal consistency of the Persian DHI (P-DHI) was considered to be good; Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total P-DHI was 0.88. The test-retest reliability for the total and three subscales of the P-DHI ranged from 0.95 to 0.98 using ICC. Conclusion: The P-DHI demonstrated a good reliability, and it can be a valid instrument for evaluating the dysphagia effects on quality of life among Persian language population. PMID:27648173

  15. Dysphagia due to oesophageal obstruction: A case report of unusual occupational aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Makaram, Navnit; Gohil, Rohit; Majumdar, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report the rare case of a patient presenting with dysphagia secondary to a large vertebral osteophyte, which formed from his previous occupation. Presentation of case A 76-year-old gentleman presented with a year-long history of dysphagia to solids, at the laryngeal level. He was otherwise well, with no red-flag symptoms. Nasoendoscopy showed a left-sided bulge obstructing the piriform fossa. Barium swallow demonstrated a large C4/C5 vertebral osteophyte. Excluding other abnormalities the patient's dysphagia was determined to be due to the osteophyte. The patient mentioned carrying large (50 kg) bags of coal for his previous occupation. This chronic trauma was concluded to be the cause for the osteophyte. Discussion We use this case as an opportunity to outline mechanism of swallowing, and the causes and classification of dysphagia are additionally described. We also review the literature regarding vertebral osteophytes to contextualise the rarity of this case, especially in regard to the strong occupational association. Conclusion A structured and thorough history and examination in dysphagia is emphasized. It is important to enquire about ‘red-flag’ symptoms, suggestive of head and neck or upper gastrointestinal malignancy. Barium swallow is a critical investigation in dysphagia-it can also demonstrate large bony abnormalities, which is a rare causative factor. PMID:26693007

  16. Validation of the Persian version of the dysphagia handicap index in patients with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barzegar-Bafrooei, Ebrahim; Bakhtiary, Jalal; Khatoonabadi, Ahmad Reza; Fatehi, Farzad; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Fathali, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia as a common condition affecting many aspects of the patient’s life. The Dysphagia Handicap Index (DHI) is a reliable self-reported questionnaire developed specifically to measure the impact of dysphagia on the patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to translate the questionnaire to Persian and to measure its validity and reliability in patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods: A formal forward-backward translation of DHI was performed based on the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. A total of 57 patients with neurogenic dysphagia who were referred to the neurology clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, participated in this study. Internal consistency reliability of the DHI was examined using Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability of the scale was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The internal consistency of the Persian DHI (P-DHI) was considered to be good; Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the total P-DHI was 0.88. The test-retest reliability for the total and three subscales of the P-DHI ranged from 0.95 to 0.98 using ICC. Conclusion: The P-DHI demonstrated a good reliability, and it can be a valid instrument for evaluating the dysphagia effects on quality of life among Persian language population.

  17. Effect of Laryngopharyngeal Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Dysphonia Accompanied by Dysphagia in Post-stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of laryngopharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on dysphonia in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Eighteen patients participated in this study. The subjects were divided into NMES (n=12) and conventional swallowing training only (CST, n=6) groups. The NMES group received NMES combined with CST for 2 weeks, followed by CST without NMES for the next 2 weeks. The CST group received only CST for 4 weeks. All of the patients were evaluated before and at 2 and 4 weeks into the study. The outcome measurements included perceptual, acoustic and aerodynamic analyses. The correlation between dysphonia and swallowing function was also investigated. Results There were significant differences in the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain scale) total score and sound pressure level (SPL) between the two groups over time. The NMES relative to the CST group showed significant improvements in total GRBAS score and SPL at 2 weeks, though no inter-group differences were evident at 4 weeks. The improvement of the total GRBAS scores at 2 weeks was positively correlated with the improved pharyngeal phase scores on the functional dysphagia scale at 2 weeks. Conclusion The results demonstrate that laryngopharyngeal NMES in post-stroke or TBI patients with dysphonia can have promising effects on phonation. Therefore, laryngopharyngeal NMES may be considered as an additional treatment option for dysphonia accompanied by dysphagia after stroke or TBI.

  18. Effect of Laryngopharyngeal Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Dysphonia Accompanied by Dysphagia in Post-stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of laryngopharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on dysphonia in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Eighteen patients participated in this study. The subjects were divided into NMES (n=12) and conventional swallowing training only (CST, n=6) groups. The NMES group received NMES combined with CST for 2 weeks, followed by CST without NMES for the next 2 weeks. The CST group received only CST for 4 weeks. All of the patients were evaluated before and at 2 and 4 weeks into the study. The outcome measurements included perceptual, acoustic and aerodynamic analyses. The correlation between dysphonia and swallowing function was also investigated. Results There were significant differences in the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain scale) total score and sound pressure level (SPL) between the two groups over time. The NMES relative to the CST group showed significant improvements in total GRBAS score and SPL at 2 weeks, though no inter-group differences were evident at 4 weeks. The improvement of the total GRBAS scores at 2 weeks was positively correlated with the improved pharyngeal phase scores on the functional dysphagia scale at 2 weeks. Conclusion The results demonstrate that laryngopharyngeal NMES in post-stroke or TBI patients with dysphonia can have promising effects on phonation. Therefore, laryngopharyngeal NMES may be considered as an additional treatment option for dysphonia accompanied by dysphagia after stroke or TBI. PMID:27606266

  19. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge involving a case of dysphagia in association with cervical osteophytosis and a dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Dable, Rajani A.; Wasnik, Pradnya B.; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L.; Ali, Mukkaram Faridi

    2013-01-01

    Herein, presenting a case of a 42-year-old female with the chief complaint of dysphagia. The problem was assumed to be of dental origin, due to the onset of dental pain followed by dysphagia. A cervical radiograph revealed the presence of osteophytic lipping which proved to be the cause of dysphagia. Confusing and overlapping disease entities showing similar symptoms need thorough investigation. Dysphagia related to cervical spondylosis may have a direct connection with the person's occupation. Dentistry is considered a potentially hazardous occupation with regard to musculoskeletal disorders. However, additional studies are required to understand the occupational hazards faced by dentists. PMID:24250178

  20. Hyoid and laryngeal excursion kinematics - magnitude, duration and velocity - changes following successful exercise-based dysphagia rehabilitation: MDTP.

    PubMed

    Sia, I; Carvajal, P; Lacy, A A; Carnaby, G D; Crary, M A

    2015-05-01

    Variability in magnitude of deglutitional hyolaryngeal excursion in patients with dysphagia suggests that it does not adequately represent the kinematics of swallowing difficulties or recovery following rehabilitation. On the other hand, reduced hyolaryngeal excursion velocity has been reported in patients with dysphagia. While increased movement velocity often accompanies clinical and functional recovery in many diseases, velocity changes in swallowing-related movement following dysphagia therapy have not been well studied. This study evaluated changes in hyoid and laryngeal excursion (magnitude, duration and velocity) before and following successful dysphagia therapy to provide a more comprehensive representation of improvement to swallowing kinematics in patients who have experienced successful rehabilitation. A secondary analysis of case series data was completed. Eight patients with severe, chronic dysphagia completed a standard course of an exercise-based dysphagia treatment programme (McNeill dysphagia therapy program, MDTP). Pre- and post-treatment, kinematic aspects of swallowing were evaluated for thin liquid, thick liquid and pudding swallows. Maximum hyoid and laryngeal excursion magnitude and excursion duration were measured. Excursion velocities were calculated from excursion magnitude and duration measures. Successful treatment for dysphagia facilitated increased hyolaryngeal excursion magnitude, duration and velocity. These changes were most prominent for the hyoid and most often observed with thin liquids. By examining hyoid and laryngeal excursion velocity in patients who have experienced successful dysphagia rehabilitation, this study demonstrated the value of evaluating spatial and temporal aspects of swallowing kinematics in a single measure for a more comprehensive representation of positive changes underlying functional recovery.

  1. Congenital Esophageal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Dysphagia in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Mohite, Ashok R.; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital embryonal gastrointestinal (GI) malformation which is diagnosed most commonly in childhood. In adults, they can present with a variety of symptoms ranging from dysphagia, chest pain, epigastric discomfort, and vomiting to more serious complications including infections, hemorrhage, and ulcerations. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressive dysphagia to solids for 4 months without significant weight loss. Clinical examination and routine laboratory examination were unrevealing. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a well-defined submucosal lesion bulging into the esophageal lumen involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal esophagus. The overlying mucosa was normal with mild luminal narrowing but gastroscope could be negotiated across this narrowing. Differential diagnosis included lipoma, leiomyoma or GI stromal tumors. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of thorax revealed a 3.5 × 2.3 × 3 cm well-defined homogenous hypodense lesion involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal thoracic esophagus with likely possibility of submucosal or intramural lesion. Subsequently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a 3.3 × 2.8 cm homogenous hypoechoic lesion without any vascularity involving the distal esophagus wall suggestive of duplication cyst. The lesion was intramural in location as muscularis propria was seen to go around the lesion. Bronchogenic cyst was excluded due to absence of cartilage and close proximity of the cyst to lumen. Fine-needle aspiration was not attempted in view of high risk of introducing infection. Being symptomatic, the patient underwent complete surgical excision of the cyst with exteriorization of the base which on histopathology confirmed duplication cyst. Esophageal duplication cysts are exceedingly rare congenital embryonal malformations with estimated prevalence of 0.0122% arising from aberration of posterior division of embryonic foregut at 3 - 4 weeks of

  2. Skeletal muscle mass is associated with severe dysphagia in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Matsushima, Masato; Uwano, Rimiko; Watanabe, Naoko; Oritsu, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the association between skeletal muscle mass, activities of daily living (ADLs) and severe dysphagia in cancer patients. Methods A nested case-control study was performed in 111 consecutive cancer patients with dysphagia who were prescribed speech therapy. Skeletal muscle mass comprising the cross-sectional area of the left and right psoas muscles was assessed via abdominal computed tomography at the third lumbar vertebral level. ADLs were evaluated by the Barthel Index. The severity of dysphagia was assessed by the Food Intake Level Scale and was characterized by non-oral feeding or oral food intake at discharge. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between dysphagia, skeletal muscle index (SMI) and ADLs. Results There were 86 men and 25 women (mean age, 70 years). The mean SMI was 5.68 ± 1.74 cm2/m2 in men and 4.43 ± 1.21 cm2/m2 in women. The median Barthel Index score was 20. Thirty-three patients were on non-oral feeding at discharge. The mean SMI did not differ significantly between non-oral feeding and oral food intake groups in t-test. The median Barthel Index score was lower in the non-oral feeding group in Mann–Whitney U test. Logistic regression analysis of the severity of dysphagia adjusted for age, sex, SMI, Barthel Index score, serum albumin, cancer type and stage, and vocal cord paralysis showed that SMI was associated independently with oral food intake at discharge. Barthel Index score showed a tendency to be associated with oral food intake. Conclusions Skeletal muscle mass is associated with severe dysphagia in cancer patients. ADLs show a tendency to be associated with severe dysphagia in cancer patients. PMID:26673551

  3. Practice Variation in Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube Placement: Trends and Predictors among Providers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Day, Lukejohn W.; Nazareth, Michelle; Sewell, Justin L.; Williams, J. Lucas; Lieberman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enteral access placement is performed among a variety of providers and specialties, yet there is a dearth of literature on trends and factors related to enteral access placement in the United States. Objective To examine trends in the incidence of enteral access procedures performed by gastroenterologists in the United States. Design Retrospective review of upper endoscopic procedures that involved percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement between 2000 and 2010 was performed. Setting Endoscopy sites participating in the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (CORI). Patients Patients undergoing an upper endoscopy. Intervention PEG tube placement. Main Outcome Measurements Number of PEG tubes placed. Results Overall PEG tube placement by a provider from 2000-2010 was 1.7% (number of PEG tubes performed/number of upper endoscopies performed) with the majority of them being performed by gastroenterologists. Very young and very old, non-white racial background (Hispanic OR 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13-1.28; blacks OR 2.24; 95% CI, 2.12-2.36) and males (OR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.39-1.50) were patient characteristics associated with greater PEG tube placement. In terms of practice setting, PEG tube placement occurred more frequently in a community/HMO environment and the East Coast. With respect to provider characteristics, male providers were less likely than females to perform a PEG tube (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.64-0.71) and there was a trend that as providers were further out of medical school they were less likely to perform a PEG tube procedure. Interestingly, surgeons (OR 6.69; 95% CI, 6.18-7.24) and other providers (non-pediatric/non-general practitioner) (OR 3.22; 95% CI, 2.63-3.94) were more likely to perform PEG tubes than gastroenterologists. Limitations Participation in CORI is voluntary and may not capture data on non-GI providers. Conclusions Significant practice variation was noted in PEG tube placement in the United States with respect to patient and provider characteristics, geographic region and endoscopy settings. PMID:25845635

  4. The Experiences of Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer With a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Janna P Y; Stokes, Edith J; Posluns, Elaine C; Fitch, Margaret I; McAndrew, Alison; Vandenbussche, Katherine A

    2014-05-28

    Background: While the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube has become an established part of the management regimen for patients with head and neck cancer (HNCA) with impaired nutrition and functional status, limited research has explored the impact and experiences of living with a PEG tube from the patient's perspective. This qualitative study serves as a follow-up investigation undertaken to describe the experiences of patients with advanced HNCA living with a PEG tube. Materials and Methods: Eligible patients from convenience sampling were invited to participate until data saturation was reached. In-depth interviews were conducted with consenting participants. Qualitative descriptive design guided the content analysis of the interview transcripts. Results: Of the 49 patients invited, a total of 15 participants' interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Each interview was 15-90 minutes in length. Four of 22 content codes were chosen to describe the overarching ideas of the progressive experience of a patient's journey from the initial decision-making process around tube insertion through to its removal. Difficulty swallowing and weight loss emerged as primary factors for PEG tube insertion, and all participants became accustomed to living with the tube. Resuming a complete oral diet was a gradual transition. All participants recognized the value of the tube, and most acknowledged its necessity for their survival. Conclusions: Results describe the overall PEG tube experience as a dichotomy. While there were issues with the PEG tube, all participants found the tube to be beneficial. This study provides invaluable insight from a practice perspective. PMID:24871492

  5. Healing of a pyoderma gangrenosum at the site of a percutaneous endoscopically sited gastrostomy tube without tube removal

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Charles; Wright, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare but important cause of pain and morbidity, and is associated with malignancy and shows pathergy. Occurrence at a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) site is rare and may prompt PEG tube removal. This case describes management of PG at a PEG site in a man with squamous cell carcinoma of the orophayrnx. Successful healing of the lesion was achieved despite the PEG tube remaining in situ. Care was delivered within the hospice setting with support from the local dermatology service. Infection of the wound was treated with a recently licensed antimicrobial with a novel action. This allowed nutrition to continue, promoting healing further and ensuring a route of delivery for medications, avoiding intravenous therapy. PMID:25239986

  6. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not. PMID:26264109

  7. Differential Progression of Dysphagia in Heredity and Sporadic Ataxias Involving Multiple Systems.

    PubMed

    Isono, Chiharu; Hirano, Makito; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic ataxia affecting multiple systems, such as cerebellar, extrapyramidal, and autonomic systems, is known as multiple system atrophy cerebellar type (MSA-C), while similar multisystem involvements are seen in certain types of hereditary ataxia, such as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). Dysphagia is a common symptom that can predispose to aspiration pneumonia, a major cause of death in patients with these diseases. Although the progressions of dysphagia in patients with MSA-C have been reported sporadically, those in SCA3 have not been reported. We retrospectively compared the results of repetitive videofluoroscopic examinations in patients with SCA3 (n = 6) and in those with MSA-C (n = 7). The result showed that the gross progression of dysphagia was significantly slower in patients with SCA3 than in those with MSA-C, but the maximum progression speeds were not significantly different. The dysphagia severities were not associated with impaired activity of daily living evaluated by the Barthel index in MSA-C, but were associated in SCA3. Despite the small number of patients enrolled, these data suggest that physicians should monitor swallowing functions in patients with SCA3 after mild dysphagia develops because it may progress as rapidly as it does in MSA-C.

  8. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p < 0.001) and central neurologic insult. In general, dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology.

  9. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  10. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p < 0.001) and central neurologic insult. In general, dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology. PMID:27106909

  11. Small caliber covered self-expanding metal stents in the management of malignant dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Stephen; Barthel, James; Klapman, Jason; Shridhar, Ravi; Hoffe, Sarah; Harris, Cynthia; Almhanna, Khaldoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of large caliber [≥18 mm body diameter (BD)] self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for management of malignant dysphasia is associated with substantial adverse event (AE) and mortality rates (MRs). We sought to determine dysphagia response, stent migration rates, and AE and MRs, for small caliber covered SEMS (sccSEMS) with BDs between 10–16 mm in malignant dysphagia. Methods Thirty-one patients underwent direct endoscopic placement of 50 sccSEMS between January 2008 and March 2011. Patients were monitored for change in dysphagia score (DS), stent migration, AEs, and death through May 2011. Results DS improved in 30 of 31 patients (97%). The median DS decreased from 3 to 2 (P<0.0001). The median effective duration of first sccSEMS placement was 116 (95% CI: 75–196) days. Major and minor AE rates were 6.5% and 19.4% respectively. No stent related deaths were encountered. The overall migration rate was 36% (18/50). The anticipated migration rate was 45.7% (16/35) and the unanticipated migration rate was 13.3% (2/15) (P=0.052). Positive effective clinical outcome occurred in 93.5% (29/31) of cases. Conclusions In malignant dysphagia, direct endoscopic sccSEMS placement provided acceptable dysphagia control and migration rates with substantial reductions in stent related AEs and MRs compared to those reported for large caliber SEMS. PMID:27284474

  12. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Claudia; Carucci, Nicolina Stefania; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryologic abnormality of the aortic arch is aberrant right subclavian artery, clinically known as arteria lusoria. This abnormality is usually silent. Here, we report a case of six-year-old child presenting to us with a history of progressive dysphagia without respiratory symptoms. A barium esophagogram showed an increase of the physiological esophageal narrowing at the level of aortic arch, while at esophagogastroduodenoscopy there was an extrinsic pulsatile compression of the posterior portion of the esophagus suggesting an extrinsic compression by an aberrant vessel. Angio-CT (computed tomography) scan confirmed the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery. PMID:26904341

  13. The Relationship Between Tongue Pressure and Oral Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationships between tongue pressure and different aspects of the oral-phase swallowing function. Methods We included 96 stroke patients with dysphagia, ranging in age from 40 to 88 years (mean, 63.7 years). Measurements of tongue pressure were obtained with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument, a device with established normative data. Three trials of maximum performance were performed for lip closure pressure (LP), anterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (AP), and posterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (PP); buccal-to-tongue pressures on both sides were also recorded (buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the weak side [BW]; buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the healthy side [BH]). The average pressure in each result was compared between the groups. Clinical evaluation of the swallowing function was performed with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Results The average maximum AP and PP values in the intact LC group were significantly higher than those in the inadequate lip closure group (AP, p=0.003; PP, p<0.001). AP and PP showed significant relationships with bolus formation (BF), mastication, premature bolus loss (PBL), tongue to palate contact (TP), and oral transit time (OTT). Furthermore, LP, BW, and BH values were significantly higher in the groups with intact mastication, without PBL and intact TP. Conclusion These findings indicate that the tongue pressure appears to be closely related to the oral-phase swallowing function in post-stroke patients, especially BF, mastication, PBL, TP and OTT. PMID:27606268

  14. The Relationship Between Tongue Pressure and Oral Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationships between tongue pressure and different aspects of the oral-phase swallowing function. Methods We included 96 stroke patients with dysphagia, ranging in age from 40 to 88 years (mean, 63.7 years). Measurements of tongue pressure were obtained with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument, a device with established normative data. Three trials of maximum performance were performed for lip closure pressure (LP), anterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (AP), and posterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (PP); buccal-to-tongue pressures on both sides were also recorded (buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the weak side [BW]; buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the healthy side [BH]). The average pressure in each result was compared between the groups. Clinical evaluation of the swallowing function was performed with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Results The average maximum AP and PP values in the intact LC group were significantly higher than those in the inadequate lip closure group (AP, p=0.003; PP, p<0.001). AP and PP showed significant relationships with bolus formation (BF), mastication, premature bolus loss (PBL), tongue to palate contact (TP), and oral transit time (OTT). Furthermore, LP, BW, and BH values were significantly higher in the groups with intact mastication, without PBL and intact TP. Conclusion These findings indicate that the tongue pressure appears to be closely related to the oral-phase swallowing function in post-stroke patients, especially BF, mastication, PBL, TP and OTT.

  15. Rehabilitation or Compensation: Time for a Fresh Perspective on Speech and Language Therapy for Dysphagia and Parkinson's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sarah K.; Roddam, Hazel; Sheldrick, Heulwen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease and can have negative consequences for physical health and quality of life. A variety of treatment options are available to clinicians working with people who have dysphagia and Parkinson's disease. These options can be broadly categorized as being compensatory or rehabilitative in…

  16. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  17. Huge Parathyroid Adenoma with Dysphagia Presentation; A Case Report from Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeean, Bizhan; Sohrabi-Nazari, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid adenoma is a benign tumor of the parathyroid glands. The cause of most parathyroid adenomas is unknown. Parathyroid adenoma increases the secretion of parathyroid hormone and results in primary hyperparathyroidism. High amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood cause the imbalance of calcium, which leads to various complications such as kidney stones, depression, lethargy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, myalgia, bone and joint pain, hoarseness, etc. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is defined as having problem in swallowing due to abnormalities in the structure and function of oropharynx and other related organs. The exact prevalence of dysphagia caused by parathyroid adenoma is unknown, but since this complication can lead to increased mortality and morbidity, its diagnosis is important. It is difficult to distinguish parathyroid malignancies from parathyroid adenoma even after surgery. Therefore, the final diagnosis is possible through surgery and histopathological evaluation. Here, a case of parathyroid adenoma with first presentation of generalized weakness and dysphagia has been reported. PMID:27582595

  18. Huge Parathyroid Adenoma with Dysphagia Presentation; A Case Report from Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Ziaeean, Bizhan; Sohrabi-Nazari, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    Parathyroid adenoma is a benign tumor of the parathyroid glands. The cause of most parathyroid adenomas is unknown. Parathyroid adenoma increases the secretion of parathyroid hormone and results in primary hyperparathyroidism. High amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood cause the imbalance of calcium, which leads to various complications such as kidney stones, depression, lethargy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, myalgia, bone and joint pain, hoarseness, etc. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is defined as having problem in swallowing due to abnormalities in the structure and function of oropharynx and other related organs. The exact prevalence of dysphagia caused by parathyroid adenoma is unknown, but since this complication can lead to increased mortality and morbidity, its diagnosis is important. It is difficult to distinguish parathyroid malignancies from parathyroid adenoma even after surgery. Therefore, the final diagnosis is possible through surgery and histopathological evaluation. Here, a case of parathyroid adenoma with first presentation of generalized weakness and dysphagia has been reported. PMID:27582595

  19. Dysphagia Lusoria: A Case of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery and a Bicarotid Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, A. D.; Nel, M.; Eloff, E. P.; Naidoo, N. G.

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia Lusoria is dysphagia secondary to an aberrant right subclavian artery that has a retroesophageal course. Adachi and Williams categorized aortic arch anomalies, showing that the right subclavian artery arising in this fashion (as the final branch of the descending aortic arch) is one of the more common. However, this very rarely coexists with a bicarotid trunk. We present such a case as it is manifested in a 36-year-old lady complaining of marked weight loss and dysphagia. The diagnosis remained elusive until a CT scan of the chest was performed; angiography further delineated the pathology. It is believed that the combination of the common carotid origins with the retroesophageal course of the aberrant vessel more frequently accounts for symptoms in the absence of an aneurysm of the origin of the aberrant vessel. Several techniques to manage the aberrant vessel have been described in the literature, but we favoured open ligation and transposition to the right carotid artery. PMID:22084776

  20. Dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat following cerebral infarction: an unexpected cause.

    PubMed

    Slade, Peter Michael Edward; Larsen, Matthew Peter

    2015-07-06

    A 75-year-old woman presented with left-sided weakness. There was no speech disturbance or reported swallowing difficulties. CT of the head revealed infarction in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. The patient was transferred to the acute stroke unit and a nasogastric tube was placed following a failed swallow screening test. The following day, on assessment, there was considerable pain on swallowing. The tone and quality of the patient's voice had deteriorated and there was significant dysphagia. Seven days later a plastic item, later identified as the patient's denture, was expectorated. Following this, the dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat rapidly resolved. The case highlights the importance of considering foreign body in the differential, and oral cavity examination in the assessment of a patient with dysphagia and sore throat is essential.

  1. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, free water protocol and quality of life: an update from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Martha; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia, typically associated with older adults, represents a spectrum of swallowing disorders with potentially serious complications and a negative impact on quality of life. A major complication of dysphagia is caused by aspiration, predominantly of thin liquids, which may cause aspiration pneumonia. Given that thin liquids are typically aspirated, the conventional therapy involves altering the diet to one consisting of modified solid consistencies and thickened fluids. While it is well known that this approach is appropriate for aspiration, it does represent difficulties with compliancy and quality of life. We have undertaken a relatively large scale clinical trial to investigate the relationships between the effects of free access to water and the development of aspiration, aspects of hydration and issues related to quality in people with dysphagia. Along with clinical observations and findings from others we have previously stratified people with dysphagia, namely those that are immobile or who have low mobility and severe degenerative neurological dysfunction, at highest risk of developing aspiration pneumonia following intake of water. In the present study, we have extended our previous clinical results. Our findings indicate that following purposeful selection of people with dysphagia with their own mobility and relatively healthy cognitive function, free access to water did not result in aspiration pneumonia, improved measures of hydration and in particular, significantly increased quality of life when compared to a diet consisting of thickened fluids only. Overall, we conclude that in people with good mobility and cognitive ability, there is no need to deviate from the Frazier Rehabilitation Centre free water protocol, which allows for the provision of water to people with dysphagia with strict guidelines particularly in relation to good physical ability.

  2. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemoirradiation (CRT) of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal Grades {>=}3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing patient-reported dysphagia (PRD) and objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF) in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods and Materials: A total of 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12 months post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and 'Overall Bother.' They underwent VF at 3 and 12 months, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results: Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared with 2 at 3 months but similar at 12 months. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12 months. Conclusions: Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia.

  3. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc; Worden, Francis; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemo-irradiation (CRT) of head and neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal grades ≥3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing 1) patient-reported dysphagia (PRD), and 2) objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF), in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12m post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and “Overall Bother”. They underwent VF at 3m and 12m, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared to 2 at 3m but similar at 12m. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12m. Conclusions Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia. PMID:19783380

  4. Dose–volume-related dysphagia after constrictor muscles definition in head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, R; Ricchetti, F; Fiorentino, A; Fersino, S; Giaj Levra, N; Naccarato, S; Sicignano, G; Albanese, S; Di Paola, G; Alterio, D; Ruggieri, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Dysphagia remains a side effect influencing the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) after radiotherapy. We evaluated the relationship between planned dose involvement and acute and late dysphagia in patients with HNC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), after a recontouring of constrictor muscles (PCs) and the cricopharyngeal muscle (CM). Methods: Between December 2011 and December 2013, 56 patients with histologically proven HNC were treated with IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy. The PCs and CM were recontoured. Correlations between acute and late toxicity and dosimetric parameters were evaluated. End points were analysed using univariate logistic regression. Results: An increasing risk to develop acute dysphagia was observed when constraints to the middle PCs were not respected [mean dose (Dmean) ≥50 Gy, maximum dose (Dmax) >60 Gy, V50 >70% with a p = 0.05]. The superior PC was not correlated with acute toxicity but only with late dysphagia. The inferior PC was not correlated with dysphagia; for the CM only, Dmax >60 Gy was correlated with acute dysphagia ≥ grade 2. Conclusion: According to our analysis, the superior PC has a major role, being correlated with dysphagia at 3 and 6 months after treatments; the middle PC maintains this correlation only at 3 months from the beginning of radiotherapy, but it does not have influence on late dysphagia. The inferior PC and CM have a minimum impact on swallowing symptoms. Advances in knowledge: We used recent guidelines to define dose constraints of the PCs and CM. Two results emerge in the present analysis: the superior PC influences late dysphagia, while the middle PC influences acute dysphagia. PMID:25348370

  5. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Amanda H; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E A; Steele, Catriona M; Pickler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity of five standard infant formulas, three barium products, and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20 % weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. The study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the lower boundary of the NDD nectar-thick liquid range. The study showed differences in viscosity between 60 % w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque(®) and E-Z-Paque(®) powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas, or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20 and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in

  6. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Amanda H; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E A; Steele, Catriona M; Pickler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity of five standard infant formulas, three barium products, and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20 % weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. The study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the lower boundary of the NDD nectar-thick liquid range. The study showed differences in viscosity between 60 % w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque(®) and E-Z-Paque(®) powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas, or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20 and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in

  7. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  8. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11) deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karpinski, Beverly A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fralish, Matthew S.; Nuwayhid, Samer; Zohn, Irene E.; Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA) signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V), glossopharyngeal (IX) or vagus (X) cranial nerves (CNs) that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS. PMID:24357327

  9. Effect of Human Saliva on the Consistency of Thickened Drinks for Individuals with Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallons, Katleen J. R.; Helmens, Harold J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thickening of foods and fluids is commonly used in the management of dysphagia to reduce the risk of aspiration. The use of starch-based thickeners is established. However, the use of gums in thickeners is gaining interest as they are resistant to salivary amylase, which may promote safer swallowing. Aims: To compare the effect of…

  10. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  11. Swallowing and Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Clinically Oriented Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, JoAnne; Butler, Susan G.; Daniels, Stephanie K.; Gross, Roxann Diez; Langmore, Susan; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McCabe, Daniel; Musson, Nan; Rosenbek, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This review presents the state of swallowing rehabilitation science as it relates to evidence for neural plastic changes in the brain. The case is made for essential collaboration between clinical and basic scientists to expand the positive influences of dysphagia rehabilitation in synergy with growth in technology and knowledge. The…

  12. Dysphagia training for speech-language pathologists: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Rahayu Mustaffa; Ward, Elizabeth; Cornwell, Petrea

    2012-12-01

    There are competency standards available in countries with established speech-language pathology services to guide basic dysphagia training with ongoing workplace mentoring for advanced skills development. Such training processes, however, are not as well established in countries where speech-language pathology training and practice is relatively new, such as Malaysia. The current study examines the extent of dysphagia training and workplace support available to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Malaysia and Queensland, Australia, and explores clinicians' perceptions of the training and support provided, and of their knowledge, skills, and confidence. Using a matched cohort cross-sectional design, a purpose-built survey was administered to 30 SLPs working in Malaysian government hospitals and 30 SLPs working in Queensland Health settings in Australia. Malaysian clinicians were found to have received significantly less university training, less mentoring in the workplace, and were lacking key infrastructure needed to support professional development in dysphagia management. Over 90% of Queensland clinicians were confident and felt they had adequate skills in dysphagia management; in contrast, significantly lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence were observed in the Malaysian cohort. The findings identify a need for improved university training and increased opportunities for workplace mentoring, training, and support for Malaysian SLPs.

  13. Assessment of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Use of Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun Hyun; Seo, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (distance between the hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage), and the time interval between the initiation of tongue movement and the time of the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, by using ultrasonography in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods Healthy controls and PD patients with dysphagia were compared. Ultrasonography was performed 3 times for the evaluation of tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, and the time between the initiation of tongue movement and the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation. Results A total of 24 healthy controls and 24 PD patients with dysphagia were enrolled. No significant differences were demonstrated between the two groups for the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (controls, 1.19±0.34 cm; PD patients, 1.37±0.5 cm; p=0.15) and tongue thickness (controls, 4.42±0.46 cm; PD patients, 4.27±0.51 cm; p=0.3). In contrast, the time to the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation was significantly different between the two groups (controls, 1.53±0.87 ms; PD patients, 2.4±1.4 ms, p=0.048). Conclusion Ultrasonography can be useful in evaluating dysphagia in patients with PD by direct visualization and measurement of the hyoid bone. Moreover, ultrasonography might contribute to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in PD. PMID:27152267

  14. Predictors of Asphyxiation Risk in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, R.; Chadwick, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Adults with learning disabilities referred for assessment of their eating and drinking are frequently reported to cough and choke when eating and drinking. The research literature investigating dysphagia has often overlooked asphyxiation risk, highlighting coughing and choking as indicators of aspiration only. This is a notable…

  15. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter “wet voice” were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders. PMID:25992153

  16. Clinical and videofluoroscopic diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood*

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Brenda Carla Lima; Motta, Maria Eugênia Almeida; de Castro, Adriana Guerra; de Araújo, Claudia Marina Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the contribution of deglutition videofluoroscopy in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 93 children diagnosed with chronic encephalopathy, in the age range between two and five years, selected by convenience among patients referred to the authors' institution by speech therapists, neurologists and gastroenterologists in the period from March 2010 to September 2011. The data collection was made at two different moments, by different investigators who were blind to each other. Results The method presented low sensitivity for detecting aspiration with puree consistency (p = 0.04). Specificity and negative predictive value were high for clinical diagnosis of dysphagia with puree consistency. Conclusion In the present study, the value for sensitivity in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia demonstrates that this diagnostic procedure may not detect any change in the swallowing process regardless of the food consistency used during the investigation. Thus, the addition of the videofluoroscopic method can significantly contribute to the diagnosis of dysphagia. PMID:25741054

  17. Dysphagia due to forestier disease: three cases and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sirshak; Biswas, Kaustuv Das; Mukherjee, Ankur; Basu, Asimjiban; Das, Saumik; Sen, Indranil; Sinha, Ramanuj

    2014-01-01

    Forestier disease or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is an uncommon cause of dysphagia. Due to rarity of this condition there is neither any demographic data nor any consensus about the investigation and treatment modalities. Here an effort is made in the present article to compile the information regarding the demographic and clinical features, investigation modalities and different methods of treatment from all the available case reports of dysphagia due to Forestier disease in the English literature till date. Three cases of the same condition are also reported in the present paper. Three cases of dysphagia due to Forestier disease treated in the ENT department of R.G. Kar Medical College and Hospital are reported herewith. A systematic review of literature is also done. All the case reports of dysphagia due to Forestier disease are obtained by World Wide Web search (WWWS) using 'Forestier Disease', 'DISH' and 'dysphagia' as the key words. Data regarding age, sex, duration of the symptom, associated symptoms, investigations done, level of vertebrae involved and different modalities of treatment with result are collected and analyzed systematically. We found total 73 cases of dysphagia due to Forestier disease. The condition commonly affects males (M:F 5.64:1) in older age group (94.52% cases are 60 years or above), often presented to the treatment facility after a long time of initiation of the symptom. Barium swallow X-rays and lateral neck X-ray were the most common investigations done to arrive at a diagnosis as per result of systematic review. Surgical removal of the causative osteophytes were the definitive treatment, but if surgery is contraindicated, conservative measures like switchover to liquid and semisolid food and proper swallow training also improve the condition to some extent. Dysphagia due to Forestier disease mostly affects older male, often has a chronic course. It can be diagnosed with simple investigations like neck X-ray or

  18. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  19. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes In The Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy To Dysphagia Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2,4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6–44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0–2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0–2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT. PMID:21669502

  20. Correlation between brain injury and dysphagia in adult patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria Cristina de Alencar; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Furkim, Ana Maria; Massi, Giselle; Pinto, Gisele Sant Ana; Lange, Marcos Christiano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In the literature, the incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with cerebrovascular accident (AVE) ranges 20–90%. Some studies correlate the location of a stroke with dysphagia, while others do not. Objective: To correlate brain injury with dysphagia in patients with stroke in relation to the type and location of stroke. Method: A prospective study conducted at the Hospital de Clinicas with 30 stroke patients: 18 women and 12 men. All patients underwent clinical evaluation and swallowing nasolaryngofibroscopy (FEES®), and were divided based on the location of the injury: cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, subcortical areas, and type: hemorrhagic or transient ischemic. Results: Of the 30 patients, 18 had ischemic stroke, 10 had hemorrhagic stroke, and 2 had transient stroke. Regarding the location, 10 lesions were in the cerebral cortex, 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, 3 were in the cerebral cortex and subcortical areas, and 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices and subcortical areas. Cerebral cortex and subcortical area ischemic strokes predominated in the clinical evaluation of dysphagia. In FEES®, decreased laryngeal sensitivity persisted following cerebral cortex and ischemic strokes. Waste in the pharyngeal recesses associated with epiglottic valleculae predominated in the piriform cortex in all lesion areas and in ischemic stroke. A patient with damage to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices from an ischemic stroke exhibited laryngeal penetration and tracheal aspiration of liquid and honey. Conclusion: Dysphagia was prevalent when a lesion was located in the cerebral cortex and was of the ischemic type. PMID:25991951

  1. Dysphagia lusoria caused by persistent right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and diverticulum of Kommerell.

    PubMed

    McNally, P R; Rak, K M

    1992-01-01

    It requires a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis of dysphagia lusoria. Clinically, these adults will present with symptoms of intermittent solid food dysphagia, and a mediastinal abnormality may be seen on chest x-ray. Noninvasive imaging of the chest with either computerized tomography or magnetic resonance scanning are excellent methods for evaluating the mediastinum for solid tumors or vascular anomalies that can cause extrinsic esophageal compression. Dysphagia lusoria caused by a persistence of the right embryologic aortic arch and diverticulum of Kommerell with an aberrant left subclavian artery may be satisfactorily managed by dietary modification when the symptoms are mild.

  2. The Use of Biodegradable Stents in Malignant Oesophageal Strictures for the Treatment of Dysphagia Before Neoadjuvant Treatment or Radical Radiotherapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis Burke, Chris; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Gkoutzios, Panos; Hynes, Orla; Ahmed, Irfan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Mason, Robert; Adam, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical results of the use of biodegradable oesophageal stents in malignant strictures.MethodsEleven patients were included in this prospective analysis in which a woven polydioxanone biodegradable oesophageal stent was used. The inclusion criterion was that the patient underwent neoadjuvant treatment or radical radiotherapy after the stent insertion. Primary end points were dysphagia score at discharge, stent patency, and complication rate. Secondary end points were overall survival and surgical outcome of surgery.ResultsThere was a 100 % procedure technical success rate. Early complications occurred in three patients resulting in failure to restore oral nutrition. In the remaining eight patients, dysphagia was significantly improved at discharge. Mean stent patency rate in this group was 71.5 days. Stent dysfunction occurred in five of eight patients (62.5 %); in two of five patients this was due to local inflammatory reaction, and in three of five patients it was due to tumour growth after a mean time of 97.8 days, and a new metallic stent was consequently placed in four of five patients. One patient was successfully treated with esophagectomy. At the end of follow-up (mean time 102.1 days), three of eight stents were patent. The overall patient survival rate was 81.8 %.ConclusionAlthough short-term dysphagia scores improved, biodegradable stents do not appear to offer a clear beneficial effect in most cases of malignant strictures, particularly due to a local inflammatory reaction that may be induced. Technical improvement of the device and delineation of the patient group that would benefit from its use is necessary if further studies are to be conducted in the future.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Early Dose-Effect Relationships for the Swallowing Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Eisbruch, Avraham . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To present initial results of a clinical trial of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the swallowing structures whose dysfunction after chemoradiation is a likely cause of dysphagia and aspiration, without compromising target doses. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective, longitudinal study of 36 patients with Stage III-IV oropharyngeal (31) or nasopharyngeal (5) cancer. Definitive chemo-IMRT spared salivary glands and swallowing structures: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus. Lateral but not medial retropharyngeal nodes were considered at risk. Dysphagia endpoints included objective swallowing dysfunction (videofluoroscopy), and both patient-reported and observer-rated scores. Correlations between doses and changes in these endpoints from pre-therapy to 3 months after therapy were assessed. Results: Significant correlations were observed between videofluoroscopy-based aspirations and the mean doses to the PC and GSL, as well as the partial volumes of these structures receiving 50-65 Gy; the highest correlations were associated with doses to the superior PC (p = 0.005). All patients with aspirations received mean PC doses >60 Gy or PC V{sub 65} >50%, and GSL V{sub 50} >50%. Reduced laryngeal elevation and epiglottic inversion were correlated with mean PC and GSL doses (p < 0.01). All 3 patients with strictures had PC V{sub 70} >50%. Worsening patient-reported liquid swallowing was correlated with mean PC (p = 0.05) and esophageal (p 0.02) doses. Only mean PC doses were correlated with worsening patient-reported solid swallowing (p = 0.04) and observer-rated swallowing scores (p = 0.04). Conclusions: These dose-volume-effect relationships provide initial IMRT optimization goals and motivate further efforts to reduce swallowing structures doses to reduce dysphagia and aspiration.

  4. Analysis of the Level of Dysphagia, Anxiety, and Nutritional Status Before and After Speech Therapy in Patients with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Drozdz, Daniela; Mancopes, Renata; Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo; Reppold, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The rehabilitation in oropharyngeal dysphagia evidence-based implies the relationship between the interventions and their results. Objective: Analyze level of dysphagia, oral ingestion, anxiety levels and nutritional status of patients with stroke diagnosis, before and after speech therapy. Method: Clinical assessment of dysphagia partially using the Protocol of Risk Assessment for Dysphagia (PARD), applying the scale Functional Oral Intake Scale for Dysphagia in Stroke Patients (FOIS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment MNA®. The sample consisted of 12 patients, mean age of 64.6 years, with a medical diagnosis of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and without cognitive disorders. All tests were applied before and after speech therapy (15 sessions). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, McNemar's test, Bowker's symmetry test and Wilcoxon's test. Results: During the pre-speech therapy assessments, 33.3% of patients had mild to moderate dysphagia, 88.2% did not receive food orally, 47.1% of the patients showed malnutrition and 35.3% of patients had mild anxiety level. After the therapy sessions, it was found that 33.3% of patients had mild dysphagia, 16.7% were malnourished and 50% of patients had minimal level of anxiety. Conclusion:  There were statistically significant evolution of the level of dysphagia (p = 0.017) and oral intake (p = 0.003) post-speech therapy. Although not statistically significant, there was considerable progress in relation to the level of anxiety and nutritional status. PMID:25992086

  5. Managing eating and drinking difficulties (dysphagia) with children who have learning disabilities: What is effective?

    PubMed

    Harding, Celia; Cockerill, Helen

    2015-07-01

    People who work with children who have neurological and learning disabilities frequently need to manage the health and emotional risks associated with eating, drinking and swallowing (dysphagia). Some approaches can support children to develop oral feeding competence or to maximise their ability to maintain some oral intake supplemented with tube feeding. However, some clinicians feel that oral-motor exercises can support eating and drinking skills as well as speech and language development, whereas there is little evidence to support this.The implied "beneficial" association between oral-motor exercises, speech and swallowing skills gives a false impression in terms of future outcomes for parents and carers of children with learning disabilities. This paper considers oral-motor approaches in the remediation of dysphagia and the need for a cultural shift away from this view. Realistic and useful outcomes for people with learning disabilities need to be an essential part of therapeutic intervention.

  6. Prolonged dysphagia due to Listeria-rhombencephalitis with brainstem abscess and acute polyradiculoneuritis.

    PubMed

    Smiatacz, Tomasz; Kowalik, Maciej Michal; Hlebowicz, Maria

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of previously healthy student with acute rhombencephalitis and brainstem abscess caused by Listeria monocytogenes. The disease begun with uncharacteristic prodromal symptoms of gastrointestinal infection followed by headache and vertigo. After hospital admission the patient rapidly deteriorated, presenting pronounced dysphagia and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis was established upon clinical symptoms of infection, brainstem involvement, typical MRI findings and positive for L. monocytogenes blood culture. Infection was complicated by acute, demyelinating neuropathy, diagnosed upon clinical symptoms of frail palsy confirmed by ENG. Initially introduced empirical doxycyclin/ceftriaxon treatment was subsequently changed to targeted ampicillin/gentamycin therapy, mechanical ventilation, intravenous human immunoglobulin treatment, tracheostomy and endoscopic gastrostomy. Prolonged dysphagia resolved after rehabilitation. After one year the patient remains well with only slight dysmetria. PMID:16260041

  7. Effects of oral intake of water in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is associated with numerous medical conditions and the major intervention to avoid aspiration in people with dysphagia involves modifying the diet to thickened fluids. This is associated with issues related to patient quality of life and in many cases non-compliance leading to dehydration. Given these concerns and in the absence of conclusive scientific evidence, we designed a study, to further investigate the effects of oral intake of water in people with dysphagia. Methods We monitored lung related complications, hydration levels and assessed quality of life in two groups of people with dysphagia. The control group was allowed only thickened fluids and patients in the intervention group were allowed access to water for a period of five days. Results Our findings indicate a significantly increased risk in the development lung complications in patients given access to water (6/42; 14.3%) compared to the control group (0/34; no cases). We have further defined patients at highest risk, namely those with degenerative neurologic dysfunction who are immobile or have low mobility. Our results indicate increased total fluid intake in the patients allowed access to water, and the quality of life surveys, albeit from a limited number of patients (24% of patients), suggest the dissatisfaction of patients to diets composed of only thickened fluids. Conclusions On the basis of these findings we recommend that acute patients, patients with severe neurological dysfunction and immobility should be strongly encouraged to adhere to a thickened fluid or modified solid consistency diet. We recommend that subacute patients with relatively good mobility should have choice after being well-informed of the relative risk. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12608000107325 PMID:21356121

  8. Lingual tonsil hypertrophy causing severe dysphagia: treatment with plasma-mediated radiofrequency-based ablation (Coblation).

    PubMed

    Mowry, Sarah E; Ament, Marvin; Shapiro, Nina L

    2010-03-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy is an uncommon cause of upper aerodigestive tract pathology. We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed severe dysphagia and subsequent weight loss as a result of lingual tonsil hypertrophy. He was successfully treated with plasma-mediated radiofrequency-based ablation (Coblation). In the past, traditional surgical procedures for lingual tonsil hypertrophy were difficult to perform and recovery was difficult, but the introduction of Coblation has made lingual tonsillectomy much easier.

  9. Ethical dilemmas in dysphagia management and the right to a natural death.

    PubMed

    Serradura-Russell, A

    1992-01-01

    Speech pathologists are at the forefront in dealing with the consequences of life-saving measures and the technological advances that promote survival. Many ethical dilemmas exist in the area of dysphagia management and these are often emphasized in the nursing home environment. A client's autonomy and ability to make informed decisions will invariably determine the role of the speech pathologist in making decisions or facilitating debate regarding eating and feeding status.

  10. Stent-Graft Repair of a Large Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Causing Dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vivek Niranjan, Khandelwal; Rawat, Lokesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2009-05-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) are rare and most frequently result from trauma, infection, or sometimes spontaneously. They have the potential to cause life-threatening hemorrhage; thus, their immediate management is necessary. Endovascular treatment by stent graft placement in the affected artery appears to be a safe and effective treatment option. We present a case of a child who presented with neck swelling and dysphagia caused by a ruptured cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm which was managed by stent graft placement.

  11. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  12. Improved Dysphagia After Decannulation of Tracheostomy in Patients With Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Jeong-Gyu; Lee, Jang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate improved dysphagia after the decannulation of a tracheostomy in patients with brain injuries. Methods The subjects of this study are patients with brain injuries who were admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine in Myongji Hospital and who underwent a decannulation between 2012 and 2014. A video fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed in order to investigate whether the patients' dysphagia had improved. We measured the following 5 parameters: laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, upper esophageal width, and semisolid aspiration. We analyzed the patients' results from VFSS performed one month before and one month after decannulation. All VFSS images were recorded using a camcorder running at 30 frames per second. An AutoCAD 2D screen was used to measure laryngeal elevation, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, and upper esophageal width. Results In this study, a number of dysphagia symptoms improved after decannulation. Laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, and semisolid aspiration showed no statistically significant differences (p>0.05), however after decannulation, the post-swallow pharyngeal remnant (pre 37.41%±24.80%, post 21.02%±11.75%; p<0.001) and upper esophageal width (pre 3.57±1.93 mm, post 4.53±2.05 mm; p<0.001) showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion When decannulation is performed on patients with brain injuries who do not require a ventilator and who are able to independently excrete sputum, improved esophageal dysphagia can be expected. PMID:26605176

  13. Effect of the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the improvement of swallowing function in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare improvements in swallowing function by the intervention of the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The Masako maneuver (n=23) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (n=24) were conducted in 47 patients with dysphagia caused by stroke over a period of 4 weeks. Swallowing recovery was recorded using the functional dysphagia scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] Mean functional dysphagia scale values for the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation groups decreased after the treatments. However, the pre-post functional dysphagia scale values showed no statistically significant differences between the groups. [Conclusion] The Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation each showed significant effects on the improvement of swallowing function for the patients with dysphagia caused by stroke, but no significant difference was observed between the two treatment methods. PMID:27512266

  14. Validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments for patients with normal to mild cognitive impairment via telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth C; Sharma, Shobha; Burns, Clare; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2012-12-01

    To assess the validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments via telerehabilitation, 40 individuals with dysphagia from various etiologies were assessed simultaneously by a face-to-face speech-language pathologist (FTF-SLP) and a telerehabilitation SLP (T-SLP) via an Internet-based videoconferencing telerehabilitation system. Dysphagia status was assessed using a Clinical Swallowing Examination (CSE) protocol, delivered via a specialized telerehabilitation videoconferencing system and involving the use of an assistant at the patient's end of the consultation to facilitate the assessment. Levels of agreement between the FTF-SLP and T-SLP revealed that the majority of parameters reached set levels of clinically acceptable levels of agreement. Specifically, agreement between the T-SLP and FTF-SLP ratings for the oral, oromotor, and laryngeal function tasks revealed levels of exact agreement ranging from 75 to 100% (kappa = 0.36-1.0), while the parameters relating to food and fluid trials ranged in exact agreement from 79 to 100% (kappa = 0.61-1.0). Across the parameters related to aspiration risk and clinical management, exact agreement ranged between 79 and 100% (kappa = 0.49-1.0). The data show that a CSE conducted via telerehabilitation can provide valid and reliable outcomes comparable to clinical decisions made in the FTF environment.

  15. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Erasmus, Corrie E; Hendriks, Jan C M; Geurts, Alexander C H; Klein, Willemijn M; Pillen, Sigrid; Sie, Lilian T; de Swart, Bert J M; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2013-05-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based recommendations for safe swallowing. In this cross-sectional study, participants were divided into: early and late ambulatory stage (AS, n = 6), early non-ambulatory stage (ENAS, n = 7), and late non-ambulatory stage (LNAS, n = 11). Quantitative oral muscle ultrasound was performed to quantify echo intensity. Swallowing was assessed with a video fluoroscopic swallow study, surface electromyography (sEMG) of the submental muscle group and tongue pressure. Differences in outcome parameters among the three DMD stages were tested with analysis of variance. Oral muscles related to swallowing were progressively affected, starting in the AS with the geniohyoid muscle. Tongue (pseudo) hypertrophy was found in 70 % of patients in the ENAS and LNAS. Oral phase problems and post-swallow residue were observed, mostly in the LNAS with solid food. sEMG and tongue pressure data of swallowing solid food revealed the lowest sEMG amplitude, the longest duration and lowest tongue pressure in the LNAS. In case of swallowing problems in DMD, based on the disturbed mechanisms of swallowing, it is suggested to (1) adjust meals in terms of less solid food, and (2) drink water after meals to clear the oropharyngeal area.

  16. Advances in Pediatric Gastrostomy Placement.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Maireade E; Smithers, C Jason

    2016-01-01

    Placement of gastrostomy tubes in infants and children has become increasingly commonplace. A historical emphasis on use of open gastrostomy has been replaced by less invasive methods of placement, including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and laparoscopically assisted gastrostomy procedures. Various complications, ranging from minor to the more severe, have been reported with all methods of placement. Many pediatric patients who undergo gastrostomy tube placement will require long-term enteral therapy. Given the prolonged time pediatric patients may remain enterally dependent, further quality improvement and education initiatives are needed to improve long-term care and outcomes of these patients.

  17. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  18. A Nasogastric Tube Inserted into the Gastrocutaneous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Joon Sung; Yu, In Hee; Jeong, Ji Young; Jung, Sung Hee; Jo, Yil Ryun

    2011-01-01

    We reported a case in which a nasogastric tube was inserted into the gastrocutaneous fistula, diagnosed by abdominal computed tomography. A 78-year-old man with a history of recurrent cerebral hemorrhage had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to dysphagia for 2 years. However, soft tissue infection at the gastrostomy site caused the removal of the tube. Immediately, antibiotic agents were infused. For appropriate hydration and medication, a nasogastric tube was inserted. However, there was no significant improvement of the soft tissue infection. Moreover, the amount of bloody exudate increased. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the nasogastric tube placed under the patient's skin via gastrocutaneous fistula. The nasogastric tube was removed, and an antibiotic agents were maintained. After 3 weeks, the signs of infection fully improved, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed again. This case shows necessities of an appropriate interval between removal of the gastrostomy tube and insertion of a nasogastric tube, and suspicion of existence of gastrocutaneous fistula. PMID:22506228

  19. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons – from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  20. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  1. Late-onset dysphagia caused by severe spastic peristalsis of a free jejunal graft in a case of hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takayuki; Goto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Ko; Kurosawa, Koreyuki; Asada, Yukinori; Saijo, Shigeru; Matsuura, Kazuto

    2016-12-01

    Free jejunal transfer is the main technique used for reconstructing a circumferential defect caused by total pharyngo-laryngo-cervical-esophagectomy in certain cancer cases. We report a rare case of severe late-onset dysphagia caused by autonomous spastic peristalsis, which led to complete obstruction of the free jejunal route. A 70-year-old man underwent treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer involving total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal transfer. After uneventful peri- and postoperative recovery, he developed sudden-onset severe dysphagia 22 months later. Gastrografin fluoroscopy revealed abnormal peristalsis and contraction of the transferred jejunum, leading to complete obstruction. Nutritional treatment, application of depressants of peristalsis, and xylocaine injection into the outer space of the jejunal mucosa all failed to alleviate the dysphagia. Surgical treatment involving a longitudinal incision of the jejunal graft, and interposing a cutaneous flap, as a fixed wall, between the incised jejunal margins to prevent obstruction was performed. After further reconstructive surgery involving using a pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap and a split-thickness skin graft to close a refractory jejunum-skin fistula, the dysphagia was permanently alleviated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe dysphagia caused by peristalsis of a free jejunal graft.

  2. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies.

  3. Late-onset dysphagia caused by severe spastic peristalsis of a free jejunal graft in a case of hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takayuki; Goto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Ko; Kurosawa, Koreyuki; Asada, Yukinori; Saijo, Shigeru; Matsuura, Kazuto

    2016-12-01

    Free jejunal transfer is the main technique used for reconstructing a circumferential defect caused by total pharyngo-laryngo-cervical-esophagectomy in certain cancer cases. We report a rare case of severe late-onset dysphagia caused by autonomous spastic peristalsis, which led to complete obstruction of the free jejunal route. A 70-year-old man underwent treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer involving total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal transfer. After uneventful peri- and postoperative recovery, he developed sudden-onset severe dysphagia 22 months later. Gastrografin fluoroscopy revealed abnormal peristalsis and contraction of the transferred jejunum, leading to complete obstruction. Nutritional treatment, application of depressants of peristalsis, and xylocaine injection into the outer space of the jejunal mucosa all failed to alleviate the dysphagia. Surgical treatment involving a longitudinal incision of the jejunal graft, and interposing a cutaneous flap, as a fixed wall, between the incised jejunal margins to prevent obstruction was performed. After further reconstructive surgery involving using a pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap and a split-thickness skin graft to close a refractory jejunum-skin fistula, the dysphagia was permanently alleviated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe dysphagia caused by peristalsis of a free jejunal graft. PMID:27068782

  4. Dysphagia lusoria” – Right subclavian retroesophageal artery causing intermitent esophageal compression and eventual dysphagia – A case report and literature review☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Guilherme; Junqueira Bizzi, Jorge Wladimir; Muller, Jader; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an uncommon anatomical anomaly in which a right subclavian retroesophageal artery (RSRA) was discovered during a routine chest CT scan in a patient with intermittent upper digestive symptoms (occasional dysphagia for solids, the so called “globus hystericus”). Subclavian arteries vary in their origin, course or length. RSRA is a relatively common embryological anomaly of the aortic arch. In this case we report a single carotid trunk. This variation is due to interruption of the fourth right aortic arch between the origins to the common carotid artery and subclavian artery, while the fourth left arch is intact. The regression of the proximal portion of the right subclavian artery occurs and the retroesophageal aortic arch persists, rarely leading to symptoms, as were present in this case. PMID:25797354

  5. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, p<0.01). Parents reported clinical signs in 46.2% of children, with 60% agreement with direct clinical mealtime assessment (kappa=0.2, p<0.01). The most common signs on direct assessment were coughing (44.7%), multiple swallows (25.2%), gurgly voice (20.3%), wet breathing (18.7%) and gagging (11.4%). 37.5% of children with TD had clinical signs, mostly observed on fluids. Dysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months. PMID:25562439

  6. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, p<0.01). Parents reported clinical signs in 46.2% of children, with 60% agreement with direct clinical mealtime assessment (kappa=0.2, p<0.01). The most common signs on direct assessment were coughing (44.7%), multiple swallows (25.2%), gurgly voice (20.3%), wet breathing (18.7%) and gagging (11.4%). 37.5% of children with TD had clinical signs, mostly observed on fluids. Dysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months.

  7. The experiential meaning of eating, handicap, adaptedness, and confirmation in living with esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B

    1995-01-01

    This article is mainly based on interview studies of pensioners' (n = 62), patients' (n = 19), and students' (n = 87) experiences of living with longstanding esophageal dysphagia. The aim is to describe the experiential meaning of dysphagic patients' lives by interpreting their experiences, problems, and emotions and by specifying these into scales according to the model of goal-directed action by Pörn [43-49]. The experiential meaning will be articulated in terms of attainment or nonattainment of goals in relation to eating, handicap, adaptedness, and confirmation. In the experiential meaning of eating, the emphasis is on the attainment of nourishing goals or goals attained by means of food with desired hedonistic qualities and linked with feelings of hope or no hope of a shared life. The experiential meaning of handicap is interpreted as the dysphagic individual's experiences of an actual nonattainment of eating goals due to swallowing disabilities and with experiences of nonattainment of other important goals and related emotions; for example, shame for human incompetence. The experiential meaning of adaptedness is understood as the dysphagic individual's experiences of actual capacity for goal attainments interpreted as a sense of control in the daily living with dysphagia and linked with security, or in the negative case, reduced self-esteem and feelings of panic or fear. The experiential meaning of confirmation is interpreted as the dysphagic individual's experiences of actual or potential repertoire for goal attainment, i.e., self-assessment strengthened by evidence obtained in relationships linked with emotions of hope of self-realization. In conclusion, a specific model for understanding the dysphagic patient's concealment of dysphagia in the medical encounter has been developed.

  8. Open thoracic aortic repair for dysphagia in patients with Kommerell's diverticulum and right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Reece, T Brett; Wallen, Tyler J; Jagasia, Dinesh H; Bavaria, Joseph E; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2010-01-01

    Kommerell's diverticulum of an aberrant left subclavian artery associated with a right-sided aortic arch is a rare congenital aortic anomaly. This communication reports two cases of this congenital anomaly leading to severe dysphagia. Both cases were successfully repaired with a staged open approach rather than an endovascular approach, which would not have addressed the presenting symptom of dysphagia.

  9. Migrated esophageal foreign body presents as acute onset dysphagia years later: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shew, Matthew; Jiang, Zi; Bruegger, Daniel; Arganbright, Jill

    2015-12-01

    Ingested esophageal foreign bodies are commonly seen in the pediatric population. Rarely do they perforate and migrate through neck fascial planes asymptomatically. We present a case of an otherwise healthy 11 year old with sudden onset dysphagia that based on MRI and CT findings was most consistent with an esophageal duplication cyst. However upon surgical exploration, a circular disk like foreign body was identified adjacent to the esophagus. Given the patient's age and no reports of purposeful ingestion, it is most likely the patient had ingested this disk foreign body in early childhood, leaving her asymptomatic for 8 years prior to presentation. PMID:26541295

  10. Trans-tracheostomic endoscopy of the larynx in the evaluation of dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ricci Maccarini, A; Stacchini, M; Salsi, D; Pieri, F; Magnani, M; Casolino, D

    2007-01-01

    Summary Laryngeal endoscopy plays a determinant role in clinical evaluation of dysphagia. The examination is performed by means of a trans-nasal approach with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope, able to visualize the pre- and post-deglutitory steps of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. In patients with tracheostomy, it is possible to visualize the glottic or neoglottic function during the intra-deglutitory phase, performing the examination through a trans-tracheostomic route. The procedure and indications of this endoscopic technique are described. PMID:18320834

  11. [Dermatomyositis. Presentation of a mild to moderate case with early dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Carbonell, M; Climent Antolí, H; Leandro Fonseca, A L; Paricio Talayero, J M; Escrivá Tomás, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a twelve year old female patient with juvenile dermatomyositis. The diagnosis was made in our unit a few days after starting with proximal muscular weakness and a skin rash. A combination of oral corticosteroids and methotrexate was administered. There was an initial improvent in the skin lesions, but with no changes in the muscle weakness. The appearance of dysphagia a few days after starting the treatment led us to add three pulses of parenteral methylprednisolone to her initial treatment. We report the case to illustrate the difficulties in deciding initial treatment options.

  12. Lymphangiomatous Polyp of Palatine Tonsil in A Child Presenting with Dysphagia and Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Yasmeen; Gite, Vinod; Shoeb, Mohammed; Oraon, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Pedunculated lymphangiomatous polyps of the tonsil are rare benign lesions that have been described in literature using varied nomenclature. Majority of the cases have been reported in adults with varying clinical symptoms. We report a case of lymphangiomatous polyp of left palatine tonsil in a 14-year-old male child who presented with dysphagia and dysarthria. Clinical examination revealed a large pedunculated polyp arising from upper pole of left tonsil. Patient underwent left tonsillectomy with excision of the polyp. Based on histopathological features a diagnosis of pedunculated lymphangiomatous polyp was made. We discuss the clinical and histopathological features of this lesion with differential diagnosis and short review of literature. PMID:26155482

  13. Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed. PMID:18940647

  14. [Aural Stimulation with Capsaicin Ointment Improved the Swallowing Function in Patients with Dysphagia: Evaluation by the SMRC Scale].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Ohnishi, Hiroki; Kawata, Ikuji; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    Cough and swallowing reflexes are important airway-protective mechanisms against aspiration. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, one of the side effects of which is cough, have been reported to reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hypertensive patients with stroke. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to improve the swallowing function in post-stroke patients. On the other hand, stimulation of the Arnold nerve, the auricular branch of the vagus, triggers the cough reflex (Arnold's ear-cough reflex). Capsaicin, an agonist of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), has been shown to activate the peripheral sensory C-fibers. Stimulation of the sensory branches of the vagus in the laryngotracheal mucosa with capsaicin induces the cough reflex and has been reported to improve the swallowing function in patients with dysphagia. In our previous study, we showed that aural stimulation of the Arnold nerve with 0.025% capsaicin ointment improved the swallowing function, as evaluated by the endoscopic swallowing score, in 26 patients with dysphagia. In the present study, the video images of swallowing recorded in the previous study were re-evaluated using the SMRC scale by an independent otolaryngologist who was blinded to the information about the patients and the endoscopic swallowing score. The SMRC scale is used to evaluate four aspects of the swallowing function: 1) Sensory: the initiation of the swallowing reflex as assessed by the white-out timing; 2) Motion: the ability to hold blue-dyed water in the oral cavity and induce laryngeal elevation; 3) Reflex: glottal closure and the cough reflex induced by touching the epiglottis or arytenoid with the endoscope; 4) Clearance: pharyngeal clearance of the blue-dyed water after swallowing. Accordingly, we demonstrated that a single application of capsaicin ointment to the external auditory canal of patients with dysphagia significantly improved the R, but not the S, M or C scores, and this

  15. A Therapeutic Maneuver for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients. METHOD Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson’s disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:18925327

  16. Evaluation of the esophagus with a marshmallow bolus: clarifying the cause of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ott, D J; Kelley, T F; Chen, M Y; Gelfand, D W

    1991-01-01

    We reviewed the radiographic examinations of the esophagus and medical records in 117 patients (55 women and 62 men; mean age, 52 years) in which a marshmallow bolus was also given. A one-third to one-half piece of a standard marshmallow was used with a mean size of 23 mm (+/- 4.5 mm SD) measured in vivo. In 62 patients with no intrinsic structural narrowing of the esophagus, impaction occurred in only seven (11%). Four of these patients had an esophageal motility disorder, and three had a previous Nissen fundoplication. The remaining 55 patients had lower esophageal mucosal rings (47) or peptic strictures (8). Marshmallow impaction was seen in 27 of 47 rings (57%) and was inversely related to ring size, and in six of eight strictures (75%). Also, impaction was related to the ratio of bolus size to ring caliber, and invariably occurred when this ratio was greater than 1.5. Dysphagia was the presenting complaint in 76 (65%) patients, but was found equally in those without intrinsic narrowing and in those with ring or stricture. However, dysphagia was reproduced by the marshmallow bolus only in patients with esophageal narrowing or abnormal motility.

  17. Neural and cortical analysis of swallowing and detection of motor imagery of swallow for dysphagia rehabilitation-A review.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Ang, K K; Wang, C; Phua, K S; Guan, C

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing is an essential function in our daily life; nevertheless, stroke or other neurodegenerative diseases can cause the malfunction of swallowing function, ie, dysphagia. The objectives of this review are to understand the neural and cortical basis of swallowing and tongue, and review the latest techniques on the detection of motor imagery of swallow (MI-SW) and motor imagery of tongue movements (MI-TM), so that a practical system can be developed for the rehabilitation of poststroke dysphagia patients. Specifically, we firstly describe the swallowing process and how the swallowing function is assessed clinically. Secondly, we review the techniques that performed the neural and cortical analysis of swallowing and tongue based on different modalities such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and magnetoencephalography. Thirdly, we review the techniques that performed detection and analysis of MI-SW and MI-TM for dysphagia stroke rehabilitation based on electroencephalography (EEG) and NIRS. Finally, discussions on the advantages and limitations of the studies are presented; an example system and future research directions for the rehabilitation of stroke dysphagia patients are suggested. PMID:27590970

  18. Screening Adult Patients with a Tracheostomy Tube for Dysphagia: A Mixed-Methods Study of Practice in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnelly, Aeron; Greenwood, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with tracheostomy tubes are at risk of aspiration and swallowing problems (dysphagia), and because of their medical acuity, complications in this patient population can be severe. It is well recognized that swallow screening in stroke significantly reduces potential complications by allowing early identification and…

  19. Training and Self-Reported Confidence for Dysphagia Management among Speech-Language Pathologists in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Cynthia R.; Dean-Claytor, Ashli

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The number of children requiring dysphagia management in the schools is increasing. This article reports survey findings relative to speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') training and self-rated confidence to treat children with swallowing and feeding disorders in the schools. Method: Surveys were completed by 222 SLPs representing…

  20. Rehabilitation approaches to dysphagia that was developed for a patient who attempted to commit suicide by hanging: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kii, Y; Mizuma, M

    2014-04-01

    We report our experience with a case of attempted suicidal hanging presenting with dysphagia, in which rehabilitation approaches resulted in improvement. A 36-year-old man was discovered collapsed at home. From the finding of a broken cord nearby, attempted suicide by hanging was suspected. He was transported to hospital after 40 minutes, and regained consciousness after emergency treatment. There were no noteworthy findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging, cervical spine computed tomography, or vocal cord examination. There were no noteworthy psychiatric disorders or cognitive abnormalities. On hospital day 10, he showed signs of dysphagia. Videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing revealed piriform sinuses residue and aspiration after ingestion of jelly in any posture. Rehabilitation approaches were started based on the diagnosis of dysphagia due to impaired transit through the piriform sinuses. The patient achieved independent oral intake by 40 days after the injury. In this case, dysphagia was considered attributable to compression of the vagus nerves running along the lateral aspects of the neck by the cord used in the hanging. If compression is brief, full functional recovery can be expected. Implementation of rehabilitation approaches is also important in this situation.

  1. The Role of the School-based Speech-Language Pathologist Serving Preschool Children with Dysphagia: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurjan, Randy Moskowitz

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the role of speech-language pathologists in serving preschool children with dysphagia. Current approaches to feeding and swallowing intervention, etiologies and programs, transdisciplinary teaming, developmental and feeding evaluation, and types of service delivery models (home-based and center-based) for preschool children…

  2. Training Support Staff to Modify Fluids to Appropriate Safe Consistencies for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia: An Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, D. D.; Stubbs, J.; Fovargue, S.; Anderson, D.; Stacey, G.; Tye, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Modifying the consistency of food and drink is a strategy commonly used in the management of dysphagia for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). People with ID often depend on others for the preparation of food and drink and therefore depend on those caregivers achieving the correct consistency to keep them safe and avoid…

  3. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  4. Application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to people with dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer management.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Ward, Elizabeth C; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-12-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an internationally recognized framework which allows its user to describe the consequences of a health condition on an individual in the context of their environment. With growing recognition that dysphagia can have broad ranging physical and psychosocial impacts, the aim of this paper was to identify the ICF domains and categories that describe the full functional impact of dysphagia following non-surgical head and neck cancer (HNC) management, from the perspective of the person with dysphagia. A secondary analysis was conducted on previously published qualitative study data which explored the lived experiences of dysphagia of 24 individuals with self-reported swallowing difficulties following HNC management. Categories and sub-categories identified by the qualitative analysis were subsequently mapped to the ICF using the established linking rules to develop a set of ICF codes relevant to the impact of dysphagia following HNC management. The 69 categories and sub-categories that had emerged from the qualitative analysis were successfully linked to 52 ICF codes. The distribution of these codes across the ICF framework revealed that the components of Body Functions, Activities and Participation, and Environmental Factors were almost equally represented. The findings confirm that the ICF is a valuable framework for representing the complexity and multifaceted impact of dysphagia following HNC. This list of ICF codes, which reflect the diverse impact of dysphagia associated with HNC on the individual, can be used to guide more holistic assessment and management for this population.

  5. Dysphagia lusoria caused by aberrant right subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum, legamentum ring, right descending aorta, and absent left pulmonary artery: a report of a unique vascular congenital disease undetected until adulthood and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hassan, W; Omrani, A Al; Neimatallah, M; Fadley, F Al; Halees, Z Al

    2005-01-01

    An active otherwise healthy and middle-aged woman presented with left supraclavicular pulsation, right upper extremity claudication, and mild dysphagia. Evaluation revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum with aneurysmal degeneration, legamentum arteriosum completing vascular ring, and absent left pulmonary artery with multiple collateral supply to the left lung. She underwent successful surgical repair via right thoracotomy, including division of the vascular ring, resection of the diverticulum and aneurysm, and finally reimplantation of the right subclavian artery to the aortic arch. Her symptoms resolved completely, and she was able to resume normal activities.

  6. How the Body Position Can Influence High-resolution Manometry Results in the Study of Esophageal Dysphagia and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciriza-de-los-Ríos, Constanza; Canga-Rodríguez-Valcárcel, Fernando; Lora-Pablos, David; De-La-Cruz-Bértolo, Javier; Castel-de-Lucas, Isabel; Castellano-Tortajada, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The body position can influence esophageal motility data obtained with high-resolution manometry (HRM). To examine whether the body position influences HRM diagnoses in patients with esophageal dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods HRM (Manoscan) was performed in 99 patients in the sitting and supine positions; 49 had dysphagia and 50 had GERD assessed by 24-hour pH monitoring. HRM plots were analyzed according to the Chicago classification. Results HRM results varied in the final diagnoses of the esophageal body (EB) in patients with dysphagia (P = 0.024), the result being more distal spasm and weak peristalsis while sitting. In patients with GERD, the HRM diagnoses of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology, and EB varied depending on the position; (P = 0.063, P = 0.017, P = 0.041 respectively). Hypotensive LES, EGJ type III (hiatal hernia), and weak peristalsis were more frequently identified in the sitting position. The reliability (kappa) of the position influencing HRM diagnoses was similar in dysphagia and GERD (“LES diagnosis”: dysphagia 0.32 [0.14–0.49] and GERD 0.31 [0.10–0.52], P = 0.960; “EB diagnosis”: dysphagia 0.49 [0.30–0.69] and GERD 0.39 [0.20–0.59], P = 0.480). The reliability in “EGJ morphology” studies was higher in dysphagia 0.81 (0.68–0.94) than in GERD 0.55 (0.37–0.73), P = 0.020. Conclusions HRM results varied according to the position in patients with dysphagia and GERD. Weak peristalsis was more frequently diagnosed while sitting in dysphagia and GERD. Hypotensive LES and EGJ type III (hiatal hernia) were also more frequently diagnosed in the sitting position in patients with GERD. PMID:26130633

  7. A radial basis classifier for the automatic detection of aspiration in children with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon; Blain, Stefanie; Casas, Mike; Kenny, Dave; Berall, Glenn; Chau, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Background Silent aspiration or the inhalation of foodstuffs without overt physiological signs presents a serious health issue for children with dysphagia. To date, there are no reliable means of detecting aspiration in the home or community. An assistive technology that performs in these environments could inform caregivers of adverse events and potentially reduce the morbidity and anxiety of the feeding experience for the child and caregiver, respectively. This paper proposes a classifier for automatic classification of aspiration and swallow vibration signals non-invasively recorded on the neck of children with dysphagia. Methods Vibration signals associated with safe swallows and aspirations, both identified via videofluoroscopy, were collected from over 100 children with neurologically-based dysphagia using a single-axis accelerometer. Five potentially discriminatory mathematical features were extracted from the accelerometry signals. All possible combinations of the five features were investigated in the design of radial basis function classifiers. Performance of different classifiers was compared and the best feature sets were identified. Results Optimal feature combinations for two, three and four features resulted in statistically comparable adjusted accuracies with a radial basis classifier. In particular, the feature pairing of dispersion ratio and normality achieved an adjusted accuracy of 79.8 ± 7.3%, a sensitivity of 79.4 ± 11.7% and specificity of 80.3 ± 12.8% for aspiration detection. Addition of a third feature, namely energy, increased adjusted accuracy to 81.3 ± 8.5% but the change was not statistically significant. A closer look at normality and dispersion ratio features suggest leptokurticity and the frequency and magnitude of atypical values as distinguishing characteristics between swallows and aspirations. The achieved accuracies are 30% higher than those reported for bedside cervical auscultation. Conclusion The proposed aspiration

  8. Treatment Techniques and Site Considerations Regarding Dysphagia-Related Quality of Life in Cancer of the Oropharynx and Nasopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Teguh, David N.; Levendag, Peter C. Noever, Inge; Rooij, Peter van; Voet, Peter; Est, Henrie van der; Sipkema, Dick; Sewnaik, Aniel; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert Jan; Bije, Daniel de la; Schmitz, Paul

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the relationship for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer and nasopharyngeal (NP) cancer between the dose received by the swallowing structures and the dysphagia related quality of life (QoL). Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 85 OP and 47 NP cancer patients were treated by radiation therapy. After 46 Gy, OP cancer is boosted by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), brachytherapy (BT), or frameless stereotactic radiation/cyberknife (CBK). After 46 Gy, the NP cancer was boosted with parallel-opposed fields or IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy; subsequently, a second boost was given by either BT (11 Gy) or stereotactic radiation (SRT)/CBK (11.2 Gy). Sixty OP and 21 NP cancer patients responded to functional and QoL questionnaires (i.e., the Performance Status Scales, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer H and N35, and M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory). The swallowing muscles were delineated and the mean dose calculated using the original three-dimensional computed tomography-based treatment plans. Univariate analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis. Results: Most dysphagia problems were observed in the base of tongue tumors. For OP cancer, boosting with IMRT resulted in more dysphagia as opposed to BT or SRT/CBK. For NPC patients, in contrast to the first booster dose (46-70 Gy), no additional increase of dysphagia by the second boost was observed. Conclusions: The lowest mean doses of radiation to the swallowing muscles were achieved when using BT as opposed to SRT/CBK or IMRT. For the 81 patients alive with no evidence of disease for at least 1 year, a dose-effect relationship was observed between the dose in the superior constrictor muscle and the 'normalcy of diet' (Performance Status Scales) or 'swallowing scale' (H and N35) scores (p < 0.01)

  9. Primary Neurolymphomatosis of the Lower Cranial Nerves Presenting as Dysphagia and Hoarseness: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves. PMID:25083392

  10. Primary neurolymphomatosis of the lower cranial nerves presenting as Dysphagia and hoarseness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-08-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves.

  11. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients.

  12. Effortful swallowing training combined with electrical stimulation in post-stroke dysphagia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youngsun; Oh, Jong-Chi; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2012-12-01

    We tested the effect of effortful swallow combined with surface electrical stimulation used as a form of resistance training in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty post-stroke dysphagic patients were randomly divided into two groups: those who underwent effortful swallow with infrahyoid motor electrical stimulation (experimental group, n = 10) and effortful swallow with infrahyoid sensory electrical stimulation (control group, n = 10). In the experimental group, electrical stimulation was applied to the skin above the infrahyoid muscle with the current was adjusted until muscle contraction occurred and the hyoid bone was depressed. In the control group, the stimulation intensity was applied just above the sensory threshold. The patients in both groups were then asked to swallow effortfully in order to elevate their hyolaryngeal complex when the stimulation began. A total of 12 sessions of 20 min of training for 4 weeks were performed. Blinded biomechanical measurements of the extent of hyolaryngeal excursion, the maximal width of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening, and the penetration-aspiration scale before and after training were performed. In the experimental group, the maximal vertical displacement of the larynx was increased significantly after the intervention (p < 0.05). The maximal vertical displacement of the hyoid bone and the maximal width of the UES opening increased but the increase was not found to be significant (p = 0.066). There was no increase in the control group. Effortful swallow training combined with electrical stimulation increased the extent of laryngeal excursion. This intervention can be used as a new treatment method in post-stroke patients with dysphagia. PMID:22447240

  13. A safe "cut, tie and thread-pull" method for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube removal in children with congenital craniofacial anomalies and pharyngeal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hermanowicz, Adam; Matuszczak, Ewa; Kondej-Muszynska, Katarzyna; Komarowska, Marta; Debek, Wojciech; Klek, Stanislaw

    2014-03-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used method for tube feeding with enteral nutrition. Both PEG's insertion and PEG's removal are usually easy and uncomplicated. The latter can be, however, of substantial difficulty in children with distorted anatomy, such as pharyngeal stenosis or endured craniofacial trauma, when regular endoscopy is contraindicated. The aim of the study was to assess the very simple, but rarely used method for percutaneous removal of the tube by pulling the thread. Four children (4 males, mean age 4.1 year) were analyzed. In all of them the procedure was successful, quick and uncomplicated. To conclude, the thread method should be recommend in case the endoscopic removal is impossible.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Chemoradiotherapy Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical and Functional Results

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Felix Y.; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Worden, Francis P.; Feng, Mary; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Carey, Thomas E.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess clinical and functional results of chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), utilizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the important swallowing structures to reduce post-therapy dysphagia. Patients and Methods This was a prospective study of weekly chemotherapy (carboplatin dosed at one times the area under the curve [AUC, AUC 1] and paclitaxel 30 mg/m2) concurrent with IMRT aiming to spare noninvolved parts of the swallowing structures: pharyngeal constrictors, glottic and supraglottic larynx, and esophagus as well as the oral cavity and major salivary glands. Swallowing was assessed by patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, observer-rated scores, and videofluoroscopy (VF) before therapy and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Results Overall, 73 patients with stages III to IV OPC participated. At a median follow-up of 36 months, 3-year disease-free and locoregional recurrence-free survivals were 88% and 96%, respectively. All measures of dysphagia worsened soon after therapy; observer-rated and patient-reported scores recovered over time, but VF scores did not. At 1 year after therapy, observer-rated dysphagia was absent or minimal (scores 0 to 1) in all patients except four: one who was feeding-tube dependent and three who required soft diet. From pretherapy to 12 months post-therapy, the Swallowing and Eating Domain scores worsened on average (± standard deviation) by 10 ± 21 and 13 ± 19, respectively (on scales of 0 to 100), and VF scores (on scale of 1 to 7) worsened from 2.9 ± 1.5 (mild dysphagia) to 4.1 ± 0.9 (mild/moderate dysphagia). Conclusion Chemoradiotherapy with IMRT aiming to reduce dysphagia can be performed safely for OPC and has high locoregional tumor control rates. On average, long-term patient-reported, observer-rated, and objective measures of swallowing were only slightly worse than pretherapy measures, representing potential improvement compared with previous studies

  15. The provision of enteral nutritional support during definitive chemoradiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Sarah; Reed, Warren Michael

    2015-12-01

    Combination chemoradiation is the gold standard of management for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. One of the most significant advantages of this approach to treatment is organ preservation which may not be possible with radical surgery. Unfortunately, few treatments are without side-effects and the toxicity associated with combined modality treatment causes meaningful morbidity. Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) may have difficulties meeting their nutritional requirements as a consequence of tumour location or size or because of the acute toxicity associated with treatment. In particular, severe mucositis, xerostomia, dysgeusia and nausea and vomiting limit intake. In addition to this, dysphagia is often present at diagnosis, with many patients experiencing silent aspiration. As such, many patients will require enteral nutrition in order to complete chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Feeding occurs via catheters placed transnasally (nasogastric tubes) or directly into the stomach through the anterior abdominal wall (percutaneous gastrostomy tubes). In the absence of clear evidence concerning the superiority of one method over another, the choice of feeding tube tends to be dependent on clinician and patient preference. This review examines key issues associated with the provision of enteral nutritional support during definitive CRT in HNC patients, including feeding methods, patient outcomes and timing of tube insertion and use. PMID:27512573

  16. Orosensory contributions to dysphagia: a link between perception of sweet and sour taste and pharyngeal delay time.

    PubMed

    Pauloski, Barbara R; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2016-06-01

    Pharyngeal delay is a significant swallowing disorder often resulting in aspiration. It is suspected that pharyngeal delay originates from sensory impairment, but a direct demonstration of a link between oral sensation and pharyngeal delay is lacking. In this study involving six patients with complaints of dysphagia, taste sensation of the oral tongue was measured and subsequently related to swallowing kinematics. It was found that a response bias for sour taste was significantly correlated with pharyngeal delay time on paste, highlighting oral sensory contributions to swallow motor dysfunctions. Investigating the precise nature of such a link between oral sensation and dysphagia would constitute a basis for understanding the disorder. The results of this study highlight oral sensory contributions to pharyngeal swallow events and provide impetus to examine this link in larger samples of dysphagic patients. PMID:27302989

  17. Adult-onset dysphagia lusoria secondary to a dissecting aberrant right subclavian artery associated with type B acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Grewal, Puneet Dhillon; Symons, John; Ahmed, Aziz; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 78-year-old African American woman who presented at the Mount Sinai Medical Center (Chicago, USA) with excruciating backache is presented. Computed tomography of the chest at the time of admission showed dissection of the aortic arch, descending aorta and dissection of an aberrant right subclavian artery. She was managed medically for Stanford type B acute aortic dissection. The patient was asymptomatic at presentation, but started complaining of new-onset dysphagia during her stay in the hospital. An esophagogram was performed and suggested posterior impingement of the esophagus, a classic sign of an aberrant right subclavian artery. Because the patient had multiple underlying comorbidities and the dysphagia was mild and intermittent, surgery was deferred. The patient was discharged home after complete stabilization and was scheduled for a follow-up appointment. PMID:18209773

  18. Orosensory contributions to dysphagia: a link between perception of sweet and sour taste and pharyngeal delay time.

    PubMed

    Pauloski, Barbara R; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2016-06-01

    Pharyngeal delay is a significant swallowing disorder often resulting in aspiration. It is suspected that pharyngeal delay originates from sensory impairment, but a direct demonstration of a link between oral sensation and pharyngeal delay is lacking. In this study involving six patients with complaints of dysphagia, taste sensation of the oral tongue was measured and subsequently related to swallowing kinematics. It was found that a response bias for sour taste was significantly correlated with pharyngeal delay time on paste, highlighting oral sensory contributions to swallow motor dysfunctions. Investigating the precise nature of such a link between oral sensation and dysphagia would constitute a basis for understanding the disorder. The results of this study highlight oral sensory contributions to pharyngeal swallow events and provide impetus to examine this link in larger samples of dysphagic patients.

  19. Non-aneurysmal aberrant right subclavian artery causing dysphagia in a young girl: challenges encountered using supraclavicular approach.

    PubMed

    Darwazah, Ahmad K; Eida, Mohammed; Khalil, Ramzi Abu; Ismail, Hassan; Hanbali, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery is the most common anomaly of the aortic arch. Patients are often asymptomatic and discovered accidentally. Occasionally, they present with symptoms related to oesophageal or tracheal compression.A 13-year-old girl presented with dysphagia and stridor was found to have an aberrant right subclavian artery. Surgical division and reconstruction of the artery was performed initially through right supraclavicular approach. An additional left thoracotomy was performed to overcome the challenges encountered at initial operation.

  20. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Desmond, Renee A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V{sub 60}) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 60} greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 65} greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  1. [Severe dysphagia secondary to Plummer-Vinson Syndrome. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; Marcos García, M; Trinidad Ruíz, G; González Palomino, A; Rejas Ugena, E; Trinidad Ramos, G; Blasco Huelva, A

    2004-01-01

    The Plummer-Vinson Syndrome is characterized by the presence of dysphagia, iron deficiency anemia and esophageal webs. We report the clinical case of a 67 year-female who was admitted with aphagia, glositis and important sialorrea. After performing a digestive endoscopy we found a double membrane located on Killiam region (upper esophageal tract) and proceeded, under general anestesia, to neumatic dilatation. The patient followed periodic controls yearly by Digestive Department and Internal Medicine with a significant clinical improvement.

  2. Repair of Kommerell's diverticulum with aberrant left subclavian artery in an elderly patient with right aortic arch and dysphagia lusoria.

    PubMed

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Delamie, Taha; Ratnam, Laxmi; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Zachariah, Sunny

    2011-11-01

    A 60-year-old femalepresented with progressive dysphagia and was found to have a right-sided aortic arch with external posterior compression of the upper esophagus due to severe compression from a Kommerell's diverticulum with an aberrant left subclavian artery. This patient underwent division of the diverticulum with an aorto-subclavian graft implantation under femoro-femoral bypass and recovered uneventfully. A review of the literature and discussion of the surgical management is presented.

  3. Effects of expiratory muscle strength training on oropharyngeal dysphagia in subacute stroke patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Oh, D H; Chang, M Y; Kim, K M

    2016-05-01

    Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) involves forcible blowing as a means of generating high expiratory pressure, against adjustable resistance. EMST has recently been introduced as a potential treatment for dysphagia. This study was performed to investigate the effects of EMST on the activity of suprahyoid muscles, aspiration and dietary stages in stroke patients with dysphagia. Twenty-seven stroke patients with dysphagia were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group performed EMST with a 70% threshold value of maximal expiratory pressure, using an EMST device, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. The placebo group trained with a sham device. The EMST regime involved 5 sets of 5 breaths through the EMST device for a total of 25 breaths per day. Activity in the suprahyoid muscle group was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Further, the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) was used to assess the results of the videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). In addition, dietary stages were evaluated using the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS). The experimental group exhibited improved suprahyoid muscle group activity and PAS results, when compared to the placebo group. Following intervention, statistical analysis indicated significant differences in measured suprahyoid muscle activity (P = 0·01), liquid PAS outcomes (P = 0·03) and FOIS results (P = 0·06), but not semisolid type PAS outcomes (P = 0·32), between the groups. This study confirms EMST as an effective treatment for the development of suprahyoid muscle activity in stroke patients with dysphagia. Additionally, improvements in aspiration and penetration outcomes were observed. PMID:26803525

  4. Perindopril increases the swallowing reflex by inhibiting substance P degradation and tyrosine hydroxylase activation in a rat model of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun-ichi; Kojima, Natsuki; Saeki, Kohji; Ishihara, Miki; Takayama, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hypertension have a high risk of ischemic stroke and subsequent stroke-associated pneumonia. Stroke-associated pneumonia is most likely to develop in patients with dysphagia. The present study was designed to compare the ameliorative effects of different treatments in rat model of dysphagia. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) to induce chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causing disorders of the swallowing reflex. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (perindopril, imidapril and enalapril), an angiotensin II type 1-receptor blocker (losartan), a vasodilator (hydralazine) and an indirect dopamine agonist (amantadine) were dissolved in drinking water and administered to the rats for six weeks. The blood pressure, the swallowing reflex under anesthesia, the substance P content in the striatum and the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the substantial nigra were measured. Compared to the vehicle control, the decrease in the swallowing reflex induced by BCAO was attenuated significantly by enalapril, imidapril and perindopril, but only slightly by losartan. Hydralazine had no effect on the swallowing reflex. Amantadine significantly attenuated the decreased swallowing reflex but increased the blood pressure. Cerebral hypoperfusion for six weeks decreased the TH expression and substance P level. Perindopril improved both the TH expressions and substance P level, but imidapril, enalapril and amantadine only improved the substance P level. The present findings indicate that perindopril could be useful for preventing dysphagia in the chronic stage of stroke by attenuating the decrease in TH expression and the decrease in the substance P level.

  5. High-resolution Impedance Manometry Measurement of Bolus Flow Time in Achalasia and its Correlation with Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Carlson, Dusty; Dykstra, Kristina; Sternbach, Joel; Hungness, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Ciolino, Jody D.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed whether a high-resolution impedance manometry (HRIM) metric, bolus flow time (BFT) across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), was abnormal in achalasia patients subtyped by the Chicago Classification and compared BFT to other HRM metrics. Methods HRIM studies were performed in 60 achalasia patients (14 type I, 36 type II and 10 type III) and 15 healthy controls. Studies were analyzed with a MATLAB program to calculate BFT using a virtual HRIM sleeve. Integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) and basal end-expiratory EGJ pressure were also calculated. The relationship between BFT and dysphagia symptom scores was assessed using the impaction dysphagia questionnaire (IDQ). Key Results Median BFT was significantly lower in achalasia patients (0.5 s, range 0.0 to 3.5 s) compared to controls (3.5 s, range 2.0 to 5.0 s) (P<0.05). BFT was significantly lower in types I and II than in type III achalasia in both the supine and upright positions (p<0.0001). BFT was the only HRIM metric significantly associated with IDQ score in both the supine (R2 =0.20, p=0.0046) and upright positions (R2 =0.27, p=0.0002). Conclusions & Inferences BFT was significantly reduced in all subtypes of achalasia and complementary to the IRP as a diagnostic discriminant in equivocal achalasia cases. Additionally, BFT had a more robust correlation with dysphagia severity compared to other metrics of EGJ function. PMID:26088614

  6. Effect of Electrical Stimulation of the Suprahyoid Muscles in Brain-Injured Patients with Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Beom, Jaewon; Oh, Byung-Mo; Choi, Kyoung Hyo; Kim, Won; Song, Young Jin; You, Dae Sang; Kim, Sang Jun; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the suprahyoid muscle is effective compared to that of the infrahyoid muscle in brain-injured patients with dysphagia. A total of 132 patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, or brain tumor in 2 university hospitals were allocated to 2 groups: those who received electrical stimulation therapy (EST) on the suprahyoid muscles (SM group, n = 66) and those who received EST with one pair of electrodes on the suprahyoid muscle and the other pair on the infrahyoid muscle (SI group, n = 66). Patients received 11.2 ± 3.4 sessions of electrical stimulation in the SM group and 11.9 ± 3.4 sessions in the SI group. The functional dysphagia scale (FDS), swallow function score (SFS), supraglottic penetration, and subglottic aspiration were measured using videofluoroscopic swallowing study. FDS scores decreased from 42.0 ± 19.1 to 32.3 ± 17.8 in the SM group and from 44.8 ± 17.4 to 32.9 ± 18.8 in the SI group by per-protocol (PP) analysis, and those decreased from 41.2 ± 20.9 to 34.5 ± 20.3 in the SM group and from 44.3 ± 19.1 to 35.7 ± 20.5 in the SI group by intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, after electrical stimulation (p < 0.001 for each). SFSs increased from 3.3 ± 1.8 to 4.2 ± 1.6 in the SM group and from 2.8 ± 1.8 to 4.0 ± 1.8 in the SI group by PP analysis, and those increased from 3.3 ± 1.6 to 3.9 ± 1.6 in the SM group and from 2.8 ± 1.9 to 3.6 ± 2.0 in the SI group by ITT analysis, after electrical stimulation (p < 0.001, respectively). However, changes in FDS scores, SFSs, penetration, and aspiration were comparable between the SM and the SI groups. The results suggest that both SM and SI therapies induced similar improvements in swallowing function in brain-injured patients.

  7. Does PEG Use Cause Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Susan; Krisciunas, Gintas P.; Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Evans, Steven R.; Cheng, Debbie M.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use is common in patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer to maintain weight and nutrition during treatment. However, the true effect of PEG use on weight maintenance and its potential impact on long-term dysphagia outcomes have not been adequately studied. This retrospective study looked at swallowing-related outcomes among patients who received prophylactic PEG vs. those who did not, and among patients who maintained oral diets vs. partial oral diets vs. those who were nil per os (NPO). Outcomes were assessed at the end of RT and at 3, 6, and 12 months post RT. A comprehensive review of patients’ medical charts for a 6-year period yielded 59 subjects with complete data. Results showed no difference in long-term percent weight change between the prophylactic PEG patients vs. all others, or between patients who, during RT, had oral diets vs. partial oral diets vs. NPO. However, those who did not receive prophylactic PEGs and those who maintained an oral or a partial oral diet during RT had significantly better diet outcomes at all times post RT. Dependence on a PEG may lead to adverse swallowing ability in post-irradiated head and neck cancer patients possibly due to decreased use of the swallowing musculature. PMID:21850606

  8. Dyspnea and dysphagia from upper airway obstruction after occipitocervical fusion in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Gonda, David D; Briceño, Valentina; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction resulting from overflexion of the craniocervical junction after occipitocervical fusion is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication and is associated with morbidity. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records and diagnostic images of 2 pediatric patients who underwent occipitocervical fusion by the Neuro-Spine Program at Texas Children's Hospital and experienced dyspnea and/or dysphagia from new upper airway obstruction in the postoperative period. Patient demographics, operative data, and preoperative and postoperative occiput-C2 angles were recorded. A review of the literature for similar complications after occipitocervical fusion was performed. A total of 13 cases of prolonged upper airway obstruction after occipitocervical fusion were analyzed. Most of these cases involved adults with rheumatoid arthritis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no previous reports of prolonged upper airway obstruction in children after an occipitocervical fusion. Fixation of the neck in increased flexion (-18° to -5°) was a common finding among these adult and pediatric cases. The authors' cases involved children with micrognathia and comparatively large tongues, which may predispose the oropharynx to obstruction with even the slightest amount of increased flexion. Close attention to a satisfactory fixation angle (occiput-C2 angle) is necessary to avoid airway obstruction after an occipitocervical fusion. Children with micrognathia are particularly sensitive to changes in flexion at the craniocervical junction after occipitocervical fixation. PMID:25828489

  9. The Measurement of Thickened Liquids Used for the Management of Dysphagia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, T. M.; Torley, P. J.; Cichero, J. A. Y.

    2008-07-01

    Dysphagia is a condition where a person has difficulty in swallowing. This can lead to reduced dietary intake, dehydration and malnutrition and also aspiration of material into the lungs and asphyxiation. Using thickened fluids slow the act of swallowing and by doing so enhance safe swallowing. A common method of thickening drinks is to use a powdered thickener, but this can lead to problems in ensuring that the consistency of the degree of thickening appropriate to an individual is maintained by those making up the fiuids. There is also no assurance that the thickness of thickened liquids is consistent across commercial manufacturers. In this field viscosity is typically measured using a Line Spread Test, with the resulting viscosities being described by such terms as nectar- honey- or pudding-thick. This test is prone to many variations in operating conditions and so cannot provide accurate reproducible data. In this paper we have used conventional rheology (dynamic oscillatory using a couette cell) to provide quantitative measurement of the development in thickness of various beverages as a function of time. It was found fruit juices typically required less thickener and milk more to achieve the same thickness, but that the degree of thickening varied non-linearly with addition level.

  10. The analysis of complex patterns of longitudinal binary response: an example of transient dysphagia following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beacon, H J; Thompson, S G; England, P D

    1998-11-30

    In many clinical trials, treatment is given in phases and the prevalence of symptoms is recorded longitudinally. As a result, complex non-linear response patterns may be observed as the prevalence of symptoms changes as a consequence of treatment. In such cases, although profiles of the marginal response over time give an informative description of the data, they do not allow a formal treatment comparison or adjustment for covariates of interest. Here we analyse previously reported data on transient dysphagia in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy. We use a generalized estimating equation approach for repeated measurement binary response to give robust standard errors taking account of the dependence of observations taken on the same subject, alongside a natural cubic spline to represent the complex shape of the marginal response. This provides a reasonable model for the marginal response and allows unbiased estimation of an apparent treatment difference. The effect of different choices for the working correlation matrix is discussed, as is the modelling of treatment group differences that vary over time. We conclude that these models provide a powerful tool for the analysis of such data that can now be applied using generally accessible software.

  11. Cortical compensation associated with dysphagia caused by selective degeneration of bulbar motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Dziewas, Rainer; Teismann, Inga K; Suntrup, Sonja; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Steinstraeter, Olaf; Warnecke, Tobias; Ringelstein, Erich-Bernd; Pantev, Christo

    2009-04-01

    According to recent neuroimaging studies, swallowing is processed within multiple regions of the human brain. In contrast to this, little is known about the cortical contribution and compensatory mechanisms produced by impaired swallowing. In the present study, we therefore investigated the cortical topography of volitional swallowing in patients with X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy (Kennedy disease, KD). Eight dysphagic patients with genetically proven KD and an age-matched healthy control group were studied by means of whole-head magnetoencephalography using a previously established swallowing paradigm. Analysis of data was carried out with synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). The group analysis of individual SAM results was performed using a permutation test. KD patients showed significantly larger swallow-related activation of the bilateral primary sensorimotor cortex than healthy controls. In contrast to the control group, in KD patients the maximum activity was located in the right sensorimotor cortex. Furthermore, while in nondysphagic subjects a previously described time-dependent shift from the left to the right hemisphere was found during the one second of most pronounced swallow-related muscle activity, KD patients showed a strong right hemispheric activation in each time segment analyzed. Since the right hemisphere has an established role in the coordination of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing, the stronger right hemispheric activation observed in KD patients indicates cortical compensation of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. PMID:18548558

  12. Malignant glomus tumor with oncocytic features: an unusual presentation of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Nesrin; Yercİ, Ömer; Yalçınkaya, Ulviye; Gülcü, Barış; Öztürk, Ersin; Yıldırım, Çınar; Çavuşoğlu, İlkin

    2015-07-01

    Glomus tumors in the gastrointestinal tract are unusual, as the previous series in the literature have been mainly limited to the stomach. Less than 10 cases of esophageal glomus tumors have been described in the literature. Oncocytic glomus tumors are a recently identified, rare variant of the glomus tumor. We report a 47-year-old female who presented with an approximately 3-month history of dysphagia and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a black-purple, hypervascular, protruding lesion measuring approximately 65 mm at the 37th cm of the esophagus. The patient underwent an Ivor Lewis operation via open thoracotomy. The resected specimen had a protuberant, ulcerated mass measuring 80 × 35 mm in the posterior wall of the esophagus. Based on the histopathological, immunohistochemical and electron microscope findings, the final diagnosis was a malignant glomus tumor with oncocytic features. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a malignant glomus tumor with oncocytic features in an esophageal location. PMID:25908295

  13. Dysphagia, Speech, Voice, and Trismus following Radiotherapy and/or Chemotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Carcinoma: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Koetsenruijter, K. W. J.; Swan, K.; Bogaardt, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with head and neck cancer suffer from various impairments due to the primary illness, as well as secondary consequences of the oncological treatment. This systematic review describes the effects of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy on the functions of the upper aerodigestive tract in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed by two independent reviewers using the electronic databases PubMed and Embase. All dates up to May 2016 were included. Results. Of the 947 abstracts, sixty articles met the inclusion criteria and described one or more aspects of the sequelae of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Forty studies described swallowing-related problems, 24 described voice-related problems, seven described trismus, and 25 studies described general quality of life. Only 14 articles reported that speech pathologists conducted the interventions, of which only six articles described in detail what the interventions involved. Conclusion. In general, voice quality improved following intervention, whereas quality of life, dysphagia, and oral intake deteriorated during and after treatment. However, as a consequence of the diversity in treatment protocols and patient characteristics, the conclusions of most studies cannot be easily generalised. Further research on the effects of oncological interventions on the upper aerodigestive tract is needed. PMID:27722170

  14. Direct effects of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy® on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Annekatrin; Cataldo, Marilena; Kerz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy® on swallowing frequency of non-tracheotomised patients with acute neurogenic dysphagia. Methods: Within a pre-, post-/during and follow-up study design, 19 non-tracheotomised dysphagic patients were included consecutively and treated according to three specific preselected Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques. Results: The primary outcome was the direct effect of the three different Facio-Oral Tract Therapy stimulation techniques on the number of swallows. We found a significant effect of Facio-Oral Tract Therapy on swallowing frequency as compared to baseline with an increase by 65.63% and medium effect size of D = 0.62. No significant difference could be demonstrated when comparing baseline to follow-up. Conclusion: For the first time, this positive therapy effect could be demonstrated on a population of non-tracheotomised patients. Facio-Oral Tract Therapy seems to be an appropriate means for improving effectiveness and safety of swallowing. Since improvement was not long lasting, it appears to be reasonable to apply therapy frequently during the day with the plausible result of minimising the amount of aspirated saliva and thereby reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Further studies may consider choosing a randomised controlled trial design to demonstrate that change in swallow frequency is related to the target intervention only. PMID:26770778

  15. Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Teresa E.; Braun, Sabrina M.; Brooks, Ryan T.; Harris, Rebecca A.; Littrell, Loren L.; Neff, Ryan M.; Hinkel, Cameron J.; Allen, Mitchell J.; Ulsas, Mollie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models. PMID:25866882

  16. Effect of pH on Rheological Properties of Dysphagia-Oriented Thickened Water

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seung-No; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2016-01-01

    Flow and dynamic rheological properties of thickened waters prepared with commercial food thickeners were investigated at different pH levels (3, 4, 5, 6, and 7). The commercial xanthan gum (XG)-based thickener (thickener A) and starch-based thickener (thickener B), which have been commonly used in a domestic hospital and nursing home for patients with swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) in Korea, were selected in this study. Thickened samples with both thickeners at different pH levels showed high shear-thinning flow behaviors (n=0.08~0.22). Thickened samples at pH 3 showed higher n values and lower consistency index (K) values when compared to those at other pH levels. The K values of thickener A increased with an increase in pH level, while the n values decreased, showing that the flow properties greatly depended on pH. There were no noticeable changes in the K values of thickener B between pH 4 and 7. At pH 3, the thickened water with thickener A showed a higher storage modulus (G′) value, while that with thickener B showed a lower G′. These rheological parameters exhibited differences in rheological behaviors between XG-based and starch-based thickeners, indicating that the rheological properties of thickened waters appear to be greatly influenced by the acidic condition and the type of food thickener. Appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener seems to be greatly important for the preparation of thickened acidic fluids with desirable rheological properties for safe swallowing. PMID:27069910

  17. Adapting human videofluoroscopic swallow study methods to detect and characterize dysphagia in murine disease models.

    PubMed

    Lever, Teresa E; Braun, Sabrina M; Brooks, Ryan T; Harris, Rebecca A; Littrell, Loren L; Neff, Ryan M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Allen, Mitchell J; Ulsas, Mollie A

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models.

  18. Effect of pH on Rheological Properties of Dysphagia-Oriented Thickened Water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seung-No; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2016-03-01

    Flow and dynamic rheological properties of thickened waters prepared with commercial food thickeners were investigated at different pH levels (3, 4, 5, 6, and 7). The commercial xanthan gum (XG)-based thickener (thickener A) and starch-based thickener (thickener B), which have been commonly used in a domestic hospital and nursing home for patients with swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) in Korea, were selected in this study. Thickened samples with both thickeners at different pH levels showed high shear-thinning flow behaviors (n=0.08~0.22). Thickened samples at pH 3 showed higher n values and lower consistency index (K) values when compared to those at other pH levels. The K values of thickener A increased with an increase in pH level, while the n values decreased, showing that the flow properties greatly depended on pH. There were no noticeable changes in the K values of thickener B between pH 4 and 7. At pH 3, the thickened water with thickener A showed a higher storage modulus (G') value, while that with thickener B showed a lower G'. These rheological parameters exhibited differences in rheological behaviors between XG-based and starch-based thickeners, indicating that the rheological properties of thickened waters appear to be greatly influenced by the acidic condition and the type of food thickener. Appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener seems to be greatly important for the preparation of thickened acidic fluids with desirable rheological properties for safe swallowing.

  19. Dysphagia and health-related quality of life in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Helen; Bergman, Karin; Finizia, Caterina; Johansson, Leif; Bove, Mogens; Bergquist, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated disease, with dysphagia as the main symptom. The aim of this study was to survey symptoms and health-related quality of life in adult patients with EoE at least 1 year after diagnosis and a 2-month course of topical corticosteroids. Forty-seven consecutive patients [79 % males, mean age 49 years (range 18-90 years)] were evaluated using three different questionnaires at three different occasions: the Watson Dysphagia Scale (WDS), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Oesophageal Module 18 (EORTC QLQ-OES18) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). The median time from diagnosis to the long-term follow-up was 23 months (range 12-34 months). The WDS scores and the EORTC QLQ-OES18 Dysphagia and Eating scale scores were improved after 2 months of treatment (p = 0.00007, p = 0.01, p = 0.004, respectively), as were the long-term follow-up scores (p = 0.01, p = 0.03, p = 0.005, respectively), relative to the scores at diagnosis. In addition, the EORTC QLQ-OES18 Choking scores were improved after the steroid course (p = 0.003) but not after the long-term follow-up. No significant differences were detected with respect to the SF-36 scores. In summary, EoE seems to be associated with a substantial burden of symptoms that improve significantly after treatment. A partial remission persists more than 1 year after diagnosis and the discontinuation of medication. The WDS and the EORTC QLQ-OES18 appear to be sensitive instruments appropriate for surveillance in these patients.

  20. The Functional Dysphagia Scale Is a Useful Tool for Predicting Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the correlation between the functional dysphagia scale and aspiration pneumonia and which characteristics influence the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. Methods Fifty-three patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease were prospectively evaluated in this study. Disease severity and functional status were measured by modified Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, Schwab and England activities of daily living (S-E ADL) scale and Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE). Swallowing function was evaluated by the functional dysphagia scale (FDS) and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) based on a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The patients were followed up for 3 months and divided into two groups according to the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia. The correlation between the variables and aspiration pneumonia was analyzed. Results Eight patients of the 53 patients were allocated to the aspiration pneumonia group and 45 patients to the non-aspiration pneumonia group. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher H&Y staging, and scored lower on S-E ADL scale and K-MMSE. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher scores on FDS and PAS. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the S-E ADL scale and the FDS were associated with the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in the patients with Parkinson disease. Conclusion Given that the FDS can quantitatively assess the functional problems associated with dysphagia, it can be clinically effective in predicting the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia, and the FDS and the S-E ADL scale could be predictive variables for aspiration pneumonia in patients with Parkinson disease. PMID:27446780

  1. Associations Between Prolonged Intubation and Developing Post-extubation Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia in Non-neurologic Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Young Sook; Song, You Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the associations between the duration of endotracheal intubation and developing post-extubational supraglottic and infraglottic aspiration (PEA) and subsequent aspiration pneumonia. Methods This was a retrospective observational study from January 2009 to November 2014 of all adult patients who had non-neurologic critical illness, required endotracheal intubation and were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Demographic information, intensive care unit (ICU) admission diagnosis, severity of critical illness, duration of endotracheal intubation, length of stay in ICU, presence of PEA and severity of dysphagia were reviewed. Results Seventy-four patients were enrolled and their PEA frequency was 59%. Patients with PEA had significantly longer endotracheal intubation durations than did those without (median [interquartile range]: 15 [9-21] vs. 10 [6-15] days; p=0.02). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the endotracheal intubation duration was significantly associated with PEA (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.18; p=0.04). Spearman correlation analysis of intubation duration and dysphagia severity showed a positive linear association (r=0.282, p=0.02). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of endotracheal intubation duration for developing PEA and aspiration pneumonia were 0.665 (95% CI, 0.542-0.788; p=0.02) and 0.727 (95% CI, 0.614-0.840; p=0.001), respectively. Conclusion In non-neurologic critically ill patients, the duration of endotracheal intubation was independently associated with PEA development. Additionally, the duration was positively correlated with dysphagia severity and may be helpful for identifying patients who require a swallowing evaluation after extubation. PMID:26605174

  2. The Value of Oro-Pharyngo-Esophageal Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Aspiration into the Tracheo-bronchial Tree and Consequent Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Mariano; Duce, Valerio; Fattori, Bruno; Bruschini, Luca; Meniconi, Martina; Raschillà, Rosanna; Cocco, Fabiola; Locantore, Luisa; Guidoccio, Federica; Orsini, Federica; Massri, Katrin; Volterrani, Duccio; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Context: Tracheo-bronchial aspiration is the most invalidating condition which can happen to patients affected by dysphagia, especially when caused by central neurologic disorders; the associated pneumonia episodes represent the most frequent cause of death in these patients. Oro-pharyngo-esophageal scintigraphy (OPES) allows both functional imaging and semiquantitative evaluation of the subsequent phases of swallowing. Case Report: We evaluated by means of OPES a woman who had previously undergone high-dose external beam radiation therapy for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which determined tissue fibrosis and progressive dysphagia. Conclusion: In this patient with dysphagia, OPES was a simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and reliable technique that allowed to show the presence of bolus aspiration and quantified tracheobronchial aspirate. PMID:26713303

  3. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  4. Rheological characteristics of cold thickened beverages containing xanthan gum-based food thickeners used for dysphagia diets.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun M; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2015-01-01

    Cold beverages are commonly thickened with commercial gum-based food thickeners for consumption by patients with dysphagia. In this study, the rheological properties of a thickened water and five thickened beverages (orange juice, apple juice, grape juice, whole milk, and a sport drink) that were prepared with four commercial instant xanthan gum-based thickeners (coded A-D) were investigated at a 3% thickener concentration. All thickened samples showed high shear-thinning behavior with yield stress at the serving temperature of 8°C. The magnitudes of apparent viscosity (ηa,50), consistency index (K), storage modulus (G'), and loss modulus (G'') of the thickened beverages, except for water, with food thickener A were significantly higher compared with other thickeners (B, C, and D) (P<0.05). The largest increases in K values for thickened beverages were observed at 1-hour storage, and at longer times their K values, except for milk, remained approximately constant. Rheological parameters demonstrated statistically significant differences in flow and dynamic behaviors between the cold thickened beverages prepared with the xanthan gum-based food thickeners (P<0.05), indicating that their rheological properties are strongly influenced by the dispersing medium, the type of food thickener, and storage time. In particular, appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener for preparing thickened beverages seems to be of importance for managing dysphagia.

  5. Effect of orofacial myofunctional exercise on the improvement of dysphagia patients’ orofacial muscle strength and diadochokinetic rate

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Measurement of the diadochokinetic rate can provide useful information on swallowing rehabilitation in the oral phase by elucidating the speed and regularity of movement of muscles related to the lips, tongue, and chin. This study investigated the effect of a three-week period of orofacial myofunctional exercise on the improvement of cheek, tongue, and lip muscle strength and diadochokinetic rate in dysphagia patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study employed a pretest-posttest control group design. Both orofacial myofunctional exercise and the temperature-tactile stimulation technique were applied to the experimental group (n=23), while only the temperature-tactile stimulation technique was applied to the control group (n=25). [Results] Tongue elevation, tongue protrusion, cheek compression, lip compression, and alternating motion rate were more significantly improved in the experimental group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Orofacial myofunctional exercise is effective in the rehabilitation of swallowing function in the oral phase in dysphagia patients by improving orofacial muscle strength and response rate. PMID:27799705

  6. The evaluation of swallowing in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia and oropharyngeal dysphagia: A comparison study of videofluoroscopic and sonar doppler

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmassih, Edna Márcia da Silva; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2013-01-01

    Sumarry Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a degenerative disease that can cause loss of coordination of voluntary muscle movement such as that required for swallowing. Aims: The purposes of this cross-sectional and comparative case study were: (1) to assess the severity of dysphagia through a videofluoroscopic swallow study, and (2) to compare differences in frequency, intensity, and duration of sound waves produced during swallowing in normal and SCA patients by using sonar Doppler. Method: During swallow evaluation using videofluoroscopy, a sonar Doppler transducer was placed on the right side of the neck, at the lateral edge of the trachea, just below the cricoid cartilage to capture the sounds of swallowing in 30 SCA patients and 30 controls. Result: The prevalence in the dynamic evaluation of swallowing videofluoroscopy was by changes in the oral phase of swallowing. The analysis of variance of the averages found in each variable - frequency, intensity and duration of swallowing - shows there was a significant correlation when compared to the healthy individual curve. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the prevalence of oral dysphagia observed in dynamic videofluoroscopic swallow evaluation. In patients with SCA, the mean initial frequency (IF), initial intensity (II), and final intensity (FI) were higher and the time (T) and peak frequency (PF) were lower, demonstrating a pattern of cricopharyngeal opening very close to that found in normal populations. PMID:26038680

  7. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  8. Effects of Device-Facilitated Isometric Progressive Resistance Oropharyngeal Therapy on Swallowing and Health-Related Outcomes in Older Adults with Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Rusche, Nicole; Hind, Jacqueline A; Zielinski, Jill; Gangnon, Ronald; Safdar, Nasia; Robbins, JoAnne

    2016-02-01

    Swallowing disorders (dysphagia) are associated with malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and mortality in older adults. Strengthening interventions have shown promising results, but the effectiveness of treating dysphagia in older adults remains to be established. The Swallow STRengthening OropharyNGeal (Swallow STRONG) Program is a multidisciplinary program that employs a specific approach to oropharyngeal strengthening-device-facilitated (D-F) isometric progressive resistance oropharyngeal (I-PRO) therapy-with the goal of reducing health-related sequelae in veterans with dysphagia. Participants completed 8 weeks of D-F I-PRO therapy while receiving nutritional counseling and respiratory status monitoring. Assessments were completed at baseline, 4, and 8 weeks. At each visit, videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were performed. Dietary and swallowing-related quality of life questionnaires were administered. Long-term monitoring for 6-17 months after enrollment allowed for comparison of pneumonia incidence and hospitalizations to the 6-17 months before the program. Veterans with dysphagia confirmed with videofluoroscopy (N = 56; 55 male, 1 female; mean age 70) were enrolled. Lingual pressures increased at anterior (effect estimate = 92.5, P < .001) and posterior locations (effect estimate = 85.4, P < .001) over 8 weeks. Statistically significant improvements occurred on eight of 11 subscales of the Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders (SWAL-QOL) Questionnaire (effect estimates = 6.5-19.5, P < .04) and in self-reported sense of effort (effect estimate = -18.1, P = .001). Higher Functional Oral Intake Scale scores (effect estimate = 0.4, P = .02) indicated that participants were able to eat less-restrictive diets. There was a 67% reduction in pneumonia diagnoses, although the difference was not statistically significant. The number of hospital admissions decreased significantly (effect estimate = 0.96; P = .009) from before to after enrollment. Findings suggest

  9. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Descriptive case report.To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one.Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown.A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5.We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications.We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of the Eating Assessment Tool and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test for clinical evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Rofes, L; Arreola, V; Mukherjee, R; Clavé, P

    2014-01-01

    Background Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is an underdiagnosed digestive disorder that causes severe nutritional and respiratory complications. Our aim was to determine the accuracy of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and the Volume-Viscosity Swallow Test (V-VST) for clinical evaluation of OD. Methods We studied 120 patients with swallowing difficulties and 14 healthy subjects. OD was evaluated by the 10-item screening questionnaire EAT-10 and the bedside method V-VST, videofluoroscopy (VFS) being the reference standard. The V-VST is an effort test that uses boluses of different volumes and viscosities to identify clinical signs of impaired efficacy (impaired labial seal, piecemeal deglutition, and residue) and impaired safety of swallow (cough, voice changes, and oxygen desaturation ≥3%). Discriminating ability was assessed by the AUC of the ROC curve and sensitivity and specificity values. Key Results According to VFS, prevalence of OD was 87%, 75.6% with impaired efficacy and 80.9% with impaired safety of swallow including 17.6% aspirations. The EAT-10 showed a ROC AUC of 0.89 for OD with an optimal cut-off at 2 (0.89 sensitivity and 0.82 specificity). The V-VST showed 0.94 sensitivity and 0.88 specificity for OD, 0.79 sensitivity and 0.75 specificity for impaired efficacy, 0.87 sensitivity and 0.81 specificity for impaired safety, and 0.91 sensitivity and 0.28 specificity for aspirations. Conclusions & Inferences Clinical methods for screening (EAT-10) and assessment (V-VST) of OD offer excellent psychometric proprieties that allow adequate management of OD. Their universal application among at-risk populations will improve the identification of patients with OD at risk for malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. PMID:24909661

  11. Effect of bolus volume and viscosity on pharyngeal automated impedance manometry variables derived for broad Dysphagia patients.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Dejaeger, Eddy; Tack, Jan; Van Beckevoort, Dirk; Rommel, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Automated impedance manometry (AIM) analysis measures swallow variables defining bolus timing, pressure, contractile vigour, and bolus presence, which are combined to derive a swallow risk index (SRI) correlating with aspiration. In a heterogeneous cohort of dysphagia patients, we assessed the impact of bolus volume and viscosity on AIM variables. We studied 40 patients (average age = 46 years). Swallowing of boluses was recorded with manometry, impedance, and videofluoroscopy. AIMplot software was used to derive functional variables: peak pressure (PeakP), pressure at nadir impedance (PNadImp), time from nadir impedance to peak pressure (TNadImp-PeakP), the interval of impedance drop in the distal pharynx (flow interval, FI), upper oesophageal sphincter (UES) relaxation interval (UES RI), nadir UES pressure (Nad UESP), UES intrabolus pressure (UES IBP), and UES resistance. The SRI was derived using the formula SRI = (FI * PNadImp)/(PeakP * (TNadImp-PeakP + 1)) * 100. A total of 173 liquid, 44 semisolid, and 33 solid boluses were analysed. The SRI was elevated in relation to aspiration. PeakP increased with volume. SRI was not significantly altered by bolus volume. PNadImp, UES IBP, and UES resistance increased with viscosity. SRI was lower with increased viscosity. In patients with dysphagia, the SRI is elevated in relation to aspiration, reduced by bolus viscosity, and not affected by bolus volume. These data provide evidence that pharyngeal AIM analysis may have clinical utility for assessing deglutitive aspiration risk to liquid boluses.

  12. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Clinical correlation of dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis and dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Fua, Tsien F. . E-mail: tsien-fei.fua@petermac.org; Corry, June; Milner, Alvin D.; Cramb, Jim; Walsham, Sue F.; Peters, Lester J.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify the dose delivered to the pharyngo-esophageal axis using different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to correlate this with acute swallowing toxicity. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 28 patients treated with IMRT between February 2002 and August 2005: 20 with whole field IMRT (WF-IMRT) and 8 with IMRT fields junctioned with an anterior neck field with central shielding (j-IMRT). Dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis was measured using dose-volume histograms. Acute swallowing toxicity was assessed by review of dysphagia grade during treatment and enteral feeding requirements. Results: The mean pharyngo-esophageal dose was 55.2 Gy in the WF-IMRT group and 27.2 Gy in the j-IMRT group, p < 0.001. Ninety-five percent (19/20) of the WF-IMRT group developed Grade 3 dysphagia compared with 62.5% (5/8) of the j-IMRT group, p = 0.06. Feeding tube duration was a median of 38 days for the WF-IMRT group compared with 6 days for the j-IMRT group, p = 0.04. Conclusions: Clinical vigilance must be maintained when introducing new technology to ensure that unanticipated adverse effects do not result. Although newer planning systems can reduce the dose to the pharyngo-esophageal axis with WF-IMRT, the j-IMRT technique is preferred at least in patients with no gross disease in the lower neck.

  13. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  14. Immediate effects of Kinesio Taping on the movement of the hyoid bone and epiglottis during swallowing by stroke patients with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Seo Yoon; Kim, Kyeong Mi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of Kinesio Taping (KT) on the swallowing function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two stroke patients were randomly assigned to two groups; an experimental group which received KT, and a control group which received no taping intervention. Two-dimensional kinematic analysis was used to determine the displacement of the hyoid bone and the angular variation of the epiglottis using human anatomy-based coordinates. The functional dysphagia scale (FDS) was determined by a videofluoroscopic study (VFSS). [Results] The experimental group presented statistically significant improvements in kinematic changes of the vertical excursion of the hyoid bone and epiglottal rotation. [Conclusion] Clinical use of KT for dysphagia patients should be considered as a treatment approach. In future research, more subjects and more diverse patterns should be studied to accumulate further evidence. PMID:26696697

  15. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  16. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  17. A case of plummer-vinson syndrome showing rapid improvement of Dysphagia and esophageal web after two weeks of iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Sumi, Kazuya; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2014-05-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a rare entity characterized by upper esophageal webs and iron deficiency anemia. We report a case of PVS whose esophageal web was rapidly improved by iron therapy. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia, vomiting, shortness of breath and weight loss for 1 month. Physical examination revealed conjunctival pallor, koilonychia, angular cheilitis and smooth tongue, and laboratory findings were consistent with microcytic hypochromic anemia with iron deficiency. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and barium-swallow esophagography detected a web that prevented passage of the endoscope into the upper portion of the esophagus. The patient received oral iron therapy daily; the hemoglobin concentration rose to 8.9 g/dl and the complaints of dysphagia were dramatically improved after 2 weeks, with improvement of luminal stenosis confirmed by gastrointestinal endoscopy and barium-swallow esophagography. The PVS described in this report had a distinct clinical course, showing very rapid improvement of dysphagia and esophageal web after 2 weeks of oral iron therapy.

  18. A Case of Plummer-Vinson Syndrome Showing Rapid Improvement of Dysphagia and Esophageal Web after Two Weeks of Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Sumi, Kazuya; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a rare entity characterized by upper esophageal webs and iron deficiency anemia. We report a case of PVS whose esophageal web was rapidly improved by iron therapy. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia, vomiting, shortness of breath and weight loss for 1 month. Physical examination revealed conjunctival pallor, koilonychia, angular cheilitis and smooth tongue, and laboratory findings were consistent with microcytic hypochromic anemia with iron deficiency. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and barium-swallow esophagography detected a web that prevented passage of the endoscope into the upper portion of the esophagus. The patient received oral iron therapy daily; the hemoglobin concentration rose to 8.9 g/dl and the complaints of dysphagia were dramatically improved after 2 weeks, with improvement of luminal stenosis confirmed by gastrointestinal endoscopy and barium-swallow esophagography. The PVS described in this report had a distinct clinical course, showing very rapid improvement of dysphagia and esophageal web after 2 weeks of oral iron therapy. PMID:25028578

  19. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease.

  20. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  1. Proposal for a New Exercise Method for Dysphagia with Velopharyngeal Inadequacy: A Case of Bickerstaff's Brainstem Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yuji; Nitta, Kayako; Tochikura, Michi; Kasahara, Takashi; Kametsu, Yutaka; Toyokura, Minoru; Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis is an autoimmune disease with the primary lesion situated in the brainstem and three cardinal signs: ophthalmoplegia; ataxia; and impaired consciousness. A 68-year-old man was started on rehabilitation exercise 3 months after onset of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis, due to remnant dysarthria and dysphagia (Functional Oral Intake Scale, level 5) after the cardinal signs of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis resolved. Exercise involved using a straw in the anterior midline between the dorsal tongue and hard palate. While the patient was inhaling through the straw, the straw was blocked. After strengthening suction as much as possible, the patient was asked to immediately dry swallow at the same time that suction was stopped. Effects of exercise were examined using videofluorographic swallowing studies before and after 6 weeks of training to compare posterior and superior velar displacements and the presence of nasopharyngeal reflux. No adverse effects of exercise were encountered, and Functional Oral Intake Scale improved to level 7, with significant increases in posterior and superior velar displacement during swallowing compared with before training. In addition, nasopharyngeal reflux that had consistently been seen on swallowing before training was absent after 6 weeks of exercise. This exercise method may prove useful. PMID:27628607

  2. Measuring Outcomes for Dysphagia: Validity and Reliability of the European Portuguese Eating Assessment Tool (P-EAT-10).

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Dália Santos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes; Reis, Elizabeth Azevedo; Lopes, Inês Sousa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and the reliability of the European Portuguese version of the EAT-10 (P-EAT-10). This research was conducted in three phases: (i) cultural and linguistic adaptation; (ii) feasibility and reliability test; and (iii) validity tests. The final sample was formed by a cohort of 520 subjects. The P-EAT-10 index was compared for socio-demographic and clinic variables. It was also compared for both dysphagic and non-dysphagic groups as well as for the results of the 3Oz wst. Lastly, the P-EAT-10 scores were correlated with the EuroQol Group Portuguese EQ-5D index. The Cronbach's α obtained for the P-EAT-10 scale was 0.952 and it remained excellent even if any item was deleted. The item-total and the intraclass correlation coefficients were very good. The P-EAT-10 mean of the non-dysphagic cohort was 0.56 and that of the dysphagic cohort was 14.26, the mean comparison between the 3Oz wst groups and the P-EAT-10 scores were significant. A significant higher perception of QoL was also found among the non-dysphagic subjects. P-EAT-10 is a valid and reliable measure that may be used to document dysphagia which makes it useful both for screening in clinical practice and in research.

  3. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group.

  4. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  5. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Thirumazhisai; Prabhakar, Gautham; Schwartz, Alan; Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep; Berman, James

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  6. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  7. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  8. Swallowing Tablets and Capsules Increases the Risk of Penetration and Aspiration in Patients with Stroke-Induced Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Julia T; Penner, Heike; Schneider, Hendrik; Quinzler, Renate; Reich, Gabriele; Wezler, Nikolai; Micol, William; Oster, Peter; Haefeli, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of difficulties swallowing solid dosage forms in patients with stroke-induced dysphagia and whether swallowing tablets/capsules increases their risk of penetration and aspiration. Concurrently, we explored whether routinely performed assessment tests help identify patients at risk. Using video endoscopy, we evaluated how 52 patients swallowed four different placebos (round, oval, and oblong tablets and a capsule) with texture-modified water (TMW, pudding consistency) and milk and rated their swallowing performance according to the Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS). Additionally, Daniels Test, Bogenhausener Dysphagiescore, Scandinavian Stroke Scale, Barthel Index, and Tinetti's Mobility Test were conducted. A substantial proportion of the patients experienced severe difficulties swallowing solid oral dosage forms (TMW: 40.4 %, milk: 43.5 %). Compared to the administration of TMW/milk alone, the placebos increased the PAS values in the majority of the patients (TMW: median PAS from 1.5 to 2.0; milk: median PAS from 1.5 to 2.5, each p value <0.0001) and residue values were significantly higher (p < 0.05). Whereas video-endoscopic examination reliably identified patients with difficulties swallowing medication, neither patients' self-evaluation nor one of the routinely performed bedside tests did. Therefore, before video-endoscopic evaluation, many drugs were modified unnecessarily and 20.8 % of these were crushed inadequately, although switching to another dosage form or drug would have been possible. Hence, safety and effectiveness of swallowing tablets and capsules should be evaluated routinely in video-endoscopic examinations, tablets/capsules should rather be provided with TMW than with milk, and the appropriateness of "non per os except medication" orders for dysphagic stroke patients should be questioned.

  9. Pain and dysphagia in patients with squamous carcinomas of the head and neck: the role of perineural spread1

    PubMed Central

    Carter, R L; Pittam, M R; Tanner, N S B

    1982-01-01

    Clinical and pathological features of perineural spread have been investigated in patients with squamous carcinomas at several sites in the head and neck. In 100 surgical cases, the clinical and pathological findings were congruent in 76%. Combined clinical and histological evidence of perineural invasion was recorded in 33% and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 44%. Perineural infiltration was demonstrated histologically in 51% of major excisions from the buccal cavity and in 34% of resections from the oropharynx, hypopharynx and cervical oesophagus. The neurological findings were dominated by hypoaesthesia, dysaesthesia and referred pain – mainly in the territories of cranial nerves V and IX. Multiple and/or sequential nerve involvement was occasionally seen. No correlation was established between nerve invasion and metastasis to regional lymph nodes. Long-distance infiltration of nerve trunks, and multiple involvement, are grave prognostic features. In 17 terminal patients submitted to autopsy, 65% had combined clinical and pathological evidence of perineural spread and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 88%. Sensory changes again predominated. Multiple nerve involvement was observed in 35%. An apparently new `dysphagia syndrome' is described in 4 patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas in whom gross mechanical obstruction was simulated by a combination of perineural spread of tumour into the ipsilateral vagal trunk, sometimes accompanied by segmental infarction, variable invasion of the sympathetic chain, and `splinting' of the pharynx by local fibrosis and tumour in the soft tissues of the neck. Short-term palliation was achieved in these patients with high-dose steroids. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7108879

  10. 75 FR 76020 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Devices for Treating Dysphagia and Dysphonia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... in the brain stem that augments the volitional control of swallowing. This principle is applicable to... the spinal cord or in the brain stem) as well as higher order interactions. This invention includes... connector for attaching the device to the patient's neck, substantially over the patient's larynx....

  11. Pneumonia and in-hospital mortality in the context of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) in stroke and a new NOD step-wise concept.

    PubMed

    Ickenstein, G W; Riecker, A; Höhlig, C; Müller, R; Becker, U; Reichmann, H; Prosiegel, M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our work was to develop a step-wise concept for investigating neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) that could be used by both trained nursing staff as well as swallowing therapists and physicians to identify patients with NOD at an early stage and so enable an appropriate therapy to be started. To achieve this objective, we assessed uniform terminology and standard operating procedures (SOP) in a new NOD step-wise concept. In-house stroke mortality rates and rates of pneumonia were measured over time (2003-2009) in order to show improvements in quality of care. In addition, outcome measures in a stroke-unit monitoring system were studied after neurorehabilitation (day 90) assessing quality of life (QL) and patient feedback. An investigation that was carried out in the context of internal and external quality assurance stroke projects revealed a significant correlation between the NOD step-wise concept and low rates of pneumonia and in-house mortality. The quality of life measures show a delta value that can contribute to "post-stroke" depression. The NOD step-wise concept (NSC) should, on the one hand, be capable of being routinely used in clinical care and, on the other, being able to fulfil the requirements of being scientifically based for investigating different stages of swallowing disorders. The value of our NSC relates to the effective management of clinical resources and the provision of adequate diagnostic and therapeutic options for different grades of dysphagia. We anticipate that our concept will provide substantial support to physicians, as well as swallowing therapists, in clinical settings and rehabilitation facilities, thereby promoting better guidance and understanding of neurogenic dysphagia as a concept in acute and rehabilitation care, especially stroke-unit settings.

  12. Unilateral vocal cord palsy and dysphagia: an unusual presentation of cerebellopontine angle meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Andrew; Douglas, James Andrew; Thompson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours are the most common neoplasms in the posterior fossa, accounting for 5–10% of intracranial tumours. Most CPA tumours are benign, with most being vestibular schwannomas. Meningiomas arising from the jugular foramen are among the rarest of all with very few being described in the literature. Treatment options vary considerably as experience with these tumours is limited. One option is a skull base approach, but this depends on size, location and ability to preserve lower cranial nerve function. This can be extremely challenging and is accompanied by high mortality risk; therefore, a more conservative option must be considered. This case report highlights the difficulty in management of patients with jugular fossa meningiomas, including appropriate investigations, analysis of surgical versus conservative treatment and associated complications. Furthermore, we elaborate the decision-making process pertaining to the tailoring of the surgical route used for the resection of jugular foramen meningiomas. (Jugular Foramen Meningioma, cerebellopontine angle). PMID:26486157

  13. Simulation-Based Dysphagia Training: Teaching Interprofessional Clinical Reasoning in a Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Miles, Anna; Friary, Philippa; Jackson, Bianca; Sekula, Julia; Braakhuis, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated hospital readiness and interprofessional clinical reasoning in speech-language pathology and dietetics students following a simulation-based teaching package. Thirty-one students participated in two half-day simulation workshops. The training included orientation to the hospital setting, part-task skill learning and immersive simulated cases. Students completed workshop evaluation forms. They filled in a 10-question survey regarding confidence, knowledge and preparedness for working in a hospital environment before and immediately after the workshops. Students completed written 15-min clinical vignettes at 1 month prior to training, immediately prior to training and immediately after training. A marking rubric was devised to evaluate the responses to the clinical vignettes within a framework of interprofessional education. The simulation workshops were well received by all students. There was a significant increase in students' self-ratings of confidence, preparedness and knowledge following the study day (p < .001). There was a significant increase in student overall scores in clinical vignettes after training with the greatest increase in clinical reasoning (p < .001). Interprofessional simulation-based training has benefits in developing hospital readiness and clinical reasoning in allied health students. PMID:26803776

  14. Steady and dynamic shear rheological properties of gum-based food thickeners used for diet modification of patients with dysphagia: effect of concentration.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chan-Won; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2013-06-01

    Gum-based food thickeners are widely used for diet modification for patients with dysphagia in Korea. In this study, the rheological properties of two commercially available gum-based food thickeners (xanthan gum and xanthan-guar gum mixture) marketed in Korea were determined as a function of concentration. The steady and dynamic shear rheological properties of the food thickeners in water were investigated at five different concentrations (1.0 %, 1.5 %, 2.0 %, 2.5 %, and 3.0 % w/w). Both food thickeners showed high shear-thinning fluid characteristics (n = 0.14-0.19) at all concentrations (1.0-3.0 %). In general, the thickener with the xanthan-guar gum mixture showed higher values for steady shear viscosity compared to that with xanthan alone, whereas it showed lower dynamic rheological parameter values. Steady and dynamic rheological parameters demonstrated differences in rheological behaviors between the gum-based food thickeners, indicating that their rheological properties are related to the type of gum and gum concentration. In particular, the type of gum played a role in the time-dependent flow properties of the gum-based food thickeners. Appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener appears to be of great importance for dysphagia therapists and patients.

  15. A Comparative Study Between Two Sensory Stimulation Strategies After Two Weeks Treatment on Older Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Omar; Rofes, Laia; Martin, Alberto; Arreola, Viridiana; López, Irene; Clavé, Pere

    2016-10-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a prevalent geriatric syndrome. Treatment is based on compensatory strategies to avoid complications. New treatments based on sensory stimulation to promote the recovery of the swallowing function have proved effective in acute studies but prolonged treatment needs further research. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the effect of two, longer-term sensory treatment strategies on older patients with OD. 38 older patients (≥70 years) were studied with videofluoroscopy (pre/posttreatment) and randomized into two 10-day treatment groups: Group A-transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist (capsaicin 1 × 10(-5) M) and Group B-transcutaneous sensory electrical stimulation (TSES) (Intelect VitalStim, biphasic pulses, 300 μs, 80 Hz). Patients were analyzed for treatment response. Patients were old (80.47 ± 5.2 years), with comorbidities (3.11 ± 1.59 Charlson Index), polymedication (8.92 ± 3.31 drugs/patient), and mild functional impairment (86.84 ± 17.84 Barthel Index), and 28.9 % were at risk of malnutrition (MNA-sf). Overall, all patients had videofluoroscopic signs of impaired safety of swallow (ISS) with delayed oropharyngeal swallow response (OSR). After sensory stimulation, prevalence of ISS decreased to 68.42 % in both groups (P = 0.019). There were 68.42 % responders in Group A (TRPV1) and 42.11 % in Group B (TSES). Group A responders showed an improvement in the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS, 5.23 ± 2.04 to 3 ± 1.47; P = 0.002), and the same was true for those of Group B (4.63 ± 1.41 to 2.13 ± 0.64; P = 0.007). 10-day sensory stimulation with either therapy improved safety of swallow and OSR in older patients with OD, reducing the severity of OD in a significant subgroup of these patients. PMID:27503566

  16. A Comparative Study Between Two Sensory Stimulation Strategies After Two Weeks Treatment on Older Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Omar; Rofes, Laia; Martin, Alberto; Arreola, Viridiana; López, Irene; Clavé, Pere

    2016-10-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a prevalent geriatric syndrome. Treatment is based on compensatory strategies to avoid complications. New treatments based on sensory stimulation to promote the recovery of the swallowing function have proved effective in acute studies but prolonged treatment needs further research. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the effect of two, longer-term sensory treatment strategies on older patients with OD. 38 older patients (≥70 years) were studied with videofluoroscopy (pre/posttreatment) and randomized into two 10-day treatment groups: Group A-transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist (capsaicin 1 × 10(-5) M) and Group B-transcutaneous sensory electrical stimulation (TSES) (Intelect VitalStim, biphasic pulses, 300 μs, 80 Hz). Patients were analyzed for treatment response. Patients were old (80.47 ± 5.2 years), with comorbidities (3.11 ± 1.59 Charlson Index), polymedication (8.92 ± 3.31 drugs/patient), and mild functional impairment (86.84 ± 17.84 Barthel Index), and 28.9 % were at risk of malnutrition (MNA-sf). Overall, all patients had videofluoroscopic signs of impaired safety of swallow (ISS) with delayed oropharyngeal swallow response (OSR). After sensory stimulation, prevalence of ISS decreased to 68.42 % in both groups (P = 0.019). There were 68.42 % responders in Group A (TRPV1) and 42.11 % in Group B (TSES). Group A responders showed an improvement in the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS, 5.23 ± 2.04 to 3 ± 1.47; P = 0.002), and the same was true for those of Group B (4.63 ± 1.41 to 2.13 ± 0.64; P = 0.007). 10-day sensory stimulation with either therapy improved safety of swallow and OSR in older patients with OD, reducing the severity of OD in a significant subgroup of these patients.

  17. Unusual length of pedicle: pedunculated squamous papilloma of uvula causing unusual Dysphagia of long duration in a child of 10 years.

    PubMed

    Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Rajsekhar, B; Srinivas, G Vijay; Moon, Ninad J

    2014-01-01

    Benign oropharyngeal tumors are far less common compared to malignant tumors. Oropharyngeal papilloma is present in adults. Squamous papillomas are exophytic masses of oral cavity. When they occur on the palate they are most often asymptomatic and benign. Pedunculated squamous papillomas usually arise from the soft palate, tonsil, or the epiglottis. These lesions can sometimes prove to be fatal. A case of pedunculated squamous papilloma, arising from the laryngopharynx, the clinical presentation, the site of origin, and the size of the lesion were quite unusual. The narrow base of the pedicle made the intraoral excision possible. But here, we present a case of a 10-year-old boy who had history of dysphagia of 3-year duration for solid food and he was comfortable only in squatting position the reason being squamous papilloma of uvula (unusual site) atypically because of astonishing length of pedicle (2.3 inches).

  18. Dysphagia caused by focal guttural pouch mycosis: mononeuropathy of the pharyngeal ramus of the vagal nerve in a 20-year-old pony mare

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old pony mare was presented to the equine hospital with a ten-day history of dysphagia, regurgitation and coughing. An obstruction of the oesophagus was excluded via endoscopy, but the proximal oesophagus appeared to be distended and circular contractions were missing. A guttural pouch endoscopy revealed a single, black-mottled plaque on the pharyngeal ramus of the vagus nerve in the left guttural pouch, causing a local swelling of this nerve. The pharyngeal ramus seemed to be atrophic distal to the lesion. A biopsy was taken from the lesion and histopathological findings proved the reasonable suspicion of a guttural pouch mycosis with a high degree of purulent-necrotic inflammation and invasion of fungal hyphae. There were no signs of neoplasia, such as melanoma. Daily guttural pouch irrigations with a clotrimazole emulsion (20 g Canesten® Gyn4 solved in 500 ml water), led to a good recovery of the mucosa above the nerve. Periodic endoscopic examination of the left guttural pouch showed that local thickening and distal atrophy of this pharyngeal ramus did not improve, neither did the clinical symptoms. Due to progressive weight loss, acute respiratory distress and aspiration pneumonia, the 20-year-old pony mare unfortunately had to be euthanized three weeks after discharge. This case report emphasizes the enormous importance of a single nerve for the realization of the swallowing process. The one-sided loss of function of the pharyngeal branch of the vagal nerve cannot be compensated neither by the remaining ipsilateral nerves nor by the contralateral normal functioning glossopharyngeal and vagal nerves and thus inevitably leads to severe dysphagia. PMID:23845027

  19. Co-occurrence of Dystonic and Dyskinetic Tongue Movements with Oral Apraxia in Post-regression Dysphagia in Classical Rett Syndrome Years of Life 1 Through 5.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Suzanne S; Taragin, Ben; Djukic, Alesandra

    2015-04-01

    We do not know the natural history of dysphagia in classical Rett syndrome (RTT) by stage or age. This study investigated swallowing physiology in 23 females ages 1:7 to 5:8 (years, months) with classical Rett syndrome to determine common and distinguishing features of dysphagia in post-regression early Pseudostationary Stage III. In-depth analysis of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) found dysmotility of oral stage events across subjects implicating oral apraxia. Impaired motility was further compromised by recurrent dystonic and dyskinetic movements that co-occurred with oral apraxia during oral ingestion in 78 % (n = 18) of the subjects with RTT. Of this group, 44 % displayed rocking and/or rolling lingual pattern, 56 % had recurrent oral tongue retroflexions, and/or elevated posturing of the tongue tip, and, 72 % displayed multi-wave oropharyngeal transfer pattern. The proportion of subjects whose swallowing motility was disrupted by aberrant involuntary tongue movements did not differ significantly between bolus types (liquid, puree, and solid) trialed. Liquid ingestion was significantly more efficient in subjects using bottles with nipples than their counterparts who used spouted or straw cups. Dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements disrupted liquid ingestion in subjects using cups with spouts or straws significantly more than those using bottles. Analysis of food ingestion revealed that significantly more subjects were able to orally form, transport, and transfer a puree bolus into the pharynx than they were a solid bolus. A significantly larger number of subjects aspirated and penetrated liquid than they did puree or solid. No significant relationship was found between subjects with airway contamination and those with dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements. Subjects' rocking and rolling lingual patterns were consistent with those evidenced in adults with Parkinson's disease. Subjects' tongue retroflexions were classified as provisionally

  20. Co-occurrence of Dystonic and Dyskinetic Tongue Movements with Oral Apraxia in Post-regression Dysphagia in Classical Rett Syndrome Years of Life 1 Through 5.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Suzanne S; Taragin, Ben; Djukic, Alesandra

    2015-04-01

    We do not know the natural history of dysphagia in classical Rett syndrome (RTT) by stage or age. This study investigated swallowing physiology in 23 females ages 1:7 to 5:8 (years, months) with classical Rett syndrome to determine common and distinguishing features of dysphagia in post-regression early Pseudostationary Stage III. In-depth analysis of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) found dysmotility of oral stage events across subjects implicating oral apraxia. Impaired motility was further compromised by recurrent dystonic and dyskinetic movements that co-occurred with oral apraxia during oral ingestion in 78 % (n = 18) of the subjects with RTT. Of this group, 44 % displayed rocking and/or rolling lingual pattern, 56 % had recurrent oral tongue retroflexions, and/or elevated posturing of the tongue tip, and, 72 % displayed multi-wave oropharyngeal transfer pattern. The proportion of subjects whose swallowing motility was disrupted by aberrant involuntary tongue movements did not differ significantly between bolus types (liquid, puree, and solid) trialed. Liquid ingestion was significantly more efficient in subjects using bottles with nipples than their counterparts who used spouted or straw cups. Dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements disrupted liquid ingestion in subjects using cups with spouts or straws significantly more than those using bottles. Analysis of food ingestion revealed that significantly more subjects were able to orally form, transport, and transfer a puree bolus into the pharynx than they were a solid bolus. A significantly larger number of subjects aspirated and penetrated liquid than they did puree or solid. No significant relationship was found between subjects with airway contamination and those with dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements. Subjects' rocking and rolling lingual patterns were consistent with those evidenced in adults with Parkinson's disease. Subjects' tongue retroflexions were classified as provisionally

  1. Radiological image-guided placement of covered Niti-S stent for palliation of dysphagia in patients with cervical esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Shimizu, Kensaku; Iida, Etsushi; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of covered Niti-S stent placement under multidetector CT and fluoroscopy guidance for the palliation of dysphagia in patients with cervical esophageal cancer. Under radiological imaging guidance using axial and sagittal CT scans, and fluoroscopy, Niti-S esophageal stents were placed in ten consecutive patients with complete obstruction caused by cervical esophageal cancer (9 men and 1 woman; age range = 54-79 years; mean age = 68.1 years) between February 2010 and December 2011. The procedure time and technical success rate were evaluated. Swallowing improvement was assessed by the following items: ability to eat and/or swallow (graded as follows: 3 = ability to eat normal diet, 2 = ability to eat semisolids, 1 = ability to swallow liquids, 0 = complete obstruction). Procedural and post-procedural complications were also evaluated. Survival (mean ± SD) was examined. The mean (±SD) procedure time was 40 ± 19 min (range = 21-69 min). Stent placement was technically successful in all patients; inadequate stent deployment did not occur in any case. Ability to eat and/or swallow was improved and scored 2.4 (score 3 in 5 cases, score 2 in 4 cases, score 1 in 1 case, and score 0 in no case) after stent placement. No major or post-procedural complications were encountered. The mean survival time was 131 ± 77 days (range = 31-259 days). Niti-S stents appeared to be a safe and effective device for the palliation of dysphagia caused by advanced cervical esophageal cancer. Multidetector CT and fluoroscopy image guidance helped the operators accurately place the stents in the cervical esophagus.

  2. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson’s disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27390429

  3. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  4. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  5. The Impact of Dysphagia Therapy on Quality of Life in Patients with Parkinson's Disease as Measured by the Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWALQOL)

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Annelise; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Rieder, Carlos Roberto de Mello; Schuh, Artur Francisco Schumacher; Olchik, Maira Rozenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Dysphagia is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it has been associated with poor quality of life (QoL), anxiety, depression. Objective  The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life in individuals with PD before and after SLP therapy. Methods  The program consisted of four individual therapy sessions. Each session comprised guidelines regarding food and postural maneuvers (chin down). The Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders (SWAL-QOL) questionnaire was applied before and after therapy. Results  The sample comprised of 10 individuals (8 men), with a mean (SD) age of 62.2 (11.3) years, mean educational attainment of 7.5 (4.3) years, and mean disease duration of 10.7 (4.7) years. Thirty percent of patients were Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage 2, 50% were H&Y stage 3, and 20% were H&Y stage 4. Mean scores for all SWAL-QOL domains increased after the intervention period, with significant pre- to post-therapy differences in total score (p = 0.033) and domain 4 (symptom frequency) (p = 0.025). There was also a bias significance for domain 5 (food selection) (p = 0.095). Conclusion  Patients exhibited improvement in swallowing-related quality of life after a SLP therapy program. The earlier in the course of PD, greater the improvement observed after therapy. PMID:27413399

  6. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  7. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. PMID:27752382

  8. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  9. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  10. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can reduce sensation. After a stroke, food or liquid could enter the airway/lungs without the survivor ... working. The survivor may be given food and liquid to swallow. Efforts to make sure survivors with ...

  11. Poststroke Communication Disorders and Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Marlís; Brodsky, Martin B; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2015-11-01

    Communication and swallowing disorders are common after stroke. Targeted surveillance followed by prompt evaluation and treatment is of paramount importance. The overall goals of rehabilitation for impaired swallowing and communication and swallowing deficits may differ based on the specific deficits caused by the stroke but the main goal is always to improve the patient's everyday interpersonal interactions and optimize participation in society. Fortunately, therapeutic or compensatory interventions can decrease the effects that communication and swallowing deficits have on the quality of life of stroke survivors.

  12. Development and Evaluation of a Home Enteral Nutrition Team

    PubMed Central

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M.

    2015-01-01

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient’s home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25751819

  13. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Adelstein, David J.

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  14. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  15. Gastrostomy feeding tube - pump - child

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - pump; G-tube - pump; Gastrostomy button - pump; Bard Button - pump; MIC-KEY - pump ... Your child has a gastrostomy tube (G-tube). This is a soft, plastic tube placed into your child's stomach. It delivers nutrition (food) and medicines until your ...

  16. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... Your child's gastrostomy tube (G-tube) is a special tube in your child's stomach that will help deliver food and medicines until your ...

  17. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  18. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  19. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... below 470 MHz, including those licensed pursuant to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48533, August 15, 2014. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to the...

  20. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  1. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  2. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  3. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  4. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF....

  5. Include Passive Solar in Your Renovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Gerald F.; Probasco, Jack F.

    1981-01-01

    A checklist covers potential energy saving modifications in a building scheduled for renovation, and includes suggestions for room utilization, landscaping, and building envelope, solar control, and active system modifications. (Author)

  6. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  7. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  8. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  9. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  10. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  13. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  14. A Retrospective Study of G-Tube Use in Japanese Patients Treated with Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Akihiro; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Kano, Satoshi; Sakashita, Tomohiro; Kuramoto, Rinnosuke; Nakamaru, Yuji; Onimaru, Rikiya; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Late toxicity after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), such as dysphagia, in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck has received a good deal of attention recently. The gastrostomy tube (G-tube) dependence rate 1 year after CCRT was reported to be 16.7–42.9% in Western countries. We evaluated swallowing outcomes after CCRT in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) treated in our hospital and compared them with previous reports. Methods We reviewed 96 consecutive patients with a HPC treated by radiotherapy with intravenous or intra-arterial chemotherapy between 2006 and 2013 at Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. Results At 1 month after CCRT, 13 patients (13.7%) used a G-tube, whereas 5/91 (5.5%) and 4/81 (4.9%) used a G-tube at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Two patients used a G-tube at 12 and 24 months after CCRT (G-tube use rate: 2.8% at 12 months, and 3.2% at 24 months). The variables female, posterior wall primary, stage IV, ECOG performance status of 2, and smoking status were significantly associated with G-tube use at 12 months after CCRT, whereas the route of cisplatin administration was not related to G-tube use (p = 0.303). Conclusions The G-tube use rate up to 1year could be lower in Japanese patients than in Western patients according to previous reports. In particular, Japanese patients resume oral intake sooner than Western patients. Further study of the incidence of dysphagia after CCRT by ethnicity is required to clarify the differences in dysphagia after CCRT. PMID:27556279

  15. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  16. Transmission line including support means with barriers

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

  17. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  18. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  19. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of... (part 27 of this chapter); (j) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27...

  20. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  1. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  2. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended; (c) All vessels which have previously been constructed with... Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended, and later adjusted in price pursuant to section 9 of the Merchant... ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the...

  3. Multicultural Resources: Including Technology and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    In the fourteen years since the 1990 MENC pre-conference symposium on Multicultural Approaches to Music Education in Washington, D.C., music educators have come to recognize the need to include a variety of world musics in all music curricula, from elementary classrooms to advanced performing ensembles. Accordingly, a significant increase in the…

  4. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  5. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  6. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  7. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  8. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  9. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... body organ or external body member (including contiguous tissue) or replace all or part of the...

  10. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  11. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  12. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  13. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  14. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  15. New STD recommendations include HIV management.

    PubMed

    1998-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its 1993 guidelines for STDs, adding new recommendations for treating primary and recurrent genital warts and for managing patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. The guidelines grew out of research into microbiologic cures, alleviating signs and symptoms, preventing sequelae, and preventing transmission. The guidelines recommend that people seeking treatment for STDs should be offered HIV testing and counseling. Results of a recent Alan Guttmacher Institute study of STD public health programs are included.

  16. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  17. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  18. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  19. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  20. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  1. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) and followed-up to 31st December 2003. Over 17,688 cases of rare thoracic cancers were selected based on the list of the RACECARE project. Mesothelioma was the most common tumour (19 per million per year) followed by epithelial tumours of the trachea and thymus (1.3 and 1.7, respectively). The age standardised incidence rates of epithelial tumours of the trachea was double in Eastern and Southern Europe versus the other European regions: 2 per million per year. Epithelial tumours of the thymus had the lowest incidence in Northern and Eastern Europe and UK and Ireland(1) and somewhat higher incidence in Central and Southern Europe.(2) Highest incidence in mesothelioma was seen in UK and Ireland(23) and lowest in Eastern Europe.(4) Patients with tumours of the thymus had the best prognosis (1-year survival 85%, 66% at 5 years). Five year survival was lowest for the mesothelioma 5% compared to 14% of patients with tumours of the trachea. Mesothelioma was the most prevalent rare cancer (12,000 cases), followed by thymus (7000) and trachea (1400). Cancer Registry (CR) data play an important role in revealing the burden of rare thoracic cancers and monitoring the effect of regulations on asbestos use and smoking related policies.

  2. [Two cases of anaerobic empyema including Actinomyces].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takiguchi, Yasuo

    2009-03-01

    We report 2 cases of empyema including Actinomyces spp. Case 1 was a 66-year-old man with fever and left pleural effusion, Actinomyces israelii and 2 other microbes were isolated. Case 2 was a 52-year-old male inpatient who developed empyema during treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Actinomyces odontolyticus and 3 other microbes were cultured in pleural effusion. Empyema caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare, in particular Actinomyces odontolyticus is rarely isolated and only 4 cases have been reported in Japan.

  3. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  4. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  5. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  6. Ocean management plan includes array of recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore appeared in Monterey, California in June 1998 for a National Oceans Conference, some of the salt water spray from the Pacific Ocean must have clung to them.As a follow-up to the conference, the Clinton Administration on September 2 issued an interagency report to help guide federal efforts in establishing a comprehensive ocean policy.The report, which touches upon a number of global issues including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, contains nearly 150 recommendations.

  7. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  8. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  9. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature. PMID:25715822

  10. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  11. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOEpatents

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  12. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  13. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  14. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nannan, N. R.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2014-02-15

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

  15. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  16. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  17. Full potential unsteady computations including aeroelastic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Ide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A unified formulation is presented based on the full potential framework coupled with an appropriate structural model to compute steady and unsteady flows over rigid and flexible configurations across the Mach number range. The unsteady form of the full potential equation in conservation form is solved using an implicit scheme maintaining time accuracy through internal Newton iterations. A flux biasing procedure based on the unsteady sonic reference conditions is implemented to compute hyperbolic regions with moving sonic and shock surfaces. The wake behind a trailing edge is modeled using a mathematical cut across which the pressure is satisfied to be continuous by solving an appropriate vorticity convection equation. An aeroelastic model based on the generalized modal deflection approach interacts with the nonlinear aerodynamics and includes both static as well as dynamic structural analyses capability. Results are presented for rigid and flexible configurations at different Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to supersonic conditions. The dynamic response of a flexible wing below and above its flutter point is demonstrated.

  18. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  19. Future ultraviolet experiments, including FUSE/COLUMBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, A.

    1984-01-01

    Several new facilities for ultraviolet astronomy are under construction or study for launch within the coming decade. These include the Hubble Space Telescope to be launched in 1986 with instruments for spectroscopy, imaging, and photopolarimetry in the ultraviolet; the ASTRO Spacelab payload, also to be launched in 1986 with a similar range of instrumentation; STARLAB, a combined Canadian, Australian and U.S. mission concentrating primarily on imagery; and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which was renamed COLUMBUS. COLUMBUS is currently under study by NASA and ESA as a future joint mission for spectroscopic studies of astrophysical plasmas covering a temperature range from approximately 10 to the 3rd power to approximately 10 to the 7th power k. In order to achieve this objective, the optics should be optimized for wavelengths below 1200 Angstroms, with a total wavelength range from approximately 2000 to approximately 100 Angstroms. The operational concept will be based on experience with IUE, but changes in communications techniques since IUE was designed suggest some interesting new approaches to observing.

  20. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context. PMID:24075704

  1. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context.

  2. Articles including thin film monolayers and multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    Articles of manufacture including: (a) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, and a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, (b) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, and a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, (c) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, and a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and (d) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and a second metal species attached to the multifunctional organic ligand, are provided, such articles useful in detecting the presence of a selected target species, as nonliear optical materials, or as scavengers for selected target species.

  3. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  4. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  5. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Compact Radar Transceiver with Included Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Rincon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is an eight-channel phased array radar system that employs solid-state radar transceivers, a microstrip patch antenna, and a reconfigurable waveform generator and processor unit. The original DBSAR transceiver design utilizes connectorized electronic components that tend to be physically large and heavy. To achieve increased functionality in a smaller volume, PCB (printed circuit board) transceivers were designed to replace the large connectorized transceivers. One of the most challenging problems designing the transceivers in a PCB format was achieving proper performance in the calibration path. For a radar loop-back calibration path, a portion of the transmit signal is coupled out of the antenna feed and fed back into the receiver. This is achieved using passive components for stability and repeatability. Some signal also leaks through the receive path. As these two signal paths are correlated via an unpredictable phase, the leakage through the receive path during transmit must be 30 dB below the calibration path. For DBSAR s design, this requirement called for a 100-dB isolation in the receiver path during transmit. A total of 16 solid-state L-band transceivers on a PCB format were designed. The transceivers include frequency conversion stages, T/R switching, and a calibration path capable of measuring the transmit power-receiver gain product during transmit for pulse-by-pulse calibration or matched filtering. In particular, this calibration path achieves 100-dB isolation between the transmitted signal and the low-noise amplifier through the use of a switching network and a section of physical walls achieving attenuation of radiated leakage. The transceivers were designed in microstrip PCBs with lumped elements and individually packaged components for compactness. Each transceiver was designed on a single PCB with a custom enclosure providing interior walls and compartments to isolate transceiver

  7. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  8. 76 FR 35026 - Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From Doherty, Including Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Doherty, Plymouth, Minnesota. The notice was published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2009 (74 FR... Doherty, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business Facilities, LLC, Hutchinson, MN; Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From...

  9. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  10. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  11. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  12. District nurses' role in managing medication dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-08-01

    A survey commissioned by the Patients Association (2015) has shown that the risky practice of altering solid-form medication to assist patients with swallowing difficulties is a daily occurrence in care homes. District nurses and community matrons who provide care to patients and assist staff in care homes are well-placed to raise awareness of the impact that tampering with tablets has on patient safety. It is essential that district nurses and community matrons discharge their duty of care to patients in care homes by supporting effective medication management that meets the individual needs of those patients. This article considers the legal and professional standards that must inform a district nurse's support of medication management for a patient with swallowing difficulties residing in a care home. PMID:27479856

  13. Feeding and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapist a physician or nurse a dietitian or nutritionist a developmental specialist Your child's posture, self-feeding ... the professions. Check Out Resources for Health Equity Law Compliance Parent-Child Language Barrier Linked to Bad ...

  14. Managing dysphagia in older people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    In the UK there is an increasing ageing population, bringing with it a host of degenerative conditions such as dementia. Dementia is a common condition among older people. In the UK there are estimated to be over 750 000 people with dementia and numbers are expected to double in the next 30 years (Comas-Herrera et al, 2007). The term 'dementia' is used to describe a syndrome which may be caused by a number of illnesses and is associated with ongoing decline of the brain and its abilities. There are many types of dementia, the most common are Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer's which accounts for 62% of all cases. Vascular dementia either alone or co-existent with Alzheimer's, is the second most common subtype of dementia (Knapp et al, 2007). Dementia is associated with complex needs especially in the later stages, and can have a devastating effect on the individual, their family and friends. The care needs often challenge the skills and capacity of carers especially when normal every-day activities decline. Food and drink are fundamental to living. Consequently observing individuals struggling with eating and drinking not only poses difficulties for professionals but also raises emotional issues for the individual and their family.

  15. Dysphagia Caused by Chronic Laryngeal Edema.

    PubMed

    Delides, Alexander; Sakagiannis, George; Maragoudakis, Pavlos; Gouloumi, Αlina-Roxani; Katsimbri, Pelagia; Giotakis, Ioannis; Panayiotides, John G

    2015-10-01

    A rare case of a young female with chronic diffuse laryngeal edema causing severe swallowing difficulty is presented. The patient was previously treated with antibiotics and steroids with no improvement. Diagnosis was made with biopsy of the epiglottis under local anesthesia in the office.

  16. An Ongoing Randomized Clinical Trial in Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, JoAnne; Hind, Jackie; Logemann, Jerilyn

    2004-01-01

    Most of us who have clinical practices firmly contend that the treatments we provide cause beneficial changes in the lives of our patients. Indeed, our clinical experience engenders strong convictions to the point of believing that withholding treatment creates ethical violations. Intellectually, however, we must recognize that the value of…

  17. Interventions and Outcomes for Children with Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gisel, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Feeding problems are common even in typically developing infants and children. However, they are more frequent and persistent in children with developmental disabilities. This article will provide an overview of current literature and a rationale underlying the interventions used for children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have eating impairments…

  18. Acute Shunt Malfunction Caused by Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy without Shunt Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jingyu; Ki, Seung Seog

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement is often performed in patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and it has been accepted as a safe procedure. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old male who developed acute exacerbation of the hydrocephalus immediately after the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement without any signs of shunt infection, which has not been reported until now. After revision of the intraperitoneal shunt catheter, the sizes of the intracranial ventricles were normalized. PMID:25371790

  19. Recurrent deletions and reciprocal duplications of 10q11.21q11.23 including CHAT and SLC18A3 are likely mediated by complex low-copy repeats.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Paweł; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Sampath, Srirangan; Bhatt, Samarth S; Shaikh, Tamim H; Xia, Zhilian; Pursley, Amber N; Cooper, M Lance; Shinawi, Marwan; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Grange, Dorothy K; Noetzel, Michael J; Saunders, Scott; Simons, Paul; Summar, Marshall; Lee, Brendan; Scaglia, Fernando; Fellmann, Florence; Martinet, Danielle; Beckmann, Jacques S; Asamoah, Alexander; Platky, Kathryn; Sparks, Susan; Martin, Ann S; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Hoover, Jacqueline; Medne, Livija; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Moeschler, John B; Vallee, Stephanie E; Parikh, Sumit; Irwin, Polly; Dalzell, Victoria P; Smith, Wendy E; Banks, Valerie C; Flannery, David B; Lovell, Carolyn M; Bellus, Gary A; Golden-Grant, Kathryn; Gorski, Jerome L; Kussmann, Jennifer L; McGregor, Tracy L; Hamid, Rizwan; Pfotenhauer, Jean; Ballif, Blake C; Shaw, Chad A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bacino, Carlos A; Patel, Ankita; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2012-01-01

    We report 24 unrelated individuals with deletions and 17 additional cases with duplications at 10q11.21q21.1 identified by chromosomal microarray analysis. The rearrangements range in size from 0.3 to 12 Mb. Nineteen of the deletions and eight duplications are flanked by large, directly oriented segmental duplications of >98% sequence identity, suggesting that nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) caused these genomic rearrangements. Nine individuals with deletions and five with duplications have additional copy number changes. Detailed clinical evaluation of 20 patients with deletions revealed variable clinical features, with developmental delay (DD) and/or intellectual disability (ID) as the only features common to a majority of individuals. We suggest that some of the other features present in more than one patient with deletion, including hypotonia, sleep apnea, chronic constipation, gastroesophageal and vesicoureteral refluxes, epilepsy, ataxia, dysphagia, nystagmus, and ptosis may result from deletion of the CHAT gene, encoding choline acetyltransferase, and the SLC18A3 gene, mapping in the first intron of CHAT and encoding vesicular acetylcholine transporter. The phenotypic diversity and presence of the deletion in apparently normal carrier parents suggest that subjects carrying 10q11.21q11.23 deletions may exhibit variable phenotypic expressivity and incomplete penetrance influenced by additional genetic and nongenetic modifiers.

  20. Recurrent Deletions and Reciprocal Duplications of 10q11.21q11.23 Including CHAT and SLC18A3 are Likely Mediated by Complex Low-Copy Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Paweł; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V.; Sampath, Srirangan; Bhatt, Samarth S.; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Xia, Zhilian; Pursley, Amber N.; Cooper, M. Lance; Shinawi, Marwan; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Noetzel, Michael J.; Saunders, Scott; Simons, Paul; Summar, Marshall; Lee, Brendan; Scaglia, Fernando; Fellmann, Florence; Martinet, Danielle; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Asamoah, Alexander; Platky, Kathryn; Sparks, Susan; Martin, Ann S.; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Hoover, Jacqueline; Medne, Livija; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Moeschler, John B.; Vallee, Stephanie E.; Parikh, Sumit; Irwin, Polly; Dalzell, Victoria P.; Smith, Wendy E.; Banks, Valerie C.; Flannery, David B.; Lovell, Carolyn M.; Bellus, Gary A.; Golden-Grant, Kathryn; Gorski, Jerome L.; Kussmann, Jennifer L.; McGregor, Tracy L.; Hamid, Rizwan; Pfotenhauer, Jean; Ballif, Blake C.; Shaw, Chad A.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Patel, Ankita; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    We report 24 unrelated individuals with deletions and 17 additional cases with duplications at 10q11.21q21.1 identified by chromosomal microarray analysis. The rearrangements range in size from 0.3 to 12 Mb. Nineteen of the deletions and eight duplications are flanked by large, directly oriented segmental duplications of >98% sequence identity, suggesting that nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) caused these genomic rearrangements. Nine individuals with deletions and five with duplications have additional copy number changes. Detailed clinical evaluation of 20 patients with deletions revealed variable clinical features, with developmental delay (DD) and/or intellectual disability (ID) as the only features common to a majority of individuals. We suggest that some of the other features present in more than one patient with deletion, including hypotonia, sleep apnea, chronic constipation, gastroesophageal and vesicoureteral refluxes, epilepsy, ataxia, dysphagia, nystagmus, and ptosis may result from deletion of the CHAT gene, encoding choline acetyltransferase, and the SLC18A3 gene, mapping in the first intron of CHAT and encoding vesicular acetylcholine transporter. The phenotypic diversity and presence of the deletion in apparently normal carrier parents suggest that subjects carrying 10q11.21q11.23 deletions may exhibit variable phenotypic expressivity and incomplete penetrance influenced by additional genetic and nongenetic modifiers. PMID:21948486