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Sample records for dysprosium isotopes

  1. Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-15

    Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  2. Magnetic memory in an isotopically enriched and magnetically isolated mononuclear dysprosium complex.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Bernot, Kevin; Golhen, Stéphane; Le Guennic, Boris; Guizouarn, Thierry; Ouahab, Lahcène; Cador, Olivier

    2015-01-26

    The influence of nuclear spin on the magnetic hysteresis of a single-molecule is evidenced. Isotopically enriched Dy(III) complexes are synthesized and an isotopic dependence of their magnetic relaxation is observed. This approach is coupled with tuning of the molecular environment through dilution in an amorphous or an isomorphous diamagnetic matrix. The combination of these approaches leads to a dramatic enhancement of the magnetic memory of the molecule. This general recipe can be efficient for rational optimization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), and provides an important step for their integration into molecule-based devices.

  3. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  4. Total and Capture Cross Sections of Dysprosium Isotopes up to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.D.; Oh, S.Y.; Chang, J.H.

    2005-11-15

    Neutron data for total and capture cross sections were evaluated on {sup 160}Dy, {sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy up to 20 MeV. The resolved resonance parameters were adopted from the Mughabghab compilation, but one bound level resonance for each isotope except {sup 162}Dy was invoked to reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. The average resonance parameters for s-wave neutrons were obtained from the analysis of the statistical behavior of resolved resonance parameters. Recent measurements of the capture cross sections were taken into account in adjusting the average resonance parameters for p- and d-waves. From the first excited energy to 20 MeV, the optical model, Hauser-Feshbach model, and quantum mechanical models were used to produce total, elastic scattering, and capture cross sections. The energy-dependent optical model potential was decided based on the recent experimental data. The calculated cross sections were in good agreement with the experimental data. The present evaluation resulted in improvement over the ENDF/B-VI.7 code.

  5. Metals fact sheet - Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to dysprosium use. Geology and exploitation, mineral sources, production processes, global production,applications, and the dysprosium market are reviewed. Applications very briefly described include use as a cooling agent in nuclear control rods, magnets, magnetostrictive devices, phosphors, photoelectric devices, and glass. Current and historical market prices are given.

  6. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu Mingwu; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high-abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties--population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, and trap dynamics--is provided.

  7. Atomic parity violation in ytterbium and dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, Dionysios; Bougas, Lykourgos; Fabricant, Anne; Leefer, Nathan; Tsigutkin, Kostantin; Budker, Dmitry; D. Budker's research Group Team

    2016-09-01

    Atomic parity violation (APV) experiments offer the opportunity to study the weak interaction at low-energy scales, providing valuable information about the Standard Model and nuclear physics. Owing to their large atomic mass, rich energy-level structure (which results in enhanced weak-interaction-induced mixing of opposite-parity states) as well as the availability of many stable isotopes, ytterbium and dysprosium are particularly good candidates for investigating APV interactions. This brings within reach the possibility to detect nuclear anapole moments in these systems, as well as to probe the variation of neutron skin among the different isotopes of the ytterbium and dysprosium nuclei. We provide an overview of the field of APV and report on our group's experimental efforts in Mainz and in Berkeley on making precision measurements of parity violation in these two elements, having as our ultimate goal to probe neutron skin variation and anapole moments.

  8. Transverse laser cooling of a thermal atomic beam of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Leefer, N.; Cingoez, A.; Gerber-Siff, B.; Sharma, Arijit; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2010-04-15

    A thermal atomic beam of dysprosium atoms is cooled using the 4f{sup 10}6s{sup 2}(J=8){yields}4f{sup 10}6s6p(J=9) transition at 421 nm. The cooling is done via a standing light wave orthogonal to the atomic beam. Efficient transverse cooling to the Doppler limit is demonstrated for all observable isotopes of dysprosium. Branching ratios to metastable states are demonstrated to be <5x10{sup -4}. A scheme for enhancement of the nonzero-nuclear-spin-isotope cooling and a method for direct identification of possible trap states are proposed.

  9. Tunable dysprosium laser.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Jackson, Stuart D

    2016-10-01

    We report the demonstration of a tunable dysprosium laser. The experiment employed in-band pumping of a Dy3+-doped fluoride fiber and a simple resonator design involving a ruled diffraction grating. The laser produced tuning between 2.95 and 3.35 μm, limited by the availability of optics.

  10. Magnetic relaxation in dysprosium-dysprosium collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Bonna K.; Johnson, Cort; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Au, Yat Shan; Connolly, Colin B.; Doyle, John M.

    2011-01-15

    The collisional magnetic reorientation rate constant g{sub R} is measured for magnetically trapped atomic dysprosium (Dy), an atom with large magnetic dipole moments. Using buffer gas cooling with cold helium, large numbers (>10{sup 11}) of Dy are loaded into a magnetic trap and the buffer gas is subsequently removed. The decay of the trapped sample is governed by collisional reorientation of the atomic magnetic moments. We find g{sub R}=1.9{+-}0.5x10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 390 mK. We also measure the magnetic reorientation rate constant of holmium (Ho), another highly magnetic atom, and find g{sub R}=5{+-}2x10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 690 mK. The Zeeman relaxation rates of these atoms are greater than expected for the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, suggesting that another mechanism, such as an anisotropic electrostatic interaction, is responsible. Comparison with estimated elastic collision rates suggests that Dy is a poor candidate for evaporative cooling in a magnetic trap.

  11. Preparation and properties of dysprosium nanocapsules coated with boron, carbon, and dysprosium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Si, P.Z.; Brueck, E.; Zhang, Z.D.; Skorvanek, I.; Kovac, J.; Zhang, M

    2004-06-08

    Boron-coated dysprosium/dysprosium oxide, carbon-coated dysprosium/DyC{sub 2}, and dysprosium oxide-coated dysprosium nanocapsules were prepared using an arc discharge method in diborane, methane, and argon, respectively. The magnetization of these nanocapsules has been measured at temperatures between 4 and 290 K, in applied fields up to 6 T. The transition temperature of nanocrystalline Dy from the helical phase to the ferromagnetic phase is much lower than that of bulk Dy. The linear temperature dependence of the inverse susceptibility of these nanocapsules, being a mixture of superparamagnetic Dy and paramagnetic dysprosium oxide or carbide, can be explained within the molecular field theory with magnetic moments with the total angular momentum J=15/2 and the Lande factor g=4/3. We discuss the relations between the structure and the magnetization of these nanocapsules.

  12. Theoretical study of some experimentally relevant states of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-05-15

    Configuration interaction method is used to calculate transition amplitudes and other properties of the low states of dysprosium which are used in cooling and in the study of the time variation of the fine structure constant and violation of fundamental symmetries. The branching ratio for the cooling state to decay to states other than ground states is found to be smaller than 10{sup -4}. The matrix element of the weak interaction between degenerate states at E=19797.96 cm{sup -1} is about 4 Hz which is consistent with the experimental limit |H{sub W}|=|2.3{+-}2.9(stat.){+-}0.7(syst.)| Hz [A. T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 56, 3453 (1997)] and points to feasibility of its experimental measurement. Applications include the search for physics beyond the standard model using the parity nonconservation (PNC) isotopic chain approach.

  13. Paramagnetic dysprosium oxide nanoparticles and dysprosium hydroxide nanorods as T₂ MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kattel, Krishna; Park, Ja Young; Xu, Wenlong; Kim, Han Gyeol; Lee, Eun Jung; Bony, Badrul Alam; Heo, Woo Choul; Jin, Seonguk; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Kim, Tae Jeong; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Lee, Gang Ho

    2012-04-01

    We report here paramagnetic dysprosium nanomaterial-based T(2) MRI contrast agents. A large r(2) and a negligible r(1) is an ideal condition for T(2) MR imaging. At this condition, protons are strongly and nearly exclusively induced for T(2) MR imaging. The dysprosium nanomaterials fairly satisfy this because they are found to possess a decent r(2) but a negligible r(1) arising from L + S state 4f-electrons in Dy(III) ion ((6)H(15/2)). Their r(2) will also further increase with increasing applied field because of unsaturated magnetization at room temperature. Therefore, MR imaging and various physical properties of the synthesized d-glucuronic acid coated ultrasmall dysprosium oxide nanoparticles (d(avg) = 3.2 nm) and dysprosium hydroxide nanorods (20 × 300 nm) are investigated. These include hydrodynamic diameters, magnetic properties, MR relaxivities, cytotoxicities, and 3 tesla in vivo T(2) MR images. Here, MR imaging properties of dysprosium hydroxide nanorods have not been reported so far. These two samples show r(2)s of 65.04 and 181.57 s(-1)mM(-1), respectively, with negligible r(1)s at 1.5 tesla and at room temperature, no in vitro cytotoxicity up to 100 μM Dy, and clear negative contrast enhancements in 3 tesla in vivo T(2) MR images of a mouse liver, which will be even more improved at higher MR fields. Therefore, d-glucuronic acid coated ultrasmall dysprosium oxide nanoparticles with renal excretion can be a potential candidate as a sensitive T(2) MRI contrast agent at MR field greater than 3 tesla.

  14. Dysprosium-induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, M.; Bienert, R.; Kürpick, U.; Matzdorf, R.

    2015-07-01

    Dysprosium-induced, self-assembled nanowires on Ge(001) were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). For this, submonolayers of dysprosium were deposited on Ge(001). After subsequent annealing, the surface shows a variety of structures as different kinds of wires with varying thickness, larger islands and surface defects like missing dimers and vacancy rows perpendicular to the Ge(001)-dimer rows. The structures are forming on all intact Ge(001)-terraces. In contrast to dysprosium on Si(001), on Ge(001) no wetting layer is found. In this work we focus on the thinnest nanowires, which have a width of four times the Ge(001)-lattice constant. STM topographies of the unoccupied states show a twofold superstructure on the wires. In contrast, topographies of the occupied states show that the structure of the wires is less regular. They exhibit elevations with distances, which are multiples higher than two of the Ge(001)-surface lattice constant. Density of states mapping reveals a cell structure of the nanowires. Possible explanations for this behaviour are discussed.

  15. Phenalenyl-based mononuclear dysprosium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Andrea; Fuhr, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Summary The phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes [Dy(PLN)2(HPLN)Cl(EtOH)] (1), [Dy(PLN)3(HPLN)]·[Dy(PLN)3(EtOH)]·2EtOH (2) and [Dy(PLN)3(H2O)2]·H2O (3), HPLN being 9-hydroxy-1H-phenalen-1-one, have been synthesized. All compounds were fully characterized by means of single crystal X-ray analysis, paramagnetic 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV–vis spectrophotometry and magnetic measurements. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of these complexes have been investigated, showing slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. Attempts to synthesize sublimable phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes have been made by implementing a synthetic strategy under anhydrous conditions. The sublimed species were characterized and their thermal stability was confirmed. This opens up the possibility to deposit phenalenyl-based lanthanides complexes by sublimation onto surfaces, an important prerequisite for ongoing studies in molecular spintronics. PMID:27547617

  16. Phenalenyl-based mononuclear dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yanhua; Magri, Andrea; Fuhr, Olaf; Ruben, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes [Dy(PLN)2(HPLN)Cl(EtOH)] (1), [Dy(PLN)3(HPLN)]·[Dy(PLN)3(EtOH)]·2EtOH (2) and [Dy(PLN)3(H2O)2]·H2O (3), HPLN being 9-hydroxy-1H-phenalen-1-one, have been synthesized. All compounds were fully characterized by means of single crystal X-ray analysis, paramagnetic (1)H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectrophotometry and magnetic measurements. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of these complexes have been investigated, showing slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. Attempts to synthesize sublimable phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes have been made by implementing a synthetic strategy under anhydrous conditions. The sublimed species were characterized and their thermal stability was confirmed. This opens up the possibility to deposit phenalenyl-based lanthanides complexes by sublimation onto surfaces, an important prerequisite for ongoing studies in molecular spintronics.

  17. Dosimetry of in situ activated dysprosium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Adnani, N

    2004-03-07

    This paper presents the results of a study aimed at investigating the dosimetry of stable dysprosium microspheres activated, in situ, by a linac generated photon beam. In phantom measurements of the neutron flux within an 18 MV photon beam were performed using CR-39 detectors and gold activation. The results were used in conjunction with a Monte Carlo computer simulation to investigate the dose distribution resulting from the activation of dysprosium (Dy) microspheres using an 18 MV photon beam. Different depths, lesion volumes and volume concentrations of microspheres are investigated. The linac lower collimator jaws are assumed completely closed to shield the tumour volume from the photon dose. Using a single AP field with 0 x 0 cm2 field size (closed jaws), a photon dose rate of 600 MU min(-1) and 80 cm SSD for 10 min, an average dose exceeding 1 Gy can be delivered to spherical lesions of 0.5 cm and higher diameter. The variation of the average dose with the size of the lesion reaches saturation for tumour volumes exceeding 1 cm in diameter. This report shows that the photon beam of a high-energy linac can be used to activate Dy microspheres in situ and, as a result, deliver a significant dose of beta radiation. Non-radioactive Dy microspheres do not have the toxicity and imaging problems associated with commercially available yttrium-90 based products.

  18. Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Aile Kozlova, Jekaterina; Aarik, Lauri; Aarik, Jaan; Kukli, Kaupo; Link, Joosep; Stern, Raivo

    2015-01-15

    Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on silicon substrates. For depositing dysprosium and titanium oxides Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 4}-O{sub 3} were used as precursors combinations. Appropriate parameters for Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} growth process were obtained by using a quartz crystal microbalance system. The Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited on planar substrates and on three-dimensional substrates with aspect ratio 1:20. The Dy/Ti ratio of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped TiO{sub 2} films deposited on a planar silicon substrate ranged from 0.04 to 0.06. Magnetometry studies revealed that saturation of magnetization could not be observed in planar Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, but it was observable in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on 3D substrates and in doped TiO{sub 2} films with a Dy/Ti atomic ratio of 0.06. The latter films exhibited saturation magnetization 10{sup −6} A cm{sup 2} and coercivity 11 kA/m at room temperature.

  19. Tetravalent dysprosium in a perovskite-type oxide.

    PubMed

    Han, Donglin; Uda, Tetsuya; Nose, Yoshitaro; Okajima, Toshihiro; Murata, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Isao; Shinoda, Kozo

    2012-04-17

    The existence of tetravalent dysprosium in perovskite-type oxide barium zirconate is confirmed in this work. This discovery will stimulate many researchers in diverse fields such as catalysts, solid state ionics, sensors, and fluorescent materials.

  20. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  1. FTIR study of matrix-isolated halides of dysprosium and thulium and their gaseous heterocomplexes with alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Feltrin, A.; Cesaro, S.N.

    1996-06-01

    Vibrational spectra of dysprosium and thulium chlorides, bromides, and iodides isolated in argon have been studied for the first time. The appearance of a single band, even in heavy deposits, suggested a planar geometry for all the samples examined. The complexity of Dy and Tm chlorides spectra, partly because of isotopic patterns, required a reinvestigation of NdCl{sub 3} isolated in argon and have been explained by comparison. Vapors in equilibrium over heated equimolar mixtures of a number of Dy, Tm, and Nd halides with alkali halides trapped in argon have been also investigated. FTIR measurements gave experimental evidence for the formation of gaseous heterocomplexes whose geometry is discussed.

  2. Narrow-line magneto-optical trap for dysprosium atoms.

    PubMed

    Maier, T; Kadau, H; Schmitt, M; Griesmaier, A; Pfau, T

    2014-06-01

    We present our technique to create a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for dysprosium atoms using the narrow-line cooling transition at 626 nm to achieve suitable conditions for direct loading into an optical dipole trap. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam via a Zeeman slower using the strongest atomic transition at 421 nm. With this combination of two cooling transitions we can trap up to 2.0·10(8) atoms at temperatures down to 6 μK. This cooling approach is simpler than present work with ultracold dysprosium and provides similar starting conditions for a transfer to an optical dipole trap.

  3. Selected-control synthesis of dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods by adjusting hydrothermal temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Song Xuchun Zheng Yifan; Wang Yun

    2008-05-06

    Dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods were prepared directly from commercial bulk Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals by facile hydrothermal process at 130 and 210 deg. C, respectively. The as-synthesized dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods were investigated by various techniques of XRD, TEM, SEM, and EDS. In the process, the temperature was found to play important roles in determining produce dysprosium hydroxide and oxide nanorods.

  4. Study of electronic structure and spin polarization of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Mund, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    In this paper, I have presented the spin-dependent momentum density of ferromagnetic dysprosium using spin polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method. A fully relativistic approach has been used to determine the magnetic Compton profile. The density of state in term of majority-spin and minority-spin of Dy also calculated using SPR-KKR. The magnetic Compton profile discussed in term of 4f and diffused electrons.

  5. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  6. New limits on variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Leefer, N; Weber, C T M; Cingöz, A; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

    2013-08-09

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant α owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of α, competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy are measured over the span of two years. The linear variation of α is α·/α=(-5.8±6.9([1σ]))×10(-17)  yr(-1), consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kα characterizing a possible coupling of α to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kα=(-5.5±5.2([1σ]))×10(-7), essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date.

  7. A study on the near-infrared luminescent properties of xerogel materials doped with dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Zhou, Liang; Song, Shu-Yan; Li, Zhe-Feng; Fan, Wei-Qiang; Sun, Li-Ning; Yu, Ying-Ning; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2009-09-07

    A series of dysprosium complex doped xerogels with the same first ligand (acac = acetylacetone) and different neutral ligands were synthesized in situ via a sol-gel process. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra, and near-infrared (NIR) luminescent properties of dysprosium complexes and dysprosium complex doped xerogels are described in detail. The results reveal that the dysprosium complex is successfully synthesized in situ in the corresponding xerogel. Excitation at the maximum absorption wavelength of the ligands resulted in the characteristic NIR luminescence of the Dy3+ ion, which contributes to the energy transfer from the ligands to the central Dy3+ ion in both the dysprosium complexes and xerogels via an antenna effect. The NIR luminescent properties of the dysprosium complexes and xerogels were compared, respectively. The evidence showed that the neutral ligand triphenyl phosphine oxide (TPPO) could increase the emission intensity of the dysprosium complex while 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) gave the negative effect. In addition, the coordinated water molecules affect the emission intensity of the dysprosium complex doped xerogel without the neutral ligand.

  8. Magnetic structure of dysprosium in epitaxial Dy films and in Dy/Er superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesnil, K.; Dufour, C.; Mangin, P.; Marchal, G.; Hennion, M.

    1996-09-01

    We present a magnetization and neutron-diffraction study of the basal plane magnetic structure of Dy epitaxial films and Dy/Er superlattices. The thermal evolution of the magnetic phases, the stability of the helical phase under a magnetic field, the thermal variation of the dysprosium in-plane and {ital c} parameters, and of the dysprosium turn angle are successively shown. In Dy/Er superlattices, the dysprosium helix propagates coherently through paramagnetic erbium; at low temperature, individual dysprosium layers undergo a ferromagnetic transition and are coupled antiferromagnetically to each other for erbium layers thicknesses larger than 20 A. In dysprosium films, as expected from the epitaxy effect, the Curie temperature of dysprosium is reduced if dysprosium is grown on yttrium and increased if it is grown on erbium, whereas it is unexpectedly close to the bulk value in Dy/Er superlattices. This amazing value of the Curie temperature in superlattices is correlated to two main experimentally observed effects: (i) the magnetoelastic driving force is reduced compared to bulk dysprosium because of the clamped {gamma} distortion; (ii) the difference between the exchange energies in the helical and the ferromagnetic phases is increased compared to the bulk value. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Dysprosium electrodeposition from a hexaalkylguanidinium-based ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Claudia A.; Arkhipova, Maria; Maas, Gerhard; Jacob, Timo

    2016-07-01

    The rare-earth element dysprosium (Dy) is an important additive that increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of neodymium magnets and additionally prevents from demagnetizing at high temperatures. Therefore, it is one of the most important elements for high-tech industries and is mainly used in permanent magnetic applications, for example in electric vehicles, industrial motors and direct-drive wind turbines. In an effort to develop a more efficient electrochemical technique for depositing Dy on Nd-magnets in contrast to commonly used costly physical vapor deposition, we investigated the electrochemical behavior of dysprosium(iii) trifluoromethanesulfonate in a custom-made guanidinium-based room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). We first examined the electrodeposition of Dy on an Au(111) model electrode. The investigation was carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial stages of metal deposition were followed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). CV measurements revealed a large cathodic reduction peak, which corresponds to the growth of monoatomic high islands, based on STM images taken during the initial stages of deposition. XPS identified these deposited islands as dysprosium. A similar reduction peak was also observed on an Nd-Fe-B substrate, and positively identified as deposited Dy using XPS. Finally, we varied the concentration of the Dy precursor, electrolyte flow and temperature during Dy deposition and demonstrated that each of these parameters could be used to increase the thickness of the Dy deposit, suggesting that these parameters could be tuned simultaneously in a temperature-controlled flow cell to enhance the thickness of the Dy layer.The rare-earth element dysprosium (Dy) is an important additive that increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of neodymium magnets and additionally prevents from demagnetizing at high temperatures. Therefore, it is one of the most important

  10. Dysprosium electrodeposition from a hexaalkylguanidinium-based ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Berger, Claudia A; Arkhipova, Maria; Maas, Gerhard; Jacob, Timo

    2016-08-07

    The rare-earth element dysprosium (Dy) is an important additive that increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of neodymium magnets and additionally prevents from demagnetizing at high temperatures. Therefore, it is one of the most important elements for high-tech industries and is mainly used in permanent magnetic applications, for example in electric vehicles, industrial motors and direct-drive wind turbines. In an effort to develop a more efficient electrochemical technique for depositing Dy on Nd-magnets in contrast to commonly used costly physical vapor deposition, we investigated the electrochemical behavior of dysprosium(iii) trifluoromethanesulfonate in a custom-made guanidinium-based room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). We first examined the electrodeposition of Dy on an Au(111) model electrode. The investigation was carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial stages of metal deposition were followed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). CV measurements revealed a large cathodic reduction peak, which corresponds to the growth of monoatomic high islands, based on STM images taken during the initial stages of deposition. XPS identified these deposited islands as dysprosium. A similar reduction peak was also observed on an Nd-Fe-B substrate, and positively identified as deposited Dy using XPS. Finally, we varied the concentration of the Dy precursor, electrolyte flow and temperature during Dy deposition and demonstrated that each of these parameters could be used to increase the thickness of the Dy deposit, suggesting that these parameters could be tuned simultaneously in a temperature-controlled flow cell to enhance the thickness of the Dy layer.

  11. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; ...

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  12. Molecular factors that determine Curie spin relaxation in dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Caravan, P; Greenfield, M T; Bulte, J W

    2001-11-01

    Dysprosium complexes can serve as transverse relaxation (T(2)) agents for water protons through chemical exchange and the Curie spin relaxation mechanism. Using a pair of matched dysprosium(III) complexes, Dy-L1 (contains one inner-sphere water) and Dy-L2 (no inner-sphere water), it is shown that the transverse relaxation of bulk water is predominantly an inner-sphere effect. The kinetics of water exchange at Dy-L1 were determined by (17)O NMR. Proton transverse relaxation by Dy-L1 at high fields is governed primarily through a large chemical shift difference between free and bound water. Dy-L1 forms a noncovalent adduct with human serum albumin which dramatically lengthens the rotational correlation time, tau(R), causing the dipole-dipole component of the Curie spin mechanism to become significant and transverse relaxivity to increase by 3-8 times that of the unbound chelate. These findings aid in the design of new molecular species as efficient r(2) agents.

  13. Two dysprosium-incorporated tungstoarsenates: synthesis, structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyan; Guo, Weihua; Xu, Lin; Ma, Lifang; Wang, Yuchao

    2012-08-14

    Two dysprosium-containing tungstoarsenates [C(NH(2))(3)](11)[Dy(2)(Hcit)(2)(AsW(10)O(38))]·9H(2)O (1) and K(8-n)H(3-n)[Dy(3-n)K(n)(H(2)O)(3)(CO(3))(A-α-AsW(9)O(34))(A-β-AsW(9)O(34))]·22H(2)O (n = 0 or 1) (2) have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses and infrared spectroscopy. Compound 1 is a citrate-decorated Keggin type di-substituted Ln/POM derivative with the two non-adjacent substituted sites occupied. Compound 2 is composed of two different trivacant Keggin unit isomers [A-α-AsW(9)O(34)](9-) and [A-β-AsW(9)O(34)](9-), linked to each other via one {Dy(3-n)K(n)(H(2)O)(3)(CO(3))}((7 - 2n)+) (n = 0 or 1) unit, where CO(3)(2-) is encapsulated in the triangle plane, resulting in a stable dysprosium carbonate-containing sandwich-type polyoxoanion with D(2h) symmetry. The investigation on both static and dynamic magnetic properties of 1 and 2 show that the magnetic relaxation behavior of 2 appear in a static magnetic field of 5000 Oe, while 1 shows no positive out-of-phase ac susceptibility.

  14. Photoelectric and luminescent properties of dysprosium-doped silver chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, G. F. Rabenok, E. V.; Bocharov, K. V.; Lichkova, N. V.; Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Latyshev, A. N.

    2011-02-15

    The influence of dysprosium doping on the photoelectric and luminescent properties of AgCl crystals is studied by methods of microwave photoconductivity and photoluminescence. Doping affects both the loss kinetics of photogenerated electrons and luminescence spectra and parameters of photostimulated burst of luminescence. It is shown that the charged [Dy{sub Ag}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}} {center_dot} V Prime {sub Ag}]{sup {center_dot}} or neutral [Dy{sub Ag}{sup {center_dot}{center_dot}} {center_dot} 2V Prime {sub Ag}]{sup x} complexes are responsible for a new luminescence band peaked at 470 nm, which manifests itself at weight concentrations of the doping additive >10{sup -6}%. The long-wavelength shoulder at 570 nm in the photoluminescence spectra is attributed to intracenter transitions in the Dy{sup 3+} ions. The rate constant of the reaction of electron capture into the traps forming upon introduction of the dopant, k{sub t} = (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, is evaluated. It is assumed that the traps are Dy{sup 3+} dysprosium ions.

  15. Separation of carrier-free holmium-166 from neutron-irradiated dysprosium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dadachova, E.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Hetherington, E.L. ); Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. )

    1994-12-01

    Holmium-166 ([sup 166]Ho, t[sub 1/2] = 26.4 h) is utilized in radiotherapeutic applications such as radioimmunospecific pharmaceuticals, bone marrow ablation, and radiation synovectomy. High specific activity [sup 166]Ho can be obtained from the decay of dysprosium-166 ([sup 166]Dy, t[sub 1/2] = 81.5 h). Dysprosium-166 is produced by the [sup 164]Dy[n,[gamma

  16. Peptoid-ligated pentadecanuclear yttrium and dysprosium hydroxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Fernández, Ignacio; Rösch, Esther S; Kölmel, Dominik K; Powell, Annie K; Bräse, Stefan; Roesky, Peter W

    2015-02-09

    A new family of pentadecanuclear coordination cluster compounds (from now on simply referred to as clusters) [{Ln15 (OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl4 ] (PepCO2 =2-[{3-(((tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino)methyl)benzyl}amino]acetate, DBM=dibenzoylmethanide) with Ln=Y and Dy was obtained by using the cell-penetrating peptoid (CPPo) monomer PepCO2 H and dibenzoylmethane (DBMH) as supporting ligands. The combination of an inorganic cluster core with an organic cell-penetrating peptoid in the coordination sphere resulted in a core component {Ln15 (μ3 -OH)20 Cl}(24+) (Ln=Y, Dy), which consists of five vertex-sharing heterocubane {Ln4 (μ3 -OH)4 }(8+) units that assemble to give a pentagonal cyclic structure with one Cl atom located in the middle of the pentagon. The solid-state structures of both clusters were established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. MS (ESI) experiments suggest that the cluster core is robust and maintained in solution. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements were carried out on the diamagnetic yttrium compound and confirmed the stability of the cluster in its dicationic form [{Y15 (μ3 -OH)20 (PepCO2 )10 (DBM)10 Cl}Cl2 ](2+) . The investigation of both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties in the dysprosium cluster revealed a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior below 8 K. Furthermore, the χT product as a function of temperature for the dysprosium cluster gave evidence that this is a ferromagnetically coupled compound below 11 K.

  17. Butterfly-shaped pentanuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haiquan; Zhao, Lang; Lin, Haifeng; Tang, Jinkui; Li, Guangshe

    2013-09-23

    Two new "butterfly-shaped" pentanuclear dysprosium(III) clusters, [Dy5(μ3-OH)3(opch)6(H2O)3]⋅3 MeOH⋅9 H2O (1) and [Dy5(μ3-OH)3(Hopch)2(opch)4(MeOH)(H2O)2]⋅(ClO4)2⋅6 MeOH⋅4 H2O (2), which were based on the heterodonor-chelating ligand o-vanillin pyrazine acylhydrazone (H2opch), have been successfully synthesized by applying different reaction conditions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the butterfly-shaped cores in both compounds were comparable. However, their magnetic properties were drastically different. Indeed, compound 1 showed dual slow-relaxation processes with a transition between them that corresponded to energy gaps (Δ) of 8.1 and 37.9 K and pre-exponential factors (τ0) of 1.7×10(-5) and 9.7×10(-8)  s for the low- and high-temperature domains, respectively, whilst only a single relaxation process was noted for compound 2 (Δ = 197 K, τ0 = 3.2×10(-9)  s). These significant disparities are most likely due to the versatile coordination of the H2opch ligands with particular keto-enol tautomerism, which alters the strength of the local crystal field and, hence, the nature or direction of the easy axes of anisotropic dysprosium ions.

  18. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer.

  19. Direct measurement of dysprosium(III)···dysprosium(III) interactions in a single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Moreno Pineda, Eufemio; Chilton, Nicholas F; Marx, Raphael; Dörfel, María; Sells, Daniel O; Neugebauer, Petr; Jiang, Shang-Da; Collison, David; van Slageren, Joris; McInnes, Eric J L; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2014-10-13

    Lanthanide compounds show much higher energy barriers to magnetic relaxation than 3d-block compounds, and this has led to speculation that they could be used in molecular spintronic devices. Prototype molecular spin valves and molecular transistors have been reported, with remarkable experiments showing the influence of nuclear hyperfine coupling on transport properties. Modelling magnetic data measured on lanthanides is always complicated due to the strong spin-orbit coupling and subtle crystal field effects observed for the 4f-ions; this problem becomes still more challenging when interactions between lanthanide ions are also important. Such interactions have been shown to hinder and enhance magnetic relaxation in different examples, hence understanding their nature is vital. Here we are able to measure directly the interaction between two dysprosium(III) ions through multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and other techniques, and explain how this influences the dynamic magnetic behaviour of the system.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9511 - Silicic acid (H6SiO2O7), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. 721.9511 Section 721.9511 Protection of Environment...), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (PMN P-98-848; CAS No.181828-07-9) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9511 - Silicic acid (H6SiO2O7), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. 721.9511 Section 721.9511 Protection of Environment...), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (PMN P-98-848; CAS No.181828-07-9) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9511 - Silicic acid (H6SiO2O7), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. 721.9511 Section 721.9511 Protection of Environment...), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (PMN P-98-848; CAS No.181828-07-9) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9511 - Silicic acid (H6SiO2O7), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. 721.9511 Section 721.9511 Protection of Environment...), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (PMN P-98-848; CAS No.181828-07-9) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9511 - Silicic acid (H6SiO2O7), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. 721.9511 Section 721.9511 Protection of Environment...), magnesium, strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new..., strontium salt(1:1:2), dysprosium and europium-doped. (PMN P-98-848; CAS No.181828-07-9) is subject...

  5. Anomalous Elastic Behavior in hcp- and Sm-Type Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Tschauner, Oliver; Grubor-Urosevic, Ognjen; Dera, Przemyslaw; Mulcahy, Sean R.

    2012-04-11

    The compression behavior of elemental dysprosium in the hcp- and the Sm-type phases has been examined under hydrostatic pressure. Sm-type Dy has been found about 1% denser than the hcp phase. This increase in density is due to c-axis contraction in Sm-type Dy, whereas the a-axis even expands compared with the hcp-phase. Both the hcp- and the Sm-type phases show an inversion in the pressure derivative of the c/a ratio. For hcp-Dy this inversion is very sharp with minimal c/a at 2.5 GPa. At the same pressure, the compression behavior of hcp-Dy changes abruptly from dominantly c-axis compression to almost isotropic compression with slightly softer S{sub 11}. The bulk modulus increases at this point by a factor of {approx}2. Both hcp- and Sm-type Dy exhibit a crossover from highly anisotropic compression mostly along the c-axis to almost isotropic compression. We discuss these anomalies with respect to a possible Lifshitz transition and structural soft modes.

  6. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S.; Guallini, F.; Vallazza, E.; Prest, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8 MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the "in vivo" dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  7. Structures and magnetic properties of dysprosium complexes: the effect of crystallization temperature.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Lang; Tang, Jinkui

    2017-01-03

    Two new dysprosium complexes, [Dy(H5L)(NO3)2(CH3OH)2]·4CH3OH (1) and [Dy2(H5L)2(NO3)4(H2O)2]·10CH3OH (2), were isolated from the reaction of a novel 1,8-naphthalenediol-based ligand N,N'-((1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-diyl)bis(methanylylidene))bis(2-hydroxybenzohydrazide), H6L with dysprosium(iii) nitrate upon crystallization at different temperatures. Because of a low-symmetrical coordination environment, both complexes display only field-induced single molecular magnetic (SMM) behavior. Interestingly, complex 2 containing two dysprosium ions shows field-induced multiple relaxation processes, whereas only one relaxation process is observed for complex 1. The remarkably different behavior observed in 2 is mainly ascribed to the weak intra- or intermolecular interactions between the two Dy(III) centres in this complex.

  8. An electrostatic model for the determination of magnetic anisotropy in dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Nicholas F; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J L; Winpenny, Richard E P; Soncini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the anisotropic electronic structure of lanthanide complexes is important in areas as diverse as magnetic resonance imaging, luminescent cell labelling and quantum computing. Here we present an intuitive strategy based on a simple electrostatic method, capable of predicting the magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium(III) complexes, even in low symmetry. The strategy relies only on knowing the X-ray structure of the complex and the well-established observation that, in the absence of high symmetry, the ground state of dysprosium(III) is a doublet quantized along the anisotropy axis with an angular momentum quantum number mJ=±(15)/2. The magnetic anisotropy axis of 14 low-symmetry monometallic dysprosium(III) complexes computed via high-level ab initio calculations are very well reproduced by our electrostatic model. Furthermore, we show that the magnetic anisotropy is equally well predicted in a selection of low-symmetry polymetallic complexes.

  9. Magnetophoretic velocity of microorganic droplets adsorbed by dysprosium(III) laurate in water.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masayori; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2003-09-26

    By using an improved apparatus for the observation of magnetophoresis, the magnetophoretic velocity of 2-fluorotoluene droplets including lauric acid was measured in aqueous dysprosium(III) solution. The magnetophoretic velocity of pure 2-fluorotoluene droplets was proportional to the square of the radius. On the other hand, the velocity of the organic droplets including lauric acid in the dysprosium(III) solution showed a deviation from the square radius relationship, more remarkably in smaller droplets than 2 microm in radius. These results indicated that the dysprosium(III)-laurate complex was formed at the liquid-liquid interface. This study is the first report on the detection of the interfacial complex by the magnetophoresis of the microdroplet.

  10. A Low-Symmetry Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet with a High Anisotropy Barrier.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas; Chilton, Nicholas F; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-09-05

    The single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of the isocarbonyl-ligated dysprosium metallocene [Cp*2 Dy{μ-(OC)2 FeCp}]2 (1Dy ), which contains a rhombus-shaped Dy2 Fe2 core, are described. Combining a strong axial [Cp*](-) ligand field with a weak equatorial field consisting of the isocarbonyl ligands leads to an anisotropy barrier of 662 cm(-1) in zero applied field. The dominant thermal relaxation pathways in 1Dy involves at least the fourth-excited Kramers doublet, thus demonstrating that prominent SMM behavior can be observed for dysprosium in low-symmetry environments.

  11. The use of dysprosium to measure endogenous zinc excretion in feces eliminates the necessity of complete fecal collections.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leland V; Sheng, Xiao-Yang; Hambidge, K Michael; Westcott, Jamie E; Sian, Lei; Krebs, Nancy F

    2010-08-01

    The secretion of endogenous zinc (Zn) into the gut and subsequent excretion in the feces is understood to play a major role in maintaining Zn homeostasis in humans. Therefore, the measurement of endogenous Zn losses in the feces (EFZ) can be an important aspect of the study of Zn metabolism and homeostasis. The methods currently used to measure EFZ have the disadvantage of requiring complete fecal collections over multiple days. We have investigated the use of dysprosium (Dy), a nonabsorbable rare earth metal, in a method of determining EFZ that does not require complete fecal collections and permits the measurement of EFZ from several fecal samples. The method was evaluated using data from a study of free-living adult females in which Dy was administered 3-4 times/d over a period of 5 or 6 d to monitor completeness of fecal collections. The results did not differ from those obtained using an established isotope dilution method. We found that the measurement of the sample Dy:Zn ratio was useful for selecting samples for measurement. We conclude that the Dy method of determining EFZ is a valid and less burdensome alternative to current techniques.

  12. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  13. Exploration of dysprosium: the most critical element for Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Dysprosium (Dy), one of the heavy rare earth elements, is used mainly as an additive for NdFeB permanent magnets which are installed in various modern industrial products such as voice coil motors in computers, factory automation machinery, hybrid and electric vehicles, home electronics, and wind turbine, to improve heat resistance of the magnets. Dy has been produced about 2,000t per year from the ores from ion adsorption type deposits in southern China. However, the produced amount of Dy was significantly reduced in 2011 in China due to reservation of heavy rare earth resources and protection of natural environment, resulting in soaring of Dy price in the world. In order to respond the increasing demand of Dy, unconventional supply sources are inevitably developed, in addition to heavy rare earth enriched ion adsorption type deposits outside China. Heavy rare earth elements including Dy are dominantly hosted in xenotime, fergusonite, zircon, eudialyte, keiviite, kainosite, iimoriite, etc. Concentration of xenotime is found in placer deposits in Malaysia and India, hydrothermal deposits associated with unconformity-type uranium mineralization (Athabasca basin in Canada, Western Australia), iron-oxide fluorite mineralization (South Africa) and Sn-bearing alkaline granite (Brazil). Zircon and fergusontie concentration is found as igneous and hydrothermal products in peralkaline syenite, alkaline granite and pegmatite (e.g., Nechalacho in Canada). Eudialyte concentration is found in some peralkaline syenite bodies in Greenland, Canada, Sweden and Russia. Among these sources, large Dy resources are estimated in the deposits hosted in peralkaline rocks (Nechalacho: 79,000t, Kvanefjeld: 49,000t, Norra Karr: 15,700t, etc.) compared to the present demand of Dy. Thus, Dy will be supplied from the deposits associated with peralkaline and alkaline deposits in future instead of ion adsorption type deposits in southern China.

  14. Magnetic frustration in a hexaazatrinaphthylene-bridged trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Grindell, Richard; Vieru, Veacheslav; Pugh, Thomas; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-10-25

    The synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of the HAN-bridged tri-dysprosium complex [{(thd)3Dy}3HAN] (1) are described. The complex is an SMM that shows two relaxation processes owing to the presence of two geometrically distinct Dy(3+) sites in 1. Ab initio calculations reveal that the magnetic ground state of 1 is characterized by magnetic frustration.

  15. Dysprosium-bearing red cells as potential transverse relaxation agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M; Tao, J Z; Kennan, R P; Gore, J C

    2001-05-01

    The cytosol of intact human red blood cells was loaded with 28.1 +/- 3.4 mM of dysprosium DTPA-BMA using a hypoosmotic technique. When loaded cells were diluted with saline and control cells to give an average dysprosium concentration of 3.3 +/- 0.5 mM, the transverse relaxation rate constants R(*)(2) and R(2) increased. R(*)(2) increased from 7.5 +/- 0.9 sec(-1) to 356 +/- 50 sec(-1), and R(2) increased from 7.4 +/- 0.7 sec(-1) to 148 +/- 40 sec(-1). After lysing, R(*)(2) was 6.0 +/- 0.6 sec(-1) in the control and 13.4 +/- 1.5 sec(-1) in the mixture; R(2) was 6.4 +/- 1.1 sec(-1) and 9.8 +/- 2.4 sec(-1), respectively. Thus, the relaxivity effects were enhanced by sequestration of the dysprosium within intact red cells, and this effect was lost after lysis. At a circulating whole-blood concentration of 0.81 +/- 0.15 mM in rats, the liver signal intensity dropped 29.9% +/- 3.7% and kidney signal intensity dropped 19.4% +/- 8.7%. Dysprosium-loaded cells might be useful in the study of perfusion and tissue blood volume.

  16. Sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Qian, Kang; Wang, Kang; Bian, Yongzhong; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Gao, Song

    2011-09-14

    Homoleptic tetrakis[2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(butyloxy)phthalocyaninato] dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker complex 1 was isolated in relatively good yield of 43% from a simple one-pot reaction. This compound represents the first sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM that has been structurally characterized.

  17. Systematic study on surface and magnetostructural changes in Mn-substituted dysprosium ferrite by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekha, G.; Tholkappiyan, R.; Vishista, K.; Hamed, Fathalla

    2016-11-01

    Dysprosium iron garnets are of scientific importance because of the wide range of magnetic properties that can be obtained in substituting dysprosium by a rare earth metal. In the present work, the effect of Mn substitution on magnetostructural changes in dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Highly crystalline pure and Mn doped dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The samples were calcined at 1100 °C for 2 h in air atmosphere which is followed by characterization using XRD, FT-IR analysis, SEM, XPS and VSM. The average crystallite size of synthesized samples were calculated by X-ray diffraction falls in the range of 88.4-86.8 nm and was found to be in cubic garnet structure. For further investigation of the structure and corresponding changes in the tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrational bonds, FT-IR was used. The synthesized samples consist of multiple oxidation (Fe3+ and Fe2+) states for Fe ions and (Mn3+ and Mn2+) Mn ions analyzed in three ways of Fe 2p and Mn 2p spectra from the XPS analysis. With respect to Mn dopant in Dy3Fe5O12, the cationic distributions of elements were discussed from high resolution XPS spectra by peak position and shift, area, width. To find out the porous/void surface morphology of the sample, scanning electron microscopy was used. From XPS analysis, the presence of elements (Dy, Mn, Fe and O) and their composition in the prepared samples were confirmed. Further, the role of dopant on the magnetic properties of the dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles was also observed from VSM which shows the ferromagnetic behavior. It was concluded that the magnetic properties of synthesized nanoparticles mainly depended on the oxidation state of elements, cationic distribution and crystallinity.

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, L. B.; Trandafir, D. L.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-11-01

    The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, 29Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T1 and RARE-T2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  19. Slow magnetic relaxation in a hydrogen-bonded 2D array of mononuclear dysprosium(III) oxamates.

    PubMed

    Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Vallejo, Julia; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2013-05-06

    The reaction of N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)oxamic acid with dysprosium(III) ions in a controlled basic media afforded the first example of a mononuclear lanthanide oxamate complex exhibiting a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation behavior typical of single-ion magnets (SIMs). The hydrogen-bond-mediated self-assembly of this new bifunctional dysprosium(III) SIM in the solid state provides a unique example of 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer with a herringbone net topology.

  20. Determination of dysprosium by resonance light scattering technique in the presence of BPMPHD.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuna; Wu, Xia; Yang, Jinghe; Li, Lei; Wang, Yuebo

    2004-01-01

    Dysprosium has been determined by resonance light scattering (RLS) method in the presence of 1,6-bi(1'-phenyl-3'-methyl-5'-pyrazolone-4'-)hexanedione (BPMPHD) at pH 5.5. The Dy-BPMPHD system has three characteristic peaks at 358, 399 and 450 nm, especially the peak at 358 nm, which is proportional to the concentration of Dy(3+) in the range of 1.0 x 10(-10)-1.0 x 10(-5) mol l(-1). The detection limit (S/N=2) is 5.6 x 10(-12) mol l(-1). Synthetic samples are determined satisfactorily. A new sensitive method for detection of dysprosium has been proposed.

  1. Technique for direct measurement of magnetic entropy of solids: Results for dysprosium titanium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A measurement technique was devised which permits direct observation of the magnetic entropy of solids as a function of applied magnetic field. Measurements were made of the magnetic entropy, in the temperature range 2 to 20 K, of polycrystalline samples of dysprosium titanium oxide (Dy2Ti2O7) to determine its suitability for use as the working substance of a magnetic refrigerator. Magnetization measurements were also made at 4.2 K and below to provide additional information on the nature of the compound. The measurements indicated that crystalline electric fields perturbed the ground state of the dysprosium ions, removed the 16-fold degeneracy predicted by Hund's rules, and left only a twofold degeneracy in its place. A positive, temperature independent contribution to the magnetization was observed in the saturation region, which indicated that the doublet ground-state wave function was perturbed by a nearby unpopulated upper energy level.

  2. Effect of Yttrium doping on structural and magnetic properties of Dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Rudra Prasad; Baidya, Arunmay; Lakhani, Archana

    2016-11-01

    A comparative structural and magneto transport study has been performed on the Dysprosium (Dy) and Yttrium (Y) doped Dysprosium (Dy-Y) alloys in order to study the effect of Y concentration, temperature and magnetic field on the magnetic states and transitions of Dy-Y alloys. The magnetic state of Dy and Dy-Y alloys having lower Y substitutions change from Paramagnetic (PM) to Helimagnetic (HM) state via second order phase transition and from Helimagnetic state to Ferromagnetic (FM) state via first order phase transition. Small change in lattice parameters, strain and micro-strain is observed with X-ray diffraction on replacement with Y ions. Neel temperature and Curie temperature both show a decreasing trend on diluting Dy with non-magnetic Y in small concentrations. PM to HM and HM to FM transitions in the lower substitutional alloys discussed in this manuscript show a direct transition from PM to FM state at fields above 1.5 T.

  3. Selective recognition of dysprosium(III) ions by enhanced chemiluminescence CdSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ganjali, Mohammad R; Vaezi, Zahra; Faridbod, Farnoush; Arabsorkhi, Batool; Sheikhha, Mohammad H

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of emitted light from CdSe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 is described as a novel chemiluminescence (CL) reaction for determination of dysprosium. This reaction is based on the catalytic effect of Dy(3+) ions, causing a significant increase in the light emission, as a result of the reaction of quantum dots (QDs) with hydrogen peroxide. In the optimum conditions, this method was satisfactorily described by linear calibration curve in the range of 8.3×10(-7)-5.0×10(-6)M, the detection limit of 6.0×10(-8)M, and the relative standard deviation for five determinations of 2.5×10(-6)M Dy(3+) 3.2%. The main experimental advantage of the proposed method is its selective to Dy(3+) ions compared with common coexisting cations, therefore, it was successfully applied for the determination of dysprosium ions in water samples.

  4. Repeat radiation synovectomy with dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates in rheumatoid knees unresponsive to initial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Because of failure to fully respond to an initial intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates, 17 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis underwent repeat radiation synovectomy using this agent. Of the 13 patients who were evaluated 1 year later, 54% (7 knees) had good results, 31% (4 knees) had fair results, and 15% (2 knees) had poor results. The initial lack of significant benefit from radiation synovectomy did not appear to preclude a favorable response to a second injection.

  5. A unique dysprosium selenoarsenate(iii) exhibiting a photocurrent response and slow magnetic relaxation behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Zou, Hua-Hong; Zhao, Rongqing; Xiao, Hong; Ding, Qingran

    2017-01-03

    A redox, substitution and self-assembly reaction offers a novel dysprosium selenoarsenate(iii) with As(3+) [Dy2(tepa)2(μ2-OH)2Cl2]3[As3Se6]2 (1, tepa = tetraethylenepentamine), which provides the first example of chair conformation ring [As3Se6](3-) combined with lanthanide complexes as counterions. 1 exhibits a photocurrent response and slow magnetic relaxation behavior.

  6. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  7. Analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Gilad; Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2007-05-15

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum (5-10.2 A ring ) emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium (Dy) is given using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic trends. Resonance 3d-4p, 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4s, and 3p-4d transitions of Ni I-like Dy XXXIX and neighboring ion satellite transitions (from Dy XXXIV to Dy XL) are identified.

  8. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-09-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used.

  9. The synthesis, structure, magnetic and luminescent properties of a new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yen-Han; Tsai, Yun-Fan; Lee, Gene-Hsian; Yang, En-Che

    2012-01-15

    The synthesis and characterization of [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1), a new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) complex, is described. The compound was characterized by its X-ray structure, magnetic properties as well as the luminescent spectra. The compound crystallizes in a P1-bar space group with a zig-zag linear form of geometry. The ac magnetic susceptibilities of the molecule indicate that it is a magnetic molecule with a slow magnetization relaxation. The molecule also exhibits an emission spectrum that was confirmed to be ligand based. These results indicate that this molecule has both a slow magnetization relaxation (that could be potentially a SMM) and luminescent properties. - Graphical Abstract: A new tetranuclear dysprosium (III) complex [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} is synthesized and reported in this paper. This molecule has luminescence and can potentially act as a SMM. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new designed ligand (dhampH{sub 5}) was syntheisized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new tetra-dysprosium cluster [Dy{sub 4}(dhampH{sub 3}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was made. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slow magnetization relaxation phenomenon was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand-based luminescence was observed.

  10. Novel Thermal Effects at the First Order Magnetic Phase Transition in Erbium, and a Comparison with Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Fort, D.

    1997-06-01

    In low temperature studies of ultrapure erbium (and dysprosium) we have discovered unusual thermal effects at the first order magnetic transformation of erbium ({congruent} 19K). These include (1)superheating (i.e., {ital the metal is colder after heat has been added to it than before the heat pulse }), (2)supercooling, and (3)the existence of metastable intermediate phases during this phase transformation in erbium (four on heating and two on cooling). In comparison, dysprosium exhibits both superheating and supercooling, but no intermediate metastable phases are observed. Furthermore, none of these effects are observed in less pure metals. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Pushing the pseudo-SU(3) model towards its limits: Excited bands in even-even Dy isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2004-12-01

    The energetics of states belonging to normal parity bands in even-even dysprosium isotopes, and their B(E2) transition strengths, are studied using an extended pseudo-SU(3) shell model. States with pseudospin 1 are added to the standard pseudospin 0 space, allowing for a proper description of known excited normal parity bands. A realistic Hamiltonian is employed. Both the success of model and its limitations are discussed.

  12. Therapeutic application of dysprosium-165-FHMA in the treatment of rheumatoid knee effusions

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation synovectomy utilizing a variety of radionuclides has proven to be an effective technique in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The recent introduction of the short-lived radionuclide, Dysprosium-165 (/sup 165/Dy), as a replacement for the longer-lived radiocolloids has reduced nontarget dosimetry caused by leakage of the agent from the articular cavity. A review of the methods and status of radiation synovectomy, and the application of /sup 165/Dy-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA) as an alternative therapeutic agent is described.

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of a novel heterobimetallic rhenium(IV)-dysprosium(III) chain.

    PubMed

    Pejo, Carolina; Guedes, Guilherme P; Novak, Miguel A; Speziali, Nivaldo L; Chiozzone, Raúl; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Vaz, Maria G F; González, Ricardo

    2015-06-08

    The use of the mononuclear rhenium(IV) precursor [ReBr5 (H2 pydc)](-) (H2 pydc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) as a metalloligand towards dysprosium(III) afforded the first heterobimetallic Re(IV) -Dy(III) complex. Crystal structures and static and dynamic magnetic properties of both rhenium-containing species are reported herein. The 5d-4f compound shows an extended 1D structure and the AC magnetic measurements reveal frequency dependence at low temperature suggesting slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  14. Calorimetric measurement of the interaction of propylene, acetylene, and methane with dysprosium films at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cerny, S.; Smutek, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Rare earth metals and their intermetallics have found applications in heterogeneous catalysis, including cracking, hydrogenation, and other reactions of hydrocarbons, yet little has been published on chemisorption of hydrocarbons by rare earths. In the present communication the authors report on exploratory calorimetric experiments with the adsorption of initial doses of C{sub 3}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} admitted to polycrystalline dysprosium films at room temperature. The obtained data are interpreted in terms of thermochemical cycles utilizing data of their previous thermochemical and XPS measurements of the interaction of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and oxygen with films of rare earths.

  15. Structure of dimeric dysprosium (III) d-tartrate of 2:2 composition in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chevela, V.V.; Vul`fson, S.G.; Sal`nikov, Yu.I.

    1994-12-20

    The molar constant of paramagnetic birefringence of dimeric dysprosium d-tartrate Dy{sub 2}(d-L){sup 2{minus}}{sub 2} (d-L{sup 4{minus}} is a deprotonated molecule of tartaric acid) was determined experimentally and by mathematical simulation. The structures of the ligand and hydrate environment in Dy{sub 2}(d-L){sup 2{minus}}{sub 2} were simulated by the molecular mechanics method (Dashevskii-Plyamovatyi model). Results consistent with the experimental data can be obtained only when coordination of Na{sup +} is taken into account. 6 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2{yields}hR9{yields}hP4{yields}distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45 GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  17. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong Rong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2→hR9→hP4→distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  18. Decay of the neutron-rich isotope 171Ho and the identification of 169Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasteler, R. M.; Nitschke, J. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Vierinen, K. S.; Wilmarth, P. A.

    1990-10-01

    Neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions between 170Er ions and natW targets. On-line mass separation was used together with β- and γ-ray spectroscopy in these studies. At mass A=169, the heaviest known dysprosium isotope, 39(8) s,169Dy, was identified. It was observed to β- decay to the ground state of 169Ho or through a level at 1578 keV. In the A=171 mass chain, a partial decay scheme for 55(3)-s 171Ho was determined.

  19. Cyclic single-molecule magnets: from the odd-numbered heptanuclear to a dimer of heptanuclear dysprosium clusters.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haiquan; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-02-07

    A heptanuclear and a dimer of heptanuclear dysprosium clusters (Dy7 and Dy14) have been successfully synthesized by ingenious coalescence of the single and double pyrazinyl hydrazone as well as phosphonate ligands. The complexes feature the largest odd-numbered cyclic lanthanide clusters reported thus far. Both exhibit single molecule magnet behaviors at low temperature.

  20. Highly Axial Magnetic Anisotropy in a N3 O5 Dysprosium(III) Coordination Environment Generated by a Merocyanine Ligand.

    PubMed

    Selvanathan, Pramila; Huang, Gang; Guizouarn, Thierry; Roisnel, Thierry; Fernandez-Garcia, Guglielmo; Totti, Federico; Le Guennic, Boris; Calvez, Guillaume; Bernot, Kévin; Norel, Lucie; Rigaut, Stéphane

    2016-10-17

    A spiropyran-based switchable ligand isomerizes upon reaction with lanthanide(III) precursors to generate complexes with an unusual N3 O5 coordination sphere. The air-stable dysprosium(III) complex shows a hysteresis loop at 2 K and a very strong axial magnetic anisotropy generated by the merocyanine phenolate donor.

  1. The determination of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium in uranium products by direct-current plasma emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Flavelle, F; Westland, A D

    1986-05-01

    Samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium were separated from uranium-containing materials by means of solvent extraction with Alamine 336, followed by cation-exchange. The elements were determined in the sub-ppm range by means of direct-current plasma atomic-emission spectrometry.

  2. A comparison of the effects of symmetry and magnetoanisotropy on paramagnetic relaxation in related dysprosium single ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ursula J; Mahoney, Brian D; DeGregorio, Patrick T; Carroll, Patrick J; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kikkawa, James M; Schelter, Eric J

    2012-06-07

    Dysprosium complexes of the tmtaa(2-) ligand were synthesized and characterized by X-band EPR and magnetism studies. Both complexes demonstrate magnetoanisotropy and slow paramagnetic relaxation. Comparison of these compounds with the seminal phthalocyanine complex [Dy(Pc)(2)](-) shows the azaannulide complexes are more susceptible to relaxation through non-thermal pathways.

  3. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Atcher, R.W.; Shortkroff, S.; Lionberger, D.R.; Rose, H.A.; Hurson, B.J.; Lankenner, P.A. Jr.; Anderson, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used.

  4. Local coordination geometry perturbed β-diketone dysprosium single-ion magnets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Changzheng; Luan, Fang; Liu, Tianqi; Yan, Pengfei; Li, Guangming

    2014-09-02

    A series of three β-diketone mononuclear dysprosium complexes, namely, Dy(TFI)3(H2O)2 (1), Dy(TFI)3(bpy) (2), and [Dy(TFI)3(Phen)]·0.02CHCl3 (3) (TFI = 2-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-1-indone, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) have been designed and synthesized. Crystal structure analysis reveals that complexes 1-3 have haveisomorphic structures in which the central Dy(III) ion is eight-coordinated by six oxygen atoms from three TFI ligands and two O/N atoms from auxiliary ligands, forming a distorted bicapped trigonal prismatic geometry for 1, a distorted dodecahedral geometry for 2, and a distorted square antiprismatic geometry for 3, respectively. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 2 with D(2d) symmetry and 3 with D(4d) symmetry exhibit slow magnetic relaxation with barrier heights (U(eff)/k(B)) of 48.8 K for 2 and 57.9 K for 3. Strikingly, the relaxation time (τ) of 0.0258 s for 3 is about 20 times that for 2, which is presumably associated with larger rotation of the SAP surroundings for 3. Further, complexes 2 and 3 exhibit essential magnetic hysteresis loops at 1.8 K. These extend the recent reports of the single-ion magnets (SIMs) of β-diketone mononuclear dysprosium complexes.

  5. Influencing the properties of dysprosium single-molecule magnets with phosphorus donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas; Tuna, Floriana; Ungur, Liviu; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J L; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Layfield, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule magnets are a type of coordination compound that can retain magnetic information at low temperatures. Single-molecule magnets based on lanthanides have accounted for many important advances, including systems with very large energy barriers to reversal of the magnetization, and a di-terbium complex that displays magnetic hysteresis up to 14 K and shows strong coercivity. Ligand design is crucial for the development of new single-molecule magnets: organometallic chemistry presents possibilities for using unconventional ligands, particularly those with soft donor groups. Here we report dysprosium single-molecule magnets with neutral and anionic phosphorus donor ligands, and show that their properties change dramatically when varying the ligand from phosphine to phosphide to phosphinidene. A phosphide-ligated, trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet relaxes via the second-excited Kramers' doublet, and, when doped into a diamagnetic matrix at the single-ion level, produces a large energy barrier of 256 cm(-1) and magnetic hysteresis up to 4.4 K.

  6. Influencing the properties of dysprosium single-molecule magnets with phosphorus donor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Thomas; Tuna, Floriana; Ungur, Liviu; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J.L.; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Layfield, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are a type of coordination compound that can retain magnetic information at low temperatures. Single-molecule magnets based on lanthanides have accounted for many important advances, including systems with very large energy barriers to reversal of the magnetization, and a di-terbium complex that displays magnetic hysteresis up to 14 K and shows strong coercivity. Ligand design is crucial for the development of new single-molecule magnets: organometallic chemistry presents possibilities for using unconventional ligands, particularly those with soft donor groups. Here we report dysprosium single-molecule magnets with neutral and anionic phosphorus donor ligands, and show that their properties change dramatically when varying the ligand from phosphine to phosphide to phosphinidene. A phosphide-ligated, trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet relaxes via the second-excited Kramers' doublet, and, when doped into a diamagnetic matrix at the single-ion level, produces a large energy barrier of 256 cm−1 and magnetic hysteresis up to 4.4 K. PMID:26130418

  7. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation.

  8. Dysprosium-doped chalcogenide films prepared by pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazabal, Virginie; Nemec, Petr; Jedelský, Jaroslav; Duverger, Claire; Le Person, Jenny; Adam, Jean-Luc; Frumar, Miloslav

    2004-08-01

    The chalcogenide glasses possess interesting optical properties such as a good transmission in the nIR-mIR wavelength region, high linear and non-linear refractive index and photosensitivity, which allows holographic patterns writing. Moreover, their low-phonon energy makes them good candidates for optical amplification. In order to design an integrated circuit on chalcogenide glasses, the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is a suitable method for deposition of glass with complex composition. Amorphous Ge-Ga-Sb-S films (pure and dysprosium doped) were prepared by PLD using different energy of the laser beam pulses. Compositional, morphological and structural characteristics of the films were studied by MEB-EDS, atomic force, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analyses. The photo-luminescence of Dy doped Ge-Ga-Sb-S films was investigated. The emission band centered at 1340 nm corresponding to 6F11/2, 6H9/2-6H15/2 electron transitions of Dy3+ ions was identified in luminescence spectra of dysprosium doped thin films. A study of the optical properties and the effects of exposure and thermal annealing below the glass transition temperature on the optical parameters of thin films from the Ge-Ga-Sb-S system will be presented.

  9. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate glass subjected to Co-60 gamma ray

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, R. S. Wagiran, H. Saeed, M. A.

    2016-01-22

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate (CMB:Dy) glass are presented. This study is deemed to understand the application of calcium as the modifier in magnesium borate glass with the presence of dysprosium as the activator to be performed as TL dosimeter (TLD). The study provides fundamental knowledge of a glass system that may lead to perform new TL glass dosimetry application in future research. Calcium magnesium borate glass systems of (70-y) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} − 20 CaO – 10 MgO-(y) Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 0.05  mol % ≤ y ≤ 0.7  mol % of dyprosium were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous structure and TL properties of the prepared samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TL reader; model Harshaw 4500 respectively. The samples were irradiated to Co-60 gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy. Dosimetric properties such as annealing procedure, time temperature profile (TTP) setting, optimization of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration of 0.5 mol % were determined for thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader used.

  10. Solvent responsive magnetic dynamics of a dinuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Ren, Min; Bao, Song-Song; Hoshino, Norihisa; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Wang, Bingwu; Ding, Yu-Chen; Wei, Shiqiang; Zheng, Li-Min

    2013-07-15

    A new dysprosium(III) phosphonate dimer {Dy(notpH4)(NO3)(H2O)}2·8H2O (1) [notpH6=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triyl-tris(methylenephosphonic acid)] that contains two equivalent Dy(III) ions with a three-capped trigonal prism environment is reported. Complex 1 can be transformed into {Dy(notpH4)(NO3)(H2O)}2 (2) in a reversible manner by desorption and absorption of solvent water at ambient temperature. This process is accompanied by a large dielectric response. Magnetic studies reveal that both 1 and 2 show thermally activated magnetization relaxation as expected for single-molecule magnets. Moreover, the magnetic dynamics of the two compounds can be manipulated by controlling the number of solvent molecules at room temperature.

  11. Nuclear resonance reflection of synchrotron radiation from thin dysprosium films with different types of magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, M. A.; Antropov, N. O.; Baulin, R. A.; Kravtsov, E. A.; Ryabukhina, M. V.; Yakunina, E. M.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Epitaxial thin films of dysprosium have been successfully synthesized by the method of high-vacuum magnetron sputtering and their structure and magnetic properties have been investigated. The opportunity of the nuclear resonance scattering for the investigation of nanostructures containing 161Dy has been considered; the specific features of the spectra of nuclear resonance reflectivity from the films have been analyzed on the energy and time scales at different orientations of the magnetic hyperfine field. The simulation of the angular dependences of nuclear resonance reflectivity for the case of spiral ordering in periodic structures containing 161Dy has been carried out. It has been shown that these dependences make it possible to uniquely determine the period of magnetic ordering.

  12. Photophysical and electrochemical properties of a dysprosium-zinc tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Tong; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Xu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Qiu-Yan; Pei, Yun-Peng

    2016-02-01

    A dysprosium-zinc porphyrin, [DyZn(TPPS)H3O]n (1) (TPPS = tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin), was prepared through solvothermal reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Complex 1 features a three-dimensional (3-D) porous open framework that is thermally stable up to 400 °C. Complex 1 displays a void space of 215 Å(3), occupying 9.2% of the unit cell volume. The fluorescence spectra reveal that it shows an emission band in the red region. The fluorescence lifetime is 39 µsec and the quantum yield is 1.7%. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement revealed one quasi-reversible wave with E1/2  = 0.30 V.

  13. Dysprosium-carboxylate nanomeshes with tunable cavity size and assembly motif through ionic interactions.

    PubMed

    Cirera, B; Đorđević, L; Otero, R; Gallego, J M; Bonifazi, D; Miranda, R; Ecija, D

    2016-09-28

    We report the design of dysprosium directed metallo-supramolecular architectures on a pristine Cu(111) surface. By an appropriate selection of the ditopic molecular linkers equipped with terminal carboxylic groups (TPA, PDA and TDA species), we create reticular and mononuclear metal-organic nanomeshes of tunable internodal distance, which are stabilized by eight-fold DyO interactions. A thermal annealing treatment for the reticular Dy:TDA architecture gives rise to an unprecedented quasi-hexagonal nanostructure based on dinuclear Dy clusters, exhibiting a unique six-fold DyO bonding motif. All metallo-supramolecular architectures are stable at room temperature. Our results open new avenues for the engineering of supramolecular architectures on surfaces incorporating f-block elements forming thermally robust nanoarchitectures through ionic bonds.

  14. Treatment of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits with dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, J.D.; Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.

    1989-01-01

    Dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (/sup 165/Dy-FHMA) was used as an agent of radiation synovectomy in an antigen-induced arthritis model in New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were killed up to 6 months after treatment. /sup 165/Dy-FHMA was found to have a potent but temporary antiinflammatory effect on synovium for up to 3 months after treatment. Treated knees also showed significant preservation of articular cartilage architecture and proteoglycan content compared with untreated controls, but only during the first 3 months after treatment. In animals killed 3 and 6 months after treatment there were only minimal differences between the treated and untreated knees, indicating that the antiinflammatory effects on synovial tissue and articular cartilage preservation were not sustained.

  15. Decay of the neutron-rich isotope sup 171 Ho and the identification of sup 169 Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Chasteler, R.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Firestone, R.B.; Vierinen, K.S.; Wilmarth, P.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions between {sup 170}Er ions and {sup nat}W targets. On-line mass separation was used together with {beta}- and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in these studies. At mass {ital A}=169, the heaviest known dysprosium isotope, 39(8) s,{sup 169}Dy, was identified. It was observed to {beta}{sup {minus}} decay to the ground state of {sup 169}Ho or through a level at 1578 keV. In the {ital A}=171 mass chain, a partial decay scheme for 55(3)-s {sup 171}Ho was determined.

  16. Dysprosium complexes and their micelles as potential bimodal agents for magnetic resonance and optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Debroye, Elke; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2013-11-18

    Six diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) bisamide derivatives functionalized with p-toluidine (DTPA-BTolA), 6-aminocoumarin (DTPA-BCoumA), 1-naphthalene methylamine (DTPA-BNaphA), 4-ethynylaniline (DTPA-BEthA), p-dodecylaniline (DTPA-BC12PheA) and p-tetradecyl-aniline (DTPA-BC14PheA) were coordinated to dysprosium(III) and the magnetic and optical properties of the complexes were examined in detail. The complexes consisting of amphiphilic ligands (DTPA-BC12PheA and DTPA-BC14PheA) were further assembled into mixed micelles. Upon excitation into the ligand levels, the complexes display characteristic Dy(III) emission with quantum yields of 0.3-0.5% despite the presence of one water molecule in the first coordination sphere. A deeper insight into the energy-transfer processes has been obtained by studying the photophysical properties of the corresponding Gd(III) complexes. Since the luminescence quenching effect is decreased by the intervention of non-ionic surfactant, quantum yields up to 1% are obtained for the micelles. The transverse relaxivity r2 per Dy(III) ion at 500 MHz and 310 K reaches a maximum value of 27.4 s(-1) mM(-1) for Dy-DTPA-BEthA and 36.0 s(-1) mM(-1) for the Dy-DTPA-BC12PheA assemblies compared with a value of 0.8 s(-1) mM(-1) for Dy-DTPA. The efficient T2 relaxation, especially at high magnetic field strengths, is sustained by the high magnetic moment of the dysprosium ion, the coordination of water molecules with slow water exchange kinetics and long rotational correlation times. These findings open the way to the further development of bimodal optical and magnetic resonance imaging probes starting from single lanthanide compounds.

  17. Structural and electronic dependence of the single-molecule-magnet behavior of dysprosium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Victoria E; Bolvin, Hélène; Rivière, Eric; Guillot, Regis; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Mallah, Talal

    2014-03-03

    We investigate and compare the magnetic properties of two isostructural Dy(III)-containing complexes. The Dy(III) ions are chelated by hexadentate ligands and possess two apical bidendate nitrate anions. In dysprosium(III) N,N'-bis(imine-2-yl)methylene-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane (1), the ligand's donor atoms are two alkoxo, two pyridine, and two imine nitrogen atoms. Dysprosium(III) N,N'-bis(amine-2-yl)methylene-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane (2) is identical with 1 except for one modification: the two imine groups have been replaced by amine groups. This change has a minute effect on the structure and a larger effect the magnetic behavior. The two complexes possess slow relaxation of the magnetization in the presence of an applied field of 1000 Oe but with a larger barrier for reorientation of the magnetization for 1 (Ueff/kB = 50 K) than for 2 (Ueff/kB = 34 K). First-principles calculations using the spin-orbit complete active-space self-consistent-field method were performed and allowed to fit the experimental magnetization data. The calculations gave the energy spectrum of the 2J + 1 sublevels issued from the J = 15/2 free-ion ground state. The lowest-lying sublevels were found to have a large contribution of MJ = ±15/2 for 1, while for 2, MJ = ±13/2 was dominant. The observed differences were attributed to a synergistic effect between the electron density of the ligand and the small structural changes provoked by a slight alteration of the coordination environment. It was observed that the stronger ligand field (imine) resulted in complex 1 with a larger energy barrier for reorientation of the magnetization than 2.

  18. Fluorescence studies, DNA binding properties and antimicrobial activity of a dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-10-05

    Luminescence and binding properties of dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Dy(phen)2(OH2)3Cl]Cl2⋅H2O with DNA has been studied by electronic absorption, emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The thermodynamic studies suggest that the interaction process to be endothermic and entropically driven, which indicates that the dysprosium(III) complex might interact with DNA by a non intercalation binding mode. Additionally, the competitive fluorescence study with ethidium bromide and also the effect of iodide ion and salt concentration on fluorescence of the complex-DNA system is investigated. Experimental results indicate that the Dy(III) complex strongly binds to DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. Furthermore, the complex shows a potent antibacterial activity and DNA cleavage ability.

  19. Peripheral Substitution: An Easy Way to Tuning the Magnetic Behavior of Tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) Dysprosium(III) SMMs

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Hong; Zeng, Suyuan; Wang, Hailong; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2015-01-01

    Two tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium(III)-cadmium(II) single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with different extent of phthalocyanine peripheral substitution and therefore different coordination geometry for the Dy ions were revealed to exhibit different SMM behavior, providing an easy way to tuning and controlling the molecular structure and in turn the magnetic properties of tetrakis(tetrapyrrole) lanthanide SMMs through simple tetrapyrrole peripheral substitution. PMID:25744587

  20. Critical Rare Earths, National Security, and U.S.-China Interactions: A Portfolio Approach to Dysprosium Policy Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    highest effectiveness to cost ratios which offers the policy maker the greatest bang for the buck. Portfolio 5 is comprised of the three portfolios in...ratios which offers the policy maker the greatest bang for the buck. 5 “Optimal” policy portfolios maximize the reduction of dysprosium criticality...Since the policies are overall less effective, we can expect “less bang for the buck.” For each dollar spent, the overall sum criticality reduction

  1. Mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-dysprosium sandwich complexes. Effect of magnetic coupling on the SMM behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Tao; Zeng, Suyuan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Qi; Duan, Chunying; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-11-21

    Reaction between Schiff-base ligand and half-sandwich complex M(Pc)(acac) led to the isolation of new sandwich-type mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-lanthanide compounds M2(Pc)2(L)H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (1, 2) [H2Pc = metal free phthalocyanine, Hacac = acetylacetone, H2L = N,N'-bis(3-methyloxysalicylidene)benzene-1,2-diamine] with the triple-decker molecular structure clearly revealed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. For the comparative studies, sandwich triple-decker analogues with pure Schiff-base ligand M2(L)3H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (3, 4) were also prepared. Dynamic magnetic measurement result reveals the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of the di-dysprosium derivative 1, while the static magnetic investigation over both pure and the diamagnetic diluted samples of this compound discloses the interionic ferromagnetic coupling between the two dysprosium ions, which in turn effectively suppresses the QTM and enhances the energy barrier of this SMM. Nevertheless, comparative studies over the static magnetic properties of the di-dysprosium triple-decker complexes 1 and 3 indicate the stronger magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions in mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) species than in the pure Schiff-base triple-decker analogue, suggesting the special coordination sphere around the dysprosium ions in the former compound over the latter one on the more intense inter-ionic ferromagnetic coupling. As a very small step towards understanding the structure-property relationship, the present result will be surely helpful for the design and synthesis of the multinuclear lanthanide-based SMMs with good properties.

  2. Peripheral Substitution: An Easy Way to Tuning the Magnetic Behavior of Tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) Dysprosium(III) SMMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hong; Zeng, Suyuan; Wang, Hailong; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2015-03-01

    Two tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium(III)-cadmium(II) single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with different extent of phthalocyanine peripheral substitution and therefore different coordination geometry for the Dy ions were revealed to exhibit different SMM behavior, providing an easy way to tuning and controlling the molecular structure and in turn the magnetic properties of tetrakis(tetrapyrrole) lanthanide SMMs through simple tetrapyrrole peripheral substitution.

  3. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  4. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  5. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions.

  6. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  7. Microwave Synthesis of Chitosan Capped Silver-Dysprosium Bimetallic Nanoparticles: A Potential Nanotheranosis Device.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandeep K; Kannan, S

    2016-12-27

    Accurate imaging of the structural and functional state of biological targets is a critical task. To amend paucities associated with individual imaging, there is high interest to develop a multifunctional theranostic devices for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, chitosan coated silver/dysprosium bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) were synthesized through a green chemistry route and characterization results inferred that the BNPs are crystalline, spherical, and of size ∼10 nm. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the reduced metallic states of Ag and Dy in nanoparticles. These BNPs demonstrate high emission in a second near-infrared (NIR-II, 1000-1400 nm) biological window on excitation at 808 nm. Moreover, magnetization and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies perceive the inherent paramagnetic features of Dy component that displays dark T2 contrast and high relaxivity. Due to high X-ray attenuation effect, BNPs exhibit better Hounsfield unit (HU) value than the reported contrast agents. BNPs unveil good biocompatibility and also express sturdy therapeutic effect in HeLa cells when tethered with doxorubicin.

  8. Spectral and physicochemical characterization of dysprosium-based multifunctional ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chengfei; Das, Susmita; Siraj, Noureen; Magut, Paul K S; Li, Min; Warner, Isiah M

    2015-05-21

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of multifunctional ionic liquid crystals (melting points below 100 °C) which possess chirality and fluorescent behavior as well as mesomorphic and magnetic properties. In this regard, (1R,2S)-(-)-N-methylephedrine ((-)MeEph), containing a chiral center, is linked with variable alkyl chain lengths (e.g., 14, 16, and 18 carbons) to yield liquid crystalline properties in the cations of these compounds. A complex counteranion consisting of trivalent dysprosium (Dy(3+)) and thiocyanate ligand (SCN(-)) is employed, where Dy(3+) provides fluorescent and magnetic properties. Examination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and hot-stage polarizing optical microscopy (POM) data confirmed liquid crystalline characteristics in these materials. We further report on phase transitions from solid to liquid crystal states, followed by isotropic liquid states with increasing temperature. These compounds exhibited two characteristic emission peaks in acetonitrile solution and the solid state when excited at λex = 366 nm, which are attributed to transitions from (4)F9/2 to (6)H15/2 and (4)F9/2 to (6)H13/2. The emission intensities of these compounds were found to be very sensitive to the phase.

  9. Paramagnetic dysprosium-doped zinc oxide thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fang-Yuh Ting, Yi-Chieh; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Chun; Ye, Cin-Wei; Hsu, Yung-Yuan; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chern, Ming-Yau

    2015-06-07

    Dysprosium(Dy)-doped zinc oxide (Dy:ZnO) thin films were fabricated on c-oriented sapphire substrate by pulsed-laser deposition with doping concentration ranging from 1 to 10 at. %. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman-scattering, optical transmission spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed incorporation of Dy into ZnO host matrix without secondary phase. Solubility limit of Dy in ZnO under our deposition condition was between 5 and 10 at. % according to XRD and Raman-scattering characteristics. Optical transmission spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry also showed increase in both transmittance in ultraviolet regime and band gap of Dy:ZnO with increasing Dy density. Zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials were identified by photoluminescence spectroscopy as the defects accompanied with Dy incorporation. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device showed paramagnetism without long-range order for all Dy:ZnO thin films, and a hint of antiferromagnetic alignment of Dy impurities was observed at highest doping concentration—indicating the overall contribution of zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials to magnetic interaction was either neutral or toward antiferromagnetic. From our investigations, Dy:ZnO thin films could be useful for spin alignment and magneto-optical applications.

  10. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  11. Paramagnetic dysprosium-doped zinc oxide thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Fang-Yuh; Ting, Yi-Chieh; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Chun; Ye, Cin-Wei; Hsu, Yung-Yuan; Chern, Ming-Yau; Liu, Hsiang-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Dysprosium(Dy)-doped zinc oxide (Dy:ZnO) thin films were fabricated on c-oriented sapphire substrate by pulsed-laser deposition with doping concentration ranging from 1 to 10 at. %. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman-scattering, optical transmission spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed incorporation of Dy into ZnO host matrix without secondary phase. Solubility limit of Dy in ZnO under our deposition condition was between 5 and 10 at. % according to XRD and Raman-scattering characteristics. Optical transmission spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry also showed increase in both transmittance in ultraviolet regime and band gap of Dy:ZnO with increasing Dy density. Zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials were identified by photoluminescence spectroscopy as the defects accompanied with Dy incorporation. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device showed paramagnetism without long-range order for all Dy:ZnO thin films, and a hint of antiferromagnetic alignment of Dy impurities was observed at highest doping concentration—indicating the overall contribution of zinc vacancies and zinc interstitials to magnetic interaction was either neutral or toward antiferromagnetic. From our investigations, Dy:ZnO thin films could be useful for spin alignment and magneto-optical applications.

  12. Optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with trivalent dysprosium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Halimah, M. K.; Muhammad, F. D.; Faznny, M. F.

    2017-04-01

    The zinc borotellurite doped with dysprosium oxide glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2) 0 . 7(B2O3) 0 . 3 ] 0 . 7(ZnO) 0 . 3 } 1 - x(Dy2O3)x (where x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The structural and optical properties of the proposed glass systems were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the glass systems is confirmed by using XRD technique. The infrared spectra of the glass systems indicate three obvious absorption bands which are assigned to BO3 and TeO4 vibrational groups. Based on the absorption spectra obtained, the direct and indirect optical band gaps, as well as the Urbach energy were calculated. It is observed that both the direct and indirect optical band gaps increase with the concentration of Dy3+ ions. On the other hand, the Urbach energy is observed to decrease as the concentration of Dy3+ ions increases.

  13. Magnetic measurements on single crystals of dysprosium trifluoromethanesulfonate nonahydrate; effects of crystal field perturbed energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogy, D.; Paul, P.; Chattopadhyay, K. N.; Bisui, D.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements on single crystals of dysprosium trifluoromethanesulfonate (DyTFMS) have been carried out from 300 K down to 13 K. The hexagonal crystal structure of DyTFMS renders the crystal uniaxial with the Kramers ion Dy 3+ occupying a site of C 3h symmetry. The principal magnetic susceptibilities, observed by us and the Friedberg group, over the wide range 300 to ˜1.0 K find an excellent theoretical simulation by the crystal field perturbed J-mixed eigenvectors with due consideration of the intermediate coupling effects. No ordering effects were noticed down to ˜13 K indicating the interionic interaction to be predominantly of the dipolar type which is consistent with the discovery of a ferromagnetic transition at T˜0.111 K by the Friedberg group. The g-values derived from other sources are reasonably accounted for. The thermal behavior of quadrupole splitting and that of electronic and nuclear heat capacities is also worked out.

  14. Thermoluminescence properties of lithium magnesium borate glasses system doped with dysprosium oxide.

    PubMed

    Mhareb, M H A; Hashim, S; Ghoshal, S K; Alajerami, Y S M; Saleh, M A; Razak, N A B; Azizan, S A B

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) dopant and magnesium oxide (MgO) modifier on the thermoluminescent properties of lithium borate (LB) glass via two procedures. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves reveal a single prominent peak at 190 °C for 0.5 mol% of Dy(3+). An increase in MgO contents by 10 mol% enhances the TL intensity by a factor of 1.5 times without causing any shift in the maximum temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the occurrence of extra electron traps created via magnesium and the energy transfer to trivalent Dy(3+) ions. Good linearity in the range of 0.01-4 Gy with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.998, fading as low as 21% over a period of 3 months, excellent reproducibility without oven annealing and tissue equivalent effective atomic numbers ~8.71 are achieved. The trap parameters, including geometric factor (μg), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) associated with LMB:Dy are also determined. These favorable TL characteristics of prepared glasses may contribute towards the development of Li2O-MgO-B2O3 radiation dosimeters.

  15. Toxicity of dysprosium nano particles with glucose and sodium chloride on E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, N. M.; Solomon, F.; Oyanedel-Craver, V.

    2013-12-01

    Application of rare earth elements (REEs) such as, dysprosium nanoparticles (nDy), to the biomedical field are increasing due to their paramagnetic properties. Current applications of nDy in the biomedical field are in MRI screening and anti-cancer therapy. Environmental impacts of nDy released into the environment are unknown or poorly understood and are a concern due to the lack of appropriate recycling systems. The objective of this toxicological study is to assess the impacts of nDy at relevant environmental concentrations on Escherichia coli. A range of glucose concentrations were used to evaluate the impact under different aerobic metabolic stages when the bacteria are exposed to the nanoparticles. Two traditional techniques used to evaluate the physiological response of E. coli at different environmental conditions were dual staining with fluorescent dyes (Live/Dead BacLight viability kit) and respirometric assays. A high-through put array-based methodology was implemented to provide additional toxicity testing. Preliminary toxicology results for both traditional techniques showed a positive trend between nDy and carbon source concentrations. High concentrations of nDy (>5mg/L) in environments with high glucose concentration (>210mg/L) are more toxic to E. coli than environments with low glucose concentrations. On the other hand, Live/Dead experiments showed higher toxicity effect in comparison to the respirometric tests using the same exposure conditions, suggesting that even at high membrane disruption the bacteria can still performed some metabolic activity.

  16. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; ...

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This ismore » followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  17. A molecular dynamics model of the atomic structure of dysprosium alumino-phosphate glass.

    PubMed

    Martin, Richard A; Mountjoy, Gavin; Newport, Robert J

    2009-02-18

    Molecular dynamics (MD) has been used to identify the relative distribution of dysprosium in the phosphate glass DyAl(0.30)P(3.05)O(9.62). The MD model has been compared directly with experimental data obtained from neutron diffraction to enable a detailed comparison beyond the total structure factor level. The MD simulation gives [Formula: see text] correlations at 3.80(5) and 6.40(5) Å with relative coordination numbers of 0.8(1) and 7.3(5), thus providing evidence of minority rare-earth clustering within these glasses. The nearest neighbour Dy-O peak occurs at 2.30 Å with each Dy atom having on average 5.8 nearest neighbour oxygen atoms. The MD simulation is consistent with the phosphate network model based on interlinked PO(4) tetrahedra where the addition of network modifiers Dy(3+) depolymerizes the phosphate network through the breakage of P-(O)-P bonds whilst leaving the tetrahedral units intact. The role of aluminium within the network has been taken into explicit account, and Al is found to be predominantly (78%) tetrahedrally coordinated. In fact all four Al bonds are found to be to P (via an oxygen atom) with negligible amounts of Al-O-Dy bonds present. This provides an important insight into the role of Al additives in improving the mechanical properties of these glasses.

  18. Simultaneous determination of dysprosium and iron in urine by capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Claudia; Cerutti, Soledad; Olsina, Roberto A; Martínez, Luis Dante; Silva, María Fernanda

    2004-11-19

    Automated preconcentration strategies are needed when analyzing metals in real samples by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV detection. The on-line incorporation of cloud point extraction (CPE) to flow injection analysis (FIA) associated with CE for simultaneously determining dysprosium and iron at ppb levels in urine is presented and evaluated for the first time. The preconcentration step is mediated by micelles of the non-ionic surfactant polyethyleneglycol-mono-p-nonylphenylether (PONPE 7.5) with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol. The micellar system containing the complex was loaded into the FIA manifold at a flow rate of 8 mlmin(-1), and the surfactant rich-phase was retained in a microcolumn packed with cotton, at pH 9.2. The surfactant-rich phase was eluted with 50 microl acetonitrile directly into the CE sample vial, allowing to reach an enrichment factor of 200-fold for a 10 ml sample urine. The type and composition of the background electrolytes (BGE) were investigated with respect to separation selectivity, reproducibility and stability. A BGE of 20mM sodium tetraborate buffer containing 13% acetonitrile, pH 9.0 was found to be optimal for the separation of metal chelates. Detection was performed at 585 nm. An enhancement factor of 200 was obtained for the preconcentration of 10 ml of sample solution. The detection limits for the preconcentration of 10 ml of urine were 0.20 microgl(-1) for Dy, and. 0.48 microgl(-1) for Fe. The calibration graphs using the preconcentration system were linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9989 (Dy) and 0.9976 (Fe) at levels near the detection limits up to at least 500 microgl(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of dysprosium and iron in urine for monitoring the elimination of dysprosium-based pharmaceuticals.

  19. Dietary inulin intake and age can significantly affect absorption of the faecal marker dysprosium in rats.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Charles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Rayssiguier, Yves

    2006-02-01

    It is believed that rare earth elements are not absorbed, and thus they are generally used in some mineral absorption studies as a faecal marker. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of inulin intake and age on dysprosium (Dy) absorption in rats. Eighty male Wistar rats of four different ages (2, 5, 10 and 20 months) were randomised into either a control group or a group receiving 3.75 % inulin in their diet for 4 d and then 7.5 % inulin until the end of the study. The animals were fed fresh food and water ad libitum for 30 d. The intestinal absorption of Dy was determined from a 4 d (day 21 to day 25) balance study. Mean faecal Dy recovery (%) in the eight groups (3 months control, 3 months inulin, 6 months control, 6 months inulin, 11 months control, 11 months inulin, 21 months control, 21 months inulin) was 94.0 (sd 8.6), 64.8 (sd 10.1), 95.8 (sd 9.4), 81.5 (sd 12.1), 98.4 (sd 9.8), 87.8 (sd 9.5), 97.8 (sd 6.2) and 84.9 (sd 10.9), respectively. Our results showed clearly that dietary inulin intake decreased faecal Dy recovery in all four rat groups, and faecal Dy recovery was significantly higher in the old rats (10 and 20 months) than in the young and adult rats. These results show that the faecal recovery (or intestinal absorption) of Dy may vary greatly with nutritional or physiological states such as inulin intake or age. The use of rare earth elements as a faecal marker should be thus validated under each nutritional or physiological state before being employed in mineral absorption studies.

  20. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped di-calcium di-aluminium silicate phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Geetanjali; Brahme, Nameeta; Sharma, Ravi; Bisen, D. P.; Sao, Sanjay K.; Tigga, Shalinta

    2016-08-01

    A Dysprosium doped di-calcium di-aluminium silicate phosphor emitting long-lasting white light was prepared and investigated. Phosphors were synthesized by combustion-assisted method. The effect of doping concentration on the crystal structure and luminescence properties of Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphors were investigated. The phase structure, surface morphology, particle size, elemental analysis was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles showed that all peaks could be attributed to the tetragonal Ca2Al2SiO7 phase when the sample was annealed at 1100 °C. The increase in TL intensity indicates that the concentration of traps increases with UV irradiation. Under the UV-excitation, the Thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphor shows the characteristic emission of Dy3+ peaking at 484 nm (blue), 583 nm (yellow) and 680 nm (red), originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2. Photoluminescence (PL) decay has also reported and it indicates that Ca2Al2SiO7:Dy3+ phosphor contains fast decay and slow decay process. The peak of Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. The possible mechanism of Thermoluminescence (TL), Photoluminescence (PL) and Mechanoluminescence (ML) of this white light emitting long lasting phosphor is also investigated.

  1. Preparation and study of an f,f,f',f'' covalently linked tetranuclear hetero-trimetallic complex - a europium, terbium, dysprosium triad.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Tropiano, Manuel; Blackburn, Octavia A; Tilney, James A; Kenwright, Alan M; Faulkner, Stephen

    2013-01-28

    A heterotrimetallic tetranuclear lanthanide complex containing two dysprosium ions, a terbium ion and a europium ion has been prepared by coupling three kinetically stable complexes together using the Ugi reaction. The covalently linked trimetallic system exhibits luminescence from all the different lanthanide centres.

  2. A water-stable metal-organic framework of a zwitterionic carboxylate with dysprosium: a sensing platform for Ebolavirus RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Lin, Li-Xian; Fang, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Shui-Ping; Qiu, Gui-Hua; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2016-01-04

    We herein report a water-stable 3D dysprosium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) that can non-covalently interact with probe ss-DNA. The formed system can serve as an effective fluorescence sensing platform for the detection of complementary Ebolavirus RNA sequences with the detection limit of 160 pM.

  3. Dysprosium compounds studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and high-resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, K J; Cui, M Q; Hua, W; Ma, C Y; Zhao, Y D; Huang, Y Y; He, W; Wu, Z Y

    2008-11-15

    A set of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) studies focusing on the 2p64f(n)-->2p54f(n)5d1(2p54f(n+1)5d0)-->2p63d94f(n)5d1(2p63d94f(n+1)5d0) channel of dysprosium in Dy metal, Dy2O3, DyNi3 and Dy25Fe18 compounds have been carried out. Data showed with high statistics and resolution, the different delocalization degree of the 5d band of dysprosium in these compounds, e.g., decreasing from Dy metal to DyNi3, Dy25Fe18 and to dysprosium oxide, in agreement with the high-resolution XANES (HRXANES) spectra. Band structure calculations performed on Dy metal and Dy2O3 confirm both RIXS and HRXANES results in the increasing delocalization of the dysprosium 5d band in Dy metal with respect to Dy2O3. The 5d orbital occupancies of DyNi3 and Dy25Fe18 alloys have been also studied by comparison of the HRXANES white line (WL) area with the behavior of the final states energy position in RIXS spectra and we show that DyNi3 has a higher 5d orbital occupancy than Dy25Fe18.

  4. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals C 6 coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Wyart, J.-F.; Dulieu, O.; Nascimbène, S.; Lepers, M.

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of the optical trapping of ultracold atoms depends on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited levels. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the C 6 coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of ab initio and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic resonances, the vector and tensor contributions are two-orders-of-magnitude smaller than the scalar contribution, whereas for the imaginary part, the vector and tensor contributions represent a noticeable fraction of the scalar contribution. Finally, our anisotropic C 6 coefficients are much smaller than those published in the literature.

  5. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Tarallo, F. J.; Stevenson, N. R.

    2005-12-01

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's®, Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The Theragenics™ PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. Theragenics™ also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, Theragenics™ has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, Theragenics™ is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed®, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes.

  6. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  7. White light emission of dysprosium doped lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luewarasirikul, N.; Kim, H. J.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses doped with dysprosium oxide were prepared by melt-quenching technique with chemical composition 20La2O3:10CaO:69P2O5:1Dy2O3 and 20La2O3:10CaF2:69P2O5:1Dy2O3. The physical, optical and luminescence properties of the glass samples were studied to evaluate their potential to using as luminescence materials for solid-state lighting applications. The density, molar volume and refractive index of the glass samples were carried out. The optical and luminescence properties were studied by investigating absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass samples. The absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-Vis-NIR region from 300 to 2000 nm. The excitation spectra observed under 574 nm emission wavelength showed the highest peak centered at 349 nm (6H15/2 → 6P7/2). The emission spectra, excited with 349 nm excitation wavelength showed two major peaks corresponding to 482 nm blue emission (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and 574 nm yellow emission (4F9/2 → 6H13/2). The experimental lifetime were found to be 0.539 and 0.540 for oxide and oxyfluoride glass sample, respectively. The x,y color coordinates under 349 nm excitation wavelength were (0.38, 0.43) for both glass samples, that be plotted in white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The CCT values obtained from the glass samples are 4204 K for oxide glass and 4228 K for oxyfluoride glass corresponding to the commercial cool white light (3100-4500 K). Judd-Ofelt theory had also been employed to obtain the J-O parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6), oscillator strength, radiative transition possibility, stimulated emission cross section and branching ratio. The Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 trend of J-O parameters of both glass samples may indicate the good quality of a glass host for using as optical device application. Temperature dependence of emission spectra was studied from 300 K to 10 K and found that the intensity of the emission peak was found to be increased with

  8. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach.

    PubMed

    Vukov, Oliver; Smith, D Scott; McGeer, James C

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60mg CaCO3 mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23°C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24h old neonates for 48h in the case of D. pulex and with 2-9 days old offspring for 96h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5-2.0mM), Na (0.5-2.0mM) and Mg (0.125-0.5mM). The effect of pH (6.5-8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (LogK values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The logK value for Dy(3+) toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific water quality guidelines and

  9. Dysprosium complexes with mono-/di-carboxylate ligands—From simple dimers to 2D and 3D frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Scales, Nicholas; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2014-11-15

    Four dysprosium (Dy) single carboxylates, a formate, a propionate, a butyrate and an oxalate have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The structure of Dy(HCO{sub 2}){sub 3} (1) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra in perfect tricapped trigonal prisms. They are linked through trigonal O atoms forming 1D pillars which are further linked together through tricapped O atoms into a 3D pillared metal organic framework. The network structure is stable up to 360 °C. The structure of [Dy{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]·2.5H{sub 2}O (2) contains nine-fold coordinated Dy polyhedra linking together through μ{sub 2}-bridging oxalate anions into a 2D hexagonal layered structure. Both [Dy{sub 2}(Pr){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]·(HPr){sub 0.5} (3) [Pr=(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CO{sub 2}){sup −1}] and [Dy{sub 2}(Bu){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}] (4) [Bu=(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}CO{sub 2}){sup −1}] have similar di-nuclear structures. The Raman vibration modes of the complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four dysprosium (Dy) complexes with formate, propionate, butyrate and oxalate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. The Dy formato complex has a 3D pillared metal organic framework and the structure is stable up to 360 °C whilst the complexes with longer alkyl chained mono-carboxylates possess similar di-nuclear structures. The Dy oxalato complex has a 2D hexagonal (honeycomb-type) structure. Their Raman vibration modes have been investigated. - Highlights: • New Dysprosium complexes with formate, propionate, butyrate and oxalate ligands. • Crystal structures range from dimers to two and three dimensional frameworks. • Vibrational modes have been investigated and correlated to the structures. • The complexes are thermal robust and stable to over 300 °C.

  10. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity.

  11. Nonlinear optical properties of lutetium and dysprosium bisphthalocyanines at 1550 nm with femto- and nanosecond pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plekhanov, A. I.; Basova, T. V.; Parkhomenko, R. G.; Gürek, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the nonlinear optical properties of unsubstituted lutetium (LuPc2) and dysprosium (DyPc2) bisphthalocyanines as well as octasubstituted Lu(PcR8)2 derivative with R=-S(C6H13) were studied at a wavelength of 1550 nm with 10 ns and 300 fs pulses. Based on Z-scan measurements the nonlinear absorption and refraction coefficient as well as the nature of nonlinear optical properties were analyzed for these materials. Open aperture Z-scan indicates strong two-photon absorption in all three bisphthalocyanines in nano- and femtosecond regimes. With good nonlinear optical coefficients, bisphthalocyanines of rare earth elements are expected to be promising materials for the creation of optical limiters.

  12. Limits on violations of Lorentz symmetry and the Einstein equivalence principle using radio-frequency spectroscopy of atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Hohensee, M A; Leefer, N; Budker, D; Harabati, C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2013-08-02

    We report a joint test of local Lorentz invariance and the Einstein equivalence principle for electrons, using long-term measurements of the transition frequency between two nearly degenerate states of atomic dysprosium. We present many-body calculations which demonstrate that the energy splitting of these states is particularly sensitive to violations of both special and general relativity. We limit Lorentz violation for electrons at the level of 10(-17), matching or improving the best laboratory and astrophysical limits by up to a factor of 10, and improve bounds on gravitational redshift anomalies for electrons by 2 orders of magnitude, to 10(-8). With some enhancements, our experiment may be sensitive to Lorentz violation at the level of 9 × 10(-20).

  13. Analysis of soft x-ray emission spectra of laser-produced dysprosium, erbium and thulium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheil, John; Dunne, Padraig; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kos, Domagoj; Long, Elaine; Miyazaki, Takanori; O’Reilly, Fergal; O’Sullivan, Gerard; Sheridan, Paul; Suzuki, Chihiro; Sokell, Emma; White, Elgiva; Kilbane, Deirdre

    2017-03-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectra of dysprosium, erbium and thulium ions created in laser-produced plasmas were recorded with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer in the 2.5–8 nm spectral range. The ions were produced using an Nd:YAG laser of 7 ns pulse duration and the spectra were recorded at various power densities. The experimental spectra were interpreted with the aid of the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes and the flexible atomic code. At wavelengths above 5.5 nm the spectra are dominated by overlapping n = 4 ‑ n = 4 unresolved transition arrays from adjacent ion stages. Below 6 nm, n = 4 ‑ n = 5 transitions also give rise to a series of interesting overlapping spectral features.

  14. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier. PMID:24969218

  15. Fine-tuning terminal solvent ligands to rationally enhance the energy barrier in dinuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Yuan, Chen; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2016-12-20

    In search of simple approaches to rationally enhance the energy barriers in polynuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets, a new system containing two structurally closely related dinuclear dysprosium complexes, namely [Dy2(L)2(DBM)2(DMF)2] (1) and [Dy2(L)2(DBM)2(DMA)2]·2DMA (2) (HDBM = dibenzoylmethane, H2L = 2-hydroxy-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide), is introduced and the structure-dependent magnetic properties are investigated. The two complexes display only slight variations in the coordination geometries of the Dy(iii) ion but display remarkably different magnetic behaviors. By replacing the DMF (dimethylformamide) ligand in complex 1 with DMA (dimethylacetamide) in 2 while retaining the same coordination atoms, we were able to create a 3-fold enhancement in the energy barrier, from 24 K for complex 1 to 77 K for complex 2. Complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations revealed that the charge distribution surrounding the Dy(iii) centers in 1 and 2 is the key factor in determining the relaxation properties of the SMMs. The introduction of an electron-donating CH3 group in DMA to replace the hydrogen in DMF resulted in a larger average charge along the magnetic axes of complex 2 compared to complex 1, which resulted in a stronger easy-axis ligand field, thus increasing the energy difference between the ground and the first excited states of complex 2. This work presents a simple method to rationally enhance the energy barrier in polynuclear lanthanide SMMs through fine-tuning of the electrostatic potential of the atoms along the magnetic axis.

  16. Mononuclear and tetranuclear compounds of yttrium and dysprosium ligated by a salicylic schiff-base derivative: synthesis, photoluminescence, and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Munendra; Mereacre, Valeriu; Lebedkin, Sergei; Kappes, Manfred M; Powell, Annie K; Roesky, Peter W

    2015-02-02

    The Schiff-base (2-aminoethyl)hydroxybenzoic acid (H(2)L) as a proligand was prepared in situ from 3-formylsalicylic acid and ethanolamine (ETA). The mononuclear {[Y(HL)(4)][ETAH]·H(2)O} (1) and {[Dy(HL)(4)] [ETAH]·3MeOH·H(2)O} (2) and tetranuclear {[Y(4)(HL)(2)(L)(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)]·4MeOH·4H(2)O} (3), {[Dy4(HL)(2)(L)(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)]·5(MeOH)(2)·7H(2)O (4), and {[Dy(4)(HL)(8)(L)(2)]·4MeOH·(2)H(2)O}(5) rare-earth metal complexes of this ligand could be obtained as single-crystalline materials by the treatment of H(2)L in the presence of the metal salts [Ln(NO(3))(3)·(H(2)O)m] (Ln = Y, Dy). In the solid state, the tetranuclear compounds 3 and 4 exhibit butterfly structures, whereas 5 adopts a rectangular arrangement. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data of the ionic compounds 1 and 2 support single-crystal X-ray analysis. The yttrium compounds 1 and 3 show fluorescence with 11.5% and 13% quantum yield, respectively, whereas the quantum yield of the dysprosium complex 4 is low. Magnetic studies on the dysprosium compounds 4 and 5 suggest the presence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions between neighboring metal centers. Compound 4 shows single-molecule-magnet behavior with two relaxation processes, one with the effective energy barrier U(eff) = 84 K and the preexponential factor τ(0) = 5.1 × 10(-9) s.

  17. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Isotopic chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, H.G.

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  19. Dysprosium(III) hydroxide coprecipitation system for the separation and preconcentration of heavy metal contents of table salts and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Peker, Dondu Serpil Kacar; Turkoglu, Orhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-05-08

    A procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) is described, that combines atomic absorption spectrometry-dysprosium hydroxide coprecipitation. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), centrifugation time, sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recoveries of analyte ions. The effects of concomitant ions were also examined. The recoveries of the analyte ions were in the range of 95.00-104.00%. The detection limits corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank for the analytes were in the range of 14.1-25.3 microg/L. The method was applied to the determination of lead, copper, nickel, cobalt, cadmium and manganese ions in natural waters and table salts good results were obtained (relative standard deviations <10%, recoveries >95%).

  20. The effects of the porous buffer layer and doping with dysprosium on internal stresses in the GaInP:Dy/por-GaAs/GaAs(100) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Seredin, P. V.; Gordienko, N. N.; Glotov, A. V.; Zhurbina, I. A.; Domashevskaya, E. P.; Arsent'ev, I. N. Shishkov, M. V.

    2009-08-15

    In structures with a porous buffer layer, residual internal stresses caused by a mismatch between the crystal-lattice parameters of the epitaxial GaInP alloy and the GaAs substrate are redistributed to the porous layer that acts as a buffer and is conducive to disappearance of internal stresses. Doping of the epitaxial layer with dysprosium exerts a similar effect on the internal stresses in the film-substrate structure.

  1. On-line complexation/cloud point preconcentration for the sensitive determination of dysprosium in urine by flow injection inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Claudia; Cerutti, Soledad; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martinez, Luis D

    2003-01-01

    An on-line dysprosium preconcentration and determination system based on the hyphenation of cloud point extraction (CPE) to flow injection analysis (FIA) associated with ICP-OES was studied. For the preconcentration of dysprosium, a Dy(III)-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex was formed on-line at pH 9.22 in the presence of nonionic micelles of PONPE-7.5. The micellar system containing the complex was thermostated at 30 degrees C in order to promote phase separation, and the surfactant-rich phase was retained in a microcolumn packed with cotton at pH 9.2. The surfactant-rich phase was eluted with 4 mol L(-1) nitric acid at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min(-1), directly in the nebulizer of the plasma. An enhancement factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 mL of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 mL of aqueous solution of Dy was 0.03 microg L(-1). The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 2.0 microg L(-1)Dy level was 2.2% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for dysprosium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 microg L(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of dysprosium in urine.

  2. In vitro and in vivo dissolution behavior of a dysprosium lithium borate glass designed for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conzone, Samuel D; Brown, Roger F; Day, Delbert E; Ehrhardt, Gary J

    2002-05-01

    Dysprosium lithium borate (DyLB) glass microspheres were investigated for use in the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In vitro testing focused on weight loss and cation dissolution from glass microspheres immersed in simulated synovial fluid (SSF) at 37 degrees C for up to 64 days. In vivo testing was performed by injecting glass microspheres into the stifle joints of Sprague-Dawley rats and monitoring the biodegradability of the microspheres and the tissue response within the joints. The DyLB microspheres reacted nonuniformly in SSF with the majority of lithium and boron being dissolved, whereas nearly all of the dysprosium (>99.7%) remained in the reacted microspheres. Because the DyLB glasses released negligible amounts of dysprosium while reacting with SSF, they are considered safe for radiation synovectomy from the standpoint of unwanted radiation release from the joint capsule. Furthermore, the DyLB microspheres fragmented, degraded, and reacted with body fluids while in the joints of rats without histologic evidence of joint damage.

  3. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  4. A comparative study of the safety and efficacy of dysprosium-165 hydroxide macro-aggregate and yttrium-90 silicate colloid in radiation synovectomy--a multicentre double blind clinical trial. Australian Dysprosium Trial Group.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, J; Smart, R; Laurent, R; Butler, P; Brooks, P; Hoschl, R; Wiseman, J; George, S; Lovegrove, F; Warwick, A

    1994-10-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the safety and efficacy of a new preparation, Dysprosium-165 Hydroxide Macroaggregate (165Dy) with Yttrium-90 Silicate (90Y) for radiation synovectomy of the knee in patients with RA and OA. A multicentre double blind clinical trial with subjects randomized to receive 165Dy or 90Y was undertaken in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth. Seventy knees of 59 patients were studied, using as clinical end point measurements, pain in the knee on walking, pain in the knee at rest and stiffness in the knee after rest. Cytogenetic damage, knee retention and extra-articular spread of the radionuclide to regional lymph nodes, liver, urine and blood were evaluated. There was no significant difference in clinical response in the two treatment groups for either RA or OA. Chromosomal changes occurred with equal frequency and the knee retention and extra-articular leakage of radiocolloids to regional lymph nodes and liver were comparable in the two groups. For radiation synovectomy of the knee, 165Dy is at least as safe and as effective as 90Y and has the advantage of a short half-life (2.334 h) and hence requires a shorter period of post-injection immobilization and hospitalization.

  5. Tetragonal to Cubic Transformation of SiO2-Stabilized ZrO2 Polymorph through Dysprosium Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Vasanthavel, Subramaniyan; Derby, Brian; Kannan, Sanjeevi

    2017-02-06

    Partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia (t-ZrO2) is of particular interest for hard tissue replacements. Aging-related failures of the ceramic associated with the gradual transformation from t-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 (monoclinic zirconia) can lead to its premature removal from the implant site. In addition, monitoring the satisfactory performance of the implant throughout its lifespan without invasive techniques is a challenging task. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast ability of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) is well-established. To this aim, varied levels of Dy(3+) additions in the ZrO2-SiO2 binary oxide system were explored. The results indicate the effective role of Dy(3+) in the formation of thermally and mechanically stable c-ZrO2 (cubic zirconia) phase at higher temperatures. The presence of SiO2 influenced the t-ZrO2 stabilization, whereas Dy(3+) tends to occupy the ZrO2 lattice sites to induce c-ZrO2 transition. Magnetic and MRI tests displayed the commendable contrast ability of Dy(3+) stabilized ZrO2-SiO2 binary systems. Nanoindentation results demonstrate a remarkable enhancement of the mechanical properties.

  6. Phthalocyanine supported dinuclear Ln(III) complexes: the solvent-induced change of magnetic properties in dysprosium(iii) analogues.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Hai-Ying; Li, Jing; Xie, Jia-Ze; Song, You; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2017-02-24

    Three dinuclear lanthanide complexes, [Ln2(thd)4Pc]·2C6H6 (Hthd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptanedione, Ln = Sm (1), Tb (2), Dy (3)), have been synthesized based on phthalocyanine (Pc). They can be reversibly transformed into [Ln2(thd)4Pc] (Ln = Sm (1'), Tb (2'), Dy (3')) via desolvation and resolvation of the lattice benzene molecules. This change generates dramatic influences on the structural and magnetic properties of the dysprosium analogue. In complex 3, one crystallographically independent metal center is observed, and it exhibits a single relaxation process of magnetization with an energy barrier of 55.7 K. Upon desolvation, the resulting complex 3' contains two types of metal centers, and shows the field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated magnetic relaxation processes. The anisotropy barriers for 3' are as high as 63.3 K and 109.6 K, respectively. This work confirms that the solvated molecules can finely tune the magnetic relaxation mechanisms.

  7. Steric structure and thermodynamic aspects of the complexes of dysprosium (III) with aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashina, Yu, G.; Mustafina, A.R.; Vul`fson, S.G.

    1994-10-01

    Steric structures of dysprosium (III) aminobenzoate complexes with the 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio in aqueous solutions were determined on the basis of pH-metric and paramagnetic birefringence data. An increase in conjugation observed for the series of the acids, viz., benzoic, meta-, ortho-, and para-aminobenzoic acids, results in the increased stability of the complexes with the 1:1 and 1:2 composition. In the case of para-aminobenzoic acid, the polyhedra [DyL(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} and [DyL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sup +} are cubes with the ligands coordinated to one and two edges, respectively. In the case of meta-aminobenzoic acid, the polyhedra [DyL(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} and [DyL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sup +} are a dodecahedron with the ligand coordinated to one edge and a square anti-prism with the ligands coordinated to two edges, respectively. In the case of ortho-aminobenzoic acid, both the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes have structures that are intermediate between the structures of meta- and para-aminobenzoic acids.

  8. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  9. On the effect of 4f electrons on the structural characteristics of lanthanide trihalides: computational and electron diffraction study of dysprosium trichloride.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giuseppe; Varga, Zoltán; Kolonits, Maria; Hargittai, Magdolna

    2008-02-21

    The molecular and electronic structure of dysprosium trichloride, DyCl(3), was calculated by high-level quantum chemical methods in order to learn about the effect of the partially filled 4f subshell and of the possible spin-orbit coupling on them. High-temperature electron diffraction studies of DyCl(3) were also carried out so that we could compare the computed geometry with the experimental one, after thermal corrections on the latter. Dysprosium monochloride, DyCl, and the dimer of dysprosium trichloride, Dy(2)Cl(6), were also investigated by computation. We found that the electron configuration of the 4f subshell does not influence the geometry of the trichloride monomer molecule as the ground state and first excited state molecules have the same geometry. Nonetheless, taking the 4f electrons into account in the calculation, together with the 5s and 5p electrons, is important in order to get geometrical parameters consistent with the results from experiment. Based on electron diffraction and different levels of computation, the suggested equilibrium bond length (r(e)) of DyCl(3) is 2.443(14) A, while the thermal average distance (r(g)) from electron diffraction is 2.459(11) A. The molecule is trigonal planar in equilibrium. Although the ground electronic state splits due to spin-orbit coupling, the lowering of the total electronic energy is very small (about 0.025 hartree) and the geometrical parameters are not affected. In contrast with the monomeric trichloride molecule, the bond angles of the dimer seem to be different for different electronic states, indicating the influence of the 4f electronic configuration on their structure. We carried out an anharmonic analysis of the out-of-plane vibration of the trichloride monomer and found that the vibration is considerably anharmonic at 39.5 cm(-1), compared with the 30.5 cm(-1) harmonic value.

  10. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-04

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

  11. On Approaching the Limit of Molecular Magnetic Anisotropy: A Near-Perfect Pentagonal Bipyramidal Dysprosium(III) Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Song; Chilton, Nicholas F; Winpenny, Richard E P; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2016-12-23

    We report a monometallic dysprosium complex, [Dy(O(t) Bu)2 (py)5 ][BPh4 ] (5), that shows the largest effective energy barrier to magnetic relaxation of Ueff =1815(1) K. The massive magnetic anisotropy is due to bis-trans-disposed tert-butoxide ligands with weak equatorial pyridine donors, approaching proposed schemes for high-temperature single-molecule magnets (SMMs). The blocking temperature, TB  , is 14 K, defined by zero-field-cooled magnetization experiments, and is the largest for any monometallic complex and equal with the current record for [Tb2 N2 {N(SiMe3 )2 }4 (THF)2 ].

  12. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Payne, Stephen A.; Krupke, William F.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  13. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOEpatents

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  14. Equation of state of zircon- and scheelite-type dysprosium orthovanadates: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Paszkowicz, Wojciech; Ermakova, Olga; López-Solano, Javier; Mujica, Andrés; Muñoz, Alfonso; Minikayev, Roman; Lathe, Christian; Gierlotka, Stanisław; Nikolaenko, Irina; Dabkowska, Hanna

    2014-01-15

    Dysprosium orthovanadate, DyVO4, belongs to a family of zircon-type orthovanadates showing a phase transition to scheelite-type structures at moderate pressures below 10 GPa. In the present study, the equations of state (EOSs) for both these phases were determined for the first time using high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory. Structural parameters for scheelite-type DyVO4 were calculated from x-ray powder diffraction data as well. The high-pressure experiments were performed under pseudo-hydrostatic conditions at pressures up to 8.44 GPa and 5.5 GPa for the stable zircon-type and metastable (quenched) scheelite-type samples, respectively. Assuming as a compression model the Birch-Murnaghan EOS, we obtained the EOS parameters for both phases. The experimental bulk moduli (K0) for zircon-type and scheelite-type DyVO4 are 118(4) GPa and 153(6) GPa, respectively. Theoretical equations of state were determined by ab initio calculations using the PBE exchange-correlation energy functional of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof. These calculations provide K0 values of 126.1 GPa and 142.9 GPa for zircon-type and scheelite-type DyVO4, respectively. The reliability of the present experimental and theoretical results is supported by (i) the consistency between the values yielded by the two methods (the discrepancy in K0 is as low as about 7% for each of the studied polymorphs) and (ii) their similarity to results obtained under similar compression conditions (hydrostatic or pseudo-hydrostatic) for other rare-earth orthovanadates, such as YVO4 and TbVO4.

  15. Determination of Diclofenac on a Dysprosium Nanowire- Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Accomplished in a Flow Injection System by Advanced Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Daneshgar, Parandis; Norouzi, Parviz; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2009-01-01

    A new detection technique called Fast Fourier Transform Square-Wave Voltammetry (FFT SWV) is based on measurements of electrode admittance as a function of potential. The response of the detector (microelectrode), which is generated by a redox processes, is fast, which makes the method suitable for most applications involving flowing electrolytes. The carbon paste electrode was modified by nanostructures to improve sensitivity. Synthesized dysprosium nanowires provide a more effective nanotube-like surface [1-4] so they are good candidates for use as a modifier for electrochemical reactions. The redox properties of diclofenac were used for its determination in human serum and urine samples. The support electrolyte that provided a more defined and intense peak current for diclofenac determination was a 0.05 mol L−1 acetate buffer pH = 4.0. The drug presented an irreversible oxidation peak at 850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl on a modified nanowire carbon paste electrode which produced high current and reduced the oxidation potential by about 100 mV. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased by application of a discrete Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method, background subtraction and two-dimensional integration of the electrode response over a selected potential range and time window. To obtain the much sensivity the effective parameters such as frequency, amplitude and pH was optimized. As a result, CDL of 2.0 × 10−9 M and an LOQ of 5.0 × 10−9 M were found for the determination for diclofenac. A good recovery was obtained for assay spiked urine samples and a good quantification of diclofenac was achieved in a commercial formulation. PMID:22408485

  16. Semiempirical quantum chemistry model for the lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) parameters for dysprosium, holmium and erbium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes' coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models.

  17. Slow magnetic relaxation in four square-based pyramidal dysprosium hydroxo clusters ligated by chiral amino acid anions - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Anson, Christopher E; Gamer, Michael T; Powell, Annie K; Roesky, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three chiral and one achiral amino acid anion ligated dysprosium hydroxo clusters [Dy5(OH)5(α-AA)4(Ph2acac)6] (α-AA = d-PhGly, l-Pro, l-Trp, Ph2Gly; Ph2acac = dibenzoylmethanide) are reported. The solid state structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and show that five Dy(iii) ions are arranged in a square-based pyramidal geometry with NO7-donor-sets for the basal and O8-donor-sets for the apical Dy atom. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties were investigated for all four compounds and show a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour below 10 K in all cases. The similar SMM behaviour observed for all four compounds suggests that the very similar coordination geometries seen for the dysprosium atoms in all members of this family, which are independent of the amino acid ligand used, play a decisive role in steering the contribution of the single ion anisotropies to the observed magnetic relaxation.

  18. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  19. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  20. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  1. A dysprosium nanowire modified carbon paste electrode for determination of levodopa using fast Fourier transformation square-wave voltammetry method.

    PubMed

    Daneshgar, Parandis; Norouzi, Parviz; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Ordikhani-Seyedlar, Amin; Eshraghi, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    A new detection technique called the fast Fourier transform square-wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) is based on the measurements of electrode admittance as a function of potential. The response of the detector (microelectrode) is fast, which makes the method suitable for most applications involving flowing electrolytes. The carbon paste electrode was modified by nanostructures to improve better sensitivity. The response is generated by a redox processes. The redox property of L-dopa was used for determination of it in human serum and urine samples. The support electrolyte that provided a more defined and intense peak current for L-dopa determination was at 0.05 mol l(-1) acetate buffer pH 7.0. Synthesized dysprosium nanowires make more effective surface like nanotubes [P.M. Ajayan, S. Iijima, Nature 361 (1993) 333; I.A. Merkoc, Microchim. Acta 152 (2006) 157; F.H. Wu, G.C. Zhao, X.W. Wei, Z.S. Yang, Microchim. Acta 144 (2004) 243; L. Liu, J. Song, Anal. Biochem. 354 (2006) 22] so they are good candidates for using as a modifier for electrochemical reactions. The drug presented one irreversible oxidation peaks at 360 mV versus Ag/AgCl by modified nanowire carbon paste electrode which produced high current and reduced the oxidation potential about 80 mV. Furthermore, signal-to-noise ratio has significantly increased by application of discrete fast Fourier transform (FFT) method, background subtraction and two-dimensional integration of the electrode response over a selected potential range and time window. To obtain the much sensitivity the effective parameters such as frequency, amplitude and pH was optimized. As a result, C(DL) of 4.0 x 10(-9)M and an LOQ of 7.0 x 10(-9) M were found for determination for L-dopa. A good recovery was obtained for assay spiked urine samples and a good quantification of L-dopa was achieved in a commercial formulation.

  2. Dinuclear dysprosium SMMs bridged by a neutral bipyrimidine ligand: two crystal systems that depend on different lattice solvents lead to a distinct slow relaxation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Yan, Bing; Jia, Li-Hui; Wang, Bing-Wu; Yang, Qian; Cheng, Xin; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2016-06-07

    Two dinuclear dysprosium complexes with the Dy(iii) ions bridged by the neutral bipyrimidine (BPYM) ligand were synthesized and magnetically characterized. They crystallized in a monoclinic and triclinic crystal system, respectively, with almost the same structural core, only differing in the lattice solvent molecules. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements revealed that they exhibit significant slow relaxation of magnetization until 25 K in the absence of a dc field. The single and double relaxation processes were assigned to one and two types of Dy(iii) environments in the two dimmers, respectively, with barriers of 266 and 345 K under zero field conditions. The magnetic hysteresis loops of 1 and 2 were both observed up to 2.5 K.

  3. Activation cross-sections of long lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 50 MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2014-01-01

    Activation cross-sections for production of (162m,161,155)Ho, (165,159,157,155)Dy and (161,160,156,155)Tb radionuclides in deuteron induced nuclear reactions on elemental dysprosium were measured up to 50 MeV for practical application and the test of the predictive power of nuclear reaction model codes. A stacked-foil irradiation technique and off-line gamma-ray spectrometry were used to determine the activities. No earlier cross-section data were found in the literature. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the ALICE-D, EMPIRE-D and TALYS codes. Integral production yields were calculated from the fitted experimental data.

  4. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  5. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field.

  6. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  7. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  8. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  9. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  10. Generation of Radixenon Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Morris, Scott J.; Panisko, Mark E.; Pitts, W. K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Reeder, Paul L.; Thomas, Charles W.

    2003-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed an automated system for separating Xe from air and can detect the following radioxenon isotopes, 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe. This report details the techniques used to generate the various radioxenon isotopes that are used for the calibration of the detector as well as other isotopes that have the potential to interfere with the fission produced radioxenon isotopes. Fission production is covered first using highly enriched uranium followed by a description and results from an experiment to produce radioxenon isotopes from neutron activation of ambient xenon.

  11. ISOTOPE CONVERSION DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of tbe type utilizing a liquid fuel and designed to convert a non-thermally fissionable isotope to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A tank containing a reactive composition of a thermally fissionable isotope dispersed in a liquid moderator is disposed within an outer tank containing a slurry of a non-thermally fissionable isotope convertible to a thermally fissionable isotope by neutron absorption. A control rod is used to control the chain reaction in the reactive composition and means are provided for circulating and cooling the reactive composition and slurry in separate circuits.

  12. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  13. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  14. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  15. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  16. Discovery of the krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Heim, M.; Fritsch, A.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-07-15

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  19. Single-Molecule-Magnet Behavior in a [2 × 2] Grid Dy(III)4 Cluster and a Dysprosium-Doped Y(III)4 Cluster.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Hu; Liu, Jiang; Wu, Zi-Hao; Yan, Hua; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jia, Jian-Hua; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-08-17

    Thanks to the MeCN hydrolysis in situ reaction, a [2 × 2] square grid Dy(III)4 cluster based on a polypyridyl triazolate ligand, [Dy4(OH)2(bpt)4(NO3)4(OAc)2] (1), was separated successfully and characterized through single-crystal X-ray diffraction and SQUID magnetometry. The frequency-dependent signals in the out-of-phase component of the susceptibility associated with slow relaxation of the magnetization confirmed that complex 1 displays single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. Two distinct slow magnetic relaxation processes, with effective energy barriers Ueff1 = 93 cm(-1) for fast relaxation and Ueff2 = 143 cm(-1) for slow relaxation observed under a zero direct-current field, are mainly attributed to the origin of single-ion behavior, which can be further acknowledged by the magnetic investigation of a dysprosium-doped yttrium cluster. Besides, it should be noted that complex 1 represents so far the highest energy barrier among the pure Dy(III)4 SMMs.

  20. Di- and octa-nuclear dysprosium clusters derived from pyridyl-triazole based ligand: {Dy2} showing single molecule magnetic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Liao, Xiao-Fen; Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2017-02-28

    Two dysprosium aggregates, formulated as [Dy2(μ-OH)2(H2bpte)2Cl2(MeOH)2]Cl2 (1), and [Dy8(μ-OH)8(bpte)8]·24H2O (2) (H2bpte = 1,2-bis(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)ethane), were obtained using solvothermal reactions. Upon changing the metal salt and synthetic reaction conditions, an eight-member {Dy8} (2) ring was isolated. Complex 1 is centrosymmetric in which two {Dy2} clusters are connecting to each other through the hydrogen bonding. Complex 2 forms an eight-member Dy(III) ring with an inner diameter of 4.5 Å and is the first reported {Dy8(μ-OH)8} core in lanthanide-hydroxo clusters. The H2bpte ligand displays trans,trans- and cis,cis-coordination modes in 1 and 2, respectively. Alternating current (ac) magnetic measurements of both complexes were carried out. In 1, the out-of-phase susceptibilities (χ''M) below 9 K confirm the slow relaxation of magnetization, which is a typical characteristic of single-molecule magnets (SMMs).

  1. Encapsulated gadolinium and dysprosium ions within ultra-short carbon nanotubes for MR microscopy at 11.75 and 21.1 T.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jens T; Cisneros, Brandon T; Matson, Michael; Sokoll, Michelle; Sachi-Kocher, Afi; Bejarano, Fabian Calixto; Wilson, Lon J; Grant, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained interest for their biocompatibility and multifunctional properties. Ultra-short SWNTs (US-tubes) have demonstrated high proton relaxivity when encapsulating gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) at clinical field strengths. At higher field strengths, however, Gd(3+) ions demonstrate decreased proton relaxation properties while chemically similar dysprosium ions (Dy(3+)) improve relaxation properties. This report investigates the first use of Gd(3+) and Dy(3+) ions within US-tubes (GNTs and DNTs, respectively) at ultra-high magnetic field (21.1 T). Both agents are compared in solution and as an intracellular contrast agent labeling a murine microglia cell line (Bv2) immobilized in a tissue-mimicking agarose phantom using two high magnetic fields: 21.1 and 11.75 T. In solution at 21.1 T, results show excellent transverse relaxation; DNTs outperformed GNTs as a T(2) agent with measured r(2)/r(1) ratios of 247 and 47, respectively. Additionally, intracellular DNTs were shown to be a better T(2) agent than GNTs with higher contrast percentages and contrast-to-noise ratios. As such, this study demonstrates the potential of DNTs at high magnetic fields for cellular labeling and future in vivo, MRI-based cell tracking.

  2. NiSi2 formation through annealing of nickel and dysprosium stack on Si(100) and impact on effective Schottky barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Phyllis S. Y.; Chi, Dong Zhi; Zhou, Qian; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2013-01-01

    Rapid thermal annealing of nickel-dysprosium (Ni-Dy) film stacks on silicon (Si) was investigated, and formation of the nickel disilicide (NiSi2) phase was observed. The formation mechanism for the NiSi2 phase was elucidated. The nucleation, growth, and distribution of the inverted NiSi2 pyramids can be explained from both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the solid-state reaction. In addition, lowering of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (ΦBn,eff) of NiSi2 on Si was observed. The high electric field at the tips of the inverted NiSi2 pyramids increases the tunneling probability of electrons, and results in thermionic field emission being the dominant carrier transport mechanism at the NiSi2/Si interface. This contributes significantly to an increase in reverse bias current and gives a reduced ΦBn,eff. An analytical expression for the localized electric field is derived and it is found to be as high as ˜1.9 × 106 V/cm based on our experimental result.

  3. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies of dysprosium(III) salt solutions for a better representation of the microscopic features used within the binding mean spherical approximation theory.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Guilbaud, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-10-19

    This work is aimed at a predictive description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide(III) salt solutions at high concentration and 25 degrees C. A new solution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, based on the Wertheim formalism, for taking into account 1:1 and also 1:2 complex formation, is used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration for three binary salt solutions of the same lanthanide(III) cation: dysprosium(III) perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride. The relevance of the fitted parameters is discussed, and their values are compared with available literature values. UV-vis/near-IR, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were conducted for dilute to concentrated solutions (ca. 3 mol.kg-1) for a study of the microscopic behavior of DyCl3 binary solutions. Coupling MD calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure led to the determination of reliable distances. The MD results were used for a discussion of the parameters used in the BIMSA.

  4. Dysprosium-sensitized chemiluminescence system for the determination of enoxacin in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids with flow-injection sampling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-wen; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Li, Li-qing

    2009-03-01

    A novel trivalence dysprosium(Dy(3+))-sensitized chemiluminescence method was developed for the first time for the determination of enoxacin (ENX) using flow-injection sampling based on the chemiluminescence (CL) associated with the reaction of the Dy(3+)-cerium(Ce(IV))-S(2)O(3) (2-)-ENX system and the Dy(3+)-MnO(4) (-) S(2)O(3) (2-)-ENX system. The analytical conditions for CL emission were investigated and optimized. The relationship between the CL intensity of ENX and its concentration has good linearity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9984-0.9994. The limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) was 0.20 ng/mL for the Dy(3+)-ENX-S(2)O(3)(2-)-Ce(IV)-H(2)SO(4) system and 0.22 ng/mL for the Dy(3+)-ENX-S(2)O(3)(2-)-MnO(4) (-)-HNO(3) system. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 11) was 1.8% for 11 determinations of 60 ng/mL ENX. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of ENX in injections, serum and urine samples with a recovery of 98%-105%. A possible mechanism for this sensitized CL reaction is discussed by comparing the CL spectra with the fluorescence emission spectra. The proposed method represents a wide linear range, high sensitivity and accuracy, and can be used for the routine determination of ENX in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids.

  5. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

    1975-11-26

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  6. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Boyer, Keith; Greiner, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  7. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  8. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  9. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  10. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Kudravetz, M.K.; Greene, H.B.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to control systems for a calutron and, in particular, describes an electro-mechanical system for interrupting the collection of charged particles when the ratio between the two isotopes being receivcd deviates from a predetermined value. One embodiment of the invention includes means responsive to the ratio between two isotopes being received for opening a normally closed shutter over the receiver entrance when the isotope ratio is the desired value. In another form of the invention the collection operation is interrupted by changing the beam accelerating voltage to deflect the ion beam away from the receiver.

  11. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  12. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  13. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Fertilizer nitrogen isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alison S; Kelly, Simon D

    2007-09-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the potential application of nitrogen isotope analysis in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops. A prerequisite of this approach is that there is a difference in the nitrogen isotope compositions of the fertilizers used in organic and conventional agriculture. We report new measurements of delta15N values for synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and present a compilation of the new data with existing literature nitrogen isotope data. Nitrogen isotope values for fertilizers that may be permitted in organic cultivation systems are also reported (manures, composts, bloodmeal, bonemeal, hoof and horn, fishmeal and seaweed based fertilizers). The delta15N values of the synthetic fertilizers in the compiled dataset fall within a narrow range close to 0 per thousand with 80% of samples lying between-2 and 2 per thousand and 98.5% of the data having delta15N values of less than 4 per thousand (mean=0.2 per thousand n=153). The fertilizers that may be permitted in organic systems have a higher mean delta15N value of 8.5 per thousand and exhibit a broader range in delta15N values from 0.6 to 36.7 per thousand (n=83). The possible application of the nitrogen isotope approach in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops is discussed in light of the fertilizer data presented here and with regard to other factors that are also important in determining crop nitrogen isotope values.

  15. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Strontium and its isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianglei; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Choi, Inhee; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental details are reported of Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) and its application for performing optical isotopic analysis of solid strontium-containing samples in ambient atmospheric air at normal pressure. The LAMIS detection method is described for strontium isotopes from samples of various chemical and isotopic compositions. The results demonstrate spectrally resolved measurements of the three individual 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr isotopes that are quantified using multivariate calibration of spectra. The observed isotopic shifts are consistent with those calculated theoretically. The measured spectra of diatomic oxide and halides of strontium generated in laser ablation plasmas demonstrate the isotopic resolution and capability of LAMIS. In particular, emission spectra of SrO and SrF molecular radicals provided clean and well resolved spectral signatures for the naturally occurring strontium isotopes. A possibility is discussed of using LAMIS of strontium isotopes for radiogenic age determination.

  16. An expanded family of dysprosium-scandium mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the role of the lanthanide metal on the carbon cage size distribution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Liu, Fupin; Wang, Song; Zhu, Xianjun; Popov, Alexey A; Yang, Shangfeng

    2015-04-07

    A large family of dysprosium-scandium (Dy-Sc) mixed-metal nitride clusterfullerenes (MMNCFs), Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) have been successfully synthesized and isolated. Among these, the C70 and C82-based MMNCFs are two new cages that have never been isolated for MMNCFs. Synthesis of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n was accomplished by the "selective organic solid" route using guanidinium thiocyanate as the nitrogen source, and their isolation was fulfilled by recycling HPLC. UV/Vis-NIR spectroscopic study indicates that almost all Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are kinetically stable fullerenes with optical band gaps beyond 1 eV. This feature is distinctly different to their counterparts Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤88), whose for optical band-gaps are below 1 eV for relatively large cages such as C84 and C86. An FTIR spectroscopic study in combination with DFT calculations enables reasonable assignments of the cage isomeric structures of all isolated Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (x = 1, 2, 2n = 68, 70, 76-86) MMNCFs. The carbon cage size distribution of Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (2n = 68, 70, 76-86) is compared to the reported Dy3N@C2n (78≤2n≤8) homogeneous NCF and Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n (78≤2n≤88) MMNCF families, revealing that the medium-sized Dy metal plays a crucial role on the expanded cage size distribution of MMNCFs. As a result, Dy(x)Sc(3-x)N@C2n MMNCFs are the largest MMNCF family reported to date.

  17. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-02-01

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets Hc(θ)/Hc(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2-1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4-0.6.

  18. Capillary microextraction combined with fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the determination of trace lanthanum, europium, dysprosium and yttrium in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Hu, Chengguo; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-15

    In this work, a congo red modified single wall carbon nanotubes (CR-SWCNTs) coated fused-silica capillary was prepared and used for capillary microextraction (CME) of trace amounts of lanthanum (La), europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy) and yttrium (Y) in human hair followed by fluorinating assisted electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (FETV-ICP-OES) determination. The adsorption properties and stability of the prepared CR-SWCNTs coated capillary along with the various factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of La, Eu, Dy and Y by CME were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, with a consumption of 2 mL sample solution, a theoretical enrichment factor of 50 and a detection limit (3σ) of 0.12 ng mL(-1) for La, 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Eu, 0.11 ng mL(-1) for Dy and 0.03 ng mL(-1) for Y were obtained, respectively. The preparation reproducibility of the CR-SWCNTs coated capillary was investigated and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were ranging from 4.1% (Eu) to 4.4% (La) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=7) in one batch, and from 5.7% (Eu) to 6.1% (Y) (CLa, Dy=1.4 ng mL(-1); CY, Eu=0.25 ng mL(-1), n=5) among different batches. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of real-world human hair sample and the recoveries for the spiked sample were in the range of 93-105%. The method was also applied to the determination of La, Eu, Dy and Y in Certified Reference Material of GBW07601 human hair, and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values.

  19. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (<8 solar masses), and 18O coming primarily from high-mass stars (Prantzos et al., 1996). These differences in type of stellar source result in large observable variations in stellar isotopic abundances as functions of age, size, metallicity, and galactic location ( Prantzos

  20. Physicochemical isotope anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, T.M.

    1988-06-01

    Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual anomalies. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium anomalies. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the anomalies in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.

  1. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  2. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  3. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  4. Isotope separation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Arnush, Donald; MacKenzie, Kenneth R.; Wuerker, Ralph F.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation apparatus consisting of a plurality of cells disposed adjacent to each other in an evacuated container. A common magnetic field is established extending through all of the cells. A source of energetic electrons at one end of the container generates electrons which pass through the cells along the magnetic field lines. Each cell includes an array of collector plates arranged in parallel or in tandem within a common magnetic field. Sets of collector plates are disposed adjacent to each other in each cell. Means are provided for differentially energizing ions of a desired isotope by applying energy at the cyclotron resonant frequency of the desired isotope. As a result, the energized desired ions are preferentially collected by the collector plates.

  5. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  6. High Atomic Weight Isotope Separator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This patent discusses a method of separating one isotopic species of a given element from a mixture. Collisionless plasma instabilities slow down the ions and oppositely charged electrodes separate the isotopes.

  7. DEEP WATER ISOTOPIC CURRENT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, W.H.

    1964-04-21

    A deepwater isotopic current analyzer, which employs radioactive isotopes for measurement of ocean currents at various levels beneath the sea, is described. The apparatus, which can determine the direction and velocity of liquid currents, comprises a shaft having a plurality of radiation detectors extending equidistant radially therefrom, means for releasing radioactive isotopes from the shaft, and means for determining the time required for the isotope to reach a particular detector. (AEC)

  8. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  9. Uranium Isotopic Analysis with the FRAM Isotopic Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Duc T. Vo; Thomas E. Sampson

    1999-05-01

    FRAM is the acronym for Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency. This software was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory originally for plutonium isotopic analysis. Later, it was adapted for uranium isotopic analysis in addition to plutonium. It is a code based on a self-calibration using several gamma-ray peaks for determining the isotopic ratios. The versatile-parameter database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration and detector type.

  10. Dysprosium(III) complexes with a square-antiprism configuration featuring mononuclear single-molecule magnetic behaviours based on different β-diketonate ligands and auxiliary ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Jangwei; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Wang, Wenyuan; Yang, Desuo; Chen, Sanping

    2016-03-28

    Three mononuclear dysprosium(III) complexes derived from three β-diketonate ligands, 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(4-methylphenyl)-1,3-butanedione (tfmb), 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-butanedione (tffb) and 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione (tfnb) as well as auxiliary ligands, 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline (5-NO2-Phen), DMF and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) have been synthesized and structurally characterized, namely [Dy(5-NO2-Phen)(tfmb)3] (1), [Dy(DMF)2(tffb)3] (2) and [Dy(bpy)2(tfnb)3]·0.5(1,4-dioxane) (3). The metal ions in 1-3 adopt an approximately square-antiprismatic (SAP) coordination environment with D4d axial symmetry. The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated, displaying weak out-of-phase AC signals under a zero-DC field. With an applied DC field of 1200 Oe, the quantum tunnelling of the magnetization was suppressed in 1-3 with the pre-exponential factor τ0 = 5.3 × 10(-7) s and the effective barrier ΔE/kB = 83 K for 1 as well as the pre-exponential factor τ0 = 3.09 × 10(-7) s and the effective barrier ΔE/kB = 39 K for 3. Interestingly, for the frequency dependence of the out-of-phase (χ'') of the AC susceptibility of 2, two slow relaxation of the magnetization processes occurred under the applied magnetic field of 1200 Oe, corresponding to the fast relaxation (FR) phase and slow relaxation (SR) phase, respectively. Arrhenius analysis gave the effective energy barrier (ΔE/kB) of 55 K and the pre-exponential factor (τ0) of 8.23 × 10(-12) for the SR. It is thus very likely that the FR process in complex 2 results from QTM enhanced by dipolar interactions between the Dy ions or the presence of the applied field. The structure-property relationship of some Dy(III) based mononuclear SMMs with the SAP configuration was further discussed.

  11. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  12. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  13. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens

    PubMed Central

    Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  14. New Isotope 263Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Dragojevic, I.; Gregorich, K.E.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Dvorak, J.; Ellison, P.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Stavsetra, L.; Nitsche, H.

    2010-03-16

    A new isotope of Hs was produced in the reaction 208Pb(56Fe, n)263Hs at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Six genetically correlated nuclear decay chains have been observed and assigned to the new isotope 263Hs. The measured cross section was 21+13-8.4 pb at 276.4 MeV lab-frame center-of-target beam energy. 263Hs decays with a half-life of 0.74 ms by alpha-decay and the measured alpha-particle energies are 10.57 +- 0.06, 10.72 +- 0.06, and 10.89 +- 0.06 MeV. The experimental cross section is compared to a theoretical prediction based on the Fusion by Diffusion model [W. J. Swiatecki et al., Phys. Rev. C 71, 014602 (2005)].

  15. The oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex

    The properties of the oxygen isotopes provide diverse examples of progress made in experiments and theory. This chain of isotopes has been studied from beyond the proton drip line in 12O to beyond the neutron drip line in 25,26O. This short survey starts with the microscopic G matrix approach for 18O of Kuo and Brown in the 1960’s and shows how theory has evolved. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 24O is particularly simple in terms of the nuclear shell model. The nuclear structure around the doubly-magic nucleus 16O exhibits the coexistence of single-particle and collective structure.

  16. Iron isotope biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Cox, L; Sun, H; Nealson, K H; Aguilar, C

    1999-09-17

    The (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases precipitated in sedimentary environments varies by 2.5 per mil (delta(56)Fe values of +0.9 to -1. 6 per mil). In contrast, the (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases in igneous rocks from Earth and the moon does not vary measurably (delta(56)Fe = 0.0 +/- 0.3 per mil). Experiments with dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella algae grown on a ferrihydrite substrate indicate that the delta(56)Fe of ferrous Fe in solution is isotopically lighter than the ferrihydrite substrate by 1.3 per mil. Therefore, the range in delta(56)Fe values of sedimentary rocks may reflect biogenic fractionation, and the isotopic composition of Fe may be used to trace the distribution of microorganisms in modern and ancient Earth.

  17. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  18. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improved isotope separating apparatus of the electromagnetic type, commonly referred to as a calutron, is described. Improvements in detecting and maintaining optimum position and focus of the ion beam are given. The calutron collector is provided with an additional electrode insulated from and positioned between the collecting pockets. The ion beams are properly positioned and focused until the deionizing current which flows from ground to this additional electrode ts a minimum.

  19. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  20. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  1. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Haynam, Christopher A.; Worden, Earl F.

    1995-01-01

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of .sup.167 Er. The hyperfine structure of .sup.167 Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level.

  2. Laser isotope separation of erbium and other isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Haynam, C.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1995-08-22

    Laser isotope separation is accomplished using at least two photoionization pathways of an isotope simultaneously, where each pathway comprises two or more transition steps. This separation method has been applied to the selective photoionization of erbium isotopes, particularly for the enrichment of {sup 167}Er. The hyperfine structure of {sup 167}Er was used to find two three-step photoionization pathways having a common upper energy level. 3 figs.

  3. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  4. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  5. Isotopic anomalies in extraterrestrial grains.

    PubMed

    Ireland, T R

    1996-03-01

    Isotopic compositions are referred to as anomalous if the isotopic ratios measured cannot be related to the terrestrial (solar) composition of a given element. While small effects close to the resolution of mass spectrometric techniques can have ambiguous origins, the discovery of large isotopic anomalies in inclusions and grains from primitive meteorites suggests that material from distinct sites of stellar nucleosynthesis has been preserved. Refractory inclusions, which are predominantly composed of the refractory oxides of Al, Ca, Ti, and Mg, in chondritic meteorites commonly have excesses in the heaviest isotopes of Ca, Ti, and Cr which are inferred to have been produced in a supernova. Refractory inclusions also contain excess 26Mg from short lived 26Al decay. However, despite the isotopic anomalies indicating the preservation of distinct nucleosynthetic sites, refractory inclusions have been processed in the solar system and are not interstellar grains. Carbon (graphite and diamond) and silicon carbide grains from the same meteorites also have large isotopic anomalies but these phases are not stable in the oxidized solar nebula which suggests that they are presolar and formed in the circumstellar atmospheres of carbon-rich stars. Diamond has a characteristic signature enriched in the lightest and heaviest isotopes of Xe, and graphite shows a wide range in C isotopic compositions. SiC commonly has C and N isotopic signatures which are characteristic of H-burning in the C-N-O cycle in low-mass stars. Heavier elements such as Si, Ti, Xe, Ba, and Nd, carry an isotopic signature of the s-process. A minor population of SiC (known as Grains X, ca. 1%) are distinct in having decay products of short lived isotopes 26Al (now 26Mg), 44Ti (now 44Ca), and 49V (now 49Ti), as well as 28Si excesses which are characteristic of supernova nucleosynthesis. The preservation of these isotopic anomalies allows the examination of detailed nucleosynthetic pathways in stars.

  6. Isotope shifts and coulomb displacement energies in calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1980-10-01

    Isotope shifts, neutron-proton radii differences and Coulomb displacement energies are calculated for calcium isotopes A = 41 to 48. A simple parametrization of the core polarization terms of the effective force in the framework of the Isospin Projected Hartree-Fock (IPHF) method leads to good agreement between theory and experiment.

  7. Dysprosium selective potentiometric membrane sensor.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hassan Ali; Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-03-01

    A novel Dy(III) ion-selective PVC membrane sensor was made using a new synthesized organic compound, 3,4-diamino-N'-((pyridin-2-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide (L) as an excellent sensing element. The electrode showed a Nernstian slope of 19.8 ± 0.6 mV per decade in a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10(-6)-1.0 × 10(-2) mol L(-1), a detection limit of 5.5 × 10(-7) mol L(-1), a short conditioning time, a fast response time (<10s), and high selectivity towards Dy(III) ion in contrast to other cations. The proposed sensor was successfully used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Dy(III) ions with EDTA. The membrane sensor was also applied to the F(-) ion indirect determination of some mouth washing solutions and to the Dy(3+) determination in binary mixtures.

  8. The magnetocaloric effect in dysprosium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect in polycrystalline Dy was measured in the 84-280-K range in measuring fields from 1 to 7 T. These adiabatic temperature changes reflect structural changes in Dy with applied field and temperature, and include the first magnetocaloric data for a helical antiferromagnet. Above the Neel point (179 K) a field increase always caused heating; below the Neel point fields less than about 2 T cause cooling for some values of initial temperature. The largest temperature increase with a 7 T field occurs at the Neel point and at fields below 2 T near the Curie point. For refrigeration purposes the optimal working region for a Dy cooling element is field dependent.

  9. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  10. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  11. ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

    1958-05-20

    A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

  12. Tellurium Stable Isotope Fractionation in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M. A.; Hammond, S. J.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2014-09-01

    New Te double spike procedures were set up to obtain high-precision accurate Te stable isotope data. Tellurium stable isotope data for 16 chondrite falls are presented, providing evidence for significant Te stable isotope fractionation.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR RESOLUTION OF HYDROLOGY PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of environmental isotopes as tracers in the hydrosphere is increasing as analytical instrumentation improves and more applications are discovered. There exists still misconceptions on the role of isotopes in resolving hydrology problems. Naturally occurring isotopes in th...

  14. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  15. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  16. (Availability of isotopic materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, H.L.

    1987-10-22

    The traveler visited several installations in Belgium, Germany, and England to meet with users of the enriched stable and radioactive materials provided by the ORNL Isotope Distribution Program (IDP). The purpose of the visits was to determine their future needs for the materials and services provided by the ORNL program and to update our existing or potential future customers on the materials and services presently available from the program. In Belgium and England, extreme interest was expressed among our customers and competitors about the status of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. This related mainly to our ability to supply the radioisotopes Ir-192 and Gd-153. A number of concerns were expressed about our ability to provide various stable and radioactive materials. Particular concern was expressed about our present capability to supply enriched Kr-85. The traveler participated in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) specialists' meeting where the chief topic of discussion was the influence of target and sample properties on nuclear data measurements. At the end of this meeting, plans were formalized for a joint IAEA/International Nuclear Target Development Society (INTDS) meeting on sample fabrication and characterization to be held in Darmstadt, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1988. as President, the traveler conducted the 1987 INTDS Board meeting at the Central Bureau of Nuclear Measurements (CBNM). The major agenda items included the recent changes in the INTDS bylaws, guidelines for future hosts of INTDS meetings, and future directions the Society should take.

  17. Method of separating boron isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.; Cluff, C.L.; Hayes, J.K.; Thorne, J.M.

    1984-05-08

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  18. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2003-12-01

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and elecromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12 ~ 15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50 ~ 80% of the cluster sum rule value.

  19. Aleutian terranes from Nd isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Kay, S. M.; Rubenstone, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Nd isotope ratios substantiate the identification of oceanic crustal terranes within the continental crustal basement of the Aleutian island arc. The oceanic terranes are exposed in the westernmost Aleutians, but to the east, they are completely buried by isotopically distinct arc-volcanic rocks. Analogous oceanic terranes may be important components of the terrane collages that comprise the continents.

  20. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

    1981-01-23

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  1. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  2. Calcium isotopes in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  3. Molybdenum Isotopes and Soil Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygenation state of Earth's oceans is a driver of evolution and extinction events as well as climate change. In recent years stable isotope fractionation of redox sensitive elements such as molybdenum (Mo) have been used as quantitative tracers of past redox-conditions in a number of marine environments. However, little is known about the processes controlling the Mo isotope compositions of the riverine inputs to the oceans and their short- and long-term variations. Several recent studies [Archer & Vance, 2008; Pearce et al., 2010] have shown that many river waters have heavy Mo isotope compositions. In some terrestrial weathering environments dissolved Mo isotope compositions in rivers are controlled by the catchment lithology [Neubert et al., 2011]. However, many rivers show fractionation of Mo isotopes relative to their catchment lithology. Possible mechanisms causing this fractionation are chemical weathering and pedogenic processes. This study has investigated the behavior of Mo isotopes during weathering of basalt under different conditions. Results from oxic to reducing soil profiles in Hawaii show that redox conditions during soil formation can control Mo isotope compositions in soils. Reducing soil profiles have light isotope compositions whereas oxidizing profiles are heavy. This general isotope behavior is confirmed by results from soil profiles from Iceland. Here reducing layers within the profiles show marked negative isotope excursions. In oxic profiles a surprisingly strong interaction of Mo with organic matter can be observed producing significant Mo isotope fractionation. This behavior might explain long term retention of Mo in soils besides its high mobility in molybdate form. Mo associated with organic matter is bioavailable and essential for processes like nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observe that fractionation relative to the source rock is dependent on the degree of weathering, i.e. relatively un-weathered profiles do not show

  4. Ca isotope variations in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jungck, M. H. A.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca-isotope measurements of Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), together with those on an apatite-enriched fraction from Orgueil, indicate the existence of widespread excesses on the neutron-rich isotope Ca-48. Isotopic anomalies are noted in 7 out of 11 CAIs analyzed. This abundance of isotopic excesses places Ca alongside Ti and O, although no clear correlation has yet been found between Ca-48 and Ti-50, which are thought to be coproduced by neutron-rich nucleosynthetic processes within stars. It is suggested that the higher volatility of Ca, by comparison with Ti compounds, led to a variable dilution with isotopically normal Ca in vaporization and recondensation processes in stellar envelopes, the interstellar medium, and/or the solar nebula.

  5. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100 nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures. PMID:24718107

  6. Isotope separation by laser means

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1982-06-15

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  7. New, heavy transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1990-10-22

    In this report, we offer our most recent results concerning the decay properties for five new isotopes of Md, No, Lr, and for {sup 258m}Md. In additions to these successful experiments, we have also conducted searches for {sup 263}(105), {sup 264}(105), {sup 272}(109), and superheavy elements from bombardments of {sup 254}Es with heavy ions. {sup 2} An exciting finding in the course of this work is a new fission phenomenon, which we have termed bidmodal fission''. This is described in a subsequent section. The final part summarizes our conclusions based on the unexpectedly long half-lives and surprising fission properties of the heaviest nuclei. 27 refs., 19 figs.

  8. Carbon isotopes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehinger, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The progress is reported of high resolution spectra of selected bright comets with the aim of determining the carbon isotope abundance ratio, C-12/C-13. The ratio was determined for various Solar System objects (in the atmospheres of the giant planets, meteorites, the Earth, and the solar photosphere), where the C-12/C-13 = 89/1. In the interstellar medium, optical and radio observations give a range of C-12/C-13 = 43-67/1 depending on the observing techniques used and the specific interstellar cloud observed. The echelle spectra is presented of the CN(0,0) violet system in three comets: P/Brorsen-Metcalf, C/Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko, and C/Austin. P/Brorsen-Metcalf has a period of 70 y (prograde) compared with P/Halley which is 76 y (retrograde). The similar periods made P/Brorsen-Metcalf of special interest for comparison with P/Halley.

  9. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  10. Cometary Isotopic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Calmonte, Ursina; Charnley, Steven; Duprat, Jean; Engrand, Cécile; Gicquel, Adeline; Hässig, Myrtha; Jehin, Emmanuël; Kawakita, Hideyo; Marty, Bernard; Milam, Stefanie; Morse, Andrew; Rousselot, Philippe; Sheridan, Simon; Wirström, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Isotopic ratios in comets provide keys for the understanding of the origin of cometary material, and the physical and chemical conditions in the early Solar Nebula. We review here measurements acquired on the D/H, 14N/15N, 16O/18O, 12C/13C, and 32S/34S ratios in cometary grains and gases, and discuss their cosmogonic implications. The review includes analyses of potential cometary material available in collections on Earth, recent measurements achieved with the Herschel Space Observatory, large optical telescopes, and Rosetta, as well as recent results obtained from models of chemical-dynamical deuterium fractionation in the early solar nebula. Prospects for future measurements are presented.

  11. Microbes: Agents of Isotopic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbes drive many of the important oxidation and reduction reactions on Earth; digest almost all forms of organic matter; and can serve as both primary and secondary producers. Because of their versatile biochemistry and physiology, they impart unique isotopic signatures to organic and inorganic materials, which have proven to be key measurements for understanding elemental cycling now and throughout Earth's history. Understanding microbial isotope fractionations in laboratory experiments has been important for interpreting isotopic patterns measured in natural settings. In fact, the pairing of simple experiment with natural observation has been the pathway for interpreting the fingerprint of microbial processes in ancient sediments and rocks. Examples of how key experiments have explained stable isotope fractionations by microbes and advanced the field of microbial ecology will be presented. Learning the isotopic signatures of Earth's microbes is a valuable exercise for predicting what isotopic signatures could be displayed by possible extant or extinct extraterrestrial life. Given the potential for discovery on Mars, Enceladus, and other solar system bodies, new methods and techniques for pinpointing what is unique about microbial isotope signatures is particularly relevant.

  12. Isotope effects in ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stößer, Reinhard; Herrmann, Werner

    2013-06-07

    In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i) ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii) the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii) the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  13. Isotopic analysis of planetary solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Neuland, M.; Meyer, S.; Wurz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Isotopic analysis of planetary surfaces is of considerable interest for planetology. Studies of isotope composition can deliver information on radio-isotope chronology of planetary soil/regolith, an insight to processes that altered planetary surface (space weathering) or on possible biogenic processes that occurred or still occur on the planet. Mass spectrometry is a well-suited method that delivers accurate and precise isotope composition. Among other instruments (LAZMA and LAMS), the miniature laser ablation/ionisation mass analyser, LMS developed in Bern for in situ space research can be used to measure the elemental and isotopic composition of planetary solids. LMS support mass spectrometric investigation with a mass resolution of m/Δm≈500-1500, dynamic range of at least 8 decades and detection sensitivity of ~10 ppb. Current studies of various solid materials and standard reference materials show that isotope composition can be conducted with an accuracy and precision at per mill level if the isotope concentration exceeds 10-100 ppm. Implications of the studies for in situ application are discussed.

  14. Calcium isotopic compositions of chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2017-03-01

    We report mass-dependent and mass-independent Ca isotopic variations in nine chondrites from three groups: carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites. There is about 0.25‰ per amu, i.e., ∼1‰ in 44Ca/40Ca, variation in chondrites: carbonaceous chondrites have the lightest Ca isotopes, enstatite chondrites have modeled bulk Earth like Ca isotopes, and ordinary chondrites are in between. The correlations between mass-dependent Ca isotopic variation and chemical variations in chondrites may reflect variable contributions from different endmembers, including refractory inclusions, in different chondrite groups. In detail, enstatite chondrites and the Earth share similar isotopic characteristics, but are very different in chemical compositions. At the ±1 and ±2 ε-unit levels, respectively, there is no measurable 40Ca or 43Ca anomaly in bulk chondrites. Carbonaceous chondrites show several ε-units of 48Ca excess. That is, Ca exhibits both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic variations in chondrites, similar to O isotopes. The 48Ca anomaly in bulk chondrites is positively correlated with 50Ti anomaly, but does not form simple correlation with 54Cr anomaly, implying multiple supernova sources for these neutron-rich isotopes in the Solar System. Finally, all meteorites with negative Δ17O have either 48Ca deficits (differentiated meteorites) or 48Ca excess (carbonaceous chondrites), implying that the Sun with a very negative Δ17O is probably also characterized by 48Ca anomaly compared to the Earth. CAIs cannot be taken as representative of the initial isotopic compositions of refractory elements like Ca for the Earth-Moon system.

  15. Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PTCA

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C.W.; Hobbs, R.L.

    1998-06-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

  16. Production of Medical Radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for Cancer Treatment and Arterial Restenosis Therapy after PTCA

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Knapp, F. F. Jr.; Beets, A. L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C. W.; Hobbs, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

  17. Magnesium isotopic composition of achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghatpour, Fatemeh; Teng, Fang-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of 22 well-characterized differentiated meteorites including 7 types of achondrites and pallasite meteorites were measured to estimate the average Mg isotopic composition of their parent bodies and evaluate Mg isotopic heterogeneity of the solar system. The δ26Mg values are -0.236‰ and -0.190‰ for acapulcoite-lodranite and angrite meteorites, respectively and vary from -0.267‰ to -0.222‰ in the winonaite-IAB-iron silicate group, -0.369‰ to -0.292‰ in aubrites, -0.269‰ to -0.158‰ in HEDs, -0.299‰ to -0.209‰ in ureilites, -0.307‰ to -0.237‰ in mesosiderites, and -0.303‰ to -0.238‰ in pallasites. Magnesium isotopic compositions of most achondrites and pallasite meteorites analyzed here are similar and reveal no significant isotopic fractionation. However, Mg isotopic compositions of D‧Orbigny (angrite) and some HEDs are slightly heavier than chondrites and the other achondrites studied here. The slightly heavier Mg isotopic compositions of angrites and some HEDs most likely resulted from either impact-induced evaporation or higher abundance of clinopyroxene with the Mg isotopic composition slightly heavier than olivine and orthopyroxene. The average Mg isotopic composition of achondrites (δ26Mg = -0.246 ± 0.082‰, 2SD, n = 22) estimated here is indistinguishable from those of the Earth (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07‰; 2SD, n = 139), chondrites (δ26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06‰; 2SD, n = 38), and the Moon (δ26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.16‰; 2SD, n = 47) reported from the same laboratory. The chondritic Mg isotopic composition of achondrites, the Moon, and the Earth further reflects homogeneity of Mg isotopes in the solar system and the lack of Mg isotope fractionation during the planetary accretion process and impact events.

  18. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine

  19. Neodymium isotopic variations in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepgras, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Direct measurement of the isotopic composition of Nd in the Atlantic agree with the Nd content in ferromanganese sediments and differ from the observed amounts in the Pacific samples. These data indicate the existence of distinctive differences in the isotopic composition of Nd in the waters of major oceans; the average values determined from seawater and ferromanganese sediments are considerably lower than in sources with oceanic mantle affinities showing that the REE in the oceans is dominated by continental sources. The Nd isotopic variations in seawater are applied to relate the residence time of Nd and mixing rates between the oceans.

  20. Stable isotopes in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Marsh, Julian B; Das, Sai Krupa; Welty, Francine K

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a major public health problem. Obesity is a multifactorial disease and is often associated with a wide range of comorbidities including hypertension, non-insulin dependent (Type II) diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, all of which contribute to morbidity and mortality. This review deals with stable isotope mass spectrometric methods and the application of stable isotopes to metabolic studies of obesity. Body composition and total energy expenditure (TEE) can be measured by mass spectrometry using stable isotope labeled water, and the metabolism of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate can be measured using appropriate labeled tracer molecules.

  1. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  2. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  3. Method for laser induced isotope enrichment

    DOEpatents

    Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2004-09-07

    Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

  4. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  5. Selective photoionisation of lutetium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, Aleksei B; Kovalevich, S K; Labozin, Valerii P; Mironov, Sergei M; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Firsov, Valerii A; Tsvetkov, G O; Shatalova, G G

    2012-10-31

    A three-stage laser photoionisation scheme intended for enriching the {sup 176}Lu isotope from natural lutetium was considered. An investigation was made of the hyperfine structure of the second excited state 5d6s7s {yields} {sup 4}D{sub 3/2} with an energy of 37194 cm{sup -1} and the autoionisation state with an energy of 53375 cm{sup -1} of the {sup 176}Lu and {sup 175}Lu isotopes. The total electron momentum of the autoionisation level and the constant A of hyperfine magnetic interaction were determined. Due to a small value of the isotopic shift between {sup 176}Lu and {sup 175}Lu, appreciable selectivity of their separation may be achieved with individual hyperfine structure components. The first tentative enrichment of the 176Lu isotope was performed to a concentration of 60 % - 70 %. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  7. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  8. Lasers utilizing CO2 isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenin, Yu V.; Domanov, M. S.

    1980-08-01

    The lasing spectra and energy characteristics were investigated for lasers operating with the isotopes 12C16O2, 13C16O2, 12C18O2, and 12C16O18O. It was found that the output power of a laser utilizing the CO2 isotopes was determined by the content of a particular isotope in the carbon dioxide gas. For equal enrichments, all the isotopes investigated, with the exception of 12C16O18O, gave comparable output powers. The unsaturated gains were identical for the most intense transitions of the symmetric molecules; the gain was a factor of two less for the asymmetric molecule. The gain rose linearly with increasing enrichment. The ultimate specific power output, given by the product of the saturation power density and the gain, was practically independent of the enrichment.

  9. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E. E.

    2010-07-15

    This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

  10. Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means.

  11. Novel hybrid isotope separation scheme and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which the specific isotope is to be isolated, radiating the gas with frequencies characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photoionization reaction of the desired isotope, and collecting the specific isotope ion by suitable ion collection means. 3 figures.

  12. Clumped isotope thermometry and catagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Clog, M. D.; Dallas, B.; Douglas, P. M.; Piasecki, A.; Sessions, A. L.; Stolper, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped- and site-specific isotopic compositions of organic compounds can constrain their formation temperatures, sources, and chemical reaction histories. The large number of isotopologues of organic molecules may allow for the isotopic composition of a single compound to illuminate many processes. For example, it is possible that clumping or site specific effects in different parts of the same molecule will differ in blocking temperature, such that a molecule's full isotopic structure could simultaneously constrain conditions of biosynthesis, catagenic 'cracking', and storage in the crust. Recent innovations in high-resolution mass spectrometry and methods of IR and NMR spectroscopy make it possible to explore these questions. Methane is the first organic molecule to have its clumped isotope geochemistry analyzed in a variety of natural environments and controlled experiments. Methane generated through catagenic cracking of kerogen and other organic matter forms in equilibrium with respect to isotopic clumping, and preserves that state through later storage or migration, up to temperatures of ~250 ˚C. This kinetic behavior permits a variety of useful geological applications. But it is unexpected because the bulk stable isotope composition of thermogenic methane is thought to reflect kinetic isotope effects on irreversible reactions. Our observations imply a new interpretation of the chemical physics of catagenic methane formation. Additional instrument and methods developments are currently extending the measurement of isotopic clumping and position specific effects to larger alkanes, other hydrocarbon compounds, and amino acids. These measurements will ultimately expand our capacity to understand the formational conditions and fates of organic molecules in high- and low-temperature environments through geological time.

  13. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  14. Isotope separation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Barry J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

  15. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  16. Electron linac for medical isotope production with improved energy efficiency and isotope recovery

    DOEpatents

    Noonan, John; Walters, Dean; Virgo, Matt; Lewellen, John

    2015-09-08

    A method and isotope linac system are provided for producing radio-isotopes and for recovering isotopes. The isotope linac is an energy recovery linac (ERL) with an electron beam being transmitted through an isotope-producing target. The electron beam energy is recollected and re-injected into an accelerating structure. The ERL provides improved efficiency with reduced power requirements and provides improved thermal management of an isotope target and an electron-to-x-ray converter.

  17. Isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labolle, Eric M.; Fogg, Graham E.; Eweis, Juana B.; Gravner, Janko; Leaist, Derek G.

    2008-07-01

    During the last decade, isotopic fractionation has gained acceptance as an indicator of microbiological and chemical transformations of contaminants in groundwater. These transformation processes typically favor isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, contaminants, resulting in enrichment of the latter in the residual aqueous phase. In these isotope applications, it has been generally presumed that physical transport processes in groundwater have a negligible effect on isotopic enrichment. It is well known, however, that aqueous phase diffusion generally proceeds faster for isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, solute molecules, often resulting in isotopic fractionation in groundwater. This paper considers the potential for isotopic fractionation during transport in groundwater resulting from minute isotopic effects on aqueous diffusion coefficients. Analyses of transport in heterogeneous systems delimit the viable range of isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater. Results show that diffusion can result in similar degrees of depletion and enrichment of isotopically heavy solutes during transport in heterogeneous systems with significant diffusion rate-limited mass transfer between fast- and slow-flow zones. Additional analyses and examples explore conditions that attenuate the development of significant fractionation. Examples are presented for 13C methyl tertiary butyl ether and deuterated and nondeuterated isopropanol and tertiary butyl alcohol using aqueous diffusion coefficients measured by the Taylor dispersion method with refractive index profiling as a part of this study. Examples elucidate the potential for diffusive fractionation as a confounder in isotope applications and emphasize the importance of hydrogeologic analysis for assessing the role of diffusive fractionation in isotope applications at contaminant field sites.

  18. Isotopic Fractionation by Gravitational Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H. S. J.

    2003-04-01

    Present natural data bases for abundances of the isotopic compositions of noble gases, carbon and nitrogen inventories can be found in the Sun, the solar wind, meteorites and the planetary atmospheres and crustal reservoirs. Mass distributions in the various volatile reservoirs provide boundary conditions which must be satisfied in modelling the history of the present atmospheres. Such boundary conditions are constraints posed by comparison of isotopic ratios in primordial volatile sources with the isotopic pattern which was found on the planets and their satellites. Observations from space missions and Earth-based spectroscopic telescope observations of Venus, Mars and Saturn's major satellite Titan show that the atmospheric evolution of these planetary bodies to their present states was affected by processes capable of fractionating their elements and isotopes. The isotope ratios of D/H in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars indicate evidence for their planetary water inventories. Venus' H2O content may have been at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean. Analysis of the D/H ratio on Mars imply that a global H2O ocean with a depth of ≤ 30 m was lost since the end of hydrodynamic escape. Calculations of the time evolution of the 15N/14N isotope anomalies in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan show that the Martian atmosphere was at least ≥ 20 times denser than at present and that the mass of Titan's early atmosphere was about 30 times greater than its present value. A detailed study of gravitational fractionation of isotopes in planetary atmospheres furthermore indicates a much higher solar wind mass flux of the early Sun during the first half billion years.

  19. Isotope shifts in francium isotopes Fr-213206 and 221Fr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, R.; Gwinner, G.; Tandecki, M.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L. A.; Aubin, S.; Gomez, E.; FrPNC Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present the isotope shifts of the 7 s1 /2 to 7 p1 /2 transition for francium isotopes 206 -213Fr with reference to 221Fr collected from two experimental periods. The shifts are measured on a sample of atoms prepared within a magneto-optical trap by a fast sweep of radio-frequency sidebands applied to a carrier laser. King plot analysis, which includes literature values for 7 s1 /2 to 7 p3 /2 isotope shifts, provides a field shift constant ratio of 1.0520(10) and a difference between the specific mass shift constants of 170(100) GHz amu between the D1 and D2 transitions, of sufficient precision to differentiate between ab initio calculations.

  20. Isotope separation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Cotter, Theodore P.

    1982-12-28

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

  1. Stable isotopes in tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil J.

    2004-04-01

    Stable isotopes in tree rings could provide palaeoclimate reconstructions with perfect annual resolution and statistically defined confidence limits. Recent advances make the approach viable for non-specialist laboratories. The relevant literature is, however, spread across several disciplines, with common problems approached in different ways. Here we provide the first overview of isotope dendroclimatology, explaining the underlying theory and describing the steps taken in building and interpreting isotope chronologies. Stable carbon isotopes record the balance between stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate, dominated at dry sites by relative humidity and soil water status and at moist sites by summer irradiance and temperature. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios record source water, which contains a temperature signal, and leaf transpiration, controlled dominantly by vapour pressure deficit. Variable exchange with xylem (source) water during wood synthesis determines the relative strength of the source water and leaf enrichment signals. Producing long Holocene chronologies will require a change in emphasis towards processing very large numbers of samples efficiently, whilst retaining analytical precision. A variety of sample preparation and data treatment protocols have been used, some of which have a deleterious effect on the palaeoclimate signal. These are reviewed and suggestions made for a more standardised approach.

  2. Isotopic Randomness and Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    Isotopic disorder in crystals can lead to suppression of thermal conductivity, mobility variations and (weak) Anderson localization on isotopic fluctuations. The latter (AAB, J.ChemPhys.1984) is akin to polaron effect (self-localization due polarization). Possibility of isotopic patterning (IP) increases near melting point (thermally activated isotopic hopping swaps). Crystal near melting threshold become “informationally sensitive” as if its IP is operated by some external Maxwell’s Demon, MD (AAB, URAM J, 2002). At this state short range (e.g. electrostatic inverse square) forces evolve into long-range interactions (due to divergence of order parameter) and information sensitivity can be further amplified by (say) a single fast electron (e.g. beta-particle from decay of 14-C or other radioactive isotope) which may result in cascade of impact ionization events and (short time-scale) enhancement of screening by impact-generated non-equilibrium (non-thermal) electrons. In this state informationally driven (MD-controlled) IP (Eccles effect) can result in decrease of positional entropy signifying emergence of physical complexity out of pure information, similar to peculiar “jinni effect” on closed time loops in relativistic cosmology (R.J.Gott, 2001) or Wheeler’s “it from bit” metaphor. By selecting special IP, MD modifies ergodicity principle in favor of info rich states.

  3. Isotope specific arbitrary material sorter

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2015-12-08

    A laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide a rapid and unique, isotope specific method for sorting materials. The objects to be sorted are passed on a conveyor in front of a MEGa-ray beam which has been tuned to the nuclear resonance fluorescence transition of the desired material. As the material containing the desired isotope traverses the beam, a reduction in the transmitted MEGa-ray beam occurs. Alternately, the laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide non-destructive and non-intrusive, quantitative determination of the absolute amount of a specific isotope contained within pipe as part of a moving fluid or quasi-fluid material stream.

  4. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  5. The terrestrial uranium isotope cycle.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Morten B; Elliott, Tim; Freymuth, Heye; Sims, Kenneth W W; Niu, Yaoling; Kelley, Katherine A

    2015-01-15

    Changing conditions on the Earth's surface can have a remarkable influence on the composition of its overwhelmingly more massive interior. The global distribution of uranium is a notable example. In early Earth history, the continental crust was enriched in uranium. Yet after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen, about 2.4 billion years ago, the aqueous mobility of oxidized uranium resulted in its significant transport to the oceans and, ultimately, by means of subduction, back to the mantle. Here we explore the isotopic characteristics of this global uranium cycle. We show that the subducted flux of uranium is isotopically distinct, with high (238)U/(235)U ratios, as a result of alteration processes at the bottom of an oxic ocean. We also find that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) have (238)U/(235)U ratios higher than does the bulk Earth, confirming the widespread pollution of the upper mantle with this recycled uranium. Although many ocean island basalts (OIBs) are argued to contain a recycled component, their uranium isotopic compositions do not differ from those of the bulk Earth. Because subducted uranium was probably isotopically unfractionated before full oceanic oxidation, about 600 million years ago, this observation reflects the greater antiquity of OIB sources. Elemental and isotope systematics of uranium in OIBs are strikingly consistent with previous OIB lead model ages, indicating that these mantle reservoirs formed between 2.4 and 1.8 billion years ago. In contrast, the uranium isotopic composition of MORB requires the convective stirring of recycled uranium throughout the upper mantle within the past 600 million years.

  6. Iron Isotope Systematics of Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shollenberger, Q. R.; Brennecka, G. A.; Schuth, S.; Weyer, S.

    2016-08-01

    CAIs from CV3 and CK meteorites are investigated for their Fe isotopic compositions. Some CAIs show correlated mass-dependent and mass-independent Fe isotopic variations, indicating possible mixing between the original CAI Fe and the host rock.

  7. APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR WATERSHED INVESTIGATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental isotopes include naturally-occurring nuclides that can be applied as tracers within watersheds (Sidle, 1998). Recent advances in mass spectroscopy may supplant many traditional and costly hydrometric techniques. It is now possible, for example, to utilize isotopes a...

  8. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  9. Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

  10. The separation of stable isotopes of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziashvili, E. D.; Egiazarov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The present state of work on the separation of carbon isotopes by diffusion, fractional distillation, chemical isotopic exchange, and the selective excitation and dissociation of molecules in electrical discharges or in the field of laser radiation has been examined. The characteristics of new laboratory and industrial assemblies for separating carbon isotopes have been described. Promising directions of study aimed at developing effective technological processes for separating carbon isotopes have been noted. The bibliography contains 148 references.

  11. Magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F. Z.; Huang, K. J.; Li, W.; Liu, X. M.; Ma, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental weathering links the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents as it regulates the CO2 content of the atmosphere, shifts the composition of the continental crust from basaltic to andesitic, and ultimately controls the chemical composition of river waters and seawater. Magnesium is a water-soluble major element in the hydrosphere, continental crust and the mantle, and has three stable isotopes (24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg). Studies of Mg isotopes during continental weathering may help to document the interactions between hydrosphere, crust and mantle. Previous studies have shown that the continental crust has a heterogeneous but on average heavier Mg isotopic composition than the mantle, whereas the hydrosphere is isotopically light. The complementary characteristics of Mg isotopic compositions between continental and hydrosphere have been attributed to continental weathering, with light Mg isotopes partitioned into water, leaving heavy Mg isotopes behind in the crustal residue. Here we summarize our studies of Mg isotope fractionation in four weathering profiles under various climate conditions. We show that large Mg isotope fractionation can occur during continental weathering. Although the weathered residue is usually enriched in heavier Mg isotopes than unaltered parent rocks, some heavily weathered products can be quite light in Mg isotopic composition. The complicated behaviors of Mg isotopes reflect different control factors during weathering such as parent rock lithology, primary mineral dissolution, secondary mineral formation, ion exchange, vegetation uptake etc. Though studies of natural samples can provide direct evidence on isotope fractionation, more well-controlled laboratory experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between fluids and minerals are needed in order to fully understand the behaviors of Mg isotopes during weathering, which ultimately lays the foundation for making Mg isotope geochemistry an important tool for studying different geological

  12. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    ScienceCinema

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  13. ICP-MS for isotope ratio measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes in mineral nutrition research has become a fundamental aspect of conducting this research. A gradual transition has occurred, now virtually complete, from radioactive isotope studies to those using stable isotopes. Although primarily used in human research, mineral stable ...

  14. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  15. Isotope Cancer Treatment Research at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, John; Nortier, Meiring

    2012-04-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced medical isotopes for diagnostic and imaging purposes for more than 30 years. Now LANL researchers have branched out into isotope cancer treatment studies. New results show that an accelerator-based approach can produce clinical trial quantities of actinium-225, an isotope that has promise as a way to kill tumors without damaging surrounding healthy cells.

  16. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  17. Isotope geochemistry in 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    The intense interest in radioactive minerals as a source of atomic energy, and their application in searching for ore deposits and also in gamma-ray and neutron logging oil wells, have opened new vistas in every science. Many minerals containing elements of high atomic weight are radioactive, and emit a radiation which affects a photographic plate and may be detected by means of a sensitive phosphorescent screen. Most of the elements as found in nature are a mixture of isotopes. isotopes are atoms of one element which have different masses. Uranium, thorium, potassium, and rubidium isotopes are also used to date minerals and rocks. Organic materials that have been in equilibrium with CO{sub 2}-photosynthetic cycle during the past 50,000 years are dated by carbon-14 method. The stable isotopes of H{sub 2}, C, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and S are intimately associated with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere and are used in probing water resources.

  18. Martian Volatiles and Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    1997-01-01

    Data on martian volatiles gathered from Viking atmosphere measurements, modest groundbased spectra, shock-implanted atmospheric gases in martian (SNC) meteorites, trapped mantle gases in martian meteorites, and volatile-rich solid phases in martian meteorites, are presented. Atmospheric volatiles, surface volatiles, and isotopic chronologies are discussed, along with energetic particle interactions.

  19. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  20. Isotope Harvesting Opportunities at FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, David

    2017-01-01

    The fragmentation of fast heavy ion beams now at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) and in the future at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction produce an unprecedentedly broad spectrum of radionuclides but only a small fraction are used in the on-line rare-isotope program. Projectile fragmentation facilities provide an electromagnetically purified beam of a single projectile fragment for nuclear physics experiments ranging from low energy astrophysics, through nuclear structure studies, to probing fundamental symmetries. By augmenting the NSCL and FRIB production facilities with complimentary collection and purification of discarded ions, called isotope harvesting with chemical purification, many other nuclides will become available for off-line experiments in parallel with the primary experiment. A growing user community has established a list of key target isotopes and is working with the FRIB design team to allow inclusion of necessary equipment in the future. An overview of the possibilities and the techniques will be presented in this talk. Supported by Office of Science, US DOE and Michigan State University.

  1. Nuclear fission of Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Chiba, S.

    2010-06-01

    Multi-modal fission has been systematically investigated for the series of isotopes of Fm and Cf. The multi-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation is used for the dynamical calculation. The primary fission mode changes from mass-asymmetric fission to mass-symmetric fission with the increase of neutron numbers for both Fm and Cf cases.

  2. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  3. Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Fulgurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, F.; Javoy, M.

    1992-07-01

    Two occurrences of vitreous rocks (fulgurites) that have resulted from the fusion of Etnean lavas, have been ascribed to the result of lightning striking the basalts and melting fresh volcanic rocks [1]. Rapidly quenched melts appear as tubular cavities that preserve the path of the discharge. Glass droplets (D <= 500 micrometers) are always dispersed around the fused lava tube and show several petrographic similarities with chondrules found in ordinary chondrites (presence of melilite, radiating skeletal fassaite, etc). In this process, high temperatures (T>1800 K) have probably been reached during timescales <=10 sec. Because it has been suggested that lightning discharges may have played an important role in the formation of chondrules [2], we have analyzed the oxygen isotope compositions of these fulgurites (our experimental protocol is described elsewhere [3]). The glass (free from any contamination from the unmelted basalt) is 1.5o/oo depleted in ^18O relative to its measured initial isotopic composition (delta^18O = +5.6o/oo); most of the data define a mass-dependent fractionation relationship (i.e. delta^17O = 0.52 x delta^18O). Therefore the data clearly do not reproduce the oxygen isotope anomaly defined for meteorites, which has a slope of 1 in the diagram delta^17O versus delta^18O (i.e. delta^17O = 1.0 x delta^18O). Nevertheless, it should be noted that some glass samples scatter around this canonical value of 0.52 with minor departures from a purely mass-dependent fractionation. If these results are confirmed by additional determinations (now in progress) on the separated glassy droplets, the following conclusions can be proposed: 1) lightning discharges do not yield oxygen isotope anomalies similar to those measured in chondrules and 2) an isotope exchange between hot chondrules and their parent nebular gas--presumably "anomalous" in its oxygen isotopes-- seems difficult to achieve within the duration of the rapid cooling of the melt. This last point

  4. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  5. A global Ge isotope budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronas, J. Jotautas; Hammond, Douglas E.; McManus, James; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Siebert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of Ge isotope composition and ancillary data for samples of river water, low- and high-temperature hydrothermal fluids, and seawater. The dissolved δ74Ge composition of analyzed rivers ranges from 2.0 to 5.6‰, which is significantly heavier than previously determined values for silicate rocks (δ74Ge = 0.4-0.7‰, Escoube et al., Geostand. Geoanal. Res., 36(2), 2012) from which dissolved Ge is primarily derived. An observed negative correlation between riverine Ge/Si and δ74Ge signatures suggests that the primary δ74Ge fractionation mechanism during rock weathering is the preferential incorporation of light isotopes into secondary weathering products. High temperature (>150 °C) hydrothermal fluids analyzed in this study have δ74Ge of 0.7-1.6‰, most likely fractionated during fluid equilibration with quartz in the reaction zone. Low temperature (25-63 °C) hydrothermal fluids are heavier (δ74Ge between 2.9‰ and 4.1‰) and most likely fractionated during Ge precipitation with hydrothermal clays. Seawater from the open ocean has a δ74Gesw value of 3.2 ± 0.4‰, and is indistinguishable among the different ocean basins at the current level of precision. This value should be regulated over time by the isotopic balance of Ge sources and sinks, and a new compilation of these fluxes is presented, along with their estimated isotopic compositions. Assuming steady-state, non-opal Ge sequestration during sediment authigenesis likely involves isotopic fractionation Δ74Gesolid-solution that is -0.6 ± 1.8‰.

  6. Measuring SNM Isotopic Distributions using FRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-02

    The first group of slides provides background information on the isotopic composition of plutonium. It is shown that 240Pu is the critical isotope in neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting. Next, response function analysis to determine isotopic composition is discussed. The isotopic composition can be determined by measuring the net peak counts from each isotope and then taking the ratio of the counts for each isotope relative to the total counts for the element. Then FRAM (Fixed energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies) is explained. FRAM can control data acquisition, automatically analyze newly acquired data, analyze previously acquired data, provide information on the quality of the analysis, and facilitate analysis in unusual situations (non-standard energy calibrations, gamma rays from non-SNM isotopes, poor spectra (within limits)).

  7. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  8. Isotopic Compositions of the Elements, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhlke, J. K.; de Laeter, J. R.; De Bièvre, P.; Hidaka, H.; Peiser, H. S.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2005-03-01

    The Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry completed its last review of the isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in 2001. That review involved a critical evaluation of the published literature, element by element, and forms the basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the "best measurement" of the isotope abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard atomic weight of the element Ar(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)] recommended by CAWIA in 2001.

  9. Isotopic compositions of the elements, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; De Laeter, J. R.; De Bievre, P.; Hidaka, H.; Peiser, H.S.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Taylor, P.D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry completed its last review of the isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in 2001. That review involved a critical evaluation of the published literature, element by element, and forms the basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the "best measurement" of the isotope abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard atomic weight of the element A r(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)] recommended by CAWIA in 2001. ?? 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  11. Strontium Isotopes and Magma Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ellis, B. S.; Ramos, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that volcanic rocks commonly exhibit internal heterogeneity in radiogenic isotopes. In particular, strontium isotopic disequilibrium between co-exisitng phenocrysts, between phenocrysts and matrix, and isotopic zoning within single crystals has been demonstrated in basalts, andesites, dacites, rhyolites and alkaline magmas; in some cases, the range in 87Sr/86Sr among different components in the same rock may equal or exceed the bulk-rock range seen in the entire formation, volcanic center, or province. High-temperature “Snake River type” rhyolites appear to be an exception. Despite the occurrence of Snake River Plain rhyolites in a region of isotopically highly variable crust and mantle, and significant differences from rhyolite unit to rhyolite unit, internally they are near-homogeneous in 87Sr/86Sr. Little or no zoning is found within feldspar phenocrysts, and feldspars within a single unit are tightly grouped. Some units show minor contrasts between phenocrysts and matrix. High temperature rhyolitic magmas possess a unique combination of temperature and melt viscosity. Although they are typically 200°C hotter than common rhyolites, the effect on visocity is offset by lower water contents (~2 wt%), hence their melt viscosities are in the same range as common, water-rich, cool rhyolites (105 - 106 Pa s). Yet magmatic temperatures are in the same range as basaltic andesites and andesites, consequently cation diffusion rates in feldspar are 2 - 3 orders of magnitude greater than in common rhyolites. We hypothesize that this combination of characteristics promotes Sr isotopic homogeneity: high melt viscosities tend to inhibit crystal transfer and mixing of isotopically distinct components on timescales shorter than those required for diffusive homogenization of Sr between phenocrysts and matrix (100 - 1000 years). This is not the case for most magmas, in which either crystal transfer is rapid (<< 100 years) due to low

  12. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  13. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  14. Lasers utilizing CO2 isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenin, Iu. V.; Domanov, M. S.

    1980-08-01

    The emission spectra and power characteristics of CW (C-12)(O-16)2, (C-13)(O-16)2, (C-12)(O-16)(O-18)2 and (C-12)(O-18) lasers are investigated. Laser output power is found to depend equally on the proportion of carbon and oxygen isotopes in the active medium for all isotopes except the asymmetrical (C-12)(O-16)(O-18), in which maximum output power is four to five times less due to the doubling of emission lines and limited enrichment caused by recombination into (C-12)(O-16)2 and (C-12)(O-18)2 molecules during discharge. The unsaturated gain is observed to increase linearly with enrichment, with that of nonsymmetrical molecules half that of the symmetrical molecules, while the maximum power output is independent of enrichment.

  15. Isotopic variations in primitive meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    1981-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic variations in carbonaceous chondrites and ordinary chondrites can each be interpreted as mixtures of two isotopically different reservoirs, one consisting of solids, enriched in O-16, the other of a gas, depleted in O-16 relative to terrestrial abundances. The data indicate a common source of the solids for each of the two classes of meteorites, but a different gas reservoir for each. These conditions might obtain in gaseous protoplanets. It is noted that radiogenic Mg-26 is variable in abundance among some classes of Allende inclusions, implying either nebular heterogeneity with respect to Al-26/Al-27 ratios or time differences of crystal formation. The presence of excess Ag-107 from decay of extinct Pd-107 corroborates the evidence from Mg-26 for a time interval of at most a few million years between the last nucleosynthetic event and the accretion of substantial bodies in the solar system.

  16. Ternary Fission of CF Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, S.; Wagemans, C.; Serot, O.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.; Almahamid, I.; Lukens, W.; Floyd, J.

    2008-04-01

    During the last years, different Cm and Cf isotopes have been studied by our research group in the frame of a systematic investigation of gas emission characteristics in ternary fission. In this paper we report on the energy distribution and the emission probability of 3H, 4He and 6He particles emitted in neutron induced ternary fission of 249Cf and 251Cf. Both measurements were performed at the high flux reactor of the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France), using suited ΔE-E telescope detectors, consisting of well-calibrated silicon surface barrier detectors. In this way, the available database can be expanded with new results for Z=98 isotopes, for which the information on neutron induced ternary fission is almost nonexistent. These measurements are important for the systematic investigation of gas emission characteristics in ternary fission.

  17. Isotope Labeling in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Krishna; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable progress in applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins that have traditionally been difficult to study due to issues with folding, posttranslational modification, and expression levels or combinations thereof. In particular, insect cells have proved useful in allowing large quantities of isotope-labeled, functional proteins to be obtained and purified to homogeneity, allowing study of their structures and dynamics by using NMR. Here, we provide protocols that have proven successful in such endeavors. PMID:22167667

  18. Isotopic heterogeneity in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Tollstrup, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    The growing microsample database on volcanic rocks is showing that isotopic disequilibrium between and among phenocryst phases, their melt inclusions, and groundmass is the rule rather than the exception. This applies even in cases of little or no petrographic evidence for disequilibrium. Erupted magmas must therefore be regarded, to some extent, as mechanical mixtures of isotopically distinct components assembled from different sources. The preservation of isotopic disequilibrium requires that the assembly takes place before diffusion can eradicate evidence of disequilibrium. For a wide range of magmas (mafic, intermediate and felsic, silica under- and oversaturated) from different volcano types (flood basalts, monogenetic cones, stratocones, silicic calderas) this timescale ranges from thousands of years down to one year or less, with no consistent pattern of mixing-to-eruption time vs. volcano or magma type. Among many issues arising from these findings, we note that estimation of magmatic temperatures from application of equilibrium thermodynamics to phenocryst assemblages in volcanic rocks should be approached with extreme caution. The isotope ratio variations observed among the components of a single volcanic rock sample, in most cases, indicate interaction between magma and the local wall-rock. This is consistent with the view that the vast majority of magmas undergo modification during transport through and residence within the crust. Three physical origins of heterogeneity have been proposed: melting of wallrock, magmatic recharge, and mixing of components within a magma chamber initially segregated into melt-rich and crystal-rich portions. Time constraints on preservation of disequilibrium imply either a causal link with eruption, or that these processes occur through the lifetime of a chamber.

  19. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  20. Unusual mercury isotopic compositions in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hintelmann, H.; Zheng, W.; Feng, X.; Cai, H.; Wang, Z.; Yuan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary studies have demonstrated both mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg isotopes in natural samples. Laboratory experiments showed that photochemical reduction of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MMHg) and liquid-vapour evaporation could produce MIF of odd Hg isotopes. This was thought to cause the MIF actually observed in aquatic organisms. Although isotopic measurements of Hg in aqueous environment would give direct evidence, little data was reported for surface water samples. Recent work reported, unexpectedly, positive MIF of odd Hg isotopes in both precipitation and ambient air, in contrast with the prediction of laboratory experiments and measurements of Hg accumulated in lichens . Intriguingly, MIF of even-mass Hg isotope (200Hg) was also recently determined in the atmosphere. In contrast with the now mainstream observation of odd Hg isotope anomaly that has several theoretical explanations, the hitherto mysterious even Hg isotope anomalies were neither reported in laboratory experiments, nor predicted by isotope fractionation mechanisms, highlighting the importance of further study on Hg isotopes in variable systems. Our measurements of lichens and lake water samples from different countries show for the first time significant Δ200Hg in surface terrestrial reservoirs, realizing a direct connection of even Hg isotope anomaly in the terrestrial reservoirs to the atmospheric deposition, and fulfilling the gap of Δ200Hg between the atmosphere and the terrestrial receptors. The specific odd Hg isotope compositions determined in lake waters also support the atmosphere contribution, and may be directly linked to the high Δ199Hg values largely determined and manifested on the top of aqueous food web. Our data show that the watershed Hg input is another contributing source, rather than the in-lake processes, to explain the lacustrine Hg isotope anomalies. Interestingly, lake sediments are isotopically

  1. Comparative isotope ecology of African great apes.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Vicky M; Fahy, Geraldine; Hohmann, Gottfried; Robbins, Martha M; Leinert, Vera; Lee, Kevin; Eshuis, Henk; Seiler, Nicole; Wessling, Erin G; Head, Josephine; Boesch, Christophe; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2016-12-01

    The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp.). First, we explore differences in isotope baselines across different habitats and whether isotopic signatures in apes can be related to feeding niches (faunivory and folivory). Secondly, we illustrate how stable isotopic variations within African ape populations compare to other extant and extinct primates and discuss possible implications for dietary flexibility. Using 701 carbon and nitrogen isotope data points resulting from 148 sectioned hair samples and an additional collection of 189 fruit samples, we compare six different great ape sites. We investigate the relationship between vegetation baselines and climatic variables, and subsequently correct great ape isotope data to a standardized plant baseline from the respective sites. We obtained temporal isotopic profiles of individual animals by sectioning hair along its growth trajectory. Isotopic signatures of great apes differed between sites, mainly as vegetation isotope baselines were correlated with site-specific climatic conditions. We show that controlling for plant isotopic characteristics at a given site is essential for faunal data interpretation. While accounting for plant baseline effects, we found distinct isotopic profiles for each great ape population. Based on evidence from habituated groups and sympatric great ape species, these differences could possibly be related to faunivory and folivory. Dietary flexibility in apes varied, but temporal variation was overall

  2. A novel methodology to investigate isotopic biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2012-04-01

    An enduring goal of trace metal isotopic studies of Earth History is to find isotopic 'fingerprints' of life or of life's individual physiochemical processes. Generally, such signatures are sought by relating an isotopic effect observed in controlled laboratory conditions or a well-characterized environment to a more complex system or the geological record. However, such an approach is ultimately limited because life exerts numerous isotopic fractionations on any one element so it is hard to dissect the resultant net fractionation into its individual components. Further, different organisms, often with the same apparent cellular function, can express different isotopic fractionation factors. We have used a novel method to investigate the isotopic fractionation associated with a single physiological process-enzyme specific isotopic fractionation. We selected Cd isotopes since only one biological use of Cd is known, CdCA (a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase from the coastal diatom T. Weissflogii). Thus, our investigation can also inform the long standing mystery as to why this generally toxic element appears to have a nutrient-like dissolved isotopic and concentration profile in the oceans. We used the pET-15b plasmid to insert the CdCA gene into the E. coli genome. There is no known biochemical function for Cd in E. coli, making it an ideal vector for studying distinct physiological processes within a single organism. The uptake of Cd and associated isotopic fractionation was determined for both normal cells and those expressing CdCA. It was found that whole cells always exhibited a preference for the light isotopes of Cd, regardless of the expression of CdCA; adsorption of Cd to cell surfaces was not seen to cause isotopic fractionation. However, the cleaning procedure employed exerted a strong control on the observed isotopic composition of cells. Using existing protein purification techniques, we measured the Cd isotopic composition of different subcellular fractions of E

  3. Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Metal Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A.; Wasylenki, L.; Liermann, L.; Mathur, R.; Brantley, S.

    2006-12-01

    The possibility that metal stable isotopes record the influence of microbes on metal geochemical cycling has motivated much recent research on "non-traditional" stable isotopes, particularly Fe. The initial wave of research on biogenic metal isotope effects focused on Fe isotope fractionation during microbially-mediated dissimilatory reduction or oxidation of Fe. Although isotope variations arising from biogenic effects have been reported in laboratory systems it is difficult to ascribe comparable variations in nature to biology because of pervasive and significant abiotic fractionation. As an alternative approach, we are investigating isotope fractionation during microbial assimilation of transition metals. Assimilation occurs because a large number of metals are essential intracellular constituents. Although assimilatory isotope fractionation is not likely to be unique in direction or magnitude compared to other processes, the large number of elements potentially involved greatly broadens the number of elements that can be examined for biogenic isotope effects in materials of interest. This raises the possibility of multi- element isotope "fingerprints" of biological metal processing. In experiments with Azotobacter vinelandii, a nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium that does not use Fe or other metals in dissimilatory respiration, fractionation of both Fe and Mo isotopes are observed. The two systems exhibit opposite sense fractionation: preferential assimilation of heavy isotopes is observed for Fe, while Mo assimilation favors uptake of light isotopes. Rayleigh-type behavior is seen in both cases; α = 1.0011 and 0.9997, respectively. The Fe isotope results are most readily interpreted in terms of an equilibrium fractionation between inorganic Fe complexes and strongly bound Fe-siderophore complexes that are taken into the cell. In contrast, the Mo isotope results may reflect a kinetic isotope effect. However, it is alternatively possible that Mo isotope

  4. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  5. Isoscapes: Spatial Pattern in Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-05-01

    Isotope ratios of actively cycled elements vary as a function of the biogeochemical processes in which they participate and the conditions under which those processes occur. The resultant spatiotemporal distribution of isotopes in environmental materials can be predicted using models of isotope-fractionating processes and data describing environmental conditions across space and time, and it has been termed an isoscape, or isotopic landscape. Analysis of isoscapes and comparison of isoscape predictions with observational data have been used to test biogeochemical models, calculate aerially integrated biogeochemical fluxes based on isotope mass balance, and determine spatial connectivity in biogeochemical, ecological, and anthropological systems. Isoscape models of varying quality are available for stable H, C, N, and O isotopes in a range of Earth surface systems, but significant opportunities exist to refine our understanding of biogeochemical cycles and our ability to predict isoscapes through the development of more mechanistic and more comprehensive isoscape models.

  6. Stable Isotope Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2012-01-03

    The isotopic distribution of the atoms composing the molecules of microorganisms is a function of the substrates used by the organisms. The stable isotope content of an organism is fixed so long as no further substrate consumption and biosynthesis occurs, while the radioactive isotopic content decays over time. The distribution of stable isotopes of C, N, O and H in heterotrophic microorganisms is a direct function of the culture medium, and therefore the stable isotope composition can be used to associate samples with potential culture media and also with one another. The 14C content depends upon the 14C content, and therefore the age, of the organic components of the culture medium, as well as on the age of the culture itself. Stable isotope signatures can thus be used for sample matching, to associate cultures with specific growth media, and to predict characteristics of growth media.

  7. Calcium and titanium isotopic fractionations during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjun; Huang, Shichun; Davis, Andrew M.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2014-09-01

    Isotope fractionations associated with high temperature evaporation provide important constraints on the physicochemical processes that affected planetary materials at the birth of the solar system. Previous evaporation experiments have focused on isotopic fractionation of moderately to highly volatile elements. Here, we investigate the isotope fractionation behavior of two highly refractory elements, calcium and titanium, during evaporation of perovskite (CaTiO3) in a vacuum furnace. In our experiments, isotope fractionation during evaporation follows the Rayleigh law, but not the commonly used exponential law, with the dominant evaporating species being Ca(g) and TiO2(g). If isotope fractionations in early solar system materials did follow the Rayleigh law, the common practice of using an exponential fractionation law to correct for mass-dependent fractionation in the study of mass-independent fractionations may introduce significant artificial isotope anomalies.

  8. Possible isotopic fractionation effects in sputtered minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A model which makes definite predictions for the fractionation of isotopes in sputtered material is discussed. The fractionation patterns are nonlinear, and the pattern for a particular set of isotopes depends on the chemical matrix within which those isotopes are contained. Calculations are presented for all nonmonoisotopic elements contained in the minerals perovskite, anorthite, ackermanite, enstatite, and troilite. All isotopes are fractionated at the level of approximately 4-6 deg/o per atomic mass unit. Oxygen is always positively fractionated (heavier isotopes sputtered preferentially), and heavier elements are generally negatively fractioned (light isotopes sputtered preferentially). The value of Delta (O-18:O-16) is always less by about 1.8 deg/o than a linear extrapolation based upon the calculated delta (O-17:O-16) value would suggest. The phenomenon of both negative and positive fractionation patterns from a single target mineral are used to make an experimental test of the proposed model.

  9. Multiple linear regression for isotopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Alonso, J. I.

    2012-04-01

    There are two typical applications of isotopic measurements: the detection of natural variations in isotopic systems and the detection man-made variations using enriched isotopes as indicators. For both type of measurements accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements are required. For the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes, multicollector ICP-MS instruments are usually applied. In many cases, chemical separation procedures are required before accurate isotope measurements can be performed. The off-line separation of Rb and Sr or Nd and Sm is the classical procedure employed to eliminate isobaric interferences before multicollector ICP-MS measurement of Sr and Nd isotope ratios. Also, this procedure allows matrix separation for precise and accurate Sr and Nd isotope ratios to be obtained. In our laboratory we have evaluated the separation of Rb-Sr and Nd-Sm isobars by liquid chromatography and on-line multicollector ICP-MS detection. The combination of this chromatographic procedure with multiple linear regression of the raw chromatographic data resulted in Sr and Nd isotope ratios with precisions and accuracies typical of off-line sample preparation procedures. On the other hand, methods for the labelling of individual organisms (such as a given plant, fish or animal) are required for population studies. We have developed a dual isotope labelling procedure which can be unique for a given individual, can be inherited in living organisms and it is stable. The detection of the isotopic signature is based also on multiple linear regression. The labelling of fish and its detection in otoliths by Laser Ablation ICP-MS will be discussed using trout and salmon as examples. As a conclusion, isotope measurement procedures based on multiple linear regression can be a viable alternative in multicollector ICP-MS measurements.

  10. Method for isotope separation by photodeflection

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1977-01-01

    In the method of separating isotopes wherein a desired isotope species is selectively deflected out of a beam of mixed isotopes by irradiating the beam with a directed beam of light of narrowly defined frequency which is selectively absorbed by the desired species, the improvement comprising irradiating the deflected beam with light from other light sources whose frequencies are selected to cause the depopulation of any metastable excited states.

  11. Quantitative Microbial Ecology through Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Rebecca L.; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cindy M.; McHugh, Theresa A.; Marks, Jane C.; Morrissey, Ember M.; Price, Lance B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in 18O and 13C composition after exposure to [18O]water or [13C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of 18O into DNA from [18O]water. However, the increase in 18O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing. PMID:26296731

  12. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Leyshon, W.E.

    1957-08-01

    A method and apparatus for collecting isotopes having a high vapor pressure, such as isotopes of mercury, in a calutron are described. Heretofore, the collected material would vaporize and escape from the ion receiver as fast as it was received. By making the receiver of pure silver, the mercury isotopes form a nonvolatile amalgam with the silver at the water cooled temperature of the receiver, and the mercury is thus retained.

  13. Crystal field splitting of the ground state of terbium(III) and dysprosium(III) complexes with a triimidazolyl tripod ligand and an acetate determined by magnetic analysis and luminescence.

    PubMed

    Shintoyo, Seira; Murakami, Keishiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naohide; Mochida, Naotaka; Ishida, Takayuki; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Watanabe, Masayuki; Tsuchimoto, Masanobu; Mrozinski, Jerzy; Coletti, Cecilia; Re, Nazzareno

    2014-10-06

    Terbium(III) and dysprosium(III) complexes with a tripodal N7 ligand containing three imidazoles (H3L) and a bidentate acetate ion (OAc(-)), [Ln(III)(H3L)(OAc)](ClO4)2·MeOH·H2O (Ln = Tb, 1; Ln = Dy, 2), were synthesized and studied, where H3L = tris[2-(((imidazol-4-yl)methylidene)amino)ethyl]amine. The Tb(III) and Dy(III) complexes have an isomorphous structure, and each Tb(III) or Dy(III) ion is coordinated by the tripodal N7 and the bidentate acetate ligands, resulting in a nonacoordinated capped-square-antiprismatic geometry. The magnetic data, including temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibilities and field dependence of the magnetization, were analyzed by a spin Hamiltonian, including the crystal field effect on the Tb(III) ion (4f(8), J = 6, S = 3, L = 3, g(J) = 3/2, (7)F6) and the Dy(III) ion (4f(9), J = 15/2, S = 5/2, L = 5, g(J) = 4/3, (6)H(15/2)). The Stark splittings of the ground states (7)F6 of the Tb(III) ion and (6)H(15/2) of the Dy(III) ion were evaluated from the magnetic analyses, and the energy diagram patterns indicated an easy axis (Ising type) anisotropy for both complexes, which is more pronounced for 2. The solid-state emission spectra of both complexes displayed sharp bands corresponding to the f-f transitions, and the fine structures assignable to the (5)D4 → (7)F6 transition for 1 and the (6)F(9/2) → (6)H(15/2) transition for 2 were related to the energy diagram patterns from the magnetic analyses. 1 and 2 showed an out-of-phase signal with frequency dependence in alternating current (ac) susceptibility under a dc bias field of 1000 Oe, indicative of a field-induced SIM.

  14. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  15. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  16. Oxygen isotopes in deep-sea spherules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions have been measured on several size fractions of deep-sea spherules of extraterrestrial origin. The silicate spherules have an isotopic composition unlike that of any known macrometeorite. Their pre-terrestrial compositions may have been similar to those of C3 chondrites or the anhydrous component of C2 chondrites, the latter being preferred on chemical grounds. Metallic particles oxidize in the upper atmosphere, and sample a region for which no previous oxygen isotope data exist. This part of the atmosphere, above about 100 km, is apparently strongly enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen.

  17. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report which was a thirty-four month project conducted to develop and demonstrate stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish the source of carbon in products of coal/petroleum coprocessing. The work included assessing precision, accuracy, the range of application and the significance of selective isotopic fractionation effects. A method was devised to correct for selective isotopic fractionation errors. The method was demonstrated through application with samples from twelve continuous-unit coprocessing tests. A data base of carbon isotope analyses is appended. 21 refs.

  18. Method for isotope enrichment by photoinduced chemiionization

    DOEpatents

    Dubrin, James W.

    1985-01-01

    Isotope enrichment, particularly .sup.235 U enrichment, is achieved by irradiating an isotopically mixed vapor feed with radiant energy at a wavelength or wavelengths chosen to selectively excite the species containing a desired isotope to a predetermined energy level. The vapor feed if simultaneously reacted with an atomic or molecular reactant species capable of preferentially transforming the excited species into an ionic product by a chemiionization reaction. The ionic product, enriched in the desired isotope, is electrostatically or electromagnetically extracted from the reaction system.

  19. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS OF ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Essential to the interpretation of natural variations of light stable isotope ratios is knowledge of the magnitude and temperature dependence of isotopic fractionation factors between the common minerals and fluids. These fractionation factors are obtained in three ways: (1) Semi-empirical calculations using spectroscopic data and the methods of statistical mechanics. (2) Laboratory calibration studies. (3) Measurements of natural samples whose formation conditions are well-known or highly constrained. In this chapter methods (1) and (2) are evaluated and a review is given of the present state of knowledge of the theory of isotopic fractionation and the fraction that influence the isotopic properties of minerals.

  20. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-05

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  1. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; ...

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  2. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  3. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  4. Osmium isotopes and mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    The decay of (187)Re to (187)Os (with a half-life of 42 billion years) provides a unique isotopic fingerprint for tracing the evolution of crustal materials and mantle residues in the convecting mantle. Ancient subcontinental mantle lithosphere has uniquely low Re/Os and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios due to large-degree melt extraction, recording ancient melt-depletion events as old as 3.2 billion years. Partial melts have Re/Os ratios that are orders of magnitude higher than their sources, and the subduction of oceanic or continental crust introduces into the mantle materials that rapidly accumulate radiogenic (187)Os. Eclogites from the subcontinental lithosphere have extremely high (187)Os/(188)Os ratios, and record ages as old as the oldest peridotites. The data show a near-perfect partitioning of Re/Os and (187)Os/(188)Os ratios between peridotites (low) and eclogites (high). The convecting mantle retains a degree of Os-isotopic heterogeneity similar to the lithospheric mantle, although its amplitude is modulated by convective mixing. Abyssal peridotites from the ocean ridges have low Os isotope ratios, indicating that the upper mantle had undergone episodes of melt depletion prior to the most recent melting events to produce mid-ocean-ridge basalt. The amount of rhenium estimated to be depleted from the upper mantle is 10 times greater than the rhenium budget of the continental crust, requiring a separate reservoir to close the mass balance. A reservoir consisting of 5-10% of the mantle with a rhenium concentration similar to mid-ocean-ridge basalt would balance the rhenium depletion of the upper mantle. This reservoir most likely consists of mafic oceanic crust recycled into the mantle over Earth's history and provides the material that melts at oceanic hotspots to produce ocean-island basalts (OIBs). The ubiquity of high Os isotope ratios in OIB, coupled with other geochemical tracers, indicates that the mantle sources of hotspots contain significant quantities

  5. Hydrogen-isotope permeation barrier

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Van Deventer, Erven H.

    1977-01-01

    A composite including a plurality of metal layers has a Cu-Al-Fe bronze layer and at least one outer layer of a heat and corrosion resistant metal alloy. The bronze layer is ordinarily intermediate two outer layers of metal such as austenitic stainless steel, nickel alloys or alloys of the refractory metals. The composite provides a barrier to hydrogen isotopes, particularly tritium that can reduce permeation by at least about 30 fold and possibly more below permeation through equal thicknesses of the outer layer material.

  6. Silicon isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2011-10-01

    The Si isotopic composition of Earth's mantle is thought to be homogeneous (δ 30Si = -0.29 ± 0.08‰, 2 s.d.) and not greatly affected by partial melting and recycling. Previous analyses of evolved igneous material indicate that such rocks are isotopically heavy relative to the mantle. To understand this variation, it is necessary to investigate the degree of Si isotopic fractionation that takes place during magmatic differentiation. Here we report Si isotopic compositions of lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland, which has formed in a region devoid of old, geochemically diverse crust. We show that Si isotopic composition varies linearly as a function of silica content, with more differentiated rocks possessing heavier isotopic compositions. Data for samples from the Afar Rift Zone, as well as various igneous USGS standards are collinear with the Hekla trend, providing evidence of a fundamental relationship between magmatic differentiation and Si isotopes. The effect of fractionation has been tested by studying cumulates from the Skaergaard Complex, which show that olivine and pyroxene are isotopically light, and plagioclase heavy, relative to the Si isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle. Therefore, Si isotopes can be utilised to model the competing effects of mafic and felsic mineral fractionation in evolving silicate liquids and cumulates. At an average SiO 2 content of ˜60 wt.%, the predicted δ 30Si value of the continental crust that should result from magmatic fractionation alone is -0.23 ± 0.05‰ (2 s.e.), barely heavier than the mantle. This is, at most, a maximum estimate, as this does not take into account weathered material whose formation drives the products toward lighter δ 30Si values. Mass balance calculations suggest that removal of continental crust of this composition from the upper mantle will not affect the Si isotopic composition of the mantle.

  7. New isotope {sup 263}Hs

    SciTech Connect

    Dragojevic, I.; Ellison, P. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Dvorak, J.; Stavsetra, L.; Duellmann, Ch. E.

    2009-01-15

    A new isotope of Hs was produced in the reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 56}Fe,n){sup 263}Hs at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Six genetically correlated nuclear decay chains have been observed and assigned to the new isotope {sup 263}Hs. The measured cross section was 21{sub -8.4}{sup +13} pb at 276.4 MeV lab frame center-of-target beam energy. {sup 263}Hs decays with a half-life of 0.74{sub -0.21}{sup +0.48} ms by {alpha}-decay and the measured {alpha}-particle energies are 10.57 {+-} 0.06, 10.72 {+-} 0.06, and 10.89 {+-} 0.06 MeV. The experimental cross section is compared to a theoretical prediction based on the Fusion by Diffusion model [W. J. SwiaPtecki et al., Phys. Rev. C 71, 014602 (2005)].

  8. Updated Evaluations for Americium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Pruet, J

    2005-09-22

    Here we describe evaluations for Am isotopes that will be included in the next release of ENDL. Current ENDL99 evaluations for these isotopes are quite outdated and almost entirely undocumented. Because Am is important for several DNT applications, and because quality evaluations are either readily available or easily calculated, the effort to update ENDL seems warranted. Results from good existing evaluations are adopted whenever possible. To this end we devote the next section of this report to a consideration of the availability of evaluations The quality of different evaluations as well as comparisons against experiments are also presented and used to motivate our choice of adopted data sets. Plans for modifying and improving adopted evaluations are also discussed. For {sup 240}Am there are no existing evaluations. To fill this gap, we are providing a new Am evaluation based on calculations with the statistical model reaction codes TALYS and EMPIRE. This evaluation is described below. The ENDF/B-VI formatted file containing this evaluation is given in the appendix.

  9. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  10. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  11. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  12. Isotope separation by selective photodissociation of glyoxal

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1976-01-01

    Dissociation products, mainly formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, enriched in a desired isotope of carbon, oxygen, or hydrogen are obtained by the selective photodissociation of glyoxal wherein glyoxal is subjected to electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength such that photon absorption excites and induces dissociation of only those molecules of glyoxal containing the desired isotope.

  13. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  14. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  15. Isotopic niches support the resource breadth hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Rader, Jonathan A; Newsome, Seth D; Sabat, Pablo; Chesser, R Terry; Dillon, Michael E; Martínez Del Rio, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Because a broad spectrum of resource use allows species to persist in a wide range of habitat types, and thus permits them to occupy large geographical areas, and because broadly distributed species have access to more diverse resource bases, the resource breadth hypothesis posits that the diversity of resources used by organisms should be positively related with the extent of their geographic ranges. We investigated isotopic niche width in a small radiation of South American birds in the genus Cinclodes. We analysed feathers of 12 species of Cinclodes to test the isotopic version of the resource breadth hypothesis and to examine the correlation between isotopic niche breadth and morphology. We found a positive correlation between the widths of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic niches (which estimate breadth of elevational range) and widths of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic niches (which estimates the diversity of resources consumed, and hence of habitats used). We also found a positive correlation between broad isotopic niches and wing morphology. Our study not only supports the resource breadth hypothesis but it also highlights the usefulness of stable isotope analyses as tools in the exploration of ecological niches. It is an example of a macroecological application of stable isotopes. It also illustrates the importance of scientific collections in ecological studies.

  16. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  17. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  18. Isotope Program Report June FY2016

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E.; Egle, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Isotope Program Monthly Highlights are briefly described. These include data on isotopes shipped, updates on equipment fabrication and testing, a potential new approach for nondestructive measurement of the amount of Cf-252 deposited on a surface, and efforts to recover and purify uranium-234 obtained from old PuBe sources.

  19. Correction of MS data for naturally occurring isotopes in isotope labelling experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Letisse, Fabien; Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with isotope labelling experiments is widely used for investigations of metabolism and other biological processes. Quantitative applications-e.g., (13)C metabolic flux analysis-require correction of raw MS data (isotopic clusters) for the contribution of all naturally abundant isotopes. This chapter describes how to perform such correction using the software IsoCor. This flexible, user-friendly software can be used to exploit any isotopic tracer, from well-known ((13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) to unusual ((57)Fe, (77)Se, etc.) isotopes. It also provides options-e.g., correction for the isotopic purity of the tracer-to improve the accuracy of quantitative isotopic studies, and allows automated correction of large datasets that can be collected with modern MS methods.

  20. Selected Isotopes for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2008-10-01

    In support of our ongoing signatures project we present information on 3 isotopes selected for possible application in optimized tags that could be applied to fuel assemblies to provide an objective measure of burnup. 1. Important factors for an optimized tag are compatibility with the reactor environment (corrosion resistance), low radioactive activation, at least 2 stable isotopes, moderate neutron absorption cross-section, which gives significant changes in isotope ratios over typical fuel assembly irradiation levels, and ease of measurement in the SIMS machine 2. From the candidate isotopes presented in the 3rd FY 08 Quarterly Report, the most promising appear to be Titanium, Hafnium, and Platinum. The other candidate isotopes (Iron, Tungsten, exhibited inadequate corrosion resistance and/or had neutron capture cross-sections either too high or too low for the burnup range of interest.

  1. Physics with chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1993-05-01

    Chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors offer a wealth of interesting physics. We review a number of impurity complexes which were discovered in ultrapure Germanium. They have led the way to the widely pursued studies of hydrogen in numerous semiconductors. Isotope related effects and processes include neutron transmutation doping, a technique used for a number of silicon and germanium devices. Isotopically pure and deliberately mixed crystals of germanium have been grown recently and have been used to study the dependence of the indirect bandgap and phonon properties on the mass and mass disorder of the nuclei. The large number of stable isotopes of the various semiconductors present a great potential for basic and applied studies. Semi-conductor isotope engineering may become a reality because of the new economic and political world order.

  2. Carbon isotope effects associated with aceticlastic methanogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Risatti, J. B.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The carbon isotope effects associated with synthesis of methane from acetate have been determined for Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and for methanogenic archaea in sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. At 37 degrees C, the 13C isotope effect for the reaction acetate (methyl carbon) --> methane, as measured in replicate experiments with M. barkeri, was - 21.3% +/- 0.3%. The isotope effect at the carboxyl portion of acetate was essentially equal, indicating participation of both positions in the rate-determining step, as expected for reactions catalyzed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. A similar isotope effect, - 19.2% +/- 0.3% was found for this reaction in the natural community (temperature = 20 degrees C). Given these observations, it has been possible to model the flow of carbon to methane within lake sediment communities and to account for carbon isotope compositions of evolving methane. Extension of the model allows interpretation of seasonal fluctuations in 13C contents of methane in other systems.

  3. Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Sander, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

  4. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    DOEpatents

    Scheibner, Karl F.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Worden, Earl F.

    1999-01-01

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

  5. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1999-08-31

    An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

  6. Manus Water Isotope Investigation Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Jessica L; Cobb, Kim M; Noone, David

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to investigate climatic controls on the stable isotopic composition of water vapor, precipitation, and seawater in the western tropical Pacific. Simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation from April 28 to May 8, 2013, at the Manus Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site, provided several key insights into the nature of the climate signal archived in precipitation and vapor isotope ratios. We observed a large shift from lower to higher isotopic values in vapor and precipitation because of the passage of a mesoscale convective system west of the site and a transition from a regional stormy period into a more quiescent period. During the quiescent period, the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation indicated the predominance of oceanic evaporation in determining the isotopic composition of boundary-layer vapor and local precipitation. There was not a consistent relationship between intra-event precipitation amount at the site and the stable isotopic composition of precipitation, thus challenging simplified assumptions about the isotopic “amount effect” in the tropics on the time scale of individual storms. However, some storms did show an amount effect, and deuterium excess values in precipitation had a significant relationship with several meteorological variables, including precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and cloud base height across all measured storms. The direction of these relationships points to condensation controls on precipitation deuterium excess values on intra-event time scales. The relationship between simultaneous measurements of vapor and precipitation isotope ratios during precipitation events indicates the ratio of precipitation-to-vapor isotope ratios can diagnose precipitation originating from a vapor source unique from boundary-layer vapor and rain re-evaporation.

  7. High Precision Isotopic Reference Material Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, J. L.; Vocke, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recent developments in thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometers have lead to "high precision" isotope ratio measurements with uncertainties approaching a few parts in 106. These new measurement capabilities have revolutionized the study of isotopic variations in nature by increasing the number of elements showing natural variations by almost a factor of two, and new research areas are actively opening up in climate change, health, ecology, geology and forensic studies. Because the isotopic applications are impacting very diverse fields, there is at present little effective coordination between research laboratories over reference materials and the values to apply to those materials. NIST had originally developed the techniques for producing accurate isotopic characterizations, culminating in the NIST Isotopic SRM series. The values on existing materials however are insufficiently precise and, in some cases, may be isotopically heterogeneous. A new generation of isotopic standards is urgently needed and will directly affect the quality and scope of emergent applications and ensure that the results being derived from these diverse fields are comparable. A series of new isotopic reference materials similar to the NIST 3100 single element solution series is being designed for this purpose and twelve elements have been selected as having the most pressing need. In conjunction with other expert users and National Metrology Institutes, an isotopic characterization of the respective 12 selected ampoules from the NIST single element solution series is currently underway. In this presentation the preliminary results of this screening will be discussed as well as the suitability of these materials in terms of homogeneity and purity, long term stability and availability, and isotopic relevance. Approaches to value assignment will also be discussed.

  8. Iron Isotope Fractionation in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lin, J. F.; Dauphas, N.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of iron isotopes in the deep Earth is of great importance, for it provides clues for determining the history of planetary differentiation and core formation, as well as the origin of the Earth. However, iron isotope composition of the Earth's interior is rarely known due to lack of samples. Previous theoretical and experimental results are insufficient because they presume the spin state of iron or they are based on relatively low quality experimental data. Here we will use a newly developed technique --NRIXS(Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering)-- to measure the force constant of lower mantle mineral candidates ferropericlase and pervoskite at relevant pressure. A reliable iron isotope fractionation factor will then be derived using SciPhon, which is a software designed specifically for the isotope fractionation factor derivation from NRIXS data. We report new high pressure 57Fe NRIXS spectra collected at beamline 3 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source, with the aim to understand the pressure effect on iron isotope fractionation. The experiments were conducted using a 3-fold Diamond Anvil Cell and a >95% 57Fe enriched sample fp25((Fe0.25Mg0.75)O). NRIXS spectra were collected by tuning the x-ray energy range within ± 200meV around the 57Fe resonant energy of 14.4125keV. We will present the force constants and derived iron isotope fractionation factors of ferropericlase. It is expected that pressure will have an effect on the iron isotope fractionation factor and should be taken into account when modeling isotope fractionation of planetary scale and when using iron isotope systems to constrain the planetary differentiation. We will also use first-principle studies and geochemical observations to study the Fe,O,Si isotope system in the deep Earth. Our ultimate goal is to build a self-consistent geophysical and geochemical model that can be used in deciphering the mystery of Earth's history.

  9. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  10. Laser system for isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirayama, Shimpey; Mikatsura, Takefumi; Ueda, Hiroaki; Konagai, Chikara

    1990-06-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J), a joint Japanese utility companies research organization, was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment. Based on research results obtained from Japanese National Labs, and Universities , Laser-J is now constructing an AVLIS experimental facility at Tokai-mura. It is planned to have a 1-ton swu capacity per year in 1991. Previous to the experimental facility construction , Toshiba proceeded with the preliminary testing of an isotope separation system, under contract with Laser-J. Since the copper vapor laser (CVL) and the dye laser (DL) form a good combination , which can obtain high power tunable visible lights ,it is suitable to resonate uranium atoms. The laser system was built and was successfully operated in Toshiba for two years. The system consist of three copper vapor lasers , three dye lasers and appropriate o Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J) , a joint Japanese utility companies research organization , was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment

  11. Fission of rotating fermium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the process of fission of even fermium isotopes, on the basis of their rotational states. The nuclear intrinsic vorticity and its coupling to the global rotation of the nucleus are used to simulate the interaction between the rotational motion and the pairing field, and lead to pairing quenching in the case of higher angular momentum states. The rotation leads to a decreasing of the fission barrier heights. The ingredients of the model—ground state fission barriers, pairing correlation energies and the cranking moments of inertia—are obtained within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework using the Skyrme \\text{Sk}{{\\text{M}}^{*}} energy density functional. Fission barriers and half-lives are estimated for spins I up to I = 16ℏ.

  12. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  13. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    PubMed

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  14. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Cyriac, Annu; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-05-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that for 244,246,248Cf isotopes highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z = 82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z = 80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z = 50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with mass number A ≤ 250 and symmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with A > 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A = 252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitting. The individual yields obtained for the cold fission of 252Cf isotope are compared with the experimental data taken from the γ- γ- γ coincidences technique using Gammasphere.

  15. A carbon isotope mass balance for an anoxic marine sediment: Isotopic signatures of diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    A carbon isotope mass balance was determined for the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC to constrain the carbon budgets published previously. The diffusive, ebullitive and burial fluxes of sigma CO2 and CH4, as well as the carbon isotope signatures of these fluxes, were measured. The flux-weighted isotopic signature of the remineralized carbon (-18.9 plus or minus 2.7 per mil) agreed with the isotopic composition of the remineralized organic carbon determined from the particulate organic carbon (POC) delta(C-13) profiles (-19.2 plus or minus 0.2), verifying the flux and isotopic signature estimates. The measured delta(C-13) values of the sigma CO2 and CH4 diffusive fluxes were significantly different from those calculated from porewater gradients. The differences appear to be influenced by methane oxidation at the sediment-water interface, although other potential processes cannot be excluded. The isotope mass balance provides important information concerning the locations of potential diagenetic isotope effects. Specifically, the absence of downcore change in the delta(C-13) value of the POC fraction and the identical isotopic composition of the POC and the products of remineralization indicate that no isotopic fractionation is expressed during the initial breakdown of the POC, despite its isotopically heterogeneous composition.

  16. Carbon isotope controlled molecular switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Brian K.

    Single molecules represent one fundamental limit to the downscaling of electronics. As a prototype element for carbon-based nanoscale science and technology, the detailed behavior of carbon monoxide (CO) on the copper surface Cu(111) has been investigated. These investigations span from individual carbon isotope resolution, to single molecules, to compact clusters assembled by molecular manipulation via a homemade scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Sub-nanoscale devices, composed of only a few molecules, which exploit both lone CO properties and molecule-molecule interaction, have been designed and assembled. The devices function as bi-stable switches and can serve as classical bits with densities > 50 Tbits/cm2. Operated in the nuclear mass sensitive regime, each switch can also function as a molecular "centrifuge" capable of identifying the isotope of a single carbon atom in real-time. A model, based on electron-vibron couping and inelastic tunneling, has been developed and explains the dynamic behavior of the switch. The interaction between pairs of switches was also explored and it was found that their behavior ranges from completely independent to strongly coupled. Larger nanostructures, which were composed of many sub-switches organized to leverage the fully coupled interaction, link two spatially separated "bits" on the surface. Such a linked system can set or read a state non-locally, which is equivalent to bidirectional information transfer. The linked system has also exhibited logic functionality. These experiments demonstrate scalable molecular cells for information storage, and for information processing through cellular automata logic schemes.

  17. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  18. Isotopic composition of Silurian seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Knauth, L.P.; Kealy, S.; Larimer, S.

    1985-01-01

    Direct isotopic analyses of 21 samples of the Silurian hydrosphere preserved as fluid inclusions in Silurian halite deposits in the Michigan Basin Salina Group yield delta/sup 18/O, deltaD ranging from 0.2 to +5.9 and -26 to -73, respectively. delta/sup 18/O has the same range as observed for modern halite facies evaporite waters and is a few per thousand higher than 100 analyses of fluid inclusions in Permian halite. deltaD is about 20 to 30 per thousand lower than modern and Permian examples. The trajectory of evaporating seawater on a deltaD-delta/sup 18/O diagram initially has a positive slope of 3-6, but hooks strongly downward to negative values, the shape of the hook depending upon humidity. Halite begins to precipitate at delta values similar to those observed for the most /sup 18/O rich fluid inclusions. Subsequent evaporation yields progressively more negative delta values as observed for the fluid inclusions. The fluid inclusion data can be readily explained in terms of evaporating seawater and are consistent with the degree of evaporation deduced from measured bromide profiles. These data are strongly inconsistent with arguments that Silurian seawater was 5.5 per thousand depleted in /sup 18/O. delta/sup 18/O for evaporite waters is systematically related to that of seawater, and does not show a -5.5 per thousand shift in the Silurian, even allowing for variables which affect the isotope evaporation trajectory. The lower deltaD may indicate a component of gypsum dehydration waters or may suggest a D-depleted Silurian hydrosphere.

  19. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  20. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Activities for this quarter include: method development -- investigation of selective fractionation. Three petroleum atmospheric still bottoms (ASBs) were separated by distillation and solubility fractionation to determine the homogeneity of the carbon isotope ratios of the separated fractions. These same three petroleum ASBs and three geographically distinct coals were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min and hydrogenated over a CoMo catalyst at 750{degree}F for 60 min to determine the effects of these treatments on the isotopic compositions of the produce fractions. Twelve coal liquefaction oils were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. These oils were derived from subbituminous and bituminous coals from the first- and second-stage reactors in the thermal/catalytic and modes; validation and application, analysis. Carbon isotope analyses of samples from HRI bench unit coprocessing run 238-2 (Taiheiyo coal/Maya VSB) were analyzed. A method to correct for selective isotopic fractionation was developed and applied to the data. Five coprocessing samples were analyzed at the request of SRI International. 12 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  2. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  3. Stable isotopic characterisation of francolite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, J. M.; Benmore, R. A.; Coleman, M. L.; Soldi, C.; Yeh, H.-W.; O'Brien, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    Stable isotopic data are presented for 112 samples of francolite from 18 separate phosphate deposits. Values of δ 13C and δ 34S in most offshore deposits suggest formation within oxic or suboxic environments either by carbonate replacement or direct precipitation of francolite from water of normal marine compositions. The exceptions are concretionary francolite from Namibia, which has an isotopic composition in keeping with its formation within organic-rich sediments, and that from offshore Morocco, which has an isotopic signature of the anoxic/suboxic interface. Onshore deposits from Jordan, Mexico, South Africa and, possibly, the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the western U.S.A., are substantially depleted in 18O: they appear to be too altered for deductions to be made about their environments of formation. In other onshore deposits which are unaltered, or minimally altered, the isotopic composition suggests that some formed within sulphate-reducing sediments (Sedhura, Morocco) whilst francolite from the Georgina Basin of Australia formed at the oxic/anoxic boundary, where oxidation of biogenic H 2S decreases the δ 34S of pore water. In general, pelletal samples show non-oxic isotopic signatures, whilst non-pelletal samples show oxic isotopic signatures, but samples from Namibia, Peru (Ica Plateau) and the Californian and Moroccan margins are exceptions to this rule. Morphology may therefore be a misleading indicator of francolite genesis as no definitive relation exists between phosphorite type and isotopic signature.

  4. Progress in isotope tracer hydrology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. J.; Edwards, T. W. D.; Birks, S. J.; St Amour, N. A.; Buhay, W. M.; McEachern, P.; Wolfe, B. B.; Peters, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of current research in isotope hydrology, focusing on recent Canadian contributions, is discussed under the headings: precipitation networks, hydrograph separation and groundwater studies, river basin hydrology, lake and catchment water balance, and isotope palaeohydrology from lake sediment records. Tracer-based techniques, relying primarily on the naturally occurring environmental isotopes, have been integrated into a range of hydrological and biogeochemical research programmes, as they effectively complement physical and chemical techniques. A significant geographic focus of Canadian isotope hydrology research has been on the Mackenzie River basin, forming contributions to programmes such as the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment. Canadian research has also directly supported international efforts such as the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation and IAEAs Coordinated Research Project on Large River Basins. One significant trend in Canadian research is toward sustained long-term monitoring of precipitation and river discharge to enable better characterization of spatial and temporal variability in isotope signatures and their underlying causes. One fundamental conclusion drawn from previous studies in Canada is that combined use of 18O and 2H enables the distinction of precipitation variability from evaporation effects, which offers significant advantages over use of the individual tracers alone. The study of hydrological controls on water chemistry is one emerging research trend that stems from the unique ability to integrate isotope sampling within both water quality and water quantity surveys. Copyright

  5. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  6. Stable Isotope Evidence for Planetary Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Mao, W. L.; Schauble, E. A.; Caracas, R.; Reagan, M. M.; Gleason, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary differentiation occurred at high temperature and varying oxygen fugacity, on bodies with varying compositions and internal pressures. The specific conditions at which bodies differentiated and the chemical fingerprints left by differentiation can be investigated by measuring stable isotope ratios in natural samples. Much can be learned by combining those data with experiments that systematically investigate the chemical and physical conditions within differentiating bodies. In this talk we focus on one variable in particular that has not been well defined with respect to stable isotope fractionation: pressure. We will present new iron isotope data on how pressure affects isotope fractionation factors for a number of iron compounds relative to silicate. The processes governing iron isotope fractionation in igneous rocks have been debated extensively over the past decade. Analyses of natural samples show that iron isotopes are fractionated at both the whole rock and mineral scales. This fractionation has been interpreted to be a result of several processes including a possible signature of high pressure core formation. We have collected new high pressure synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering data from Sector 16-ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source on 57Fe enriched Fe, FeO, FeHx and Fe3C. Our data show clear trends with pressure implying that not only does pressure have an effect on the iron isotope beta factors but also a fractionation amongst the alloys. This suggests that depending on the light element in the core, there will be a different resulting signature in the iron isotope record. We will discuss the likelihood of different light elements in the core based on these results, as well as the theoretical predictions for the same phases. Finally, we will present the fractionation expected between metal and silicate at high pressure and high temperature in order to determine if core formation would indeed leave an isotopic signature in

  7. Isotope production in fast reactor blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonarev, A.V.; Koloskov, B.V.; Kochetkov, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    At the BR-10 research reactor radioactive isotopes are produced that are required for the production of radiopharmaceuticals and phosphor 32 used for the synthesis of biochemical labelled compounds. A procedure has been developed of uranium target irradiation followed by radiochemical processing aimed at isotope isolation of molybdenum 99, xenon 133 and iodine 131,132,and 133 isotopes mixture. Irradiation is carried out in a special channel of the radial blanket. The production of cobalt 60 at the BN-600 reactor and facilities are also described.

  8. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, D.-C.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Burton, K.W.; Christensen, J.N.; Gunther, D.

    1999-01-01

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in 87Sr/86Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  9. Theory of the Helium Isotope Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Yerokhin, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    Theory of the isotope shift of the centroid energies of light few-electron atoms is reviewed. Numerical results are presented for the isotope shift of the 2{sup 3}P-2{sup 3}S and 2{sup 1}S-2{sup 3}S transition energies of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. By comparing theoretical predictions for the isotope shift with the experimental results, the difference of the squares of the nuclear charge radii of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, δR{sup 2}, is determined with high accuracy.

  10. SAIL--stereo-array isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Optimal stereospecific and regiospecific labeling of proteins with stable isotopes enhances the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for the determination of the three-dimensional protein structures in solution. Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) offers sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information and the ability to rapidly collect and automatically evaluate the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins up to twice as large as before. This review gives an overview of stable isotope labeling methods for NMR spectroscopy with proteins and provides an in-depth treatment of the SAIL technology.

  11. Titanium Isotopes Provide Clues to Lunar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    The idea that the Moon formed as the result of the giant impact of a Mars-sized impactor with the still-growing Earth explains two central facts about the Earth-Moon system: its total angular momentum (Earth's spin and the Moon's orbital motion), and the sizes of the metallic cores of the Earth (large) and Moon (tiny). This gives cosmochemists some confidence in the hypothesis, but they would greatly appreciate additional compositional tests. One undisputed point is the identical abundance of the three oxygen isotopes in Earth and Moon. Junjun Zhang and colleagues at the University of Chicago (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland) have added another isotopic system to the cosmochemical testing tool kit, titanium isotopes. They find that the ratio of titanium-50 to titanium-47 is identical in Earth and Moon to within four parts per million. In contrast, other solar system materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, vary by considerably more than this-- up to 150 times as much. The identical oxygen and titanium isotopic compositions in Earth and Moon are surprising in light of what we think we know about planet formation and formation of the Moon after a giant impact. The variations in oxygen and titanium isotopes among meteorite types suggest that it is unlikely that the Moon-forming giant impactor would have had the same isotopic composition as the Earth. Simulations show that the Moon ends up constructed mostly (40-75%) from the impactor materials. Thus, the Moon ought to have different isotopic composition than does Earth. The isotopes might have exchanged in the complicated, messy proto-lunar disk (as has been suggested for oxygen isotopes), making them the same. However, Zhang and colleagues suggest that this exchange is unlikely for a refractory element like titanium. Could the impact simulations be greatly overestimating the contributions from the impactor? Was the mixing of building-block materials throughout the inner solar system much less than

  12. Isotopic Fractionation of Selenium Oxyanions in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. K.; Johnson, T. M.

    2004-05-01

    As oxic surface waters pass through aquatic macrophytes and over anoxic sediments in wetlands and lakes, the dissolved Se load often decreases; and, Se isotope ratio measurements can provide information about the mechanisms involved. Previous work on microbially induced isotopic fractionation of Se oxyanions under nearly natural conditions using wetland sediments shows consistent Se isotopic shifts during reduction of Se(VI) and Se(IV) to insoluble Se(0). However, previous isotopic studies of total dissolved selenium in wetlands found little to no isotopic shift as dissolved selenium concentrations decreased. This suggests that plant/algal uptake, followed by deposition and degradation, is the primary route of Se transfer into sediments. However, it is possible that the effective isotopic fractionation between Se in the surface water and Se deposited into sediments is somehow much less than the fractionation induced by the reduction reaction, or that cycling of organically bound Se is involved. In this study, we report Se isotope data for Se(VI), Se(IV) and total dissolved Se, Se(T), in surface waters from three wetland/lake sites: Sweitzer Lake, CO; 33-Mile Reservoir, WY; and, a small pond adjacent to Benton Lake, MT. We isolated Se(IV) via hydride generation, and Se(VI) via ion exchange. Se(T), including any organic components, was also analyzed. Isotope analysis was performed on an Isoprobe MC-ICPMS, using a method modified from that of Rouxel et al. (2002). We used the 82Se + 74Se double spike approach, and spiked samples before species separation. Our results for all three locations indicate similar trends in concentration changes and isotopic shifts between the inflow and outflow waters. Se(T) concentrations decrease by 45-70%, and Se(VI) concentrations decrease by 60-90%, whereas Se(IV) concentrations increase by 60-150%. Concomitant 80Se/76Se shifts are +0.5-0.8‰ for Se(T); -0.1-0.5‰ for Se(VI); and +0.4-6.5‰ for Se(IV). These data provide greater

  13. Chlorine isotope fractionation in the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Laube, J C; Kaiser, J; Sturges, W T; Bönisch, H; Engel, A

    2010-09-03

    Chlorinated organic compounds are important contributors to the anthropogenic enhancement of stratospheric ozone depletion. We report measurements of stratospheric isotope fractionation in such a compound. Stratospheric and tropospheric difluorodichloromethane (CF2Cl2) were found to have the largest relative 37Cl/35Cl isotope ratio difference ever measured for a natural compound. The increase of the relative isotope ratio difference with altitude was tightly correlated to the corresponding decrease in the CF2Cl2 mixing ratio. The observed relationship has a high potential to provide new insights into atmospheric chemistry and transport processes.

  14. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  15. New Isotopic Tracers for Shale Gas and Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The combined application of geochemistry, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr), boron isotopes (δ11B), and radium isotopes (228Ra/226Ra) provides a unique methodology for tracing and monitoring shale gas and fracking fluids in the environment.

  16. Newtonian kinetic isotope effects. Observation, prediction, and origin of heavy-atom dynamic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kelmara K; Hirschi, Jennifer S; Singleton, Daniel A

    2009-06-24

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of cyclopentadiene. Substantial isotope effects were observed in three positions, despite the C(2) symmetry of the cycloaddition transition state and the absence of dynamical bottlenecks after this transition state. The observed isotope effects were predicted well from trajectory studies by extrapolating the outcomes of trajectories incorporating superheavy isotopes of carbon, ranging from (20)C to (140)C. Trajectory studies suggest that the isotope effects are unrelated to zero-point energy or the geometrical and momentum properties of the transition state. However, steepest-descent paths in mass-weighted coordinates correctly predict the direction of the isotope effects, supporting a novel origin in Newton's second law of motion.

  17. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  18. Isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in polonium isotopes by atomic-beam laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewska, D.; Bekk, K.; Göring, S.; Hanser, A.; Kälber, W.; Meisel, G.; Rebel, H.

    1991-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a collimated atomic beam has been applied to determine isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure of an isotopic chain of the radioactive element polonium (200Po, 202Po, 204-210Po). The relative isotope shifts show a striking similarity with results for other elements in the vicinity of Pb, even reproducing details of the odd-even staggering.

  19. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  20. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  1. Beam delivery for stable isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Andrew; Strydom, Hendrick J.; Botha, Lourens R.; Ronander, Einar

    2002-10-01

    In the multi-photon dissociation process of Carbon isotope enrichment, IR photons are used to selectively excite a molecule with the given isotopic base element. This enrichment process is very sensitive to the beam's intensity and wavelength. Because the intensity is determined by the propagation of the field, the enrichment factors are also very dependent on the field propagation. In this paper, the influence of the wavelength and intensity of the beam, on the isotope selective dissociation of a CFC compound is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Consideration is also given to some of the factors that influence the delivery of various beams to the reactor chamber, and their subsequent propagation through the reactor. The results show that suitable beam forming can lead to an improved isotope separation process.

  2. Ordinary Chondrite Chondrules: Oxygen Isotope Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, K.; Pack, A.; Hezel, D. C.

    2017-02-01

    Chondrules in some H and LL chondrites show positive/negative correlations between size and oxygen isotopic composition. This indicates that they exchanged oxygen with different oxygen reservoirs and cannot stem from a common chondrule population.

  3. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  4. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N; Leu, A; Muñoz, E; Olsen, J; Kwong, E; Des Marais, D

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4% depleted in 13C relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3% enriched in 13C. The acetate 13C enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6% depleted in 13C, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7%, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7%, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. PMID:2867741

  5. Nucleosynthesis and the Isotopic Composition of Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Various components have been isolated from carbonaceous meteorites with an isotopically anomalous elemental composition. Several of these are generally thought to represent stardust containing a nucleosynthetic record of their birthsites. This paper discusses the expected isotopic composition of stardust based upon astronomical observations and theoretical studies of their birthsites: red giants and supergiants, planetary nebulae, C-rich Wolf-Rayet stars, novae and supernovae. Analyzing the stardust budget, it is concluded that about 15% of the elements will be locked up in stardust components in the interstellar medium. This stardust will be isotopically heterogenous on an individual grain basis by factors ranging from 2 to several orders of magnitude. Since comets may have preserved a relatively unprocessed record of the stardust entering the solar nebula, isotopic studies of returned comet samples may provide valuable information on the nucleosynthetic processes taking place in the interiors of stars and the elemental evolution of the Milky Way.

  6. Possible application of laser isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The laser isotope separation process is described and its special economic features discussed. These features are its low cost electric power operation, capital investment costs, and the costs of process materials.

  7. Isotope ratio determination in boron analysis.

    PubMed

    Sah, R N; Brown, P H

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, boron (B) isotope ratios have been determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and, to some extent, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both TIMS and SIMS use a high-resolution mass analyzer, but differ in analyte ionization methods. TIMS uses electrons from a hot filament, whereas SIMS employs an energetic primary ion beam of Ga+, Cs+, or O- for analyte ionization. TIMS can be used in negative or positive ion modes with high sensitivity and precision of B isotope ratio determination. However, isobaric interferences may be a problem, if the sample is not well purified and/or memory of the previous sample is not removed. Time-consuming sample preparation, analyte (B) purification, and sample determination processes limit the applications of TIMS for routine analyses. SIMS can determine B and its isotope ratio in intact solid samples without destroying them, but has poorer resolution and sensitivity than TIMS, and is difficult to standardize for biological samples. Development of plasma-source mass spectrometry (MS) enabled the determination of B concentration and isotope ratio without requiring sample purification. Commonly used plasma-source MS uses an Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as an ionization device interfaced to a low-resolution quadrupole mass analyzer. The quadrupole ICP-MS is less precise than TIMS and SIMS, but is a popular method for B isotope ratio determination because of its speed and convenience. B determination by ICP-MS suffers no spectroscopic interferences. However, sample matrices, memory effects, and some instrument parameters may affect the accuracy and precision of B isotope ratio determination if adequate precautions are not taken. New generations of plasma-source MS instruments using high-resolution mass analyzers provide better sensitivity and precision than the currently used quadrupole ICP-MS. Because of the convenience and high sample throughput, the high-resolution ICP-MS is expected to be the

  8. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  9. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-10-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle. 38 references.

  10. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  11. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-03-01

    Research on coprocessing materials/products continued. Major topics reported here are described below. Microautoclave runs are described in which gases and insoluble organic matter produced from five coals and gases produced from three petroleum resids were analyzed to study feedstock/product selective isotopic fractionation. Selective isotopic fractionation was further explored through isotope analysis of the feed New Mexico coal and products from a continuous coal liquefaction run (HRI CC-10 or 227-68). Feeds (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and products from two HRI continuous coprocessing runs (227-54 and 238-12) were analyzed. The results were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation and carbon sourcing was performed for the product fractions. {sup 1}H-NMR and phenolic -OH determinations are reported for all continuous unit samples obtained under this contract. 13 refs., 17 figs., 40 tabs.

  13. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  14. The Most Useful Actinide Isotope: Americium-241.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navratil, James D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed is the discovery, nuclear and chemical properties, and uses of an isotope of Americium (Am-241). Production and separation techniques used in industry are emphasized. Processes are illustrated in flow sheets. (CW)

  15. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  16. The Palladium Isotopic Composition in Iron Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Ru, Mo and Pd are very useful indicators for the identification of nucleosynthetic components. We have developed techniques for Pd isotopes, in an effort to check the extent of isotopic effects in this mass region and for a Pt-group element which is less refractory than Ru. Stable Pd isotopes are produced by the process only (102Pd), the s-process only (104Pd), the process only (Pd-110) and by both the r- and s-processes (Pd-105, Pd-106, Pd-108). Kelly and Wasserburg reported a hint of a shift in 102Pd (approx. 25(epsilon)u; 1(epsilon)u (triple bonds) 0.01%) in Santa Clara. Earlier searches for Mo and Ru isotopic anomalies were either positive or negative.

  17. Mercury Isotopes in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Sherman, Laura S.; Johnson, Marcus W.

    2014-05-01

    Virtually all biotic, dark abiotic, and photochemical transformations of mercury (Hg) produce Hg isotope fractionation, which can be either mass dependent (MDF) or mass independent (MIF). The largest range in MDF is observed among geological materials and rainfall impacted by anthropogenic sources. The largest positive MIF of Hg isotopes (odd-mass excess) is caused by photochemical degradation of methylmercury in water. This signature is retained through the food web and measured in all freshwater and marine fish. The largest negative MIF of Hg isotopes (odd-mass deficit) is caused by photochemical reduction of inorganic Hg and has been observed in Arctic snow and plant foliage. Ratios of MDF to MIF and ratios of 199Hg MIF to 201Hg MIF are often diagnostic of biogeochemical reaction pathways. More than a decade of research demonstrates that Hg isotopes can be used to trace sources, biogeochemical cycling, and reactions involving Hg in the environment.

  18. New accelerator to bridge isotope gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2010-08-01

    The TRIUMF nuclear- and particle-physics lab in British Columbia in Canada is to build an extremely intense electron linear accelerator to produce radioactive isotopes for fundamental research and medicine.

  19. Carbon isotope effects associated with autotrophic acetogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelwicks, J.T.; Risatti, J.B.; Hayes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon kinetic isotope effects associated with synthesis of acetate from CO2 and H2 during autotrophic growth of Acetobacterium woodii at 30??C have been measured by isotopic analyses of CO2, methyl-carbon, and total acetate. Closed systems allowing construction of complete mass balances at varying stages of growth were utilized, and the effects of the partitioning of carbon between CO2 and HCO3- were taken into account. For the overall reaction, total carbonate ??? total acetate, isotope effects measured in replicate experiments ranged from -59.0 ?? 0.9% to - 57.2 ?? 2.3z%. Taking into account all measurements, the weighted mean and standard deviation are -58.6 ?? 0.7%. There is no evidence for intramolecular ordering in the acetate. The carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary acetate, otherwise expected to be near that of sedimentary organic carbon, is likely to be depleted in environments in which autotrophic acetogenesis is occurring. ?? 1989.

  20. Isotope Engineering of Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, F.; Kramberger, Ch.; Pfeiffer, R.; Kuzmany, H.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Singer, P. M.; Alloul, H.

    2005-06-01

    The synthesis of a unique isotope engineered system, double-wall carbon nanotubes with natural carbon outer and highly 13C enriched inner walls, is reported from isotope enriched fullerenes encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The material allows the observation of the D line of the highly defect-free inner tubes that can be related to a curvature induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling. Ab initio calculations explain the inhomogeneous broadening of inner tube Raman modes due to the distribution of different isotopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance shows a significant contrast of the isotope enriched inner SWCNTs compared to other carbon phases and provides a macroscopic measure of the inner tube mass content. The high curvature of the small diameter inner tubes manifests in an increased distribution of the chemical shift tensor components.

  1. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  2. Stable Isotope Systematics of Martian Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairen, A.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine isotopic compositions in HCl released during evolved gas analysis (EGA) runs have been detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover ranging from approximately -9‰ to -50‰ δ37Cl, with two spatially and isotopically separated groups of samples averaging -15‰ and -45‰. These extremely low values are the first such detection of any known natural material; common terrestrial values very rarely exceed ±5‰, and the most extreme isotopic signature yet detected elsewhere in the solar system are values of around +24‰ on the Moon. The only other known location in the solar system with large negative chlorine isotopes is the Atacama Desert, where perchlorate with -14‰ δ37Cl has been detected. The Atacama perchlorate has unusual Δ17O signatures associated with it, indicating a formation mechanism involving O3, which suggests an atmospheric origin of the perchlorate and associated large isotopic anomalies. Identification of non-zero positive Δ17O signatures in the O2 released during EGA runs would allow definitive evidence for a similar process having occurred on Mars. Perchlorate is thought to be the most likely source of HCl in EGA runs due to the simultaneous onset of O2 release. If perchlorate is indeed the HCl source, atmospheric chemistry could be responsible for the observed isotopic anomalies, with variable extents of perchlorate production producing the isotopic variability. However, chloride salts have also been observed to release HCl upon heating; if the timing of O2 release is merely coincidental, observed HCl could be coming from chlorides. At thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor of perchlorate reduction is 0.93, meaning that differing amounts of post-deposition reduction of isotopically normal perchlorate to chloride could account for the highly variable Cl isotopes. Additionally, post-deposition reduction could account for the difference between the two Cl isotopic groups if perchlorate

  3. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  4. IBFM for Ba isotopes and chaoticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cáta-Danil, G.; Ivasçu, M.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Ur, C. A.

    1992-06-01

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes121Ba to131Ba. The results indicate, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 123), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive parity states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations.

  5. IBFM for barium isotopes and chaoticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Ivascu, M.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; UR, C. A.

    Fluctuation properties have been analysed for the energy levels predicted by IBFM calculations in the Ba isotopes 121Ba to 131Ba. The results are indicating, in general, a situation which is close to the chaotic limit. For the lighter isotopes studied (121 and 131), a phase transition is obtained in the low-spin, positive states, from a situation close to regularity at low excitation energies, towards chaoticity at higher excitations.

  6. Biogeochemistry of the stable hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Marilyn F.; Hoering, Thomas C.

    1980-08-01

    The fractionation of H isotopes between the water in the growth medium and the organically bonded H from microalgae cultured under conditions, where light intensity and wavelength, temperature, nutrient availability, and the H isotope ratio of the water were controlled, is reproducible and light dependant. All studies were based either on the H isotope ratios of the total organic H or on the lipids, where most of the H is firmly bonded to C. H bonded into other macromolecules, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, does not exchange with water, when algae are incubated in water enriched with deuterium. Only after the destruction of quaternary H bonds are labile hydrogens in macromolecules free to exchange with water. By growing algae (18 strains), including blue-green algae, green algae and diatoms, in continuous light, the isotope fractionations in photosynthesis were reproducibly -93 to -178 %. depending on the organism tested. This fractionation was not temperature dependent. Microalgae grown in total darkness with an organic substrate did not show the isotope fractionation seen in cells grown in light. In both light- and dark-grown algae, however, additional depletion of deuterium (-30 to -60%.) in cellular organic matter occurs during the metabolism of carbohydrates to form lipids. Plants from several natural populations also fractionated isotopes during photosynthesis by an average of -90 to -110%. In addition, the organically bonded H in nonsaponifiable lipids was further fractionated by -80%. from that in saponifiable lipids, isolated from two geographically distinct populations of marsh plants. This difference between H isotope ratios of these two groups of lipids provides an endogenous isotopic marker.

  7. The Marine Biogeochemistry of Zinc Isotopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton , natural plankton, and seawater. By measuring Zn isotopes in a diverse array of...chemical processes that have acted upon Zn atoms. The growth of phytoplankton in the oceans, chemical adsorption to sinking particles, the circulation of...Dolgopolova et al., 2006), cultured phytoplankton (G6labert et al., 2006), and seawater (Bermin et al., 2006). 1.2 Zinc stable isotope analysis Zinc has

  8. Isotope shortage triggers delays for patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Paula

    2009-07-01

    An unplanned shutdown of a nuclear reactor in Canada is disrupting the supply of medical isotopes across North America and forcing some hospitals to cancel or postpone patients' tests. The closure of the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor in Chalk River, Ontario, has also embarrassed Canadian officials, including a senior government minister who was forced to apologize after calling the isotope shortage a "sexy" career challenge.

  9. Isotopic studies in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of lunar soil samples returned by Apollo 11 and 12 flights are discussed. Isotopic studies of the rare gases from Apollo 11 flight lunar samples are presented. The lunar soil analyses indicated the following: (1) high concentrations of solar wind rare gases, (2) isotopic match between solar wind gases and gas components in gas-rich meteorites, and (3) rare gases attributable to spallation reactions induced in heavier nuclides by cosmic ray particles.

  10. Nickel isotopic composition of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Louise; Williams, Helen M.; Halliday, Alex N.; Kerr, Andrew C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed high-precision study of Ni isotope variations in mantle peridotites and their minerals, komatiites as well as chondritic and iron meteorites. Ultramafic rocks display a relatively large range in δ60 Ni (permil deviation in 60 Ni /58 Ni relative to the NIST SRM 986 Ni isotope standard) for this environment, from 0.15 ± 0.07‰ to 0.36 ± 0.08‰, with olivine-rich rocks such as dunite and olivine cumulates showing lighter isotope compositions than komatiite, lherzolite and pyroxenite samples. The data for the mineral separates shed light on the origin of these variations. Olivine and orthopyroxene display light δ60 Ni whereas clinopyroxene and garnet are isotopically heavy. This indicates that peridotite whole-rock δ60 Ni may be controlled by variations in modal mineralogy, with the prediction that mantle melts will display variable δ60 Ni values due to variations in residual mantle and cumulate mineralogy. Based on fertile peridotite xenoliths and Phanerozoic komatiite samples it is concluded that the upper mantle has a relatively homogeneous Ni isotope composition, with the best estimate of δ60Nimantle being 0.23 ± 0.06‰ (2 s.d.). Given that >99% of the Ni in the silicate Earth is located in the mantle, this also defines the Ni isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE). This value is nearly identical to the results obtained for a suite of chondrites and iron meteorites (mean δ60 Ni 0.26 ± 0.12‰ and 0.29 ± 0.10‰, respectively) showing that the BSE is chondritic with respect to its Ni isotope composition, with little to no Ni mass-dependent isotope fractionation resulting from core formation.

  11. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  12. Global Isotopic Signatures of Oceanic Island Basalts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Bioko [5] 17,18 Pagalu [1] 18 Principe [3] 18 Sao Tom6 [9] 17,18 Cape Verde Islands [411 Fogo [61 14 Maio 19] 8,14 Sao Antao [10] 8,14 Sao Tiago [13] 14...A. ZINDLER, S. R. HART, T. LESLIE, C.-Y. CHEN and 1). CLAGUE. 1984. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotope

  13. Isotopic delta values of molybdenum reference solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanjie; Carignan, Jean; Cloquet, Christophe; Zhu, Xiangkun; Zhang, Yuxu

    2010-05-01

    We report the isotopic composition of five molybdenum (Mo) standard reference solutions and four fractions from one of these solutions eluted through anion resin column relative to a sixth reference solution. Measurements were conducted using Isoprobe multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) at the Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques (France) and Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS at either the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon (France) or the Laboratory of Isotope Geology in the Ministry of Land and Resources (China). The sample-standard bracketing method was employed to correct the mass bias for Mo isotopes during instrumental measurement. Except for the Merck Mo solution, all the Mo solutions were identical in isotopic composition within error. Although the JMC Mo solution has been used as the internal reference material by various groups, uncertainty may still occur with different lot numbers and availability might be limited. Here, we propose the NIST 3134 Mo solution as a new candidate for delta zero reference material, used for reporting Mo isotopic composition of natural samples. Isotopic compositions for four eluted fractions of the Sigma-Aldrich Mo solution range from 2.2 ‰ to -2.0 ‰ for δ97/95Mo relative to the NIST Mo standard. These values span the range of reported isotopic composition for natural terrestrial and experimental samples (approximately -0.5‰ to 1.6‰ for δ97/95Mo). We propose these eluted fractions to be used as secondary reference for Mo isotope measurements.

  14. IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holden, N.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Wieser, M.E.; Singleton, G.; Walczyk, T.; Yoneda, S.; Mahaffy, P.G.; Tarbox, L.V.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 150 years, the Periodic Table of the Elements has served as a guide to the world of elements by highlighting similarities and differences in atomic structure and chemical properties. To introduce students, teachers, and society to the existence and importance of isotopes of the chemical elements, an IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes (IPTI) has been prepared and can be found as a supplement to this issue.

  15. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  16. Isotopic discrimination of zinc in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D J; Mason, T F D; Zhao, F J; Kirk, G J D; Coles, B J; Horstwood, M S A

    2005-03-01

    * The extent of isotopic discrimination of transition metals in biological processes is poorly understood but potentially has important applications in plant and biogeochemical studies. * Using multicollector inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, we measured isotopic fractionation of zinc (Zn) during uptake from nutrient solutions by rice (Oryza sativa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants. * For all three species, the roots showed a similar extent of heavy Zn enrichment relative to the nutrient solution, probably reflecting preferential adsorption on external root surfaces. By contrast, a plant-species specific enrichment of the light Zn isotope occurred in the shoots, indicative of a biological, membrane-transport controlled uptake into plant cells. The extent of the fractionation in the shoots further depended on the Zn speciation in the nutrient solution. * The observed isotopic depletion in heavy Zn from root to shoot (-0.13 to -0.26 per atomic mass unit) is equivalent to roughly a quarter of the total reported terrestrial variability of Zn isotopic compositions (c. 0.84 per atomic mass unit). Plant uptake therefore represents an important source of isotopic variation in biogeochemical cycling of Zn.

  17. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  18. Uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis using MGA++

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W; Clark, D; Friensehner, A; Parker, W; Raschke, K; Romine, W; Ruhter, W; Wang, T-F; kreek, S

    1998-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory develops sophisticated gamma-ray analysis codes for the isotopic analysis of nuclear materials based on the principles used in the original MultiGroup Analysis (MGA) code. Over the years, the MGA methodology has been upgraded and expanded far beyond its original capabilities and is now comprised of a suite of codes known as MGA++. The early MGA code analyzed Pu gamma-ray data collected with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to yield Pu isotopic ratios. While the original MGA code relied solely on the lower-energy gamma rays (around 100 keV), the most recent addition to the MGA++ code suite, MGAHI, analyzes Pu data using higher-energy gamma rays (200 keV and higher) and is particulatly useful for Pu samples - that are enclosed in thick-walled containers. The MGA++ suite also includes capabilities to perform U isotopic analysis on data collected with either HPGe or cadmium-zinc-tellutide (CZT) detectors. These codes are commercially available and are known as U235 and CZTU, respectively. A graphical user interface has also been developed for viewing the data and the fitting procedure. In addition, we are developing new codes that will integrate into the MGA++ suite. These will include Pu isotopic analysis capabilities for data collected with CZT detectors, U isotopic analysis with HPGe detectors which utilizes only higher energy gamma rays, and isotopic analyses on mixtures of Pu and U.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application an authentic continuous-unit products. The experimental details used for stable carbon isotope analyses by the organization that performs most of those analyses under this contract are described. A method was developed previously under this contract to correct the carbon sourcing calculations performed from stable carbon isotope analyses for selective isotopic fractionation. The method relies on three assumptions. This quarter, a study was completed to define the sensitivity of the carbon sourcing results to errors in the assumptions. Carbon contents and carbon isotope ratios were determined for the available feeds and product fractions from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 238-10 (Texas lignite/Hondo vacuum still bottoms (VSB), Texas lignite/Cold Lake VSB and Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB). These data were used for carbon sourcing calculations and individual feedstock conversion calculations. A previously devised means for correcting for selective isotope fractionation was applied. 6 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Isotopic tracing of perchlorate in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Gu, Baohua; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Jackson, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic data can be used for tracing the origin and behavior of ClO4- in the environment. Four independently varying parameters have been measured on individual ClO4- samples for this purpose: delta 37Cl, 18O, 17O, and 36Cl/Cl. At least three distinct types of ClO4- have been identified isotopically, and these distinctions have proven to be useful in forensic applications. Additional data for natural ClO4- are urgently needed, however, to obtain a global picture of its isotopic variations. Improved methods for sample preparation and isotopic analysis with much better sensitivity would be helpful for measuring ClO4- isotopic variations in some sample types such as aerosols and precipitation as well as foodstuffs and bodily fluids, which have been precluded by the impracticality of obtaining the currently-required milligram amounts of ClO4-.. Further experimental and theoretical investigations of atmospheric ClO4- production mechanisms may lead to improved explanations of observed isotopic variations in natural samples.

  1. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  2. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions. These

  3. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  4. Grosnaja ABCs: Magnesium isotope compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, G.; Ulyanov, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Three CAI's from the Grosnaja CV3 chondrite were analyzed for their magnesium isotopic compositions by the ion microprobe. The selected CAI's represent three distinct types: GR4(compact Type A), GR7(Type B) and GR2(Type C). Petrographic studies indicate that all three Grosnaja inclusions were subjected to secondary alterations. The Type A CAI GR4 is primarily composed of melilite with spinel and pyroxene occurring as minor phases. The rim of the inclusion does not exhibit distinct layered structure and secondary alteration products (garnet, Fe-rich olivine and Na-rich plagioclase) are present in some localized areas near the rim region. The average major element compositions of different mineral phases in GR4 are given. Preliminary REE data suggest a depletion of HREE relative to LREE by about a factor of 3 without any clear indication of interelement fractionation. The CAI GR7 has textural and minerological characteristics similar to Type B inclusions. The REE data show a pattern that is similar to Group 6 with enrichment in Eu and Yb. In addition, a depletion of HREE compared to LREE is also evident in this object. Melilite composition shows a broad range of akermanite content (Ak(sub 15-55)). Detailed petrographic study is in progress. GR2 is a anorthite-rich Type C inclusion with large plagioclase laths intergrown with Ti-rich pyroxene. The average plagioclase composition is close to pure anorthite (An99).

  5. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  6. Chemical stability of levoglucosan: an isotopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xuefang; Gensch, Iulia; Schlag, Patrick; Wildt, Juergen; Laumer, Werner; Kammer, Beatrix; Tillmann, Ralf; Chitwan, Ojha; Heinichen, Gesa; Kiendler-scharr, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    Levoglucosan, used in receptor models as a specific tracer of biomass burning aerosols, has long been considered chemically stable in the atmosphere. Recent laboratory investigations found significant chemical degradation of levoglucosan when exposed to OH radicals (Hennigan et al., 2010). Stable carbon isotopic analyses, complementarily to concentration measurements, can provide additional evidence for physical and chemical processing in the atmosphere, since chemical processing causes changes in the relative abundance between heavy and light isotopes due to kinetic isotope effect (KIE). In this study, the chemical stability of levoglucosan was studied by exploring the isotopic fractionation of the reactant during the oxidation by OH. Mixed particles with levoglucosan and ammonium sulfate were generated in a continuous-stirred flow reactor and exposed to different levels of OH. Levoglucosan chemical degradation as function of OH exposure was derived from the decrease of levoglucosan/(NH4)2SO4 concentration ratios using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). Filter samples were collected for off-line isotopic analyses. Liquid extraction - Gas Chromatography - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (LE-GC-IRMS) was applied to measure stable carbon isotope ratios of levoglucosan. The observed d13C became more positive with increasing OH exposure, showing isotopic fractionations up to 3 ‰ at a reactant conversion of 45%. From the dependence of levoglucosan d13C on the OH exposure, a KIE of 1.00451 was derived, being within the range of predicted values for alkanes and alkenes with the same number of carbon atoms. With known source isotopic composition of levoglucosan in biomass burning aerosol (Sang et al., 2012), ambient measurements of levoglucosan d13C composition can therefore be used to determine the extent of chemical processing at the observation site. Reference: Hennigan, C. J., et al. 2010. Levoglucosan stability in biomass burning particles exposed to hydroxyl radicals

  7. A Cr Isotope Proxy For Ocean Deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C. E.; Scheiderich, K. D.; Amini, M.; Francois, R. H. G. M.; Bacconais, I.

    2015-12-01

    The concentration and distribution of Cr in the oceans is strongly controlled by its oxidation state. Cr(VI) (as soluble chromate) is the dominant oxidation state in oxygenated seawater. Chromate is typically greater than 70% of total dissolved Cr in the open ocean, consistent with thermodynamic predictions. However, lower than average chromate concentrations in coastal seas and oxygen minimum zones suggest that chromate is being removed in these settings by reduction to Cr(III), which favours particle reactive species. Cr is an element whose isotopes are fractionated by redox changes. Reduction of Cr(VI) causes light isotopes of Cr to be enriched in the product Cr(III). Accordingly, any local-scale increase in reductive Cr removal fluxes will cause the seawater Cr concentration to decrease and the δ53Cr value to increase. A recent study of Cr isotopes in the oceans1 supports this prediction. Cr isotopes show a range of δ53Cr values correlating inversely with Cr concentration. The fractionation factor deduced from this correlation is -0.80 ±0.03 ‰ (2s) on a global scale. The difference in solubility of oxidized and reduced Cr in seawater, and the isotopic fractionation between them, is the basis on which the Cr isotope proxy may be used for tracing ocean deoxygenation events in the geological past. More specifically, changes in the size of the chromate inventory of seawater, both locally and globally, should be traceable from reconstructions of seawater-derived Cr isotope variations in marine sedimentary successions. Geological records of Cr isotope changes in the oceans during past deoxygenation events may be used to gauge the impact of global warming on future deoxygenation of the oceans, particularly if proxy records of temperature and ocean pH are also reconstructed. However, study of the modern ocean Cr cycle is still in its early stages, and important knowledge gaps need to be filled going forward. In this talk, we present results of our seawater Cr

  8. Chromium isotope heterogeneity in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiuxing; Qin, Liping; Shen, Ji; Carlson, Richard W.; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Mock, Timothy D.

    2017-04-01

    To better constrain the Cr isotopic composition of the silicate Earth and to investigate potential Cr isotopic fractionation during high temperature geological processes, we analyzed the Cr isotopic composition of different types of mantle xenoliths from diverse geologic settings: fertile to refractory off-craton spinel and garnet peridotites, pyroxenite veins, metasomatised spinel lherzolites and associated basalts from central Mongolia, spinel lherzolites and harzburgites from North China, as well as cratonic spinel and garnet peridotites from Siberia and southern Africa. The δ53CrNIST 979 values of the peridotites range from - 0.51 ± 0.04 ‰ (2SD) to + 0.75 ± 0.05 ‰ (2SD). The results show a slight negative correlation between δ53Cr and Al2O3 and CaO contents for most mantle peridotites, which may imply Cr isotopic fractionation during partial melting of mantle peridotites. However, highly variable Cr isotopic compositions measured in Mongolian peridotites cannot be caused by partial melting alone. Instead, the wide range in Cr isotopic composition of these samples most likely reflects kinetic fractionation during melt percolation. Chemical diffusion during melt percolation resulted in light Cr isotopes preferably entering into the melt. Two spinel websterite veins from Mongolia have extremely light δ53Cr values of - 1.36 ± 0.04 ‰ and - 0.77 ± 0.06 ‰, respectively, which are the most negative Cr isotopic compositions yet reported for mantle-derived rocks. These two websterite veins may represent crystallization products from the isotopically light melt that may also metasomatize some peridotites in the area. The δ53Cr values of highly altered garnet peridotites from southern Africa vary from - 0.35 ± 0.04 ‰ (2SD) to + 0.12 ± 0.04 ‰ (2SD) and increase with increasing LOI (Loss on Ignition), reflecting a shift of δ53Cr to more positive values by secondary alteration. The Cr isotopic composition of the pristine, fertile upper mantle is

  9. Isotopically pure magnesium isotope-24 is prepared from magnesium-24 oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellew, N. R.; Schilb, J. D.; Steunenberg, R. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus is used to prepare isotopically pure magnesium isotope-24, suitable for use in neutron scattering and polarization experiments. The apparatus permits thermal reduction of magnesium-24 oxide with aluminum and calcium oxide, and subsequent vaporization of the product metal in vacuum. It uses a resistance-heated furnace tube and cap assembly.

  10. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  11. LANL-IPF responses to isotopes workshop background information survey

    SciTech Connect

    Nortier, Francois Meiring

    2008-01-01

    Responses to the following are provided: (A) Which isotopes do you (company, agency, university, community) currently use in your activities or distribute (repackage) to end-users? (B) Describe generally what these isotopes are used for, i.e. the science or application. (C) Which isotope(s) do you anticipate may have significant future increase in demand. Identify the isotope(s), its priority, possible chemical form and for what purpose it would be used. (D) Are there other isotopes that you might use but are currently unavilable or not available in difficient quantities? If so, please identify this isotope, from whom have you tired to obtain it and for what prupose would it be used. (E) Do you have any specific issues with respect to the purity, availability, reliability of supply, etc. of isotopes at present?

  12. Isotopic inferences of ancient biochemistries - Carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schidlowski, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In processes of biological incorporation and subsequent biochemical processing sizable isotope effects occur as a result of both thermodynamic and kinetic fractionations which take place during metabolic and biosynthetic reactions. In this chapter a review is provided of earlier work and recent studies on isotope fractionations in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, hydrogen, and nitrogen. Attention is given to the biochemistry of carbon isotope fractionation, carbon isotope fractionation in extant plants and microorganisms, isotope fractionation in the terrestrial carbon cycle, the effects of diagenesis and metamorphism on the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon, the isotopic composition of sedimentary carbon through time, implications of the sedimentary carbon isotope record, the biochemistry of sulfur isotope fractionation, pathways of the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, and the D/H ratio in naturally occurring materials.

  13. Nuclear Volume Effects in Equilibrium Stable Isotope Fractionations of Hg, Tl and Pb Isotope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many evidences showed that heavy isotope systems could be significantly fractionated as the consequence of the nuclear volume effect (NVE) or so-called nuclear field shift effect. Here we investigate NVEs of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems by using quantum chemistry computational methods with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wavefunction. Our results generally agree with previous studies but with noticeable differences in many cases. With the unique NVE driving force, equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg and 205Tl/203Tl isotopes can be fractionated up to 3.94‰ and 2.78‰ at 0℃, respectively, showing potentially large equilibrium isotope fractionations can be expected for future studies of these two isotope systems. Moreover, the NVE causes large mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆199NVHg and ∆201NVHg) and small MIFs for even-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆200NVHg). For Pb isotope system, NVEs induce isotope fractionations up to 1.62‰ (207Pb/206Pb) and 4.06‰ (208Pb/206Pb) at 0℃. However, contributions from classical mass-dependent driving force are small, about 0.1-0.5‰ for 207Pb/206Pb and 0.2-0.9‰ for 208Pb/206Pb. We find that Pb4+-bearing species can be significantly enriched heavy isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species. Comparing to Pb0, Pb2+-bearing species even enrich lighter Pb isotopes. A very strange and interesting thing is that the beta value of Pb2+-bearing species can be smaller than the unity (1.000). Similar thing has been found on Tl+-bearing species. This is an impossible and unexplained situation if only based on classical mass-dependent isotope fractionation theory (e.g., Bigeleisen-Mayer equation). The consequence is that the different direction of beta values of Pb2+-bearing species will let the Pb isotope fractionation even larger when they fractionate with Pb4+-bearing species. Moreover, NVEs also cause mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of odd 207Pb

  14. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of Iron Meteorites, Chondrites and Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H.; Walker, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent Mo isotopic studies of meteorites reported evidence for differences in isotopic compositions for whole rocks of some primitive and differentiated meteorites relative to terrestrial materials. Enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes of up to 3-4 units (e unit = parts in 10(exp 4) over s-process dominated isotopes are the most prominent features. Certain types of presolar grains show large enrichments in s-process isotopes, however, it was concluded on grounds of mass balance that incomplete digestion of such grains cannot explain the enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes in whole rocks of primitive chondrites. If the reported variability in r- and p-process isotope enrichments reflects the true isotopic characteristics of the whole rocks, the implications are quite profound. It would suggest the presence of large scale Mo isotopic heterogeneity within the solar accretion disk with likely collateral effects for other elements. However, such effects were not found for Ru isotopes, nor for Zr isotopes. Another recent Mo isotopic study by multi collector ICP-MS could not confirm the reported deviations in Allende, Murchison or iron meteorites. Here, we present new results for the Mo isotopic composition of iron meteorites, chondrites and CAIs obtained by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS). We discuss analytical aspects and the homogeneity of Mo isotopic compositions in solar system materials.

  15. Fractal Hierarchy in Isotopic Positional Correlations in Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2007-03-01

    From subatomic particles to superclusters of galaxies, nature has nested hierarchial fractal-like organization (R.L. Oldershaw). Earlier I discussed formation of isotopic superlattices due to self organizational dynamics among isotopes (A.A. Berezin, SolidStComm, 1988). Informationally (in spirit of ``Maxwell's demon'' engine), formation of isotopic superlattices can be inferred from Maximum Entropy Principle (C.E. Shannon, E.T. Jaynes). In spite that effects of gravitation for isotopes (due to their nuclear mass difference) are very small, they can, nevertheless, manifest in such subtle effects as gravitationally-induced reduction (collapse) of wave functions (F. Karolyhazy, R. Penrose, A.A. Berezin). Since Planck mass (which is combination of h, G and c) is about 0.02 mg, size of desired isotopic fluctuation should be about 100 mkm (mesoscipic). Experimentally, isotopic correlations, micron and sub-millimeter isotopic fluctuations, isotopic clusters and isotopic fractal-type distribution can be probed by Rayleigh scattering (sampling at various wavelengths) and/or such high electric field effects as hopping conductivity (B. Ya. Shklovsky) in which isotopic clusters act as trapping or scattering centers. Other aspects of purposeful isotopic structuring (isotopic engineering) include isotopic fiber optics (A.A. Berezin) when core and cladding has varied (step or gradual) isotopic content which causes total internal reflection and light confinement.

  16. Iron Isotopic Fractionation in Early Planetary Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Moynier, F.; Dauphas, N.; Barrat, J.; Day, J. M.; Sio, C.; Korotev, R. L.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Differentiated meteorites (achondrites) derive from planetary bodies that experienced variable degrees of melting and silicate-metal segregation. The oldest achondrites, such as eucrites, angrites, brachinites and the oligoclase-rich meteorites Graves Nunataks 06128/06129 (GRA 06128/9), were formed ~2-5 Ma after the first Solar System solids. They represent the oldest differentiated silicate samples known in the Solar System and the study of these samples provides insight on the origins and conditions of formation of the first planetary crusts. Here, we present new high-precision data for the Fe isotopic compositions of eucrites, angrites, brachinites and GRA 06128/9 and interpret these results in terms of magmatism during formation of these samples. We find that most eucrites and brachinites are not fractionated compared to undifferentiated chondritic meteorites (δ56Fe = 0.00±0.01, 2se), while the rare Stannern-trend eucrites are slightly enriched in the heavier isotopes of Fe. Angrites are also enriched in the heavier isotopes (δ56Fe = 0.12±0.01, 2se), similar to what is observed for terrestrial basalts, reflecting the relatively high oxidation states of the angrite parent body(ies). Contrastingly to the 'basaltic' achondrites, GRA 06128/9 are enriched in light isotopes of Fe (δ56Fe = -0.08±0.02, 2se). Evidence for light Fe isotope enrichments may be the consequence of the segregation of magma rich in sulphide (usually enriched in light isotopes of Fe compared to silicate and metal in undifferentiated meteorites). If correct, this result not only confirms that GRA 06128/9 represent products from <30% partial melting of an asteroidal body, prior to core formation, but also indicates complementary Fe isotope systematics between GRA 06128/9 and brachinites.

  17. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    PubMed

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  18. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-10-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  19. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large ∆44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  20. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    PubMed Central

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  1. Isotope distribution program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with emphasis on medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, H.L.

    1987-02-26

    The Isotope Distribution Program (IDP) is a group of individual activities with separate and diverse DOE sponsors which share the common mission of the production and distribution of isotope products and the performance of isotope-related services. Its basic mission is to provide isotope products and associated services to the user community by utilizing government-owned facilities that are excess to the primary mission of the DOE. The IDP is in its 41st year of operation. Initially, the program provided research quantities of radioactive materials, and through the 1950's it was the major supplier of radioisotopes for both research and commercial application. Distribution of enriched stable isotopes began in 1954. This paper discusses the use of radioisotopes in medicine and the role that ORNL plays in this field.

  2. Palladium Isotopic Evidence for Nucleosynthetic and Cosmogenic Isotope Anomalies in IVB Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Wittig, Nadine; Humayun, Munir; Leya, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    The origin of ubiquitous nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies in meteorites may represent spatial and/or temporal heterogeneity in the sources that supplied material to the nascent solar nebula, or enhancement by chemical processing. For elements beyond the Fe peak, deficits in s-process isotopes have been reported in some (e.g., Mo, Ru, W) but not all refractory elements studied (e.g., Os) that, among the iron meteorites, are most pronounced in IVB iron meteorites. Palladium is a non-refractory element in the same mass region as Mo and Ru. In this study, we report the first precise Pd isotopic abundances from IVB irons to test the mechanisms proposed for the origin of isotope anomalies. First, this study determined the existence of a cosmogenic neutron dosimeter from the reaction 103Rh(n, β-)104Pd in the form of excess 104Pd, correlated with excess 192Pt, in IVB irons. Second, all IVB irons show a deficit of the s-process only isotope 104Pd (\\varepsilon 104Pd = -0.48 ± 0.24), an excess of the r-only isotope 110Pd (\\varepsilon 110Pd = +0.46 ± 0.12), and no resolvable anomaly in the p-process 102Pd (\\varepsilon 102Pd = +1 ± 1). The magnitude of the Pd isotope anomaly is about half that predicted from a uniform depletion of the s-process yields from the correlated isotope anomalies of refractory Mo and Ru. The discrepancy is best understood as the result of nebular processing of the less refractory Pd, implying that all the observed nucleosynthetic anomalies in meteorites are likely to be isotopic relicts. The Mo-Ru-Pd isotope systematics do not support enhanced rates of the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg neutron source for the solar system s-process.

  3. Resolving the stellar sources of isotopically rare presolar silicate grains through Mg and Fe isotopic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Messenger, Scott

    2014-04-01

    We conducted multi-element isotopic analyses of 11 presolar silicate grains from the Acfer 094 meteorite having unusual O isotopic compositions. Eight grains are {sup 18}O-rich, one is {sup 16}O-rich, and two are extremely {sup 17}O-rich. We constrained the grains' stellar sources by measuring their Si and Mg isotopic ratios, and also the {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe and {sup 57}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios for five grains. The Mg and Fe isotopic measurements were conducted after surrounding matrix grains were removed for more accurate ratios. Most of the {sup 18}O-rich silicates had anomalous Mg isotopic ratios, and their combined isotopic constraints are consistent with origins in low-mass Type II supernovae (SNe II) rather than high-metallicity stars. The isotopic ratios of the {sup 16}O-rich silicate are also consistent with an SN origin. Mixing small amounts of interior stellar material with the stellar envelope replicated all measured isotopic ratios except for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si and {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe in some grains. The {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si ratios of all SN-derived grains are matched by doubling the {sup 29}Si yield in the Ne- and Si-burning zones. The {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios of the grains imply elemental fractionation in the Si/S zone, or introduction of isotopically solar Fe by secondary processing. The two highly {sup 17}O-rich silicates exhibited significant {sup 25}Mg and/or {sup 26}Mg enrichments and their isotopic ratios are best explained by strong dilution of 1.15 M {sub ☉} CO nova matter. We estimate that ∼12% and 1% of presolar silicates have SN and nova origins, respectively, similar to presolar SiC and oxides. This implies that asymptotic giant branch stars are the dominant dust producers in the galaxy.

  4. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. Results: The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given ‘expert’ selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using

  5. Myths of Isotopic Reference Materials Busted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coplen, T.

    2007-12-01

    During the past several years, the determination of the isotopic abundances of elements including H, Li, B, C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Cl, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Tl, and Se has substantially increased because of expanded use in hydrology, environmental studies, microbiology, forensic investigations, atmospheric investigations, oceanography, etc. Improvements in instrumentation enable increasingly precise isotope-amount-ratio measurements in these fields, but these improvements in precision commonly do not lead to improvements in accuracy because of the lack or improper use of isotopic reference materials. When properly used, these critically important materials enable any laboratory worldwide to measure the same homogeneous sample and report the same isotopic abundance within analytical uncertainty. For example, for stable isotopic analysis of gaseous hydrogen samples, the agreement among 36 laboratories worldwide before normalization to any hydrogen gas reference material was 11.8 per mill. After normalization to anchors (gaseous H isotopic reference materials) at each end of the delta H-2 scale, the agreement was 0.85 per mill, an improvement of more than an order of magnitude. Consistency of delta C-13 measurements often can be improved by nearly 50 percent by anchoring the delta C-13 scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in C-13 mole fraction, namely NBS 19 calcite and L-SVEC lithium carbonate. Agreement of delta C-13 values of four expert laboratories analyzing USGS40 L- glutamic acid by CF-IRMS methods improved from 0.084 to 0.015 per mill with use of the two scale anchors (NBS 19 and L-SVEC). Solid oxygen isotopic reference materials (IAEA-600 caffeine, IAEA-601 and IAEA-602 benzoic acids, IAEA-NO-3, USGS32, USGS34, and USGS35 nitrates, NBS-127, IAEA-SO-5, and IAEA-SO-6 barium sulfates) are poorly calibrated. Calibrating these solids to the VSMOW-SLAP reference water scale has been very difficult because both the solids and reference

  6. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  7. Tin isotope fractionation in terrestrial cassiterites

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, N.J. ); Rosman, K.J.R. )

    1991-02-01

    The isotopic composition of tin has been measured in a range of cassiterites and pure reagents to assess the extent to which this element is isotopically fractionated in natural processes. Only two samples showed evidence of isotopic fractionation, and it is concluded that natural Sn isotope fractionation is small and uncommon. This feature reflects the world dominance of Sn-oxide ores Sn-sulfide ores, and the highly efficient processes of Sn dissolution and precipitation which negate equilibrium and kinetic fractionation of Sn isotopes, respectively. The two samples which show slight fractionation are a highly purified and cassiterite from the Archaean Greenbushes pegmatite, Western Australia. The latter Sn is 0.15{per thousand} per mass unit heavier than the authors laboratory standard, whereas the former is 0.12{per thousand} per mass unit lighter. Although the cassiterite fractionation is considered to result from natural geological processes, the fractionation of purified Sn may be either natural or relate to the purification process, the fractionation of this magnitude has a negligible effect on the current best estimate of the atomic weight of Sn, but it does place a lower limit on its associated accuracy.

  8. Accelerator Production of Isotopes for Medical Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2014-03-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging and therapy has led to the development of novel routes of isotope production. For example, the production and purification of longer-lived position emitting radiometals has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller medical cyclotrons at dedicated facilities. Recently, isotope harvesting from heavy ion accelerator facilities has also been suggested. The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a new national user facility for nuclear science to be completed in 2020. Radioisotopes could be produced by dedicated runs by primary users or may be collected synergistically from the water in cooling-loops for the primary beam dump that cycle the water at flow rates in excess of hundreds of gallons per minute. A liquid water target system for harvesting radioisotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) was designed and constructed as the initial step in proof-of-principle experiments to harvest useful radioisotopes in this manner. This talk will provide an overview of isotope production using both dedicated machines and harvesting from larger accelerators typically used for nuclear physics. Funding from Department of Energy under DESC0007352 and DESC0006862.

  9. Laser Isotope Separation Employing Condensation Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Eerkens, Jeff W.; Miller, William H.

    2004-09-15

    Molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) techniques using condensation repression (CR) harvesting are reviewed and compared with atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), gaseous diffusion (DIF), ultracentrifuges (UCF), and electromagnetic separations (EMS). Two different CR-MLIS or CRISLA (Condensation Repression Isotope Separation by Laser Activation) approaches have been under investigation at the University of Missouri (MU), one involving supersonic super-cooled free jets and dimer formation, and the other subsonic cold-wall condensation. Both employ mixtures of an isotopomer (e.g. {sup i}QF{sub 6}) and a carrier gas, operated at low temperatures and pressures. Present theories of VT relaxation, dimerization, and condensation are found to be unsatisfactory to explain/predict experimental CRISLA results. They were replaced by fundamentally new models that allow ab-initio calculation of isotope enrichments and predictions of condensation parameters for laser-excited and non-excited vapors which are in good agreement with experiment. Because of supersonic speeds, throughputs for free-jet CRISLA are a thousand times higher than cold-wall CRISLA schemes, and thus preferred for large-quantity Uranium enrichments. For small-quantity separations of (radioactive) medical isotopes, the simpler coldwall CRISLA method may be adequate.

  10. Oxygen isotopes in deep sea spherules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeda, T. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The determination of the genetic relationships between the dust and small particles in the solar system, and the meteorites and larger bodies are examined. Oxygen isotopes proved useful in the identification of such relationships between one meteorite group and another. Of the various samples of submillimeter extraterrestrial particles available for laboratory study, only the deep sea spherules are abundant enough for precise oxygen isotope analysis using existing techniques. Complications arise in interpretation of the isotopic data, since these particles were melted during passage through the Earth's atmosphere, and have been in contact with seawater for prolonged periods. Spherules that were originally silicates are considered with the originally metallic ones to deduce their preterrestrial isotopic compositions. The type 1 spherules which enter the atmosphere as metallic particles, contain only atmospheric oxygen. The type S spherules contain a mixture of atmospheric oxygen and their original extraterrestrial oxygen. It is suggested that the Earth's mesosphere is strongly enriched in heavy isotopes of oxygen at altitudes near 90 km at which the iron particles are oxidized. Fractionation due to the combined diffusion of O atoms and O2 molecules may be responsible.

  11. Isotopic composition of formaldehyde in urban air.

    PubMed

    Rice, Andrew L; Quay, Paul

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric formaldehyde was measured in air samples collected in urban Seattle, Washington. A recently developed gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analytical technique was used to extract formaldehyde directly from whole air, separate it from other volatile organic compounds, and measure its (13)C/(12)C and D/H ratio. Measurements of formaldehyde concentration were also made concomitant with isotope ratio. Results of the analysis of nine discrete air samples for delta(13)C-HCHO have a relatively small range in isotopic composition (-31 to -25 per thousand versus VPDB [+/-1.3 per thousand]) over a considerable concentration range (0.8-4.4 ppb [+/-15%]). In contrast, analyses of 17 air samples for deltaD-HCHO show a large range (-296 to +210 per thousand versus VSMOW [+/-50 per thousand]) over the concentrations measured (0.5-2.9 ppb). Observations of deltaD are weakly anticorrelated with concentration. Isotopic data are interpreted using both source- and sink-based approaches. Results of delta(13)C-HCHO are similar to those observed previously for a number of nonmethane hydrocarbons in urban environments and variability can be reconciled with a simple sink-based model. The large variability observed in deltaD-HCHO favors a source-based interpretation with HCHO depleted in deuterium from primary sources of HCHO (i.e., combustion) and HCHO enriched in deuterium from secondary photochemical sources (i.e., hydrocarbon oxidation).

  12. Highly tritiated water processing by isotopic exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, W.M.; Willms, R.S.; Glugla, M.; Cristescu, I.; Michling, R.; Demange, D.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) is produced in fusion machines and one of the promising technologies to process it is isotopic exchange. 3 kinds of Pt-catalyzed zeolite (13X-APG, CBV-100-CY and HiSiv-1000) were tested as candidates for isotopic exchange of highly tritiated water (HTW), and CBV-100-CY (Na-Y type with a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio of ∼ 5.0) shows the best performance. Small-scale tritium testing indicates that this method is efficient for reaching an exchange factor (EF) of 100. Full-scale non-tritium testing implies that an EF of 300 can be achieved in 24 hours of operation if a temperature gradient is applied along the column. For the isotopic exchange, deuterium recycled from the Isotope Separation System (deuterium with 1% T and/or 200 ppm T) should be employed, and the tritiated water regenerated from the Pt-catalyzed zeolite bed after isotopic exchange should be transferred to Water Detritiation System (WDS) for further processing.

  13. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  14. New approaches to the Moon's isotopic crisis

    PubMed Central

    Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the isotopic compositions of the Earth and the Moon show that, unlike nearly every other body known in the Solar System, our satellite's isotopic ratios are nearly identical to the Earth's for nearly every isotopic system. The Moon's chemical make-up, however, differs from the Earth's in its low volatile content and perhaps in the elevated abundance of oxidized iron. This surprising situation is not readily explained by current impact models of the Moon's origin and offers a major clue to the Moon's formation, if we only could understand it properly. Current ideas to explain this similarity range from assuming an impactor with the same isotopic composition as the Earth to postulating a pure ice impactor that completely vaporized upon impact. Several recent proposals follow from the suggestion that the Earth–Moon system may have lost a great deal of angular momentum during early resonant interactions. The isotopic constraint may be the most stringent test yet for theories of the Moon's origin. PMID:25114301

  15. Stable Isotope Spectroscopy for Diagnostic Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnick, D. E.

    2000-06-01

    Isotopic tracers have been used in medical research for more than fifty years. Radioactive isotopes have been most used because of the high detection efficiencies possible. With increased awareness of the effects of low level radiation and radioactive waste management problems, the need for safe non radioactive tracers has become apparent. Rare stable isotopes of biologically active elements can be used for metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies provided that both sufficient detection sensitivity can be achieved and reliable cost effective instruments can be developed. High resolution optical spectroscopic methods which can determine isotopic ratios with high precision and accuracy are viable for research and clinical use. The study of 13C/12C ratios in CO2 for breath test diagnostics will be described in detail. Using the laser optogalvonic effect with isotopic lasers a specific medical diagnostic for h-pylori infection, has recently received FDA approval. Opportunities exist to study D/H ratios in water and 18O/16O ratios in CO2 and water for basic metabolism diagnostics and 15N/14N ratios in urine for liver function and related studies.

  16. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  17. Zn Isotope Fractionation during Sorption onto Kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Guinoiseau, Damien; Gélabert, Alexandre; Moureau, Julien; Louvat, Pascale; Benedetti, Marc F

    2016-02-16

    In this study, we quantify zinc isotope fractionation during its sorption onto kaolinite, by performing experiments under various pH, ionic strength, and total Zn concentrations. A systematic enrichment in heavy Zn isotopes on the surface of kaolinite was measured, with Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution ranging from 0.11‰ at low pH and low ionic strength to 0.49‰ at high pH and high ionic strength. Both the measured Zn concentration and its isotopic ratio are correctly described using a thermodynamic sorption model that considers two binding sites: external basal surfaces and edge sites. Based on this modeling approach, two distinct Zn isotopic fractionation factors were calculated: Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution = 0.18 ± 0.06‰ for ion exchange onto basal sites, and Δ(66)Znadsorbed-solution = 0.49 ± 0.06‰ for specific complexation onto edge sites. These two distinct factors indicate that Zn isotope fractionation is dominantly controlled by the chemical composition of the solution (pH, ionic strength).

  18. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  19. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  20. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-board the Polarstern research vessel and in the Siberian Lena delta Samoylov research station (N 72° 22', E 126° 29'). The Polarstern measurements cover the summer 2015 Arctic campaign from July to mid-October, including six weeks in the Fram Strait region in July- August, followed by a campaign reaching the North Pole and a transect from the Norwegian Sea to the North Sea. These vapour observations are completed by water isotopic measurements in samples from the surface ocean water for Polarstern and from precipitation in Samoylov and Tiksi (120 km south-east of the station). A custom-made designed automatic calibration system has been implemented in a comparable manner for both vapour instruments, based on the injection of different liquid water standards, which are completely vaporised in dry air at high temperature. Subsequent humidity level can be adjusted from 2000 to at least 30000 ppm. For a better resilience, an independent calibration system has been added on the Samoylov instrument, allowing measurements of one standard at humidity levels ranging from 2000 to 15000 ppm: dry air is introduced in a tank containing a large amount of liquid water standard, undergoing evaporation under a controlled environment. The measurement protocol includes an automatic calibration every 25 hours. First instrument characterisation experiments depict a significant isotope-humidity effect at low humidity, dependant on the isotopic composition of the standard. For ambient air, our first isotope

  1. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  2. Isotope tracers help manage water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Hudson, B.; Davisson, L.

    1997-11-01

    Livermore isotope scientists are using stable and radioactive isotopes to learn about groundwater sources, ages, travel times, and flow paths and to determine the path and extent of contaminant movement in the water. These studies started at the Nevada Test Site because of concern about the transport in groundwater of contaminants from underground nuclear testing. When water managers can accurately predict where contaminated groundwater will be, they can avoid using it. Groundwater studies have also been performed for the Orange County Water District, Contra Costa County, and other public agencies, as well as at the Livermore site. Livermore scientists are some of the first to marry isotope tracing techniques and numerical groundwater models, using data from the former to verify and validate the predictions of the latter and thus provide a powerful forecasting tool for water managers.

  3. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  4. Hydrogen isotope separation installation for tritium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, B.M.; Perevezentsev, A.N.; Selivanenko, I.L.; Tenyaev, B.N.; Vedeneev, A.I.; Golubkov, A.N.

    1995-10-01

    The separation of hydrogen isotopes in the hydrogen-palladium system in sectioned separation columns with the simulation of counter-current isotopic exchange is described. The separation efficiency of sectioned columns is investigated with the experimental installation as a function of various parameters. The separation of deuterium-tritium mixtures with high tritium concentrations is tested with the pilot installation operating at room temperature and atmospheric hydrogen pressure. Due to very high separation efficiency, flexibility and simplicity of operation separation installations with sectioned columns are ideally suitable for tritium laboratories and facilities dealing with separation of hydrogen isotopes. Estimation of applicability of sectioned columns for regeneration of exhaust gas in a fuel cycle of thermonuclear reactors, such as JET and ITER, shows the number of advantages of separation installations with sectioned columns. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Thorium isotopic analysis by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gingell, T

    2001-01-01

    The technique of alpha spectrometry is used to detect alpha particles and to determine their energy. In this way the technique is able to provide simultaneously quantitative information (i.e. the activity) and qualitative information (the identity) on any radionuclide that emits an alpha particle. The longer-lived naturally occurring isotopes of thorium are all alpha emitters so the technique can be used to quantify them directly and this is extremely important if radiation doses due to intakes of these isotopes into the body are to be accurately assessed. The principle of the technique is discussed, its advantages and disadvantages, and the instrumentation that is commonly used today. The need for radiochemical separation is discussed and illustrated by reference to analysis procedures in current use for thorium isotopic analysis. Practical issues such as detection limits, quality control procedures. sample throughput and cost will be covered.

  6. Theoretical calculation of polarizability isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Félix; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Andrés

    2017-03-01

    We propose a scheme to estimate hydrogen isotope effects on molecular polarizabilities. This approach combines the any-particle molecular orbital method, in which both electrons and H/D nuclei are described as quantum waves, with the auxiliary density perturbation theory, to calculate analytically the polarizability tensor. We assess the performance of method by calculating the polarizability isotope effect for 20 molecules. A good correlation between theoretical and experimental data is found. Further analysis of the results reveals that the change in the polarizability of a X-H bond upon deuteration decreases as the electronegativity of X increases. Our investigation also reveals that the molecular polarizability isotope effect presents an additive character. Therefore, it can be computed by counting the number of deuterated bonds in the molecule.

  7. Synthesis on evaporation partitioning using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Bogaard, Thom; Wenninger, Jochen; Jonson Sutanto, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Partitioning of evaporation into productive (transpiration) and non-productive evaporation (interception, soil evaporation) is of highest importance for water management practices, irrigation scheme design, and climate modeling. Despite this urge, the magnitude of the ratio of transpiration over total evaporation is still under debate and poorly understood due to measuring difficulties. However, with the current development in isotope measuring devices, new opportunities arise to untangle the partitioning of evaporation. In this paper we synthesize the opportunities and limitations using stable water isotopes in evaporation partitioning. We will analyze a set of field as well as laboratory studies to demonstrate the different evaporation components for various climate and vegetation conditions using stable isotopes 18O/16O and 2H/1H. Experimental data on evaporation partitioning of crops, grass, shrubs and trees are presented and we will discuss the specific experimental set-ups and data collection methods. The paper will be a synthesis of these studies.

  8. Apparatus for separating and recovering hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for recovering hydrogen and separating its isotopes. The apparatus includes a housing bearing at least a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. A baffle is disposed within the housing, attached thereto by a bracket. A hollow conduit is coiled about the baffle, in spaced relation to the baffle and the housing. The coiled conduit is at least partially filled with a hydride. The hydride can be heated to a high temperature and cooled to a low temperature quickly by circulating a heat transfer fluid in the housing. The spacing between the baffle and the housing maximizes the heat exchange rate between the fluid in the housing and the hydride in the conduit. The apparatus can be used to recover hydrogen isotopes (protium, deuterium and tritium) from gaseous mixtures, or to separate hydrogen isotopes from each other.

  9. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-07-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of coprocessing research (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique currently is in routine use for other applications. Progress is discussed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Chromium Isotopic Compositions of Some Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, N.; Imamura, M.

    1996-03-01

    Studies of isotopic anomalies in meteorites have contributed significantly to our understanding of the early history of the solar system. The isolation, identification and isotopic analysis of presolar grains in primitive meteorites has been highlight of meteoritic science in recent years and also become significant developing subdiscipline of astronomy providing primary data on stellar and supernova nucleosynthesis. We have continued detail analysis of primitive meteorites particularly acid residue fractions from them. It is because acid residues are little suffered from metamorphism due to secondary heating and shock; so they would contain the component which retains some informations on the early evolution of the solar system and on the processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage. In this paper, we present Cr isotopic data for some chondritic meteorites and discuss the implications of the data from the viewpoint of the evolution of the solar system.

  11. Primitive boron isotope composition of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Chaussidon, M; Marty, B

    1995-07-21

    Boron isotope ratios are homogeneous in volcanic glasses of oceanic island basalts [-9.9 +/- 1.3 per mil, relative to standard NBS 951 (defined by the National Bureau of Standards)], whereas mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs) and back-arc basin basalts (BABBs) show generally higher and more variable ratios. Melts that have assimilated even small amounts of altered basaltic crust show significant variations in the boron isotope ratios. Assimilation may thus account for the higher boron ratios of MORBs and BABBs. A budget of boron between mantle and crust implies that the primitive mantle had a boron isotope ratio of -10 +/- 2 per mil and that this ratio was not fractionated significantly during the differentiation of the mantle.

  12. Sourcing explosives: a multi-isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Widory, David; Minet, Jean-Jacques; Barbe-Leborgne, Martine

    2009-06-01

    Although explosives are easily identified with current instrumental techniques, it is generally impossible to distinguish between sources of the same substance. To alleviate this difficulty, we present a multi-stable isotope (delta13C, delta15N, delta18O, deltaD) approach for appraising the possibility of discriminating explosives. The results from 30 distinct PETN, TNT and ANFO samples show that the different families of explosives are clearly differentiated by both their specific isotope signatures and their combination with corresponding element concentrations. Coupling two or more of the studied isotope systematics yields an even more precise differentiation on the basis of their raw-material origin and/or manufacturing process.

  13. Isotopic ratio measurements with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1986-06-03

    An inductively-coupled-plasma source mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Pb, Os, and B standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on uranium because of its nuclear and environmental interest and because of the availability of a well-characterized set of standards with a wide range of isotopic compositions. The precision and accuracy obtainable in isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS depend on many factors including background, interferences, dead time, mass fractionation (bias), abundance sensitivity, and counting statistics. Which, if any, of these factors controls accuracy and precision depends on the type of sample being analyzed and the characteristics of the mass spectrometer. These issues are discussed in detail.

  14. The HEAO-3 Cosmic Ray Isotope spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouffard, M.; Engelmann, J. J.; Koch, L.; Soutoul, A.; Lund, N.; Peters, B.; Rasmussen, I. L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the Cosmic Ray Isotope instrument launched aboard the HEAO-3 satellite on September 20, 1979. The primary purpose of the experiment is to measure the isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei from Be-7 to Fe-58 over the energy range 0.5 to 7 GeV/nucleon. In addition charge spectra will be measured between beryllium and tin over the energy range 0.5 to 25 GeV/nucleon. The charge and isotope abundances measured by the experiment provide essential information needed to further our understanding of the origin and propagation of high energy cosmic rays. The instrument consists of 5 Cerenkov counters, a 4 element neon flash tube hodoscope and a time-of-flight system. The determination of charge and energy for each particle is based on the multiple Cerenkov technique and the mass determination will be based upon a statistical analysis of particle trajectories in the geomagnetic field.

  15. Ca isotope fractionation on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Tombrello, T. A.; Epstein, S.

    1977-01-01

    Ca has been measured in a lunar soil in order to establish the presence of isotopically mass-fractionated components. Ca was extracted by a series of water leaches after the soils were 'activated' by brief exposures to fluorine gas. The O2 obtained by this fluorination is found to have delta (O-18) of +21 per mil and to be, therefore, significantly mass-fractionated. Ca obtained in the leaches was analyzed using the double-spike technique. Very small Ca isotope fractionation is found in the leaches of this soil of up to 1 per mil per mass unit difference. The small Ca effects are in marked contrast to the measured delta (O-18) for the same sample and to large effects observed in many soils for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The data on Ca provide stringent constraints on models which attempt to explain the isotope mass-fractionation effects in lunar soils.

  16. Separation of isotopes by cyclical processes

    DOEpatents

    Hamrin, Jr., Charles E.; Weaver, Kenny

    1976-11-02

    Various isotopes of hydrogen are separated by a cyclic sorption process in which a gas stream containing the isotopes is periodically passed through a high pressure column containing a palladium sorbent. A portion of the product from the high pressure column is passed through a second column at lower pressure to act as a purge. Before the sorbent in the high pressure column becomes saturated, the sequence is reversed with the stream flowing through the former low-pressure column now at high pressure, and a portion of the product purging the former high pressure column now at low pressure. The sequence is continued in cyclic manner with the product being enriched in a particular isotope.

  17. The rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Leemann

    2000-08-01

    The envisioned Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility would add substantially to research opportunities for nuclear physics and astrophysics by combining increased intensities with a greatly expanded variety of high-quality rare-isotope beams. A flexible superconducting driver linac would provide 100 kW, 400 MeV/nucleon beams of any stable isotope from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets. Combinations of projectile fragmentation, target fragmentation, fission, and spallation would produce the needed broad assortment of short-lived secondary beams. This paper describes the project's background, purpose, and status, the envisioned facility, and the key subsystem, the driver linac. RIA's scientific purposes are to advance current theoretical models, reveal new manifestations of nuclear behavior, and probe the limits of nuclear existence [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show, respectively, examples of RIA research opportunities and the yields projected for pursuing them. Figure 3 outlines a conceptual approach for delivering the needed beams.

  18. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  19. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  20. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zehn; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    he zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰66Zn66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe–Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰66Zn66Zn=0.28±0.05‰ (2s.d.).