Science.gov

Sample records for dystonia musculorum deformans

  1. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Broussolle, Emmanuel; Laurencin, Chloé; Bernard, Emilien; Thobois, Stéphane; Danaila, Teodor; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste. Results In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin. Discussion Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia. PMID:26417535

  2. Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dystonia is usually a lifelong condition with persistent pain and disability. Focal dystonia affects a single part of the body; generalised dystonia can affect most or all of the body. It is more common in women, and some types of dystonia are more common in people of Ashkenazi descent. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, surgical treatments, and physical treatments for focal and generalised dystonia? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, amantadine, baclofen, benzatropine, biofeedback, botulinum toxins, bromocriptine, carbamazepine, carbidopa/levodopa, clonazepam, clozapine, deep brain stimulation of thalamus and globus pallidus, diazepam, gabapentin, haloperidol, lorazepam, myectomy (for focal dystonia), occupational therapy, ondansetron, physiotherapy, pregabalin, procyclidine, selective peripheral denervation (for focal dystonia), speech therapy, tizanidine, trazodone hydrochloride, and trihexyphenidyl. PMID:25347760

  3. Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been considerable progress in our understanding of dystonia over the last century. Growing recognition of dystonia has enhanced awareness of its diverse motor phenomenology and brought attention to the importance that nonmotor features may play in this disorder, once considered to be purely motor. Using the latest technologies in human genetics, new genetic links are being discovered at an ever-quickening pace and expanding our knowledge of the disorder's complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, as we gain clearer insight into the pathophysiology of dystonia and an appreciation of the involvement of dysfunction outside the basal ganglia, dystonia has been increasingly viewed as a network disorder. Here we briefly discuss some of the recent noteworthy advances. PMID:26124980

  4. Musician's Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  5. Oromandibular Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  6. Fluorosis and periostitis deformans as complications of prolonged voriconazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Rad, Babak; Saleem, Mohamed; Grant, Susan; Florkowski, Christopher; Coates, Penelope; Gordon, David; Rankin, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of development of painful periostitis deformans in a 39-year-old woman who was receiving long-term voriconazole treatment for Aspergillus infection as a complication of orthotopic liver transplant. Measurement of fluoride levels strongly supports fluorosis to be the mechanism of the voriconazole-induced periostitis deformans and supports the concept that such measurements might be of use in predicting this complication of long-term voriconazole treatment.

  7. Musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Jon

    2015-08-01

    Musician's dystonia is a task-specific dystonia that usually affects the embouchure or the most active digits of the most active hand, and therefore differs between instruments. Since it is usually painless and intermittent, the diagnosis is often delayed and it is commonly misdiagnosed as being an overuse disorder or tendon pathology. It arises from pathological brain plasticity: physiological studies suggest that it is an exaggeration of brain changes that are required to achieve advanced musical skills. Its treatment often has limited success; however, musical retraining, botulinum toxin or rehabilitation based on modifying the aberrant plasticity may help. PMID:26023204

  8. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompany the dystonia. Under the guidance of a physical therapist and a physician, an individual may learn to ... the dystonia. For information about locating a local physical therapist who specializes in neurological conditions such as dystonia, ...

  9. Dystonia Medical Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. alone. Join us in the global effort to find a cure. Learn More About Dystonia Dystonia news Addex Therapeutics to Conduct Clinical Study of Dipraglurant in Cervical Dystonia Local Leader Organizes First Cedar Rapids Dogs4Dystonia Dog Walk ...

  10. The Genetics of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has been defined as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Dystonia is also a clinical sign that can be the presenting or prominent manifestation of many neurodegenerative and neuro-metabolic disorders. Etiological categories include primary dystonia, secondary dystonia, heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, and dystonia plus. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Most primary dystonia begins in adults, and approximately 10% of probands report one or more affected family members. Many cases of childhood- and adolescent-onset dystonia are due to mutations in TOR1A and THAP1. Mutations in THAP1 and CIZ1 have been associated with sporadic and familial adult-onset dystonia. Although significant recent progress had been made in defining the genetic basis for most of the dystonia-plus and heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, a major gap remains in understanding the genetic etiologies for most cases of adult-onset primary dystonia. Common themes in the cellular biology of dystonia include G1/S cell cycle control, monoaminergic neurotransmission, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the neuronal stress response. PMID:22989765

  11. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coping Tips & Strategies Are You Severely Depressed? Dystonia & Depression Dystonia & Anxiety Finding a Mental Health Professional When a Child is Diagnosed Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is ...

  12. Untethering the Nuclear Envelope and Cytoskeleton: Biologically Distinct Dystonias Arising from a Common Cellular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Atai, Nadia A.; Ryan, Scott D.; Kothary, Rashmi; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Nery, Flávia C.

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of early onset DYT1 dystonia in humans are caused by a GAG deletion in the TOR1A gene leading to loss of a glutamic acid (ΔE) in the torsinA protein, which underlies a movement disorder associated with neuronal dysfunction without apparent neurodegeneration. Mutation/deletion of the gene (Dst) encoding dystonin in mice results in a dystonic movement disorder termed dystonia musculorum, which resembles aspects of dystonia in humans. While torsinA and dystonin proteins do not share modular domain architecture, they participate in a similar function by modulating a structural link between the nuclear envelope and the cytoskeleton in neuronal cells. We suggest that through a shared interaction with the nuclear envelope protein nesprin-3α, torsinA and the neuronal dystonin-a2 isoform comprise a bridge complex between the outer nuclear membrane and the cytoskeleton, which is critical for some aspects of neuronal development and function. Elucidation of the overlapping roles of torsinA and dystonin-a2 in nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum dynamics should provide insights into the cellular mechanisms underlying the dystonic phenotype. PMID:22611399

  13. Art and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Sitek, Emilia J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Dystonia has a recent history in medicine. Focal dystonia was described in the 19th century by classic authors including Gowers, whilst generalized dystonia was described at the turn of the century. However, it is possible to find precise descriptions of dystonia in art, centuries before the medical definition. We have reviewed several pieces of art (sculpture, painting and literature) across the history that might represent descriptions of dystonia, from ancient period to nowadays. In classic times, the first reference to abnormal postures can be tracked back to the new Empire of Egypt (equinus foot), not to mention some recently described examples of dystonia from the Moche sculptures in Peru or Veracruz culture from Mexico. In Middle Ages it is possible to find many examples of sculptures in European cathedrals representing peasants with dramatic, presumably dystonic postures that coexist with amputation of limbs. This unique combination of dystonia and limb amputation probably represents ergotism. The painters Brueghel, Ribera and Velazquez also represented figures with postures likely to be dystonic. Literature is also a source of precise pre-neurological descriptions, especially during the 19th century. In David Copperfield, Dickens depicts characters with generalized dystonia (Uriah Heep), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr Creakle). Finally, even in modern Art (19th and 20th centuries), there are dramatic descriptions of abnormal postures that are likely to be dystonic, such as painful cervical dystonia (Brancusi), cervical dystonia with sensory trick (Modigliani) and upper limb dystonia (Wyspianski). However some postures presented in works of art may simply be a form of artistic expression and only bear unintentional resemblance to the dystonic postures. Art may be a source of neurological information, and that includes primary and secondary dystonia.

  14. Art and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Sitek, Emilia J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Dystonia has a recent history in medicine. Focal dystonia was described in the 19th century by classic authors including Gowers, whilst generalized dystonia was described at the turn of the century. However, it is possible to find precise descriptions of dystonia in art, centuries before the medical definition. We have reviewed several pieces of art (sculpture, painting and literature) across the history that might represent descriptions of dystonia, from ancient period to nowadays. In classic times, the first reference to abnormal postures can be tracked back to the new Empire of Egypt (equinus foot), not to mention some recently described examples of dystonia from the Moche sculptures in Peru or Veracruz culture from Mexico. In Middle Ages it is possible to find many examples of sculptures in European cathedrals representing peasants with dramatic, presumably dystonic postures that coexist with amputation of limbs. This unique combination of dystonia and limb amputation probably represents ergotism. The painters Brueghel, Ribera and Velazquez also represented figures with postures likely to be dystonic. Literature is also a source of precise pre-neurological descriptions, especially during the 19th century. In David Copperfield, Dickens depicts characters with generalized dystonia (Uriah Heep), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr Creakle). Finally, even in modern Art (19th and 20th centuries), there are dramatic descriptions of abnormal postures that are likely to be dystonic, such as painful cervical dystonia (Brancusi), cervical dystonia with sensory trick (Modigliani) and upper limb dystonia (Wyspianski). However some postures presented in works of art may simply be a form of artistic expression and only bear unintentional resemblance to the dystonic postures. Art may be a source of neurological information, and that includes primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26139341

  15. Dystonia: Related and Differential Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... respond, too. What is the difference between a Parkinson's disease patient with dystonia and a dystonia patient with Parkinson's symptoms? Parkinson's disease is a neurological movement disorder ...

  16. Focal dystonia in musicians.

    PubMed

    Lie-Nemeth, Theresa J

    2006-11-01

    In conclusion, musicians' focal dystonia is a significant and potentially career-ending neurological condition of which physiatrists and other performing arts medicine clinicians should be aware. Pathology has been identified in the somatosensory cortex, and in the motor cortex and basal ganglia. Although advances have been made in the elucidating some of the pathologic changes in focal dystonia, better understanding is needed. Current treatments such as retraining, splinting, oral medications, and botulinum toxin injections are limited. Therefore, the ultimate goal for focal dystonia is to prevent this disabling disorder of instrumental musicians.

  17. Osteitis deformans (Paget's disease) in a Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus)--a case report.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Rosario; Diana, Alessia; Florio, Daniela; Gustinelli, Andrea; Nardini, Giordano

    2007-11-01

    Osteitis deformans (Paget's disease of bone) is a chronic focal disorder of bone remodelling characterized by an initial increase in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increase in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone. In the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) of this report, multifocal gross swellings involving the proximal third of the vertebral spine were observed and associated with anorexia, a relative inability to move or to fully extend the body, and to strike at prey. Serum biochemistry revealed elevated alkaline-phosphatase activity. Radiographic changes (irregular bone proliferation along the vertebral margins), computed tomography scan results (abnormal mineral density), and histopathological features (generalized thickening of the bony trabeculae at the expense of the intertrabecular spaces and irregular patches of lamellar bone with a characteristic "mosaic" pattern) indicated osteitis deformans.

  18. Therapeutic advances in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Alberto; Romito, Luigi M; Calandrella, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    Knowledge on dystonia has greatly improved recently, because of a renewed effort in understanding its cause, pathophysiology, and clinical characterization. Different drug classes traditionally have been used for the symptomatic treatment of dystonia, more recently surpassed by the introduction of botulinum neurotoxins and deep brain stimulation. No curative or disease-modifying treatments are available. Recent knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of inherited dystonias is highlighting new potential treatment strategies. We review therapeutic advances in dystonia that have been published over the last 3 years, particularly regarding oral medications, local injections of botulinum neurotoxins, deep brain stimulation, and transcranial or epidural brain stimulations. We discuss evidence of efficacy, highlight recent advances, and focus on key areas under development. PMID:26301801

  19. Therapeutic advances in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Alberto; Romito, Luigi M; Calandrella, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    Knowledge on dystonia has greatly improved recently, because of a renewed effort in understanding its cause, pathophysiology, and clinical characterization. Different drug classes traditionally have been used for the symptomatic treatment of dystonia, more recently surpassed by the introduction of botulinum neurotoxins and deep brain stimulation. No curative or disease-modifying treatments are available. Recent knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of inherited dystonias is highlighting new potential treatment strategies. We review therapeutic advances in dystonia that have been published over the last 3 years, particularly regarding oral medications, local injections of botulinum neurotoxins, deep brain stimulation, and transcranial or epidural brain stimulations. We discuss evidence of efficacy, highlight recent advances, and focus on key areas under development.

  20. Forms of Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the symptoms, and associated features such as additional movement disorders or neurological symptoms, and 2. Cause (which includes ... that includes prominent myoclonus symptoms. Paroxysmal dystonias and dyskinesias : Episodic movement disorders in which abnormal movements occur ...

  1. Task-specific Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Russotto, Diego; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific dystonias are primary focal dystonias characterized by excessive muscle contractions producing abnormal postures during selective motor activities that often involve highly skilled, repetitive movements. Historically these peculiar postures were considered psychogenic but have now been classified as forms of dystonia. Writer’s cramp is the most commonly identified task-specific dystonia and has features typical of this group of disorders. Symptoms may begin with lack of dexterity during performance of a specific motor task with increasingly abnormal posturing of the involved body part as motor activity continues. Initially, the dystonia may manifest only during the performance of the inciting task, but as the condition progresses it may also occur during other activities or even at rest. Neurological exam is usually unremarkable except for the dystonia-related abnormalities. Although the precise pathophysiology remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests reduced inhibition at different levels of the sensorimotor system. Symptomatic treatment options include oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, neurosurgical procedures, and adaptive strategies. Prognosis may vary depending upon body part involved and specific type of task affected. Further research may reveal new insights into the etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and improved treatment of these conditions. PMID:18990127

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... various neurological symptoms, often including dystonia and other movement disorders. Symptoms • Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, ... following an injury. Symptoms of dystonia and other movement disorders may be delayed by several months or years ...

  3. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  4. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  5. Medication-induced periostitis in lung transplant patients: periostitis deformans revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lina; Mulligan, Michael E

    2011-02-01

    We report five cases of diffuse periostitis resembling hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and perostitis deformans in lung transplantation patients on chronic voriconazole, a fluoride-containing compound. Although drug-related periostitis has long been known, the association of lung transplant medication with periostitis was only recently introduced in the literature. To our knowledge, imaging findings have not been fully characterized in the radiology literature. Imaging features along with clinical history help to distinguish this benign condition from other disease entities. In this article, we review the current literature and illustrate the variety of imaging characteristics of this entity so that interpreting radiologists can make accurate diagnoses and avoid unnecessary work up.

  6. Recent Developments in Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Teller, Jan K.; Galpern, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The dystonias are a family of related disorders with many different clinical manifestations and causes. This review summarizes recent developments regarding these disorders, focusing mainly on advances with direct clinical relevance from the past two years. Recent findings The dystonias are generally defined by their clinical characteristics, rather than by their underlying genetic or neuropathological defects. The many varied clinical manifestations and causes contribute to the fact that they are one of the most poorly recognized of all movement disorders. A series of recent publications has addressed these issues offering a revised definition and more logical means for classifying the many subtypes. Our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms responsible for different types of dystonias also has grown rapidly, creating new opportunities and challenges for diagnosis and identifying increasing numbers of rare subtypes for which specific treatments are available. Summary Recent advances in describing the clinical phenotypes and determining associated genotypes have pointed to the need for new strategies for diagnosis, classification and treatment of the dystonias. PMID:26110799

  7. Update on Treatments for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Sharma, Nutan

    2015-01-01

    Oral medication, botulinum toxin injections and deep brain stimulation are the mainstays of treatment for dystonia. In addition, physical and other supportive therapies may help prevent further complications (e.g., contractures) and improve function. This review discusses evidence-based medical treatment of dystonia with an emphasis on recent advances in treatment and how the information can be applied to individuals with dystonia. PMID:24744022

  8. Brain Stimulation for Torsion Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Alterman, Ron L.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a heterogeneous neurological disorder characterized by abnormal muscle contractions for which standard medical therapy is often inadequate. For such patients, therapeutic brain stimulation is becoming increasingly utilized. Here we review the evidence and effect sizes for treating different types of dystonia with different types of brain stimulation. Strong (level B) evidence supports the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of primary generalized or segmental dystonia, especially DYT-1, as well as for patients with cervical dystonia. Large effect sizes have also been reported for DBS treatment of tardive dystonia, writer’s cramp, cranial dystonia, myoclonus dystonia, and off-state dystonia associated with Parkinson’s disease. Lesser benefit is generally seen in dystonia secondary to structural brain damage. Other brain stimulation techniques including epidural cortical stimulation and noninvasive brain stimulation have been investigated, but generally report smaller effect sizes in a more limited number of patients. Recent advances relevant to patient selection, surgical approach, DBS programming, and mechanism of action are discussed. PMID:25894231

  9. Genetic linkage of the Huntington's disease gene to a DNA marker.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F

    1984-11-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have provided the means to generate large numbers of new genetic linkage markers. This technology has been used to identify a DNA marker that coinherits with the Huntington's Disease (HD) gene in family studies. The HD locus has thereby been mapped to human chromosome 4. The discovery of a genetic marker for the inheritance of HD has implications both for patient care and future research. The same approach holds considerable promise for the investigation of other genetic diseases, including Dystonia Musculorum Deformans.

  10. Treatment of focal dystonias with botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Benecke, Reiner; Blitzer, Andrew; Comella, Cynthia L.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review on the use of injections of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal dystonias. Disorders covered include cranial dystonia, cervical dystonia, spasmodic dysphonia, and focal hand dystonia. Considered are clinical aspects, alternative treatment strategies and principles of use of botulinum toxin injections. PMID:19103214

  11. Strategies for treatment of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Dirk; Altenmueller, Eckart; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chana, Pedro; Chung, Tae Mo; Frucht, Steven; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Kaelin, Alain; Kaji, Ryuji; Kanovsky, Petr; Laskawi, Rainer; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Warner, Thomas T; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of dystonias is generally symptomatic. To produce sufficient therapy effects, therefore, frequently a multimodal and interdisciplinary therapeutic approach becomes necessary, combining botulinum toxin therapy, deep brain stimulation, oral antidystonic drugs, adjuvant drugs and rehabilitation therapy including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, re-training, speech therapy, psychotherapy and sociotherapy. This review presents the recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders Special Task Force on Interdisciplinary Treatment of Dystonia. It reviews the different therapeutic modalities and outlines a strategy to adapt them to the dystonia localisation and severity of the individual patient. Hints to emerging and future therapies will be given. PMID:26370676

  12. Dystonia in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, S; Wenning, G; Ransmayr, G; Poewe, W

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the frequency and nature of dystonia in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Methods: a cohort of 24 patients with clinically probable MSA over the past 10 years were prospectively followed up. Motor features were either dominated by parkinsonism (MSA-P subtype, n=18) or cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C, n=6). Classification of dystonic features and their changes with time was based on clinical observation during 6–12 monthly follow up visits. Parkinsonian features and complications of drug therapy were assessed. Most patients (22/24) died during the observation period. Neuropathological examination was confirmatory in all of the five necropsied patients. Results: At first neurological visit dystonia was present in 11 (46%) patients all of whom had been levodopa naive at this time point. Six patients (25%) exhibited cervical dystonia (antecollis) (MSA-P n=4, MSA-C n=2), five patients (21%) showed unilateral limb dystonia (MSA-P n=4; MSA-C n=1). A definite initial response to levodopa treatment was seen in 15/18 patients with MSA-P, but in none of the six patients with MSA-C. A subgroup of 12 patients with MSA-P developed levodopa induced dyskinesias 2.3 years (range 0.5–4) after initiation of levodopa therapy. Most patients had peak dose craniocervical dystonia; however, some patients experienced limb or generalised dystonia. Isolated peak dose limb chorea occurred in only one patient. Conclusion: The prospective clinical study suggests that dystonia is common in untreated MSA-P. This finding may reflect younger age at disease onset and putaminal pathology in MSA-P. Levodopa induced dyskinesias were almost exclusively dystonic affecting predominantly craniocervical musculature. Future studies are required to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of dystonia in MSA. PMID:11861684

  13. Diagnosis & Treatment of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. There are many different clinical manifestations and many different causes. A careful assessment of the clinical manifestations is helpful for identifying syndromic patterns that focus diagnostic testing on potential causes. If a cause can be identified, specific etiology-based treatments may be available. However, in the majority of cases, a specific cause cannot be identified, and treatments are based on symptoms. Treatment options include counseling and education, oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, and several surgical procedures. A substantial reduction in symptoms and improved quality of life can be achieved in the majority of patients by combining these various options. PMID:25432724

  14. Carbamazepine-induced dystonia in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shwetank; Gill, Manpreet; Bhasin, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is sustained muscle contraction, which may be primary or secondary to other causes. Drugs comprise one of the most important causes for the secondary dystonia, the usual mechanism being a dopaminergic blockade. There are very few reports describing dystonia resulting from carbamazepine (CBZ) administration. In this case report, a 16-year-old male with mental retardation and seizure disorder developed dystonia at therapeutic blood levels of CBZ. PMID:27298509

  15. The Functional Neuroanatomy of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Neychev, Vladimir K.; Gross, Robert; Lehéricy, Stephane; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary twisting movements and postures. There are many different clinical manifestations, and many different causes. The neuroanatomical substrates for dystonia are only partly understood. Although the traditional view localizes dystonia to basal ganglia circuits, there is increasing recognition that this view is inadequate for accommodating a substantial portion of available clinical and experimental evidence. A model in which several brain regions play a role in a network better accommodates the evidence. This network model accommodates neuropathological and neuroimaging evidence that dystonia may be associated with abnormalities in multiple different brain regions. It also accommodates animal studies showing that dystonic movements arise with manipulations of different brain regions. It is consistent with neurophysiological evidence suggesting defects in neural inhibitory processes, sensorimotor integration, and maladaptive plasticity. Finally, it may explain neurosurgical experience showing that targeting the basal ganglia is effective only for certain subpopulations of dystonia. Most importantly, the network model provides many new and testable hypotheses with direct relevance for new treatment strategies that go beyond the basal ganglia. PMID:21303695

  16. Cognitive Flexibility in Primary Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Although primary dystonia is typically characterized as a movement disorder, it is also associated with cognitive alterations in the domain of executive functioning which may arise from changes in cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, patients with dystonia show deficits in neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility. However, it is unclear whether cognitive inflexibility is caused by the pathomechanisms underlying primary dystonia or by confounding factors such as depression or symptom-related distraction.Methods The present study aimed to eliminate these confounds by examining cognitive flexibility in dystonia patients and in patients with similar motor symptoms but without a comparable central pathophysiology. Eighteen patients with primary blepharospasm, a common form of dystonia affecting the muscles around the eyes, and 19 patients with hemifacial spasm, a facial nerve disorder causing similar eyelid spasms, completed a computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (cWCST). The two groups were further compared on tests of global cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, health status, and impulsiveness. Results Blepharospasm patients committed significantly more errors on the cWCST than patients with hemifacial spasm. Group differences were most pronounced with regard to integration errors, a measure of rule-inference processes on the cWCST. Integration errors were also associated with impulsiveness in patients with blepharospasm. Conclusions Primary blepharospasm is related to deficits in cognitive flexibility, even when blepharospasm patients are compared with patients who suffer from motor symptoms of non-dystonic origin. Our results support the possibility that cognitive inflexibility results from the specific pathophysiological processes underlying primary dystonia. (JINS, 2016, 22, 662-670). PMID:27333537

  17. Investigation of the osteitis deformans phases in snake vertebrae by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galiová, M; Kaiser, J; Novotný, K; Ivanov, M; Nývltová Fisáková, M; Mancini, L; Tromba, G; Vaculovic, T; Liska, M; Kanický, V

    2010-09-01

    Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) was optimized for microspatial analyses of fossil and recent snake vertebrae. As complimentary techniques, solution analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography was utilized in order to determine the overall concentration of the selected elements in the samples and to visualize nondestructively the fossil sample microstructure, respectively. Elemental mapping of pathological bony tissue by DP-LIBS has been proven as a powerful tool for considering the osteitis deformans phases in fossil vertebrae.

  18. Did Robert Schumann have dystonia?

    PubMed

    García de Yébenes, J

    1995-07-01

    Occupational dystonia is a frequent clinical symptom in musicians and has been described as muscle spasms and hand cramps in pianists. Robert Schumann had a neurological impairment of his right hand that was not clinically diagnosed during his life and that impaired his career as pianist from his early 20s. This disturbance was characterized by pain and by rigidity of the fingers, which extended to other segments of his right upper extremity while he was performing and that increased with stress and improved with muscle relaxation. This disturbance produced a progressive impairment of his writing. We here hypothesize that Schumann's neurological problem was consistent with dystonia.

  19. Dystonia rating scales: critique and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del; Comella, Cynthia; Jinnah, H.A.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Post, Bart; Vidailhet, Marie; Volkmann, Jens; Warner, Thomas T.; Leentjens, Albert F.G.; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Stebbins, Glenn T.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Schrag, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Background Many rating scales have been applied to the evaluation of dystonia, but only few have been assessed for clinimetric properties. The Movement Disorders Society commissioned this task force to critique existing dystonia rating scales and place them in the clinical and clinimetric context. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify rating scales that have either been validated or used in dystonia. Results Thirty six potential scales were identified. Eight were excluded because they did not meet review criteria, leaving twenty-eight scales that were critiqued and rated by the task force. Seven scales were found to meet criteria to be “recommended”: the Blepharospasm Disability Index is recommended for rating blepharospasm; the Cervical Dystonia Impact Scale and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale for rating cervical dystonia; the Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire for blepharospasm and cervical dystonia; the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and the Vocal Performance Questionnaire (VPQ) for laryngeal dystonia; and the Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale for rating generalized dystonia. Two “recommended” scales (VHI and VPQ) are generic scales validated on few patients with laryngeal dystonia, whereas the others are disease-specific scales. Twelve scales met criteria for “suggested” and seven scales met criteria for “listed”. All the scales are individually reviewed in the online appendix. Conclusion The task force recommends five specific dystonia scales and suggests to further validate in dystonia two recommended generic voice-disorder scales. Existing scales for oromandibular, arm and task-specific dystonia should be refined and fully assessed. Scales should be developed for body regions where no scales are available, such as lower limbs and trunk. PMID:23893443

  20. Rating scales for musician's dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Berque, Patrice; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart; Frucht, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a focal adult-onset dystonia most commonly involving the hand. It has much greater relative prevalence than non-musician’s focal hand dystonias, exhibits task specificity at the level of specific musical passages, and is a particularly difficult form of dystonia to treat. For most MD patients, the diagnosis confirms the end of their music performance careers. Research on treatments and pathophysiology is contingent upon measures of motor function abnormalities. In this review, we comprehensively survey the literature to identify the rating scales used in MD and the distribution of their use. We also summarize the extent to which the scales have been evaluated for their clinical utility, including reliability, validity, sensitivity, specificity to MD, and practicality for a clinical setting. Out of 135 publications, almost half (62) included no quantitative measures of motor function. The remaining 73 studies used a variety of choices from among 10 major rating scales. Most used subjective scales involving either patient or clinician ratings. Only 25% (18) of the studies used objective scales. None of the scales has been completely and rigorously evaluated for clinical utility. Whether studies involved treatments or pathophysiologic assays, there was a heterogeneous choice of rating scales used with no clear standard. As a result, the collective interpretive value of those studies is limited because the results are confounded by measurement effects. We suggest that the development and widespread adoption of a new clinically useful rating scale is critical for accelerating basic and clinical research in MD. PMID:23884039

  1. Task-specific dystonia: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Butler, Katherine; Edwards, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Task-specific dystonia is a form of isolated focal dystonia with the peculiarity of being displayed only during performance of a specific skilled motor task. This distinctive feature makes task-specific dystonia a particularly mysterious and fascinating neurological condition. In this review, we cover phenomenology and its increasingly broad-spectrum risk factors for the disease, critically review pathophysiological theories and evaluate current therapeutic options. We conclude by highlighting the unique features of task-specific dystonia within the wider concept of dystonia. We emphasise the central contribution of environmental risk factors, and propose a model by which these triggers may impact on the motor control of skilled movement. By viewing task-specific dystonia through this new lens which considers the disorder a modifiable disorder of motor control, we are optimistic that research will yield novel therapeutic avenues for this highly motivated group of patients.

  2. Functional dystonia in musicians: rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chamagne, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    For functional dystonia in musicians, rehabilitation should be principally psychomotor, including psychotherapy based on analysis of the personality and a global physical education of the corporal scheme--it is a compartmental reeducation. From the time of onset, it is of great importance to the musician that the mechanism at the origin of the problem be understood and analyzed. For the therapist, the principal goal is to identify the multiple compensations that mask the real dysfunction. When the musician and the therapist agree on the real cause of the dystonia, it becomes evident that an anatomopathologic explanation using simple vocabulary is as efficacious in the treatment as is the physical therapy. Beginning to rectify abnormal postures and reeducation of the impaired motions then can begin with a whole range of techniques, using specific exercises, stretching, and removable ortheses.

  3. An African-American family with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W; Searcy, Jill A; LeDoux, Mark S; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-08-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African-Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African-Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African-Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African-Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  4. An African-American Family with Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W.; Searcy, Jill A.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5,870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  5. A case of Parkinson's disease following dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Takei, Takanobu; Uozumi, Takenori; Toyota, Tomoko; Yuhi, Tomoaki; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-09-29

    Parkinsonism and dystonia are both disorders of the extrapyramidal motor system, and some patients exhibit a complex of the two symptoms. Although several reports have referred to the coexistence of these disorders as parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, in the majority of cases, dystonia appeared after parkinsonism. DAT-scan is useful for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other types of parkinsonism such as dementia with Lewy bodies. This case report describes a 67-year old woman diagnosed with axial dystonia without parkinsonism 6 years previously, which had worsened despite treatment with Botulinum toxin injections, and hindered the patient's gait. The patient visited the hospital because of gait disturbances and DAT-scan showed a levodopa transducer decrease in the putamen. A few weeks later, she was re-admitted to hospital and exhibited Parkinsonism. Levodopa improved the gait disturbances but axial dystonia was unchanged, and a clinical diagnosis of PD was made. In the authors' opinion, this was a rare case of parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, characterized by the development of PD after dystonia. DAT-scan may be helpful for the diagnosis of patients with parkinsonian disorders with dystonia. PMID:27498816

  6. Nine Years with Munchausen Syndrome: A Case of Psychogenic Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mirac A.; Sahin, Sevki; Cinar, Nilgun; Tiyekli, Utkan; Karsidag, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Background Munchausen syndrome presenting with psychogenic dystonia is a rare condition. Phenomenology Shown A psychogenic dystonia case presenting with an acute onset of retrocollis, lower limb dystonia and bizarre gait was diagnosed as Munchausen syndrome. Educational Value Recognizing psychogenic dystonia avoids unnecessary investigations and provides successful treatment. PMID:27352135

  7. [Cervical dystonia treatment with botulin toxin].

    PubMed

    Cervical Dystonia Treatment With Botulin Toxin, Kazimierz

    2016-08-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of dystonia in adult age. It is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and positioning of the head and neck. Symptoms of it are often associated with pain. This distinguishes this form from other dystonia. The drug of choice is botulinum toxin. It effectively reduces both pain and abnormal excessive muscle activity. In some cases, particularly where there is not obtained the full recovery after treatment botulinum toxin we used drugs for systemic effect. To increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of botulinum toxin more commonly we used administration of toxin under the EMG and ultrasound control. PMID:27591450

  8. [Cervical dystonia treatment with botulin toxin].

    PubMed

    Cervical Dystonia Treatment With Botulin Toxin, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of dystonia in adult age. It is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and positioning of the head and neck. Symptoms of it are often associated with pain. This distinguishes this form from other dystonia. The drug of choice is botulinum toxin. It effectively reduces both pain and abnormal excessive muscle activity. In some cases, particularly where there is not obtained the full recovery after treatment botulinum toxin we used drugs for systemic effect. To increase the effectiveness and reduce the side effects of botulinum toxin more commonly we used administration of toxin under the EMG and ultrasound control. PMID:27590655

  9. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonus-dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome impair epsilon-sarcoglycan trafficking to the plasma membrane: modulation by ubiquitination and ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  10. Emerging Common Molecular Pathways for Primary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S; Dauer, William T; Warner, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Background The dystonias are a group of hyperkinetic movement disorders whose principal cause is neuron dysfunction at one or more interconnected nodes of the motor system. The study of genes and proteins which cause familial dystonia provides critical information about the cellular pathways involved in this dysfunction which disrupts the motor pathways at systems level. In recent years study of the increasing number of DYT genes has implicated a number of cell functions which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia. Methods Review of literature published in English language publications available on Pubmed relating to the genetics and cellular pathology of dystonia Results and Conclusions Numerous potential pathogenetic mechanisms have been identified. We describe those which fall into three emerging thematic groups: cell cycle and transcriptional regulation in the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope function, and control of synaptic function. PMID:23893453

  11. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  12. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  13. [Preliminary results of noncontact temperature measuring using an infrared thermometer on the tarsus pf swine with osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans].

    PubMed

    Sabec, D; Lazar, P

    1990-01-01

    The surface temperature on tarsus of 54 performance tested boars of about 60 kg of Swedish Landrace was measured by means of infra-red thermometer at three measuring points (MP1, MP2 and MP3). MP1 was situated above the tuberculum of os metatarsale III or, as visualised in 21 slaughtered boars, above pathoanatomical alterations of osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans (OATD). MP2 was located directly medially and MP3 laterally from MP1. A clear palpatory symptom was found only with 10 boars, while all 21 slaughtered boars showed different morphological lesions of OATD. The average temperature at MP1 was 35.69 degrees C and was significantly higher (P = .01) than at MP2 (35.34) and MP3 (35.30). The temperature differences between MP1 and MP2 or MP3 were statistically reliable. Boars, who had a clear palpatory symptoms at tuberculum, showed an average temperature at MT1 of 36.27 degrees C, which was higher (P = .0114) than of those with an unclear palpatory symptom (35.64 degrees C). The results show that the temperature differences are the consequence of OATD. PMID:2311530

  14. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Funding Opportunities (NIH Guide) Forms and Deadlines Electronic Research Admin (eRA) Grants Policy OER News About OER Research Contracts Loan Repayment News News Releases News Feed RSS ...

  15. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the brain that handles messages about muscle contractions. There is no cure. Doctors use medicines, Botox injections, surgery, physical therapy, and other treatments to reduce or eliminate muscle spasms and pain. NIH: National Institute of Neurological ...

  16. Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals ...

  17. Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders This study uses deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders. More Information » See All Trials » See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a ...

  18. Genetic Issues in the Diagnosis of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, Simona; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting and repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Several causative genes have been identified, but their genetic bases still remain elusive. Primary Torsion Dystonias (PTDs), in which dystonia is the only clinical sign, can be inherited in a monogenic fashion, and many genes and loci have been identified for autosomal dominant (DYT1/TOR1A; DYT6/THAP1; DYT4/TUBB4a; DYT7; DYT13; DYT21; DYT23/CIZ1; DYT24/ANO3; DYT25/GNAL) and recessive (DYT2; DYT17) forms. However most sporadic cases, especially those with late-onset, are likely multifactorial, with genetic and environmental factors interplaying to reach a threshold of disease. At present, genetic counseling of dystonia patients remains a difficult task. Recently non-motor clinical findings in dystonias, new highlights in the pathophysiology of the disease, and the availability of high-throughput genome-wide techniques are proving useful tools to better understand the complexity of PTD genetics. We briefly review the genetic basis of the most common forms of hereditary PTDs, and discuss relevant issues related to molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:23596437

  19. Piriformis muscle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuncewicz, Elzbieta; Gajewska, Ewa; Sobieska, Magdalena; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Sciatica is characterized by radiating pain from the sacro-lumbar region to the buttocks and down to the lower limb. The causes of sciatica usually relate to degenerative changes in the spine and lesions to the intervertebral discs. Secondary symptomatic sciatica may by caused by metastases to the vertebra, tuberculosis of the spine, tumors located inside the vertebral channel, or entrapment of the sciatic nerve in the piriformis muscle. The piriformis syndrome is primarily caused by fall injury, but other causes are possible, including pyomyositis, dystonia musculorum deformans, and fibrosis after deep injections. Secondary causes like irritation of the sacroiliac joint or lump near the sciatic notch have been described. In the general practice the so-called posttraumatic piriformis muscle syndrome is common. The right treatment can be started following a thorough investigation into the cause of symptoms. PMID:17385355

  20. "Visual sensory trick" in patient with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan-Nyoung; Eun, Mi-Yeon; Kwon, Do-Young; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Kun-Woo

    2012-06-01

    Sensory tricks are clinical maneuvers that may partially relieve dystonic contractions. Any clinical maneuver that modulates afferent sensory and efferent motor pathways could be used as a sensory trick in patients with cervical dystonia. Although various sensory tricks have been described to reduce cervical dystonia, little is known about the exact mechanisms by which they operate. We report a case of cervical dystonia that was alleviated through the use of a visual-sensory trick. Our findings suggest that visual stimulation might be an effective sensory trick in cervical dystonia by compensating for a defective sensory system, or because visual pathways might be also affected by sensory interactions in cervical dystonia.

  1. Botulinum toxin physiology in focal hand and cranial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-11-20

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders.

  2. Ocular palatal tremor plus dystonia – new syndromic association

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ghasia, Fatema F.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Jinnah, H. A.; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ocular palatal tremor typically develops after a breach in the Guillian-Mollaret triangle. We herein describe a variant of this syndrome in which dystonia is also present, hence called, here, ocular palatal tremor plus dystonia. Methods We assessed eye-head movements and dystonia in six patients with ocular palatal plus dystonia. Results Among six patients with ocular palatal tremor two had focal dystonia, three had multifocal dystonia, and one had generalized dystonia. The dystonia affected the upper extremities and neck in four patients, the lower extremities in three and the face in two. Three out of four cervical dystonia patients had head tremor. Two patients also had speech involvement. Lack of correlation between eye and head oscillations suggested that head oscillations were not compensatory or secondary to the eye oscillations and vice versa. Conclusions We describe a novel variant of ocular palatal tremor with dystonia. We speculate that in such variant the dystonia is possibly could be a result of abnormal cerebellar outflow in patients with a breach in Guillain-Mollaret triangle. PMID:26889496

  3. A practical approach to management of focal hand dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia can be focal, segmental, multifocal, generalized, or hemidystonia. Focal dystonia is localized to a specific part of the body. Overall upper limb is more commonly involved in focal dystonia than lower limb and since it starts from hand, focal hand dystonia (FHD) is a more accepted terminology. Writer's cramp and musician dystonia are commonest types of FHD. Typically this dystonia is task specific, but in some patients this specificity may be lost over a period of time. Segmental or generalized dystonia may also start as FHD, so a detailed clinical assessment is required, which should be supplemented by relevant investigations. Treatment includes oral medications, injection botulinum toxin, neurosurgery including neurostimulation, and rehabilitation. Role of injection botulinum toxin has been extensively studied in writer's cramp patients and found to be effective; however, selection of muscles and techniques of injection are crucial in getting best results. PMID:26019409

  4. Efficacy of Zolpidem for Dystonia: A Study Among Different Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Sako, Wataru; Asanuma, Kotaro; Izumi, Yuishin; Miki, Tetsuro; Kaji, Ryuji

    2012-01-01

    Although there are some newly developed options to treat dystonia, its medical treatment is not always satisfactory. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine agonist with a high affinity on benzodiazepine subtype receptor BZ1 (ω1), was found to improve clinical symptoms of dystonia in a limited number of case reports. To investigate what subtype of dystonia is responsive to the therapy, we conducted an open label study to assess the efficacy of zolpidem (5–20 mg) in 34 patients suffering from miscellaneous types of dystonia using the Burke–Fahn–Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). Patients were entered into the study if they had been refractory to other medications as evaluated by BFMDRS (no change in the previous two successive visits). After zolpidem therapy, the scores in the patients as a whole were decreased from 7.2 ± 7.9 to 5.5 ± 5.0 (P = 0.042). Patients with generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome/blepharospasm, and hand dystonia improved in the scale by 27.8, 17.8, and 31.0%, respectively, whereas no improvement was found in cervical dystonia patients. Overall response rate among patients were comparable to that of trihexyphenidyl. Zolpidem may be a therapeutic option for generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome, and hand dystonia including musician’s. Drowsiness was the dose-limiting factor. PMID:22529836

  5. Dystonia and Paroxysmal Dyskinesias: Under-Recognized Movement Disorders in Domestic Animals? A Comparison with Human Dystonia/Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Angelika; Hamann, Melanie; Wissel, Jörg; Volk, Holger A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements, and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis, and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e., dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals. PMID:26664992

  6. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al. 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  7. Late-onset primary dystonia in Zhejiang province of China: a service-based epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yin; Hu, Beibei; Hu, Xingyue

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained muscle contractions, causing repetitive movements and abnormal postures. The epidemiological study of dystonia of Chinese population was limited reported. In this study, we investigated the epidemiology of primary dystonia, and its clinical characteristics in an adult population in China. We identified all dystonia patients from the movement disorders database and botulinum toxin clinic between 2009 and 2013. The medical records were reviewed to verify the diagnosis of dystonia, and demographic and clinical data were collected. A total of 1481 patients with primary dystonia were studied. The most common focal dystonia were blepharospasm (56.4 %), cervical dystonia (36.7 %), limb dystonia (3.4 %), oromandibular dystonia (2.9 %) and laryngeal dystonia (0.6 %). Males with primary dystonia were found to have an earlier age of onset. A female predominance was noted for most of the primary dystonia, with a men to women ratio (M:F) of 1:2.01. The minimum estimate of prevalence of primary dystonia was 27.0 (95 % confidence interval: 25.6-28.3) per million persons in this study. Despite the difference in genetic background and geographic area, the epidemiological features of dystonia in China from our study share most features around the world, such as women dystonia dominance, early-onset age of dystonia with women, etc. But East Asia countries (China and Japan) may share more common features of dystonia.

  8. Is acute dystonia an emergency? Sometimes, it really is!

    PubMed

    Kanburoglu, Mehmet Kenan; Derinoz, Oksan; Cizmeci, Mehmet Nevzat; Havali, Cengiz

    2013-03-01

    Most cases of acute dystonia are mild and easy to manage; nevertheless, some of them can be fatal because of the involvement of certain muscle groups such as the laryngeal muscles, thus requiring urgent intervention. In the literature, approach to life-threatening acute dystonia has not been investigated thoroughly, although the diagnosis is a challenge, and treatment should be offered immediately. Herein the management of life-threatening acute dystonia is discussed via 2 case reports.

  9. Dystonia and Cerebellar Degeneration in the Leaner Mouse Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Raike, Robert S.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar degeneration is traditionally associated with ataxia. Yet, there are examples of both ataxia and dystonia occurring in individuals with cerebellar degeneration. There is also substantial evidence suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction alone may cause dystonia. The types of cerebellar defects that may cause ataxia, dystonia, or both have not been delineated. In the current study, we explored the relationship between cerebellar degeneration and dystonia using the leaner mouse mutant. Leaner mice have severe dystonia that is associated with dysfunctional and degenerating cerebellar Purkinje cells. Whereas the density of Purkinje cells was not significantly reduced in 4 week-old leaner mice, approximately 50% of the neurons were lost by 34 weeks of age. On the other hand, the dystonia and associated functional disability became significantly less severe during this same interval. In other words, dystonia improved as Purkinje cells were lost, suggesting that dysfunctional Purkinje cells, rather than Purkinje cell loss, contribute to the dystonia. These results provide evidence that distorted cerebellar function may cause dystonia and support the concept that different types of cerebellar defects can have different functional consequences. PMID:25791619

  10. A reflection on plasticity research in writing dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Hamada, Masashi; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    Much attention has focused on the hypothesis that there is enhanced plasticity of sensorimotor circuits in patients with dystonia. A common experimental method to assess plasticity in dystonia research is paired associative stimulation (PAS). Excessive, nonfocal effects of PAS were observed in early studies of dystonia; however, these large effects have not been uniformly replicated. In this viewpoint, data from 15 patients with writing dystonia are presented. We suggest that, as in healthy individuals, the effects of PAS are highly variable. A review of previous studies examining PAS in writing dystonia highlights the range of results that have been observed. We conclude that current experimental evidence cannot be fully explained by the notion that PAS responses in writing dystonia are consistently excessive or nonspecific. The variability of PAS responses is such that enhanced plasticity should not be considered a dystonic fingerprint, because the direction of response can vary, and there is overlap between patient and healthy data. We also discuss evidence questioning the assumption that PAS responses are a clear correlate to levels of synaptic plasticity; we need to define more specifically what PAS responses signify in the dystonic brain. Our conclusions are limited to PAS in writing dystonia; however, much variation exists with other plasticity protocols. Large multicenter studies of both focal and generalized forms of dystonia, probing variability of individual neurophysiological profiles, are encouraged. This will reveal the true role of plasticity in the pathophysiology of dystonia and may expose subject-specific therapeutic interventions that are currently concealed.

  11. Two Task-Specific Dystonias in One Hand

    PubMed Central

    Linssen, Manon; Delnooz, Cathérine; van de Warrenburg, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background Dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that lead to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. Task-specific dystonia only manifests during a specific activity. Case report We report a case of a female with writer's cramp who developed a second task-specific hand dystonia (tremor and abnormal posturing of the hand while using a computer mouse) many years after the initial onset. Discussion This observation is in agreement with the concept that task-specific hand dystonia is induced by repetitive, skilled hand movements in those who have an intrinsic vulnerability towards developing “dystonic” motor programs. PMID:23961337

  12. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  13. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician's Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians' dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician's dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  14. Mutations in GNAL cause primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Masuho, Ikuo; Luciano, Marta San; Raymond, Deborah; Factor, Stewart; Lang, Anthony E.; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Trosch, Richard M.; White, Sierra; Ainehsazan, Edmond; Herve, Denis; Sharma, Nutan; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Bressman, Susan B.; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive twisting muscle contractions and postures1,2. Its molecular pathophysiology is poorly understood, in part due to limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the disorder. Only three genes for primary torsion dystonia (PTD), TOR1A (DYT1)3, THAP1 (DYT6)4, and CIZ15 have been identified. Using exome sequencing in two PTD families we identified a novel causative gene, GNAL, with a nonsense p.S293X mutation resulting in premature stop codon in one family and a missense p.V137M mutation in the other. Screening of GNAL in 39 PTD families, revealed six additional novel mutations in this gene. Impaired function of several of the mutations was shown by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. PMID:23222958

  15. Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

  16. Serotonergic perturbations in dystonia disorders-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smit, M; Bartels, A L; van Faassen, M; Kuiper, A; Niezen-Koning, K E; Kema, I P; Dierckx, R A; de Koning, T J; Tijssen, M A

    2016-06-01

    Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions. Emerging data describe high prevalences of non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric co-morbidity, as part of the phenotype of dystonia. Basal ganglia serotonin and serotonin-dopamine interactions gain attention, as imbalances are known to be involved in extrapyramidal movement and psychiatric disorders. We systematically reviewed the literature for human and animal studies relating to serotonin and its role in dystonia. An association between dystonia and the serotonergic system was reported with decreased levels of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, the main metabolite of serotonin. A relation between dystonia and drugs affecting the serotonergic system was described in 89 cases in 49 papers. Psychiatric co-morbidity was frequently described, but likely underestimated as it was not systematically examined. Currently, there are no good (pharmaco)therapeutic options for most forms of dystonia or associated non-motor symptoms. Further research using selective serotonergic drugs in appropriate models of dystonia is required to establish the role of the serotonergic system in dystonia and to guide us to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27073048

  17. A case of mitochondrial cytopathy with exertion induced dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal dystonias are a group of relatively benign hyperkinetic childhood movement disorders of varied etiology. Mitochondrial diseases are well known to produce persistent dystonias as sequelae, but paroxysmal exertion induced dystonia has been reported in only one case to the best of our knowledge. Two siblings born to consanguineous parents presented with early-onset exertion induced dystonia, which was unresponsive to diphenylhydantoin and carbamazepine. A trial with valproate in one of the siblings turned fatal within 24 h. Based on this clue, the second child was investigated and found to suffer from complex I deficiency with a paternally inherited dominant nuclear DNA mutation, which is responsive to the mitochondrial cocktail. Exertion induced dystonia can be a rare manifestation of complex I deficiency. PMID:26557169

  18. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Jeff L.; Kuster, John K.; Levenstein, Jacob M.; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Breiter, Hans C.; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. Methods We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Results Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Conclusions Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches. PMID:27171035

  19. Convergent evidence for abnormal striatal synaptic plasticity in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, David A.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a functionally disabling movement disorder characterized by abnormal movements and postures. Although substantial recent progress has been made in identifying genetic factors, the pathophysiology of the disease remains a mystery. A provocative suggestion gaining broader acceptance is that some aspect of neural plasticity may be abnormal. There is also evidence that, at least in some forms of dystonia, sensorimotor “use” may be a contributing factor. Most empirical evidence of abnormal plasticity in dystonia comes from measures of sensorimotor cortical organization and physiology. However, the basal ganglia also play a critical role in sensorimotor function. Furthermore, the basal ganglia are prominently implicated in traditional models of dystonia, are the primary targets of stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, and provide a neural substrate for sensorimotor learning influenced by neuromodulators. Our working hypothesis is that abnormal plasticity in the basal ganglia is a critical link between the etiology and pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review we set up the background for this hypothesis by integrating a large body of disparate indirect evidence that dystonia may involve abnormalities in synaptic plasticity in the striatum. After reviewing evidence implicating the striatum in dystonia, we focus on the influence of two neuromodulatory systems: dopamine and acetylcholine. For both of these neuromodulators, we first describe the evidence for abnormalities in dystonia and then the means by which it may influence striatal synaptic plasticity. Collectively, the evidence suggests that many different forms of dystonia may involve abnormal plasticity in the striatum. An improved understanding of these altered plastic processes would help inform our understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, and, given the role of the striatum in sensorimotor learning, provide a principled basis for designing therapies aimed at the dynamic processes

  20. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  1. Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan B.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Fahn, Stanley; Fung, Victor S.C.; Hallett, Mark; Jankovic, Joseph; Jinnah, H.A.; Klein, Christine; Lang, Anthony E.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Teller, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the consensus outcome of an international panel consisting of investigators with years of experience in this field that reviewed the definition and classification of dystonia. Agreement was obtained based on a consensus development methodology during three in-person meetings and manuscript review by mail. Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia is classified along two axes: clinical characteristics, including age at onset, body distribution, temporal pattern and associated features (additional movement disorders or neurological features), and etiology, which includes nervous system pathology and inheritance. The clinical characteristics fall into several specific dystonia syndromes that help to guide diagnosis and treatment. We provide here a new general definition of dystonia and propose a new classification. We encourage clinicians and researchers to use these innovative definition and classification and test them in the clinical setting on a variety of patients with dystonia. PMID:23649720

  2. The genetics of dystonia: new twists in an old tale

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder seen by neurologists in clinic. Genetic forms of the disease are important to recognize clinically and also provide valuable information about possible pathogenic mechanisms within the wider disorder. In the past few years, with the advent of new sequencing technologies, there has been a step change in the pace of discovery in the field of dystonia genetics. In just over a year, four new genes have been shown to cause primary dystonia (CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL), PRRT2 has been identified as the cause of paroxysmal kinesigenic dystonia and other genes, such as SLC30A10 and ATP1A3, have been linked to more complicated forms of dystonia or new phenotypes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding genetic forms of dystonia—related to both new and well-known genes alike—and incorporating genetic, clinical and molecular information. We discuss the mechanistic insights provided by the study of the genetic causes of dystonia and provide a helpful clinical algorithm to aid clinicians in correctly predicting the genetic basis of various forms of dystonia. PMID:23775978

  3. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological.

  4. Risperidone in idiopathic and symptomatic dystonia: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Marini, P; Sorbi, S

    2000-04-01

    Risperidone is a heterocyclic neuroleptic with prominent antiserotoninergic (5HT2) as well as antidopaminergic (D2) activity. We studied the efficacy of risperidone in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic dystonias in seven patients using the Fahn and Marsden rating scale for torsion dystonia before and after four weeks of treatment (2-6 mg/day). The twisting and involuntary movements with abnormal postures decreased in all the patients treated, with a statistically significant mean improvement (41%; p = 0.009, CI 95%). Our results suggest that risperidone is useful in idiopathic and symptomatic dystonia. PMID:10938193

  5. Oral methylphenidate for the treatment of refractory facial dystonias.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Kian; Choe, Christina H; Vagefi, M Reza; Gausas, Roberta E; Eckstein, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Oral methylphenidate (Ritalin, Novartis) has been reported to alleviate symptoms of benign essential blepharospasm in an off-label application. This series presents 3 patients with refractory periorbital and facial dystonias, including blepharospasm, apraxia of eyelid opening, and oromandibular dystonia unresponsive to standard treatments who experienced a response to oral methylphenidate therapy. While the mechanisms for facial dystonias have not been elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that they are on the spectrum with Parkinson disease. Given the role of dopamine loss in the pathogenesis of Parkinson, the authors' speculate that methylphenidate may be acting on the pathway directly involved in facial dystonias. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a case of successful treatment of blepharospasm refractory to upper eyelid myectomy with methylphenidate monotherapy.

  6. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  7. Genetic and clinical features of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) is defined as a syndrome in which dystonia is the only clinical sign (except for tremor), and there is no evidence of neuronal degeneration or an acquired cause by history or routine laboratory assessment. Seven different loci have been recognized for PTD but only two of the genes have been identified. In this review we will described the phenotypes associated with these loci and discuss the responsible gene. PMID:21168499

  8. Basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C; van Vugt, Floris T; Keller, Peter E; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument.

  9. The Most Cited Works in Essential Tremor and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    King, Nicolas K. K.; Tam, Joseph; Fasano, Alfonso; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of the most cited works in a particular field gives an indication of the important advances, developments, and discoveries that have had the highest impact in that discipline. Our aim was to identify the most cited works in essential tremor (ET) and dystonia. Methods A bibliometric search was performed using the ISI Web of Science database using selected search terms for ET and dystonia for articles published from 1900 to 2015. The resulting citation counts were analyzed to identify the most cited works, and the studies were categorized. Results Using the criterion of more than 400 citations, there were four citation classics for ET and six for dystonia. The most cited studies were those on pathophysiology followed by medical treatments, clinical classification, genetic studies, surgical treatments, review articles, and epidemiology studies. A comparison of the most cited articles for ET and dystonia showed that there was a divergence, with ET and dystonia having a higher number of epidemiologic and genetic studies, respectively. Whereas the peak period for the number of publications was 2000–2004 for ET, it was 1995–1999 for dystonia. Discussion Given the large number of patients with these disorders, there appears to be an unmet need for further research advances in both areas, but particularly for ET as the most common movement disorder. PMID:27119049

  10. Genetic animal models of dystonia: common features and diversities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Richter, Angelika

    2014-10-01

    Animal models are pivotal for studies of pathogenesis and treatment of disorders of the central nervous system which in its complexity cannot yet be modeled in vitro or using computer simulations. The choice of a specific model to test novel therapeutic strategies for a human disease should be based on validity of the model for the approach: does the model reflect symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment response present in human patients? In the movement disorder dystonia, prior to the availability of genetically engineered mice, spontaneous mutants were chosen based on expression of dystonic features, including abnormal muscle contraction, movements and postures. Recent discovery of a number of genes and gene products involved in dystonia initiated research on pathogenesis of the disorder, and the creation of novel models based on gene mutations. Here we present a review of current models of dystonia, with a focus on genetic rodent models, which will likely be first choice in the future either for pathophysiological or for preclinical drug testing or both. In order to help selection of a model depending on expression of a specific feature of dystonia, this review is organized by symptoms and current knowledge of pathogenesis of dystonia. We conclude that albeit there is increasing need for research on pathogenesis of the disease and development of improved models, current models do replicate features of dystonia and are useful tools to develop urgently demanded treatment for this debilitating disorder.

  11. Development of the Comprehensive Cervical Dystonia Rating Scale: Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Comella, Cynthia L.; Fox, Susan H.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Jinnah, Hyder A.; Zurowski, Mateusz; McDonald, William M.; Marsh, Laura; Rosen, Ami R.; Waliczek, Tracy; Wright, Laura J.; Galpern, Wendy R.; Stebbins, Glenn T.

    2016-01-01

    We present the methodology utilized for development and clinimetric testing of the Comprehensive Cervical Dystonia (CD) Rating scale, or CCDRS. The CCDRS includes a revision of the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS-2), a newly developed psychiatric screening tool (TWSTRS-PSYCH), and the previously validated Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58). For the revision of the TWSTRS, the original TWSTRS was examined by a committee of dystonia experts at a dystonia rating scales workshop organized by the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation. During this workshop, deficiencies in the standard TWSTRS were identified and recommendations for revision of the severity and pain subscales were incorporated into the TWSTRS-2. Given that no scale currently evaluates the psychiatric features of cervical dystonia (CD), we used a modified Delphi methodology and a reiterative process of item selection to develop the TWSTRS-PSYCH. We also included the CDIP-58 to capture the impact of CD on quality of life. The three scales (TWSTRS2, TWSTRS-PSYCH, and CDIP-58) were combined to construct the CCDRS. Clinimetric testing of reliability and validity of the CCDRS are described. The CCDRS was designed to be used in a modular fashion that can measure the full spectrum of CD. This scale will provide rigorous assessment for studies of natural history as well as novel symptom-based or disease-modifying therapies. PMID:27088112

  12. Basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C; van Vugt, Floris T; Keller, Peter E; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  13. Temporal discrimination, a cervical dystonia endophenotype: penetrance and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Kimmich, Okka; Molloy, Anna; Whelan, Robert; Williams, Laura; Bradley, David; Balsters, Joshua; Molloy, Fiona; Lynch, Tim; Healy, Daniel G; Walsh, Cathal; O'Riordan, Seán; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The pathogenesis of adult-onset primary dystonia remains poorly understood. There is variable age-related and gender-related expression of the phenotype, the commonest of which is cervical dystonia. Endophenotypes may provide insight into underlying genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of dystonia. The temporal discrimination threshold (TDT)-the shortest time interval at which two separate stimuli can be detected as being asynchronous-is abnormal both in patients with cervical dystonia and in their unaffected first-degree relatives. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that putaminal activation positively correlates with the ease of temporal discrimination between two stimuli in healthy individuals. We hypothesized that abnormal temporal discrimination would exhibit similar age-related and gender-related penetrance as cervical dystonia and that unaffected relatives with an abnormal TDT would have reduced putaminal activation during a temporal discrimination task. TDTs were examined in a group of 192 healthy controls and in 158 unaffected first-degree relatives of 84 patients with cervical dystonia. In 24 unaffected first-degree relatives, fMRI scanning was performed during a temporal discrimination task. The prevalence of abnormal TDTs in unaffected female relatives reached 50% after age 48 years; whereas, in male relatives, penetrance of the endophenotype was reduced. By fMRI, relatives who had abnormal TDTs, compared with relatives who had normal TDTs, had significantly less activation in the putamina and in the middle frontal and precentral gyri. Only the degree of reduction of putaminal activity correlated significantly with worsening of temporal discrimination. These findings further support abnormal temporal discrimination as an endophenotype of cervical dystonia involving disordered basal ganglia circuits.

  14. Improvement of both dystonia and tics with 60 Hz pallidal deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hwynn, Nelson; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron L; Limotai, Natlada; Zeilman, Pamela; Malaty, Irene A; Foote, Kelly D; Morishita, Takashi; Okun, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized in both dystonia and in medication refractory Tourette syndrome. We present an interesting case of a patient with a mixture of disabling dystonia and Tourette syndrome whose coexistent dystonia and tics were successfully treated with 60 Hz-stimulation of the globus pallidus region.

  15. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  16. The syndrome of fixed dystonia: an evaluation of 103 patients.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette; Trimble, Michael; Quinn, Niall; Bhatia, Kailash

    2004-10-01

    We describe the clinical features of 103 patients presenting with fixed dystonia and report the prospective assessment and investigation of 41 of them. Most patients were female (84%) and had a young age of onset [mean 29.7 (SD 13.1) years]. A peripheral injury preceded onset in 63% and spread of dystonia to other body regions occurred in 56%. After an average follow-up of 3.3 years (overall disease duration 8.6 years), partial (19%) or complete (8%) remission had occurred in a minority of patients. The fixed postures affected predominantly the limbs (90%), and rarely the neck/shoulder region (6%) or jaw (4%). In the prospectively studied group, pain was present in most patients and was a major complaint in 41%. Twenty percent of patients fulfilled criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). No consistent investigational abnormalities were found and no patient tested (n = 25) had a mutation in the DYT1 gene. Thirty-seven percent of patients fulfilled classification criteria for documented or clinically established psychogenic dystonia; 29% fulfilled DSM-IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition) criteria for somatization disorder, which was diagnosed only after examination of the primary care records in many cases; and 24% fulfilled both sets of criteria. Ten percent of the prospectively studied and 45% of the retrospectively studied patients did not have any evidence of psychogenic dystonia, and detailed investigation failed to reveal an alternative explanation for their clinical presentation. Detailed, semi-structured neuropsychiatric assessments in a subgroup of 26 patients with fixed dystonia and in a control group of 20 patients with classical dystonia revealed dissociative (42 versus 0%, P = 0.001) and affective disorders (85 versus 50%, P = 0.01) significantly more commonly in the fixed dystonia group. Medical and surgical treatment was largely unsuccessful. However, seven patients who underwent multidisciplinary

  17. Pain Relief in Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cattai, Lígia; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by intermittent or sustained muscle contractions that cause abnormal, usually repetitive, movements and postures. Dystonic movements can be tremulous and twisting and often follow a pattern. They are frequently associated with overflow muscle activation and may be triggered or worsened by voluntary action. Most voluntary muscles can be affected and, in the case of the neck muscles, the condition is referred to as cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of dystonia. The high incidence of pain distinguishes CD from other focal dystonias and contributes significantly to patient disability and low quality of life. Different degrees of pain in the cervical region are reported by more than 60% of patients, and pain intensity is directly related to disease severity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is currently considered the treatment of choice for CD and can lead to an improvement in pain and dystonic symptoms in up to 90% of patients. The results for BoNT/A and BoNT/B are similar. The complex relationship between pain and dystonia has resulted in a large number of studies and more comprehensive assessments of dystonic patients. When planning the application of BoNT, pain should be a key factor in the choice of muscles and doses. In conclusion, BoNT is highly effective in controlling pain, and its analgesic effect is sustained for a long time in most CD patients. PMID:26110508

  18. Bilateral segmental dystonia in a professional tennis player.

    PubMed

    Mayer, F; Topka, H; Boose, A; Horstmann, T; Dickhuth, H H

    1999-08-01

    Dystonias occur frequently as repetitive movements, persistent elevations of muscle tone, or tonic contortions, whereby the cause is assumed to be an impairment of basal ganglia function. Focal dystonias are especially known in musicians, although little is reported on focal dystonias in athletic stress. The present case report describes the case of a 34-yr-old professional tennis player with bilateral segmental dystonia. The symptoms were expressed in involuntary movements when he intended to hit the ball and in a progredient tremor, initially in one hand, later in both, making him unable to write. The altered mobility during athletic stress was confirmed by video analysis, the altered innervation with excessive, uncoordinated impulse influx by means of electromyography during sport-type specific stress, and writing incapacity during a writing test. The symptoms abated under therapy with trihexyphenidyl-HCL, so that the patient has been able to work as a tennis coach with improved athletic performance for the past 3 yr. It is concluded that the various forms of dystonia should be included in the differential diagnosis of impaired coordinative movements under athletic exercise, especially of the upper extremities.

  19. The challenge of diagnosing focal hand dystonia in musicians

    PubMed Central

    Rosset-Llobet, J.; Candia, V.; Molas, S. Fàbregas i; Dolors Rosinés i Cubells, D.; Pascual-Leone, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose To most clinicians, medical problems in musicians, particularly those concerning focal hand dystonia, constitute an unfamiliar domain difficult to manage. The latter can importantly influence diagnostics and the course of treatment. The purpose of this study was to enlighten the issue and to identify possible problems in diagnosing musicians’ cramp within the Spanish medical community. Methods We used a brief questions’ catalog and clinical histories of 665 musicians seen at our clinic for performing artists. We analyzed patients’ diagnosis records in 87 cases of focal hand dystonia (13.1%). In so doing, we surveyed previous diagnoses and diverse treatments prescriptions prior to referral to our clinic. Results Referrals came primarily from orthopaedists and neurologists. The 52.9% arrived at our clinic without a diagnosis or a suspicion of suffering from focal dystonia. The most frequently attempted diagnoses other than musicians’ dystonia included nerve compression, tendonitis and trigger fingers. Commonly prescribed treatments included rest, various surgical procedures, physiotherapy and oral anti-inflammatory medication. Conclusions This data depicts the diagnostic challenges of medical professionals may encounter when confronted with musician’s focal dystonia. PMID:19473363

  20. Delays to the diagnosis of cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Kelly L; Williams, David R

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cervical dystonia (CD) is based on physical examination and is therefore reliant on clinician experience. Due to variability of presenting symptoms it may be misdiagnosed, thus delaying the provision of effective treatment. We sought to determine the average time taken to make a diagnosis of CD in our clinical cohort and explore contributing factors to diagnostic delay. Forty-nine patients with a diagnosis of CD attending a movement disorder specialist for treatment completed a questionnaire regarding symptoms and clinical interactions at onset and diagnosis. The mean time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 6.8 years (range 0-53 years). More than 50% of patients sought physical therapies initially, prior to consulting their general practitioner. Only 40% of patients sought medical advice within the first 6 months of symptom onset and only 10% were given an initial diagnosis of CD. The first referral from the general practitioner was to a specialist other than a neurologist in 31% of patients. Patients were seen by a mean of three doctors (range one to nine) before being given the correct diagnosis of CD. Delay to diagnosis of CD may in part be due to lack of awareness of the condition amongst health care professionals. Improved diagnostic skill appears likely to have had a substantial impact on the delivery of appropriate treatment in this population.

  1. What is new in tics, dystonia and chorea?

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Movement disorders comprise hyperkinetic involuntary movements (eg tremor, myoclonus, tics, dystonia and chorea) and hypokinetic (parkinsonism) disorders. Tics are cardinal features of primary tic disorders encompassing Tourette syndrome (TS), but are also found in some neurodegenerative conditions and may be induced by psychoactive substances. The first line treatment for tics is pharmacological (mainly dopamine receptor blockers or alpha-2 adrenergic agonists) and behavioural. Dystonia and chorea syndromes are considerably heterogeneous in aetiology, and age at onset, body distribution of the movement disorder, accompanying neurological motor and non-motor features, and systemic manifestations are all important to reach a correct aetiological diagnosis. While symptomatic pharmacological treatment remains the mainstay of treatment for choreas, deep brain stimulation surgery has a well-defined place in the management of medically refractory dystonia.

  2. What is new in tics, dystonia and chorea?

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Movement disorders comprise hyperkinetic involuntary movements (eg tremor, myoclonus, tics, dystonia and chorea) and hypokinetic (parkinsonism) disorders. Tics are cardinal features of primary tic disorders encompassing Tourette syndrome (TS), but are also found in some neurodegenerative conditions and may be induced by psychoactive substances. The first line treatment for tics is pharmacological (mainly dopamine receptor blockers or alpha-2 adrenergic agonists) and behavioural. Dystonia and chorea syndromes are considerably heterogeneous in aetiology, and age at onset, body distribution of the movement disorder, accompanying neurological motor and non-motor features, and systemic manifestations are all important to reach a correct aetiological diagnosis. While symptomatic pharmacological treatment remains the mainstay of treatment for choreas, deep brain stimulation surgery has a well-defined place in the management of medically refractory dystonia. PMID:27481387

  3. Familial dystonia and visual failure with striatal CT lucencies.

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D; Lang, A E; Quinn, N P; McDonald, W I; Abdallat, A; Nimri, S

    1986-01-01

    A unique disorder is described in seven members of two families in whom dystonia was variably associated with subacute visual loss or asymptomatic optic atrophy, and striking bilateral symmetrical lucencies on CT scan, especially involving the putamen. It is possible that this is a variant of Leigh's disease. However, there were considerable differences between these patients and those with pathologically proven Leigh's disease. This condition must be excluded in all patients thought to have idiopathic dystonia, subacute visual failure similar to Leber's optic neuropathy, or a combination of these disorders. Images PMID:3711913

  4. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14155.001 PMID:27249418

  5. Advances in the genetics of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Enza Maria

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetics of primary torsion dystonia (PTD) has been progressing at a very slow pace compared with other movement disorders. For many years, only one causative gene was known, DYT1/TOR1A, yet the recent identification of a second PTD causative gene (DYT6/THAP1), the detection of subclinical alterations caused by mutations in PTD genes in some healthy non-penetrant individuals, and functional studies on TOR1A and THAP1 protein products have significantly improved mutation detection, genotype-phenotype correlates, and our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying the development of dystonia. PMID:20948792

  6. [Paradoxical kinesis phenomenon in focal hand dystonia--writer's cramp].

    PubMed

    Shavlovskaia, O A; Orlova, O R; Golubev, V L

    2005-01-01

    Paradoxical kinesis (PK) phenomenon and its variants, exerting a beneficial influence on dystonia dynamics, are described using self clinical examination of 57 writer's cramp patients. PK was found in all the patients independently of writer's cramp variant, duration and severity. The most frequent writing maneuvers were as follows: hand printed (100%), proximal arm muscles writing (82.5%), individually selected writing instrument (67.5-80%), unusual means (67.5-75%), writing imitation with unlike-pen object (70%), marked papers (52.5%). The beneficial influence of PK phenomenon on dystonia expression may be considered as one of the directions of writer's cramp rehabilitation.

  7. Overuse Cervical Dystonia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Elliot; Tagliati, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background Overuse or task-specific dystonia has been described in a number of professions characterized by repetitive actions, typically affecting the upper extremities. Cervical dystonia (CD), however, has rarely been associated with overuse. Case Report We present a case report of typical CD that developed in the context of chronic repetitive movements associated with the patient’s professional occupation as an office manager who spent many hours per day holding a phone to his ear. Discussion Overuse CD should be suspected when typical symptoms and signs of CD develop in the context of chronic repetitive use or overuse of cervical muscles, especially where exacerbating tasks involve asymmetric postures. PMID:27708983

  8. Loss of sensory function in patients with idiopathic hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Oberdiek, Denise; Suttrup, Judith; Osada, Nani; Evers, Stefan; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Former studies suggest an additional involvement of the sensory nervous system, beside the involuntary contractions of antagonist muscles, in idiopathic hand dystonia. We studied contact heat-evoked potentials and quantitative sensory testing (QST) in 10 patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia and 10 age-matched healthy controls. Cortical potentials recorded from the vertex (Pz) after contact heat stimulation of the volar forearm and the dorsum of the hand at a temperature of 51°C showed significantly reduced A-δ-amplitudes. Numerical pain ratings on the affected side in comparison to the unaffected side and to healthy controls were significantly reduced. QST results showed an impairment of the thermal detection thresholds, the mechanical pain sensitivity and the mechanical pain threshold at the affected body side of the patients. Our results suggest a loss of distinct sensory functions of the affected hand in comparison with the contralateral hand and to matched healthy subjects in patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia. For the first time, an extended loss of sensory function could be shown in patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia.

  9. Abnormal Movement Preparation in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Scheef, Lukas; Bewersdorff, Malte; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological and behavioral studies in primary dystonia suggest abnormalities during movement preparation, but this crucial phase preceding movement onset has not yet been studied specifically with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To identify abnormalities in brain activation during movement preparation, we used event-related fMRI to analyze behaviorally unimpaired sequential finger movements in 18 patients with task-specific focal hand dystonia (FHD) and 18 healthy subjects. Patients and controls executed self-initiated or externally cued prelearnt four-digit sequential movements using either right or left hands. In FHD patients, motor performance of the sequential finger task was not associated with task-related dystonic posturing and their activation levels during motor execution were highly comparable with controls. On the other hand reduced activation was observed during movement preparation in the FHD patients in left premotor cortex / precentral gyrus for all conditions, and for self-initiation additionally in supplementary motor area, left mid-insula and anterior putamen, independent of effector side. Findings argue for abnormalities of early stages of motor control in FHD, manifesting during movement preparation. Since deficits map to regions involved in the coding of motor programs, we propose that task-specific dystonia is characterized by abnormalities during recruitment of motor programs: these do not manifest at the behavioral level during simple automated movements, however, errors in motor programs of complex movements established by extensive practice (a core feature of FHD), trigger the inappropriate movement patterns observed in task-specific dystonia. PMID:24167610

  10. Therapeutic immobilisation for small guitar player's dystonia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Waissman, Flavia; Pereira, João Santos; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2009-01-01

    The development of focal hand dystonia through repetitive tasks is a result of degradation of cortical somatosensory representation due to repetitive fast stimuli sufficient to alter the sensory-motor stimulus, harming the motor control. A sensory-motor training program can modify this disorder. A behavioural intervention focusing on movement could help reduce or eliminate these conditions.

  11. Bromocriptine-induced dystonia in patients with aphasia and hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Leiguarda, R; Merello, M; Sabe, L; Starkstein, S

    1993-11-01

    Five of seven patients with chronic nonfluent aphasia and hemiparesis due to a focal ischemic infarction developed painful hemidystonia during treatment with a high dose of bromocriptine. All seven patients had cortical damage, but four also had basal ganglia and one thalamic involvement. While lesion location did not differ between dystonic and nondystonic patients, the dystonic patients had more weakness than those without dystonia.

  12. A Beautician's Dystonia: Long-Lasting Effect of Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Siria; Dalise, Stefania; Lamola, Giuseppe; Venturi, Martina; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for dystonia are not curative but symptomatic; the treatment of choice for focal dystonias is repeated botulinum toxin injections. Here, we present the case of a 46-year-old beautician with focal dystonia in her left hand that affected her ability to work. Pharmacological treatment with clonazepam and gabapentin failed to resolve her symptoms and was discontinued due to side effects (sleepiness, gastrointestinal disorders). Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin (incobotulinumtoxinA, Xeomin) into the extensor digitorum communis (35 U), flexor carpi radialis (35 U), and flexor digitorum superficialis (30 U) muscles resulted in complete resolution of symptoms at clinical assessments at 1, 3, 6, and 10 months after the injections, confirmed by the results of surface electromyography 10 months after treatment. The patient was able to work again 1 month after treatment. No reinjection has been necessary at the last evaluation (12 months after treatment). In conclusion, botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for focal dystonia that can have long-lasting effects and can improve patients' ability to work and quality of life. PMID:25143844

  13. Risk factors for idiopathic dystonia in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jeremy R B; Boyle, Richard S; O'Sullivan, John D; Silburn, Peter A; Mellick, George D

    2014-12-01

    It is currently hypothesised that a combination of genetic and environmental factors underlies the development of idiopathic isolated dystonia (IID). In this study, we examined several possible environmental or other non-genetic factors that may influence the risk for IID in Queensland, Australia. We surveyed several environmental exposures, lifestyle factors, medical and family histories to investigate potential risk factors for IID. Associations between putative risk factors and IID were assessed using a total of 184 dystonia patients and 1048 neurologically-normal control subjects sampled from Queensland between 2005 and 2012. Our analyses revealed that anxiety disorders, depression, tremor, cigarette smoking and head injuries with a loss of consciousness were associated with increased risk for IID (p<0.05), all of which remained statistically significant following an adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing except for depression. We also observed that the risk for dystonia increased with higher cigarette smoking pack-year quartiles in our analyses. Our results suggest possible environmental factors that influence the development of IID and complement the findings of similar dystonia risk factor studies. Further investigation defining the environmental and other non-genetic risk factors for IID may provide insight into the development of the disorder in genetically-susceptible individuals.

  14. Limb Amputations in Fixed Dystonia: A Form of Body Integrity Identity Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Mark J; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Schrag, Arnette; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Thompson, Philip D; Bhatia, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought amputation of the affected limb. We place these cases in the context of previous reports of patients with healthy limbs and patients with chronic regional pain syndrome who have sought amputation. Our cases, combined with recent data regarding disorders of mental rotation in patients with fixed dystonia, as well as previous data regarding body integrity identity disorder and amputations sought by patients with chronic regional pain syndrome, raise the possibility that patients with fixed dystonia might have a deficit in body schema that predisposes them to developing fixed dystonia and drives some to seek amputation. The outcome of amputation in fixed dystonia is invariably unfavorable. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21484872

  15. Spatial reorganization of putaminal dopamine D2-like receptors in cranial and hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Mink, Jonathan W; Tolia, Veeral N; Revilla, Fredy J; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [(18)F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zdystonia z, p = 0.016). We conclude that in isolated focal dystonia, dopamine D2-like receptors are distributed differently in the putamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia. PMID:24520350

  16. Pallidal deep brain stimulation: an effective treatment in Chinese patients with tardive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peter Y M; Chan, Danny T M; Zhu, X L; Yeung, Jonas H M; Chan, Anne Y Y; Au, Angie C W; Cheng, K M; Lau, K Y; Wing, Y K; Mok, Vincent C T; Poon, W S

    2014-10-01

    Tardive dystonia is an iatrogenic complication of dopamine receptor antagonist medication such as first-generation antipsychotics. It occurs in up to 2% of patients and only 10% recover after stopping medication. Deep brain stimulation for primary dystonia has proven to be effective and its application for secondary dystonias is gaining acceptance. We report our experience in treating three ethnic Chinese schizophrenia patients with severe medically refractory tardive dystonia by globus pallidus internus deep brain stimulation. Preoperatively, all required assistance with essential activities of daily living and two were bed-bound. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale score was 61 (range, 44-80) and mean Global Dystonia Rating Scale score was 47 (range, 40-52). No procedure-related complications were encountered. By 3 months all could return to unassisted living and walk with support with a mean of 77% and 66% improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale and Global Dystonia Rating Scale scores, respectively. Quality-of-life assessment performed for two patients using the EuroQol-5 dimensions visual analogue scale showed a mean improvement of 86% at 3 months. On clinical follow-up, the effect was well maintained for a period of 3 to 10 years. Pallidal deep brain stimulation is a safe and highly effective form of symptomatic treatment for patients with medically refractory tardive dystonia.

  17. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician’s Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians’ dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician’s dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  18. Botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Schuele, Stephan; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Lederman, Richard J; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2005-01-25

    The authors present the results of 84 musicians with focal task-specific dystonia treated with EMG-guided botulinum toxin injections. Treatment outcome was assessed by subjective estimation of playing before and after treatment and self-rating of treatment response. Fifty-eight (69%) of the musicians experienced improvement from the injections and 30 of 84 musicians (36%) reported long-term benefit in their performance ability.

  19. Unmet Needs in the Management of Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Smit, Marenka; van den Dool, Joost; Volkmann, Jens; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is a movement disorder which affects daily living of many patients. In clinical practice, several unmet treatment needs remain open. This article focuses on the four main aspects of treatment. We describe existing and emerging treatment approaches for CD, including botulinum toxin injections, surgical therapy, management of non-motor symptoms, and rehabilitation strategies. The unsolved issues regarding each of these treatments are identified and discussed, and possible future approaches and research lines are proposed. PMID:27733842

  20. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper. PMID:26271953

  1. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper.

  2. Domperidone-induced dystonia: a rare and troublesome complication

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Om Prakash; Dhakal, Mona; Bhandari, Dhurba

    2014-01-01

    Domperidone is a commonly prescribed antiemetic drug but its side effects are rarely seen. Extrapyramidal side effects are a very rare complication of the drug occurring in 1/10 000 population. They usually occur in infants and very young children due to a poorly developed blood–brain barrier. We report a case of acute dystonia in a 13-year-old boy induced by domperidone. The boy was treated for viral fever and was started on domperidone 30 mg/day, sustained release form (0.7 mg/kg/day), for persistent vomiting along with other supportive treatment. On the fourth day of treatment, although the fever and vomiting subsided, the child developed oromandibular dystonia despite giving the drug in the recommended dose. Fortunately, drug-induced dystonias are a reversible condition and the child improved in 7–8 days after discontinuation of the drug. There was no recurrence at 1 month follow-up. Usually, dystonic reactions do not threaten life but are troublesome and life altering, so judicious use of the drug is advised. PMID:24973343

  3. A model of task-specific focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Müller, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a task-specific movement disorder which manifests itself as a loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. The condition is most frequent in musicians. Until today, the aetiology of focal hand dystonia is not completely understood, but there is growing evidence for an abnormal cortical processing of sensory information, as well as degraded representation of motor functions. It was demonstrated that in the somatosensory cortex the topographical location of sensory inputs from individual fingers is corrupted. Occasionally, a change in sensory information of the hand may at least temporarily improve the condition. This phenomenon is called sensory trick. In this paper, we propose a model of encoding of sensory stimuli which could explain the task specificity of cortical representations of the fingers or other effectors in the context of dystonia. In the framework of this model a sensory stimulus is encoded as a signal vector of higher dimension. A part of its components directly represents the sensory stimulus, while the remaining components describe the context. This model does not only account for the task specificity, but may also explain some characteristics of the retraining process in this disorder.

  4. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder.

  5. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for early-onset torsion dystonia.

    PubMed

    Rechitsky, S; Verlinsky, O; Kuliev, A; Ozen, S; Laziuk, K; Beck, R; Gleicher, N; Verlinsky, Y

    2004-02-01

    Early-onset primary torsion dystonia (DYT1) is the most severe and common form of hereditary movement disorders, characterized by sustained twisting contractures that begin in childhood, which is caused in majority of cases by a 3-bp deletion of the DYT1 gene on chromosome 9q34 at the heterozygote state. As there is no effective treatment of this disease, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may be a useful option for at-risk couples to establish an DYT1 mutation-free pregnancy. PGD was performed for two obligate carriers of the DYT1 3-bp deletion, using blastomere testing to preselect the mutation-free embryos, based on mutation analysis with simultaneous testing of the three closely linked markers, D9S62, D9S63 and ASS. Of 19 tested blastomeres in three cycles, 17 had conclusive information about the mutation and linked markers, of which eight were predicted to be free of 3-bp deletion. Six of these embryos were transferred back to patients, two in each cycle, yielding singleton DYT1 3-bp deletion-free clinical pregnancies in two. One of these pregnancies was terminated due to severe anencephaly and the other resulted in birth of a mutation-free child. This is the first PGD for primary torsion dystonia, providing an alternative for those at-risk couples who cannot accept prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy as an option for avoiding early onset torsion dystonia.

  6. Review: genetics and neuropathology of primary pure dystonia.

    PubMed

    Paudel, R; Hardy, J; Revesz, T; Holton, J L; Houlden, H

    2012-10-01

    Neuropathology has been the key to understanding the aetiology of many neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal degeneration and cerebellar ataxias. Dystonia shares many clinical features with these conditions but research in general, has been unrewarding in providing information on disease processes. Neuropathological studies are few in number and only limited morphological abnormalities have been described. In the genetic literature, dystonia loci are represented as DYT and are assigned ascending numerals chronologically as they are identified. This review will concentrate on the neuropathology of primary pure dystonia, focusing on DYT1 and DYT6 and the correlation between clinical and genetic findings. Research in this area is incomplete and confounded by the rarity of post mortem brain tissue. However, recent findings, indicating a direct interaction between the torsinA (TOR1A) gene responsible for DYT1 and the thanatos-associated domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) gene responsible for DYT6, have important implications in understanding these two entities and also for other members of this group of disorders. PMID:22897341

  7. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M.; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J.; Reilly, Richard B.; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  8. Dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: outcome of bilateral pallidal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, K. A. M.; Wieland, K.; Jech, R.; Kurlemann, G.; Sharma, N.; Gill, S. S.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Hayflick, S. J.; Hogarth, P.; Leenders, K. L.; Limousin, P.; Malanga, C. J.; Moro, E.; Ostrem, J. L.; Revilla, F. J.; Santens, P.; Schnitzler, A.; Tisch, S.; Valldeoriola, F.; Vesper, J.; Volkmann, J.; Woitalla,, D.; Peker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty with speech and swallowing, pain and respiratory distress. Several case reports and one case series have been published concerning therapeutic outcome of pallidal deep brain stimulation in dystonia caused by neurodegeneration with brain iron degeneration, reporting mostly favourable outcomes. However, with case studies, there may be a reporting bias towards favourable outcome. Thus, we undertook this multi-centre retrospective study to gather worldwide experiences with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. A total of 16 centres contributed 23 patients with confirmed neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation. Patient details including gender, age at onset, age at operation, genetic status, magnetic resonance imaging status, history and clinical findings were requested. Data on severity of dystonia (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Motor Scale, Barry Albright Dystonia Scale), disability (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Disability Scale), quality of life (subjective global rating from 1 to 10 obtained retrospectively from patient and caregiver) as well as data on supportive therapy, concurrent pharmacotherapy, stimulation settings, adverse events and side effects were collected. Data were collected once preoperatively and at 2–6 and 9–15 months postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was change in severity of dystonia. The mean improvement in severity of dystonia was 28.5% at 2–6 months and 25.7% at 9–15 months. At 9–15 months postoperatively, 66.7% of patients showed an improvement of 20% or more in severity of dystonia

  9. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  10. The non-motor syndrome of primary dystonia: clinical and pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark J.; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is typically considered a movement disorder characterized by motor manifestations, primarily involuntary muscle contractions causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. However, growing evidence indicates an important non-motor component to primary dystonia, including abnormalities in sensory and perceptual functions, as well as neuropsychiatric, cognitive and sleep domains. Here, we review this evidence and discuss its clinical and pathophysiological implications. PMID:21933808

  11. Exhaustive Analysis of BH4 and Dopamine Biosynthesis Genes in Patients with Dopa-Responsive Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clot, Fabienne; Grabli, David; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Roze, Emmanuel; Castelnau, Pierre; Chabrol, Brigitte; Landrieu, Pierre; Nguyen, Karine; Ponsot, Gerard; Abada, Myriem; Doummar, Diane; Damier, Philippe; Gil, Roger; Thobois, Stephane; Ward, Alana J.; Hutchinson, Michael; Toutain, Annick; Picard, Fabienne; Camuzat, Agnes; Fedirko, Estelle; San, Chankannira; Bouteiller, Delphine; LeGuern, Eric; Durr, Alexandra; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia is a childhood-onset dystonic disorder, characterized by a dramatic response to low dose of L-Dopa. Dopa-responsive dystonia is mostly caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the "GCH1" gene (GTP cyclohydrolase1) and more rarely by autosomal recessive mutations in the "TH" (tyrosine hydroxylase) or "SPR" (sepiapterin…

  12. Update on Deep Brain Stimulation for Dyskinesia and Dystonia: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; SAIKI, Hidemoto; NISHIDA, Namiko; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been an established surgical treatment option for dyskinesia from Parkinson disease and for dystonia. The present article deals with the timing of surgical intervention, selecting an appropriate target, and minimizing adverse effects. We provide an overview of current evidences and issues for dyskinesia and dystonia as well as emerging DBS technology. PMID:27053331

  13. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  14. Striatal cholinergic dysfunction as a unifying theme in the pathophysiology of dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jaunarajs, K.L. Eskow; Bonsi, P.; Chesselet, M.F.; Standaert, D.G.; Pisani, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of both genetic and non-genetic causes, which typically results in twisted posturing due to abnormal muscle contraction. Evidence from dystonia patients and animal models of dystonia indicate a crucial role for the striatal cholinergic system in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review, we focus on striatal circuitry and the centrality of the acetylcholine system in the function of the basal ganglia in the control of voluntary movement and ultimately clinical manifestion of movement disorders. We consider the impact of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) on dopamine-acetylcholine interactions and examine new evidence for impairment of ChIs in dysfunction of the motor systems producing dystonic movements, particularly in animal models. We have observed paradoxical excitation of ChIs in the presence of dopamine D2 receptor agonists and impairment of striatal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia, which are improved by administration of recently developed M1 receptor antagonists. These findings have been confirmed across multiple animal models of DYT1 dystonia and may represent a common endophenotype by which to investigate dystonia induced by other types of genetic and non-genetic causes and to investigate the potential effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutics and other strategies to improve dystonia. PMID:25697043

  15. Prevalence and diagnostic challenge of dystonia in Thailand: a service-based study in a tertiary university referral centre.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Wannachai, Natnipa; Brenden, Neil; Truong, Daniel D; Devahastin, Ratanaruedee

    2011-11-01

    Although the subspeciality of movement disorders was established in neurology more than 20 years ago, it is relatively new in Thailand, and while most physicians are generally aware of Parkinson's disease, they often are not familiar with dystonia. As one of the common movement disorders seen in general practice, a number of family and population studies have suggested that as many as two-thirds of patients with dystonia may be underdiagnosed and it is likely that misdiagnosis occurs frequently. Moreover, there is little information on the prevalence of dystonia in Thailand. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical profile of dystonia among Thai patients who came from the southern part of Bangkok, which is in the catchment area of Chulalongkorn University Hospital. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of dystonia among referred patients was assessed. The medical records of 207 patients were reviewed and it was determined that a large proportion of them (71.9%) had focal dystonia with cervical dystonia being the most common form. Primary dystonia (68.1%) accounted for the majority of the cases. The prevalence of all forms of dystonia, primary dystonia and focal dystonia was 19.9, 13.6 and 14.3 per 100,000 persons, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of dystonia among referred patients was 85.5%. The most common misdiagnosis was cervical spondylosis, followed by myofascial pain syndrome. Most patients had an average disease duration of 4 years before dystonia was finally diagnosed. Most patients with focal dystonia responded well to botulinum toxin therapy, with 13.3% suffering only mild transient adverse events. In spite of the limitations of this study, this data will initiate a process of increasing both patient and professional awareness of dystonia in Thailand.

  16. Patient considerations in the treatment of cervical dystonia: focus on botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Reversa R; Pagan, Fernando L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of focal dystonia characterized by involuntary muscle contractions causing abnormal movements and posturing of the head and neck and is associated with significant pain. Botulinum toxin is considered first-line therapy in the treatment of pain and abnormal head posturing associated with cervical dystonia. There are currently three botulinum toxin type A neurotoxins and one botulinum type B neurotoxin commercially available and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeled for the treatment of cervical dystonia. This review will focus on the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic use of botulinum type A neurotoxins in the treatment of cervical dystonia. We conclude with a discussion of factors influencing toxin selection including therapeutic effect, duration of effect, side effect profile, cost, and physician preference. PMID:26082621

  17. Myoclonus-dystonia: An under-recognized entity - Report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Puneet; Sharma, Suvasini; van Ruissen, Fred; Aneja, Satinder

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary myoclonus-dystonia (DYT 11) is caused by the epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE) mutation. The clinical details and investigations of cases diagnosed with myoclonus-dystonia were reviewed. We describe 5 patients (3 families) with myoclonus-dystonia diagnosed at our center. Majority of the patients had the classical phenotype with few atypical features (adult-onset disease and onset in lower limbs). Four patients carried a mutant variant in the SGCE-gene. A diagnosis of myoclonus-dystonia should be considered in cognitively normal patients with early-onset myoclonus (that may occur both at rest and/or action) with or without dystonia and with or without psychiatric-disturbances. PMID:27625242

  18. Case report: Physical therapy management of axial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Voos, Mariana Callil; Oliveira, Tatiana de Paula; Piemonte, Maria Elisa Pimentel; Barbosa, Egberto Reis

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have described physical therapy approaches to provide functional independence and reduce pain in individuals with dystonia. This report describes the physical therapy treatment of a 46-year-old woman diagnosed with idiopathic segmental axial dystonia. For two years, the patient was treated with kinesiotherapy (active and resisted movements and stretching of neck and trunk muscles), abdominal taping (kinesiotaping techniques), functional training, and sensory tricks. She was assessed with parts I, II and III of Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS-I, TWSTRS-II and TWSTRS-III), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Six-Minute Walk Test (6-MWT), and the motor domain of Functional Independence Measure (FIM-motor) before and after the two-year treatment and after the one year follow-up. Postural control and symmetry improved (TWSTRS-I: from 30 to 18), functional independence increased (TWSTRS-II: from 27 to 15; BBS: from 36 to 46; 6-MWT: from 0 to 480 meters (m); FIM-motor: from 59 to 81), and the pain diminished (TWSTRS-III: from 12 to 5). The functional improvement was retained after one year (TWSTRS-I: 14/35; TWRTRS-II: 12/30; TWRTRS-III: 5/20; BBS: 48/56; 6-MWT: 450 m; FIM-motor: 81/91). This program showed efficacy on providing a better control of the dystonic muscles and thus the doses of botulinum toxin needed to treat them could be reduced. Outcomes support the therapeutic strategies used to deal with this type of dystonia.

  19. Biomechanical abnormalities in musicians with occupational cramp/focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, F R; Wagner, C; Hömberg, V

    1993-01-01

    Occupational factors and peripheral injuries are frequently implicated in the development of hand cramps and the syndrome of persistent manual incoordination among musicians and others most commonly given a diagnosis of focal limb dystonia. In an attempt to gain insight into the character and influence of risk factors in the evolution of this disorder, the authors conducted detailed evaluations of 33 individuals who responded to a questionnaire sent to university- and conservatory-level music schools in Germany in September 1989. Response was invited from any musician with complaints of impaired hand control. Of the 33 individuals accepted for evaluation, 18 were musicians who met clinical criteria for the diagnosis of occupational cramp/focal dystonia (OC/FD). Nineteen of the original 33 subjects underwent a quantitative biochemical assessment, comparing active and passive ranges of motion at all joints below the shoulder with those for cohorts of unimpaired musicians, matched for gender and musical instrument. Of the 19 tested biomechanically, 14 had OC/FD and the remaining five had either persistent pain or nonspecific movement idiosyncracies interfering with playing. Compared with the matched groups of normals, no consistent biomechanical abnormality was found in the non-OC/FD group; in the OC/FD group two thirds had marked limitation of passive and/or active abduction range between the central digits of both hands. Based on detailed training and performance histories in these subjects, the authors conclude that a specific biomechanical condition in the hand can interfere with certain high-speed digital movements required in musical instrument performance. Unintended muscle synergies, postures, and movement patterns can develop as attempts are made to increase the speed and fluency of such movements. As rehearsal is intensified, degraded movements are stabilized ("programmed"). In this situation, OC/FD appears to represent an aberrant outcome of normal motor

  20. A gait paradigm reveals different patterns of abnormal cerebellar motor learning in primary focal dystonias.

    PubMed

    Hoffland, B S; Veugen, L C; Janssen, M M H P; Pasman, J W; Weerdesteyn, V; van de Warrenburg, B P

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of primary dystonia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the abnormalities of cerebellar motor learning in primary dystonia are solely detectable in more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms, or whether these are also present in other motor learning paradigms that rely heavily on the cerebellum but in addition require a more widespread sensorimotor network. Twenty-six patients with various forms of focal dystonia and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in a motor learning paradigm on a split-belt treadmill. By using reflective markers, three-dimensional kinematics were recorded using a 6-camera motion analysis system. Adaptation walking parameters were analyzed offline, comparing the different dystonia groups and healthy controls. Patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp were significantly impaired on various adaptation walking parameters. Whereas results of cervical dystonia patients did not differ from healthy controls in terms of adaptation walking parameters, differences in parameters of normal gait were found. We have here demonstrated abnormal sensorimotor adaptation with the split-belt paradigm in patients with blepharospasm and writer's cramp. This reinforces the current concept of cerebellar dysfunction in primary dystonia, and that this extends beyond more pure forms of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning paradigms. However, the finding of normal adaptation in cervical dystonia patients indicates that the pattern of cerebellar dysfunction may be slightly different for the various forms of primary focal dystonia, suggesting that actual cerebellar pathology may not be a primary driving force in dystonia.

  1. Mental rotation of body parts and sensory temporal discrimination in fixed dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig, Petra; Edwards, Mark J; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Aguirregomozcorta, Maria; Kägi, Georg; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-06-15

    Fixed dystonia is an uncommon but severely disabling condition typically affecting young women following a minor peripheral injury. There is no evidence of any structural lesions of the central nervous system nor any clear peripheral nerve or root damage. Electrophysiological techniques such as short intracortical inhibition, cortical silent period and a plasticity inducing protocol have revealed similarities but also differences compared to classical mobile dystonia. To further explore the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia we compared mental rotation of body parts and sensory temporal discrimination in 11 patients with fixed dystonia, 11 patients with classical mobile dystonia and 10 healthy controls. In the mental rotation task subjects were presented with realistic photos of left or right hands, feet and the head of a young women with a black patch covering the left or the right eye in six different orientations. Subjects had to verbally report the laterality of the presented stimuli. To assess sensory temporal discrimination subjects were asked to discriminate whether pairs of visual, tactile (electrical), or visuo-tactile stimuli were simultaneous or sequential (temporal discrimination threshold) and in the latter case which stimulus preceded the other (temporal order judgement). In accordance with previous studies patients with mobile dystonia were abnormal in mental rotation and temporal discrimination, whereas patients with fixed dystonia were only impaired in mental rotation. Possible explanations for this deficit may include the influence of the abnormal body posture itself, a shared predisposing pathophysiology for mobile and fixed dystonia, or a body image disturbance. These findings add information to the developing pathophysiological picture of fixed dystonia.

  2. Secondary motor disturbances in 101 patients with musician's dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosset‐Llobet, Jaume; Candia, Víctor; Fàbregas, Sílvia; Ray, William; Pascual‐Leone, Álvaro

    2007-01-01

    Objective Musician's focal dystonia is usually considered to be task specific but secondary motor disturbances have been reported also. We carried out a detailed evaluation of the incidence of these secondary motor problems in 101 patients. Method Symptoms were assessed using clinical histories, neurological examinations and observation of instrumental manoeuvres. Results 53.5% of patients reported secondary motor disturbances in activities other than playing their main instrument, with the onset delayed in some cases by up to 12 years from the awareness of dystonic symptoms. 46.5% suffered from simple, 19.8% from complex and 33.7% from progressive cramps. Plucked string players (guitarists) mainly suffered from simple cramps while keyboardists more frequently displayed the progressive form. In all patients, symptoms were focal, and the type of cramp was unrelated to the severity of the perceived symptoms. Those patients playing a second instrument similar to their main instrument showed symptoms which worsened to a higher degree than those playing either only one instrument or whose second instrument was different. Conclusions Longer follow‐up assessments may reveal secondary motor symptoms that are not visible over shorter examination periods. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of everyday life motor activities should be considered in any clinical and treatment protocol. We speculate that the avoidance of movements that are similar to the main affected task may be of help in limiting symptoms. Consequently, focal dystonia may be considered more movement than task specific. PMID:17237142

  3. History of the 'geste antagoniste' sign in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Poisson, A; Krack, P; Thobois, S; Loiraud, C; Serra, G; Vial, C; Broussolle, E

    2012-08-01

    The geste antagoniste is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic posture or movements. It is a classical feature of focal and particularly cervical dystonia. However, the precise historical aspects of geste antagoniste still remain obscure. The goals of this review were (1) to clarify the origin of the geste antagoniste sign; (2) to identify the factors that led to its diffusion in the international literature; (3) to follow the evolution of that term across the twentieth century. We used medical and neurological French, German and English literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the PubMed database by entering the terms geste antagoniste, antagonistic gesture and sensory trick. The geste antagoniste sign is a legacy of the Paris Neurological School of the end of the nineteenth century. The term was introduced by Meige and Feindel in their 1902 book on tics, written in the vein of their master, Brissaud, who first described this sign in 1893. The almost immediate translations of this book by Giese into German and Kinnier Wilson into English contributed to the rapid spreading of the term geste antagoniste, which is still in use worldwide today. The term antagonistic gesture is the translation proposed by Kinnier Wilson, which also led to the use of the term geste antagonistique. The geste antagoniste sign has long been considered a solid argument for the psychogenic origins of dystonia until the 1980s when Marsden made strong arguments for its organic nature.

  4. Abnormal sensorimotor processing in pianists with focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Vanessa K; Bradshaw, John L; Nicholls, Michael E; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2004-01-01

    Focal dystonia is a task-specific sensorimotor disorder that is characterized by sustained muscle contractions, which may cause twisting, repetitive movements, or abnormal postures. In the current study, the contingent negative variation was recorded in a group of professional pianists with focal dystonia (musicians' cramp) and compared to pianist controls. The CNV is composed of an early stimulus processing component and a later response preparation component. The CNV can be elicited in tasks that require movement and nonmovement. A subtractive analysis with a nonmovement condition was used to minimize effects of the CNV not related to response preparation. The current results revealed no group differences for the early CNV (processing of stimulus properties). In contrast, a significant group difference was found in the late CNV (movement preparation) between patients and controls, with the patients showing significantly higher activation prior to movement. The current study demonstrates an increase in overall sensorimotor activity prior to movement in patients with musicians' cramp. This overexcitation of the cortex may be the result of a dysfunction in the globus pallidus, resulting in a lack of inhibition and/or an increase in excitation.

  5. Different forms of rumen dystonia in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sederevicius, A; Kantautaité, J

    1993-01-01

    Four naturally occurring main forms of rumen dystonia of alimentary origin were observed in cattle: acidotic conditions; microflora inactivity; acidosis, and alkalosis. The following disturbances in the metabolism of carbohydrates, protein and energy were observed: 1. Acidotic conditions in rumen--ruminal pH, total and protein nitrogen decreased, whereas the total amount of VFA and the reduction activity of bacteria increased. 2. Inactivity of rumen microflora--significant changes of pH of rumen fluid were not observed, but the total number and activity of infusoria decreased. Fermentation of glucose, digestibility of cellulose, and reduction activity of bacteria decreased, whereas the amount of non-protein nitrogen increased. 3. Acidosis--ruminal pH, reduction activity of bacteria, and total number of VFA decreased. The percentage ratio between VFA changed--acetic acid concentration decreased, the concentration of valeric and caproic acids increased. The amount of total and non-protein nitrogen increased. 4. Alkalosis--ruminal pH increased, reduction activity of bacteria, fermentation of glucose, and concentration of VFA decreased. The amount of total and non-protein nitrogen increased. This investigation of different forms of rumen dystonia of alimentary origin is believed to be useful for the development of more effective treating methods and measures.

  6. Focal dystonia in musicians: linking motor symptoms to somatosensory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Konczak, Jürgen; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a neurological motor disorder characterized by involuntary contractions of those muscles involved in the play of a musical instrument. It is task-specific and initially only impairs the voluntary control of highly practiced musical motor skills. MD can lead to a severe decrement in a musician's ability to perform. While the etiology and the neurological pathomechanism of the disease remain unknown, it is known that MD like others forms of focal dystonia is associated with somatosensory deficits, specifically a decreased precision of tactile and proprioceptive perception. The sensory component of the disease becomes also evident by the patients' use of "sensory tricks" such as touching dystonic muscles to alleviate motor symptoms. The central premise of this paper is that the motor symptoms of MD have a somatosensory origin and are not fully explained as a problem of motor execution. We outline how altered proprioceptive feedback ultimately leads to a loss of voluntary motor control and propose two scenarios that explain why sensory tricks are effective. They are effective, because the sensorimotor system either recruits neural resources normally involved in tactile-proprioceptive (sensory) integration, or utilizes a fully functioning motor efference copy mechanism to align experienced with expected sensory feedback. We argue that an enhanced understanding of how a primary sensory deficit interacts with mechanisms of sensorimotor integration in MD provides helpful insights for the design of more effective behavioral therapies. PMID:23805090

  7. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  8. A novel gene mutation in PANK2 in a patient with severe jaw-opening dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Zuhal; Akcakaya, Nihan Hande; Tekturk, Pinar; Iseri, Sibel Aylin Ugur; Ozbek, Ugur

    2016-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare neurodegenerative condition. Major clinical features include progressive dystonia, pigmentary retinopathy, spasticity, and cognitive decline. The typical MRI sign of the disease, known as "eye-of-the-tiger", is what makes differential diagnosis possible. We here describe a 16-year-old male patient with PKAN presenting with severe and sustained jaw-opening dystonia which may be due to heterogeneous etiologies showing poor response to treatment. Herein, long-term follow-up and genetic results of a PKAN case who experienced severe jaw-opening dystonia are presented and discussed. PMID:27185474

  9. [Clinico-rheoencephalographic characteristics of the cerebral form of neurocirculatory dystonia].

    PubMed

    Litvinova, E V

    1978-01-01

    The study is related to a clinical and REG study of 387 patients with cerebral forms of neurocirculatory dystonia, proceeding against the background of normal, increased and decreased arterial pressure. These studies were performed in order to clarify the question of the state of cerebral hemodynamics in this form of vascular pathology. The study detected some general regularities of the changes of cerebral hemodynamics (an increase of the cerebral vascular tone, difficulties of the venous outflow, signs of vascular dystonia in the form of unstable curves and intrahemispheric asymmetry) and some traits in different types of neurocirculatory dystonia as well as some traits of semiotics.

  10. Refractory Case of Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability With Dystonia Syndrome Secondary to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kern, John; Bodek, Daniel; Niazi, Osama Tariq; Maher, James

    2016-02-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) is a syndrome commonly related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and rarely to anoxia associated with symptoms of dystonia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and diaphoresis. This is a case of a 20-year-old man who was stabbed in the heart. He underwent surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect and mitral valve replacement. Postoperatively, he developed dystonia with tachycardia and tachypnea consistent with PAID syndrome, secondary to prolonged hypoxia. Traditionally, this poorly understood syndrome is treated with morphine, clonazepam, and nonselective β-blockers. Second-line medications commonly used are baclofen, dantrolene, and gabapentin, which are aimed at the dystonia itself. In this case, both first- and second-line agents were ineffective. A 72-hour dexmedetomidine infusion resulted in complete resolution of symptoms. This is the first case of anoxia-induced PAID syndrome to be effectively treated with dexmedetomidine, which was previously used in a case induced by TBI. PMID:26867852

  11. Musicians' social representations of health and illness: a qualitative case study about focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zosso, Amélie; Schoeb, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    Musicians are artists who use the entire body when playing their instruments. Since over-practicing may lead to physical problems, musicians might encounter focal dystonia, a hand's motor disorder. The cause seems to be the brain's confusion between afferent and efferent information transfer provoking a disharmony with the instrument. Although focal dystonia may have serious consequences for a musician's career, it is unclear how musicians perceive this trouble. This case study describes two musicians with focal dystonia. Qualitative research was used to study their social representations of health and illness. The results show the central role of the hand during music playing, the passion for music and the understanding for focal dystonia as "brain panic". Therapists should account for those specific features inherent to this population in order to better help them in their quest for art through music. Giving a voice to musicians may improve their quality of care. PMID:22246303

  12. Physiotherapy in cervical dystonia: six experimental single-case studies.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Lena; Halvorsen, Kjartan; Färnstrand, Catarina; Aquilonius, Sten-Magnus; Lindmark, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the outcome of a physiotherapy program targeted to improve the quality of life of people with cervical dystonia (CD) by reducing pain, improving awareness of postural orientation, increasing muscle strength, and reducing the effort of moving the head and neck. In six single case studies, the primary outcome measure for each case was the Cervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ) to measure the impact of the program on the individuals' quality of life. Secondary outcome measures were identified for the different components of the physiotherapy program: Visual Analogue Scale (pain); Postural Orientation Index (postural orientation awareness); and Movement Energy Index (effort of moving head and neck). Each of the cases had the severity of their problems scored on the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Scale. The study period was 26 weeks: 2 weeks' baseline period, 4 weeks' treatment period, and 20 weeks' follow-up. All measures except the Movement Energy Index (MEI) and CDQ-24 were taken three times per week for the first 6 weeks of the study and then once at 3 and 6 months. The MEI was taken once a week during the pretreatment and the treatment periods and during the first 2 weeks of follow-up and also after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. The CDQ-24 was taken once in the pretreatment period, once after completion of treatment, once 2 weeks after treatment, and once at 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Five of the six case studies reported an increase in quality of life at 6-month follow-up, as measured on the CDQ-24. Three of the six cases reported a reduction in pain and severity of the dystonia and had improved scores on the postural orientation measure at 6-month follow-up. All six patients had a reduction in the movement energy scores, but this was not significant. The outcomes of the six case studies would suggest that further investigation is required to show the effectiveness of physiotherapy programs in the management of CD.

  13. Metatarsal fracture as a consequence of foot dystonia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McDade, Eric; Weiner, William J; Shulman, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    We report a 45-year-old man with a 4-year history of Parkinson's disease complicated by the development of left-foot dystonia resulting in a fracture of the fifth metatarsal. Orthopedic injuries are common in Parkinson's disease, but they are usually secondary to falls. Although drug-induced dystonia is a common side effect of pharmacological treatment of Parkinson's disease, this is the first report of a fracture related to these abnormal movements.

  14. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Blepharospasm, Orofacial/Oromandibular Dystonia, and Hemifacial Spasm.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky; Alter, Katharine

    2016-02-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary, repetitive eye closure. Orofacial and oromandibular dystonia describe involuntary dystonic movements of orofacial and oromandibular musculature. Hemifacial spasm is characterized by repetitive synchronous contraction of facial nerve innervated muscles on one side of the face. In this article, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, and approaches to treatment are reviewed. Technical aspects of using botulinum toxin for treatment and reported outcomes are discussed.

  15. Acute dystonia in a young schizophrenic patient associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing cough syrup.

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Garmendia, M T; Lizaso, X

    2000-01-01

    Acute dystonic reactions are usually observed after exposure to drugs with antidopaminergic actions. We report on one patient with acute dystonia associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing syrup, who suffered from schizophrenia but had been neuroleptic-free for 6months. Cloperastine has antihistaminic properties. We suggest that antihistaminic agents may induce acute dystonia by altering the balance between dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum. PMID:18591150

  16. Basal ganglia hyperechogenicity does not distinguish between patients with primary dystonia and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hagenah, Johann; König, Inke R; Kötter, Charlotte; Seidel, Günter; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2011-04-01

    Transcranial sonography (TCS) of the basal ganglia is a non-invasive tool to study movement disorders. Very few studies have addressed the question of whether TCS may detect specific echofeatures in patients with primary dystonia. The basal ganglia including the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventricular system were investigated by TCS in 84 primary dystonia patients and 43 neurologically healthy controls. Any hyperechogenicity of the lenticular nucleus was present in 57.5% of the patients and in 50.0% of the controls (p = 0.453). While marked hyperechogenicity was more frequently present in the patients (17.8 vs. 7.9%), this difference was not significant (p = 0.227). No differences in the occurrence of hyperechogenicity were detectable either in the caudate nucleus (21.6 vs. 39.5%, p = 0.122) or the thalamus (4.1 vs. 0%, p = 0.199). Marked hyperechogenicity of the caudate nucleus was rare in dystonia (4.1%) and absent in controls. There was no relationship between the side of basal ganglia hyperechogenicity and the clinically affected side of cervical dystonia. The area of SN echogenicity was similar in patients and controls (0.19 ± 0.14 vs. 0.20 ± 0.13 cm(2)), but correlated negatively with increasing disease duration in the dystonia patients (ρ = -0.257, p = 0.028). Width of the third ventricle correlated with increasing age (ρ = 0.511, p = 0.000) and, in patients, with disease duration (ρ = 0.244, p = 0.034) and severity of cervical dystonia (ρ = 0.281, p = 0.038). No characteristic abnormalities were found in the basal ganglia of primary dystonia patients. It remains to be explored whether this is due to a true absence of signal alterations in the basal ganglia of dystonia patients or to limitations of the current technology used.

  17. Search for a founder mutation in idiopathic focal dystonia from Northern Germany.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C; Ozelius, L J; Hagenah, J; Breakefield, X O; Risch, N J; Vieregge, P

    1998-01-01

    Both the discovery of the DYT1 gene on chromosome 9q34 in autosomal dominant early-onset torsion dystonia and the detection of linkage for one form of adult-onset focal dystonia to chromosome 18p (DYT7) in a family from northern Germany provide the opportunity to further investigate genetic factors in the focal dystonias. Additionally, reports of linkage disequilibrium between several chromosome 18 markers and focal dystonia, both in sporadic patients from northern Germany and in members of affected families from central Europe suggest the existence of a founder mutation underlying focal dystonia in this population. To evaluate the role of these loci in focal dystonia, we tested 85 patients from northern Germany who had primary focal dystonia, both for the GAG deletion in the DYT1 gene on chromosome 9q34 and for linkage disequilibrium at the chromosome 18p markers D18S1105, D18S1098, D18S481, and D18S54. None of these patients had the GAG deletion in the DYT1 gene. Furthermore, Hardy-Weinberg analysis of markers on 18p in our patient population and in 85 control subjects from the same region did not support linkage disequilibrium. Taken together, these results suggest that most cases of focal dystonia in patients of northern German or central European origin are due neither to the GAG deletion in DYT1 nor to a proposed founder mutation on chromosome 18p but must be caused by other genetic or environmental factors. PMID:9837831

  18. IDIOPATHIC TORSION DYSTONIA WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA IN FIRST DEGREE RELATIVES : A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Channabasavanna, S.M.; Goswami, Utpal; Venkatesh, H.S.; Pradhan, N.

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY A patient having two schizophrenic brothers developed simple writer's cramp at the age of 20 years. Three years later she developed irregular and unusual movements which was diagnosed and treated as hysteria until she had contractures in the right hand. EMG studies revealed abnormalities suggestive of torsion dystonia. The association of schizophrenia in the first degree relatives and the differential responses to haloperidol in this case of torsion dystonia has been discussed. PMID:21965893

  19. Dystonia and tremor following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Klawans, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-seven railroad workers who were exposed to polychlorinated phenols, including dioxin (TCDD), during 1979 while cleaning up the chemical spillage following damage to a tank car filled with these chemicals were followed medically for the subsequent 6 years. Two committed suicide. The initial neurological complaints included a sense of fatigue and muscle aching, both of which have been reported in other individuals following dioxin exposure. On detailed neurological examination in December, 1985, 24 of 45 had dystonic writer's cramp and/or other action dystonias of the hands. None of the involved individuals had a family history of dystonia, and all 24 dated the onset of the dystonia to the first 2 to 3 years subsequent to their toxic exposure. The dystonias varied in severity but were usually mild. No other types of dystonic involvement were recognized. Thirty-five of the 45 individuals also manifested postural and terminal intention tremor which resembled benign essential tremor. None of the involved individuals had a family history of tremor, and all 35 of those affected dated the onset of the tremor to some time subsequent to their toxic exposure. Forty-three of 45 patients had histories and findings suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. This is the first report relating any type of dystonia to prior dioxin exposure and the first report relating action dystonia, such as dystonic writer's cramp, and postural/terminal intention tremor, to toxic exposure of any type.

  20. Agreement among neurologists on the clinical diagnosis of dystonia at different body sites

    PubMed Central

    Logroscino, G; Livrea, P; Anaclerio, D; Aniello, M; Benedetto, G; Cazzato, G; Giampietro, L; Manobianca, G; Marra, M; Martino, D; Pannarale, P; Pulimeno, R; Santamato, V; Defazio, G

    2003-01-01

    Methods: 12 patients with adult onset focal segmental dystonia were videotaped in a standardised way. The tape was sent to six neurologists who are involved in clinical practice without a specific interest in movement disorders (general neurologists), and to four neurologists expert in movement disorders. The observers had to recognise whether the patients were affected by dystonia and to distinguish among blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, cervical dystonia, and writer's cramp. Interobserver reliability was assessed by κ statistics, and the degree of agreement was classified according to the Landis classification. Results: The 10 neurologists reached slight to moderate agreement on the diagnosis of these four disorders. When the observers were subdivided according with their professional experience in the field, a moderate to perfect agreement on the diagnosis was achieved by specialists in movement disorders, and a fair to moderate agreement by the general neurologists. Conclusions: Neurologists may have different ability to recognise adult onset focal dystonia, depending on their experience and on the type of dystonia. PMID:12588923

  1. Biperiden hydrochlorate ameliorates dystonia of rats produced by microinjection of sigma ligands into the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Takahashi, H; Sato, K; Higuchi, H; Shimizu, T

    2000-11-01

    It has been reported that the imbalance of anticholinergic and antidopaminergic activity of each neuroleptic drug correlates with the capacity to produce neuroleptic-induced acute dystonia (NAD) and the major focus of NAD is thought to be the striatum. Anticholinergic drugs are highly effective on NAD, but they are partially effective on neuroleptic-induced tardive dystonia and their effect on idiopathic dystonia is disappointing. Recently, it has been reported that the unilateral microinjection of sigma (sigma) ligands into the red nucleus induces torticollis of rats. This animal model appears to be a model of dystonia, but it is not clear whether it is suitable for NAD in man. To clarify this issue, we investigated the effect of an anticholinergic drug, biperiden hydrochlorate (BH), on this animal model. This study revealed that BH dose-dependently ameliorated dystonia of rats induced by two sigma ligands, whether each sigma ligand had dopaminergic affinity or not. This animal model of dystonia appears to be a model of NAD in man from the viewpoint of treatment-response. The results also suggest that not only dopaminergic and cholinergic systems but also sigma system, and not only the striatum but also the red nucleus, may play an important role in the pathophysiology of NAD.

  2. Sonographic Alteration of Basal Ganglia in Different Forms of Primary Focal Dystonia: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Sheng, Yu-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Cai-Shan; Ma, Qi; Chen, Han-Bing; Yu, Li-Fang; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Luo, Wei-Feng; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have addressed whether abnormalities in the lenticular nucleus (LN) are characteristic transcranial sonography (TCS) echo features in patients with primary dystonia. This study aimed to explore alterations in the basal ganglia in different forms of primary focal dystonia. Methods: cross-sectional observational study was performed between December 2013 and December 2014 in 80 patients with different forms of primary focal dystonia and 55 neurologically normal control subjects. TCS was performed in patients and control subjects. Multiple comparisons of multiple rates were used to compare LN hyperechogenicity ratios between control and patient groups. Results: Thirteen individuals were excluded due to poor temporal bone windows, and two subjects were excluded due to disagreement in evaluation by sonologists. Totally, 70 patients (cervical dystonia, n = 30; blepharospasm, n = 30; oromandibular dystonia, n = 10) and 50 normal controls were included in the final analysis. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 51% (36/70) of patients with primary focal dystonia, compared with 12% (6/50) of controls (P < 0.001). Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity did not differ between the two groups. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 73% (22/30) of patients with cervical dystonia, a greater prevalence than in patients with blepharospasm (33%, 10/30, P = 0.002) and oromandibular dystonia (40%, 4/10, P = 0.126). LN hyperechogenicity was more frequently observed in patients with cervical dystonia compared with controls (73% vs. 12%, P < 0.001); however, no significant difference was detected in patients with blepharospasm (33% vs. 12%, P = 0.021) or oromandibular dystonia (40% vs. 12%, P = 0.088). Conclusions: LN hyperechogenicity is more frequently observed in patients with primary focal dystonia than in controls. It does not appear to be a characteristic TCS echo feature in patients with blepharospasm or oromandibular dystonia. PMID:27064039

  3. Restoring balance in focal limb dystonia with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Sheean, Geoffrey

    2007-12-15

    Focal task-specific dystonia of the hand is rare in the general population, where it usually manifests as writer's cramp, but seems relatively common among musicians. The disability may be so severe as to prevent writing altogether or to end a professional musician's career. The cause is usually unknown but it is thought to be primarily a basal ganglia disorder with dysfunction of cortical-striatothalamic-cortical circuits. Abnormalities have been found in cortical movement preparation, intracortical inhibition, sensory and motor maps, and patterns of cortical activation during movement. Much evidence supports disordered processing of sensory information with disturbed sensorimotor integration. Underlying this may be maladaptive neural plasticity mechanisms. Treatment is difficult. Oral medications are generally ineffective and have troublesome side-effects. Intensive rehabilitation techniques based on neural plasticity theory show promise but are rarely available and are time-intensive. Botulinum toxin injections appear to be effective in writer's cramp and musician's dystonia, at least initially; long-term benefit is less common. Despite definite improvement, some patients abandon treatment because the gain is insufficient for meaningful function: this is particularly so for musicians. Much of the benefit from botulinum toxin injection comes from simply reducing muscle overactivity through muscle paralysis, restoring balance to motor control. However, some evidence suggests that botulinum toxin injections can produce transient improvement in some of the various cortical abnormalities described, probably through alteration of sensory input from the periphery, by direct and indirect means. These changes in cortical function might be usefully combined with those brought about by sensorimotor retraining programs, but such studies are awaited.

  4. Botulinum neurotoxins for the treatment of focal dystonias: Review of rating tools used in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Francesca; Albanese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are used to achieve therapeutic benefit in focal dystonia. An expert panel recently reviewed published evidence on the efficacy of BoNTs for the treatment of focal dystonias and produced recommendations for clinical practice. Another panel reviewed the clinimetric properties of rating scales for dystonia and produced recommendations for current usage and future directions. Considering that the strength of evidence derives not only from the quality of the study design, but also from usage of validated outcome measures, we combined the information provided by these two recent reviews and assessed the appropriateness of the rating instruments used in clinical trials on BoNT treatment in focal dystonia. Data sources included all the publications on BoNT treatment for focal dystonias reviewed by the recent evidence-based analysis. We reviewed all rating instruments used to assess primary and secondary outcome following BoNT treatment. The publications were allocated into five topics according to the focal dystonia type reviewed in the meta-analysis: blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, cervical dystonia, upper limb dystonia, and laryngeal dystonia. For each topic, papers were divided, according to the terminology used in the meta-analysis, into placebo-controlled, active comparator and methodological or uncontrolled. For each topic we identified the rating tools used in each study class and annotated which were the mostly used in each focal dystonia type. Outcome measures included tools related to motor and non-motor features, such as pain and depression, and functional as well as health-related quality of life features. Patient- and investigator-reported outcomes were also included. Rating instruments were classified as recommended, suggested, listed or not included, based on recommendations produced by the rating scale task force. Both primary and secondary outcome measures were assessed. As a final step we compared current practice, as

  5. [Psychogenic hand dystonia and hereditary polyneuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. A contribution to etiology of dystonias].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Speidel, H; Albert, E; Helbig, B

    1996-01-01

    We report on a case of a female who had developed a fixed flexion contracture of the 4th and 5th fingers of the right hand which was painless and at-rest right in the beginning at the age of 19. By means of neurographical examinations a hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was established in her and her mother, which had clinically manifested with symptoms of the ulnar nerve at the affected hand. The dystonic symptoms did not show any progression within ten years follow-up. A remarkable feature of the course was the twice repeated occurrence of short, sudden and complete remissions immediately following invasive diagnostic procedures. The thorough discussion of differential diagnostic aspects and the analysis of the familiar situation and psychodynamics of the patient resulted in the diagnosis of a psychogenic hand dystonia. PMID:8850092

  6. Clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia in a large multicenter cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Thompson, Misty M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wright, Laura J.; Jinnah, H.A.; Rosen, Ami R.; Hedera, Peter; Comella, Cynthia L.; Weissbach, Anne; Junker, Johanna; Jankovic, Joseph; Barbano, Richard L.; Reich, Stephen G.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Berman, Brian D.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Severt, Lawrence; Agarwal, Pinky; Stover, Natividad P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia (CD). Methods: Participants enrolled in the Dystonia Coalition biorepository (NCT01373424) with initial manifestation as CD were included in this study (n = 1,000). Data intake included demographics, family history, and the Global Dystonia Rating Scale. Participants were screened for sequence variants (SVs) in GNAL, THAP1, and Exon 5 of TOR1A. Results: The majority of participants were Caucasian (95%) and female (75%). The mean age at onset and disease duration were 45.5 ± 13.6 and 14.6 ± 11.8 years, respectively. At the time of assessment, 68.5% had involvement limited to the neck, shoulder(s), and proximal arm(s), whereas 47.4% had dystonia limited to the neck. The remaining 31.5% of the individuals exhibited more extensive anatomical spread. A head tremor was noted in 62% of the patients. Head tremor and laryngeal dystonia were more common in females. Psychiatric comorbidities, mainly depression and anxiety, were reported by 32% of the participants and were more common in females. Family histories of dystonia, parkinsonian disorder, and tremor were present in 14%, 11%, and 29% of the patients, respectively. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic SVs in THAP1, TOR1A, and GNAL were identified in 8 participants (0.8%). Two individuals harbored novel missense SVs in Exon 5 of TOR1A. Synonymous and noncoding SVs in THAP1 and GNAL were identified in 4% of the cohort. Conclusions: Head tremor, laryngeal dystonia, and psychiatric comorbidities are more common in female participants with CD. Coding and noncoding variants in GNAL, THAP1, and TOR1A make small contributions to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27123488

  7. Basal ganglia modulation of thalamocortical relay in Parkinson's disease and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yixin; Park, Choongseok; Worth, Robert M; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2013-01-01

    Basal ganglia dysfunction has being implied in both Parkinson's disease and dystonia. While these disorders probably involve different cellular and circuit pathologies within and beyond basal ganglia, there may be some shared neurophysiological pathways. For example, pallidotomy and pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) are used in symptomatic treatment of both disorders. Both conditions are marked by alterations of rhythmicity of neural activity throughout basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits. Increased synchronized oscillatory activity in beta band is characteristic of Parkinson's disease, while different frequency bands, theta and alpha, are involved in dystonia. We compare the effect of the activity of GPi, the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, on information processing in the downstream neural circuits of thalamus in Parkinson's disease and dystonia. We use a data-driven computational approach, a computational model of the thalamocortical (TC) cell modulated by experimentally recorded data, to study the differences and similarities of thalamic dynamics in dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Our analysis shows no substantial differences in TC relay between the two conditions. Our results suggest that, similar to Parkinson's disease, a disruption of thalamic processing could also be involved in dystonia. Moreover, the degree to which TC relay fidelity is impaired is approximately the same in both conditions. While Parkinson's disease and dystonia may have different pathologies and differ in the oscillatory content of neural discharge, our results suggest that the effect of patterning of pallidal discharge is similar in both conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that the mechanisms of GPi DBS in dystonia may involve improvement of TC relay fidelity.

  8. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  9. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Samuel J.; Yu, Xin Y.; Heinzer, Ann K.; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S.; Thompson, Valerie B.; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  10. Explicit Agency in Patients with Cervical Dystonia: Altered Recognition of Temporal Discrepancies between Motor Actions and Their Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Cécile; Roze, Emmanuel; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Degos, Bertrand; Vidailhet, Marie; Worbe, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the cognitive processing of movement have been demonstrated in patients with dystonia. The sense of agency, which is the experience of initiating and controlling one’s own actions, has never before been studied in these patients. Objectives We investigated whether the sense of agency is altered in patients with cervical dystonia. Methods We used an explicit metacognitive agency task in which participants had to catch targets with a cursor by moving a computer’s mouse. The task included several conditions in which the control over the cursor could be disrupted by adding a spatial or a temporal discrepancy between the mouse and the cursor’s movements. Participants had to acknowledge these discrepancies and reflect them in metacognitive judgements of agency. Results Twenty cervical dystonia patients and 20 matched controls were included in the study. Despite performing equally well as the matched controls, cervical dystonia patients did not fully recognize alterations of agency when a temporal lag was added between their movement and the visual feedback. Moreover, they relied predominantly on their perceived performance to provide judgements of agency and less on their objective degree of controls. There was no correlation between agency scores and clinical severity of dystonia measured by the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale. Conclusion We demonstrated an abnormal processing of agency in cervical dystonia patients, even for motor actions not affected by dystonia. The exact contribution of abnormal agency to dystonia pathophysiology remains to be clarified. PMID:27575487

  11. Pallidal stimulation in children: comparison between cerebral palsy and DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Marks, Warren; Bailey, Laurie; Reed, Maryann; Pomykal, Angela; Mercer, Mary; Macomber, David; Acosta, Fernando; Honeycutt, John

    2013-07-01

    The authors compared the outcomes of 17 children aged 7 to 15 years with DYT1 dystonia or cerebral palsy following deep brain stimulation. While patients with cerebral palsy presented with significantly greater motor disability than the DYT1 cohort at baseline, both groups demonstrated improvement at 1 year (cerebral palsy = 24%; DYT1 = 6%). The group as a whole demonstrated significant improvement on the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale across time. Gains in motor function were apparent in both axial and appendicular distributions involving both upper and lower extremities. Gains achieved by 6 months were sustained in the cerebral palsy group, whereas the DYT1 group demonstrated continued improvement with ongoing pallidal stimulation beyond 18 months. Young patients with dystonia due to cerebral palsy responded comparably to patients with DYT1 dystonia. The severity of motor impairment in patients with cerebral palsy at baseline and follow-up raises the issue of even earlier intervention with neuromodulation in this population to limit long-term motor impairments due to dystonia.

  12. Deep brain stimulation and dantrolene for secondary dystonia in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara; Horvath, Gabriella; Murphy, Tyler; Purtzki, Jacqueline; Bowden, Kristin; Sirrs, Sandra; Honey, Christopher R; Stockler, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat secondary dystonias caused by inborn errors of metabolism with varying degrees of effectiveness. Here we report for the first time the application of DBS as treatment for secondary dystonia in a 22-year-old male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The disease manifested at age 6 with ADHD, tics, and dystonic gait, and deteriorated to loss of ambulation by age 11, and speech difficulties, seizures, and characteristic adrenal insufficiency by age 16. DBS in the globus pallidus internus was commenced at age 18. However, after 25 months, no improvement in dystonia was observed (Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) scores of 65.5 and 62 and disability scores of 28 and 26, pre- and post-DBS, respectively) and the DBS device was removed. Treatment with dantrolene reduced skeletal muscle tone and improved movement (Global Dystonia Rating Scores from 5 to 1 and BFM score 42). Therefore, we conclude that DBS was a safe but ineffective intervention in our case with long-standing dystonia, whereas treatment of spasticity with dantrolene did improve the movement disorder in this young man with X-ALD.

  13. Effects of two weeks of cerebellar theta burst stimulation in cervical dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Porcacchia, Paolo; Ponzo, Viviana; Carrillo, Fatima; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Brusa, Livia; Desiato, Maria Teresa; Arciprete, Flavio; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Pisani, Antonio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Palomar, Francisco J; Mir, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is generally regarded as a disorder of the basal ganglia and their efferent connections to the thalamus and brainstem, but an important role of cerebellar-thalamo-cortical (CTC) circuits in the pathophysiology of dystonia has been invoked. Here in a sham controlled trial, we tested the effects of two-weeks of cerebellar continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) in a sample of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. Clinical evaluations were performed by administering the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). We used TMS to measure the inhibitory connectivity between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex (cerebellar brain inhibition [CBI]), and the excitability of the contralateral primary motor cortex assessing intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical silent period (CSP). Paired associative stimulation (PAS) was tested to evaluate the level and the topographical specificity of cortical plasticity, which is abnormally enhanced and non-focal in CD patients. Two weeks of cerebellar stimulation resulted in a small but significant clinical improvement as measured by the TWSTRS of approximately 15%. Cerebellar stimulation modified the CBI circuits and reduced the heterotopic PAS potentiation, leading to a normal pattern of topographic specific induced plasticity. These data provide novel evidence CTC circuits could be a potential target to partially control some dystonic symptoms in patients with cervical dystonia. PMID:24881805

  14. Finger-specific loss of independent control of movements in musicians with focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Furuya, S; Altenmüller, E

    2013-09-01

    The loss of independent control of finger movements impairs the dexterous use of the hand. Focal hand dystonia is characterised by abnormal structural and functional changes at the cortical and subcortical regions responsible for individuated finger movements and by the loss of surround inhibition in the finger muscles. However, little is known about the pathophysiological impact of focal dystonia on the independent control of finger movements. Here we addressed this issue by asking pianists with and without focal dystonia to repetitively strike a piano key with one of the four fingers as fast as possible while the remaining digits kept the adjacent keys depressed. Using principal component analysis and cluster analysis to the derived keystroke data, we successfully classified pianists according to the presence or absence of dystonic symptoms with classification rates and cross-validation scores of approximately 90%. This confirmed the effects of focal dystonia on the individuated finger movements. Interestingly, the movement features that contributed to successful classification differed across fingers. Compared to healthy pianists, pianists with an affected index finger were characterised predominantly by stronger keystrokes, whereas pianists with affected middle or ring fingers exhibited abnormal temporal control of the keystrokes, such as slowness and rhythmic inconsistency. The selective alternation of the movement features indicates a finger-specific loss of the independent control of finger movements in focal dystonia of musicians.

  15. Decreased striatal dopamine receptor binding in primary focal dystonia: a D2 or D3 defect?

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Morvarid; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Videen, Tom O.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Taylor, Michelle; Mach, Robert H.; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is an involuntary movement disorder characterized by repetitive patterned or sustained muscle contractions causing twisting or abnormal postures. Several lines of evidence suggest that abnormalities of dopaminergic pathways contribute to the pathophysiology of dystonia. In particular dysfunction of D2-like receptors that mediate function of the indirect pathway in the basal ganglia may play a key role. We have demonstrated with positron emission tomography (PET) that patients with primary focal cranial or hand dystonia have reduced putamenal specific binding of [18F]spiperone a non-selective D2-like radioligand with nearly equal affinity for serotonergic 5-HT(2A) sites. We then repeated the study with [18F]N-methyl-benperidol (NMB), a more selective D2-like receptor radioligand with minimal affinity for 5-HT(2A). Surprisingly, there was no decrease in NMB binding in the putamen of subjects with dystonia. Our findings excluded reductions of putamenal uptake greater than 20% with 95% confidence intervals. Following analysis of the in vitro selectivity of NMB and spiperone demonstrated that NMB was highly selective for D2 receptors relative to D3 receptors (200-fold difference in affinity), whereas spiperone has similar affinity for all three of the D2-like receptor subtypes. These findings coupled with other literature suggest that a defect in D3, rather than D2, receptor expression may be associated with primary focal dystonia. PMID:20960437

  16. Abnormal High-Frequency Burst Firing of Cerebellar Neurons in Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Fremont, Rachel; Calderon, D. Paola; Maleki, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the α3 isoform of the Na+/K+ ATPase (sodium pump) are responsible for rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (DYT12). Recently, a pharmacological model of DYT12 was generated implicating both the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the disorder. Notably, partially blocking sodium pumps in the cerebellum was necessary and sufficient for induction of dystonia. Thus, a key question that remains is how partially blocking sodium pumps in the cerebellum induces dystonia. In vivo recordings from dystonic mice revealed abnormal high-frequency bursting activity in neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), which comprise the bulk of cerebellar output. In the same mice, Purkinje cells, which provide strong inhibitory drive to DCN cells, also fired in a similarly erratic manner. In vitro studies demonstrated that Purkinje cells are highly sensitive to sodium pump dysfunction that alters the intrinsic pacemaking of these neurons, resulting in erratic burst firing similar to that identified in vivo. This abnormal firing abates when sodium pump function is restored and dystonia caused by partial block of sodium pumps can be similarly alleviated. These findings suggest that persistent high-frequency burst firing of cerebellar neurons caused by sodium pump dysfunction underlies dystonia in this model of DYT12. PMID:25164667

  17. Sensory Abnormalities in Focal Hand Dystonia and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Quartarone, Angelo; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Terranova, Carmen; Milardi, Demetrio; Bruschetta, Daniele; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Girlanda, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that synchronous and convergent afferent input arising from repetitive motor tasks may play an important role in driving the maladaptive cortical plasticity seen in focal hand dystonia (FHD). This hypothesis receives support from several sources. First, it has been reported that in subjects with FHD, paired associative stimulation produces an abnormal increase in corticospinal excitability, which was not confined to stimulated muscles. These findings provide support for the role of excessive plasticity in FHD. Second, the genetic contribution to the dystonias is increasingly recognized indicating that repetitive, stereotyped afferent inputs may lead to late-onset dystonia, such as FHD, more rapidly in genetically susceptible individuals. It can be postulated, according to the two factor hypothesis that dystonia is triggered and maintained by the concurrence of environmental factors such as repetitive training and subtle abnormal mechanisms of plasticity within somatosensory loop. In the present review, we examine the contribution of sensory-motor integration in the pathophysiology of primary dystonia. In addition, we will discuss the role of non-invasive brain stimulation as therapeutic approach in FHD. PMID:25538594

  18. Striatal parvalbuminergic neurons are lost in Huntington's disease: implications for dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Anton; Shelby, Evan; Wang, Hongbing; DeMarch, Zena; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie Hart; Hogg, Virginia; Roxburgh, Richard; Tippett, Lynette J; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard LM

    2013-01-01

    Although dystonia represents a major source of motor disability in Huntington's disease (HD), its pathophysiology remains unknown. Because recent animal studies indicate that loss of parvalbuminergic (PARV+) striatal interneurons can cause dystonia, we investigated if loss of PARV+ striatal interneurons occurs during human HD progression, and thus might contribute to dystonia in HD. We used immunolabeling to detect PARV+ interneurons in fixed sections, and corrected for disease-related striatal atrophy by expressing PARV+ interneuron counts in ratio to interneurons co-containing somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (whose numbers are unaffected in HD). At all symptomatic HD grades, PARV+ interneurons were reduced to less than 26% of normal abundance in rostral caudate. In putamen rostral to the level of globus pallidus, loss of PARV+ interneurons was more gradual, not dropping off to less than 20% of control until grade 2. Loss of PARV+ interneurons was even more gradual in motor putamen at globus pallidus levels, with no loss at grade 1, and steady grade-wise decline thereafter. A large decrease in striatal PARV+ interneurons, thus, occurs in HD with advancing disease grade, with regional variation in the loss per grade. Given the findings of animal studies and the grade-wise loss of PARV+ striatal interneurons in motor striatum in parallel with the grade-wise appearance and worsening of dystonia, our results raise the possibility that loss of PARV+ striatal interneurons is a contributor to dystonia in HD. PMID:24014043

  19. Neuroimaging characteristics of patients with focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Webster, Rebecca L; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Advances in structural and functional imaging have provided both scientists and clinicians with information about the neural mechanisms underlying focal hand dystonia (FHd), a motor disorder associated with aberrant posturing and patterns of muscle contraction specific to movements of the hand. Consistent with the hypothesis that FHd is the result of reorganization in cortical fields, studies in neuroimaging have confirmed alterations in the topography and response properties of somatosensory and motor areas of the brain. Noninvasive stimulation of these regions also demonstrates that FHd may be due to reductions in inhibition between competing sensory and motor representations. Compromises in neuroanatomical structure, such as white matter density and gray matter volume, have also been identified through neuroimaging methods. These advances in neuroimaging have provided clinicians with an expanded understanding of the changes in the brain that contribute to FHd. These findings should provide a foundation for the development of retraining paradigms focused on reversing overlapping sensory representations and interactions between brain regions in patients with FHd. Continued collaborations between health professionals who treat FHd and research scientists who examine the brain using neuroimaging tools are imperative for answering difficult questions about patients with specific movement disorders. PMID:19217255

  20. Precise Muscle Selection Using Dynamic Polyelectromyography for Treatment of Post-stroke Dystonia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has a wide range of causes, but treatment of dystonia is limited to minimizing the symptoms as there is yet no successful treatment for its cause. One of the optimal treatment methods for dystonia is chemodenervation using botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), alcohol injection, etc., but its success depends on how precisely the dystonic muscle is selected. Here, we reported a successful experience in a 49-year-old post-stroke female patient who showed paroxysmal repetitive contractions involving the right leg, which may be of dystonic nature. BTX-A and alcohol were injected into the muscles which were identified by dynamic polyelectromyography. After injection, the dystonic muscle spasm, cramping pain, and the range of motion of the affected lower limb improved markedly, and she was able to walk independently indoors. In such a case, dynamic polyelectromyography may be a useful method for selecting the dominant dystonic muscles. PMID:27446795

  1. Painful cervical dystonia triggered by the extension wire of a deep brain stimulator.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, F; Picozzi, P; Franzin, A; Martinelli, V; Comi, G; Volonte, M A

    2012-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) can be complicated by adverse events, which are generally classified as surgical-hardware or stimulation-related. Here we report the onset of a painful cervical dystonia probably triggered by the extension wire of a subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS device in a woman suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Two months after implantation of the STN-DBS device, our patient developed a painful cervical dystonia, which was not responsive to neurostimulation or to medication. No sign of infections or fibrosis was detected. A patch test with the components of the device was performed, revealing no hypersensibility. The patient was referred back to surgery to reposition the pulse generator in the contralateral subclavian region. A deeper channeling of the wire extensions produced a complete remission of the painful dystonia. PMID:22954791

  2. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in children with dystonia: a sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Young, Scott J; Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-02-01

    Increased motor cortex excitability is a common finding in dystonia, and transcranial direct current stimulation can reduce motor cortex excitability. In an earlier study, we found that cathodal direct-current stimulation decreased motor overflow for some children with dystonia. To investigate this observation further, we performed a sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study of 14 children with dystonia. We found a significant reduction in overflow following real stimulation, when participants performed the experimental task with the hand contralateral to the cathode. While these results suggest that cathodal stimulation may help some children to reduce involuntary overflow, the size of the effect is small. Further research will need to investigate ways to increase the magnitude of the effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation. PMID:23760989

  3. Long-term neuropsychiatric outcomes after pallidal stimulation in primary and secondary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Meoni, Sara; Zurowski, Mateusz; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Poon, Yu-Yan; Fallis, Melanie; Voon, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the diagnosis of Axis I psychiatric disorders in patients with primary and secondary dystonia after deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods: Structured Clinical Interviews for the DSM-IV, Axis I psychiatric disorders, were prospectively performed before and after surgery. Diagnoses were made based on DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric disorders were grouped into 5 categories: mood, anxiety, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and psychosis. Patients could be stratified to more than one category. Rates for unchanged diagnoses, diagnoses in remission, and new-onset diagnoses after surgery for each category were calculated. Results: Fifty-seven patients with primary and secondary dystonia were included. Mean ± SD age at surgery and dystonia duration at time of surgery was 50.6 ± 13.8 and 19.0 ± 13.2 years, respectively. Preoperatively, 37 Axis I diagnoses were made in 25 patients, 43.8% of those presenting with at least 1 Axis I diagnosis (mostly mood and anxiety disorders). Mean ± SD duration of psychiatric follow-up was 24.4 ± 19.6 months. Overall, after surgery no significant changes (p = 0.16) were found in Axis I diagnoses (23 patients, 40.3%): 27 (73%) unchanged, 10 (27%) in complete remission, and 4 (12.9%) new-onset diagnoses. Conclusions: Our results support the overall psychiatric stability of patients with primary and secondary dystonia treated with GPi DBS. However, considering the high psychiatric morbidity in the dystonia population, psychiatric assessments before and after surgery are strongly recommended. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that GPi DBS does not change Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in patients with primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26156506

  4. Mutations in CIZ1 cause adult-onset primary cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Uitti, Ryan J.; Zhao, Yu; Vemula, Satya R.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Auburger, Georg; Leube, Barbara; Lehnhoff, Katja; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Primary dystonia is usually of adult onset, can be familial, and frequently involves the cervical musculature. Our goal was to identify the causal mutation in a family with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia. Methods Linkage and haplotype analyses were combined with solution-based whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing in a large Caucasian pedigree with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia to identify a cosegregating mutation. High-throughput screening and Sanger sequencing were completed in 308 Caucasians with familial or sporadic adult-onset cervical dystonia and matching controls for sequence variants in this mutant gene. Results Exome sequencing led to the identification of an exonic splicing enhancer mutation in Exon 7 of CIZ1 (c.790A>G, p.S264G) which encodes CIZ1, Cip1-interacting zinc finger protein 1. CIZ1 is a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting zinc finger protein expressed in brain and involved in DNA synthesis and cell-cycle control. Using a minigene assay, we showed that c.790A>G altered CIZ1 splicing patterns. The p.S264G mutation also altered the nuclear localization of CIZ1. Screening in subjects with adult-onset cervical dystonia identified two additional CIZ1 missense mutations (p.P47S and p.R672M). Interpretation Mutations in CIZ1 may cause adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia, possibly by precipitating neurodevelopmental abnormalities that manifest in adults and/or G1/S cell-cycle dysregulation in the mature central nervous system. PMID:22447717

  5. Alteration of digital representations in somatosensory cortex in focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Elbert, T; Candia, V; Altenmüller, E; Rau, H; Sterr, A; Rockstroh, B; Pantev, C; Taub, E

    1998-11-16

    Focal hand dystonia involves a loss of motor control of one or more digits; it is associated with the repetitive, synchronous movements of the digits made by musicians over periods of many years. Magnetic source imaging revealed that there is a smaller distance (fusion) between the representations of the digits in somatosensory cortex for the affected hand of dystonic musicians than for the hands of non-musician control subjects. The data suggest that use-dependent susceptibility to digital representation fusion in cortex may be involved in the etiology of focal dystonia. A successful therapy for the condition has been developed based on this consideration.

  6. Acute Dystonia in a Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Maillis, Antonis; Maltezou, Maria; Tsiori, Sofia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (di George syndrome) is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders. The clinical features of the syndrome are distinct facial appearance, velopharyngeal insufficiency, conotruncal heart disease, parathyroid and immune dysfunction; however, little is known about possible neurodegenerative diseases. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient suffering from 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Since adolescence, he presented with behavioral disorders, recommended treatment with 2 mg aloperidin and he presented cervical dystonia and emergence of torticollis and trunk dystonia. Antipsychotic medications either accelerate or reveal dystonic symptoms. PMID:26605035

  7. Rehabilitation of a cellist whose vibrato was affected by focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Lisle, Rae; Speedy, Dale B; Thompson, John M D

    2012-12-01

    Focal dystonia can result in a variety of technical problems in the performing musician, most often affecting control of finger movement, and embouchure. Less common is the effect of focal dystonia on the vibrato of string players. The professional cellist in our study presented with difficulty controlling her vibrato, which fluctuated both in speed and amplitude, causing an inconsistency of sound. This study investigated whether instrumental retraining could alleviate her condition. We report the novel finding that instrumental retraining can significantly improve the symptoms of a dystonic vibrato in a cellist. PMID:23247881

  8. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  9. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions.

  10. Low dose alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) in the treatment of dystonia and dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Ankenman, Ralph; Salvatore, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    AMPT (alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine) is an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. In clinical settings, AMPT is approved to treat pheochromocytoma. Dystonias and dyskinesias seem to have their origin in inconsistent regulation of dopamine function in dopamine pathways. This paper presents case histories of the clinical efficacy of AMPT for treating certain individuals with neuroleptic-induced dystonia or dyskinesia. The authors propose that a special utility of AMPT in tardive disorders may be related to a downregulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity that may be increased by neuroleptic-induced effects on tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation.

  11. An international survey of patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Comella, Cynthia; Bhatia, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    This was an international survey undertaken to assess cervical dystonia (CD) patients own perceptions of their illness and its management. A total of 1,071 self-identified respondents with CD in 38 countries completed the online survey between March and December 2012. The mean time since diagnosis was 9.6 years and over half (54%) of patients surveyed were not diagnosed in the first year. When asked how the symptoms of CD affected them, two-thirds (66%) of patients reported they experienced a lot of pain, and 61% said that they suffered depression and mood alterations; only 7% reported no impact on their lives. Despite problems with the diagnosis, almost 70% of respondents reported being satisfied with the overall relationship with their doctor. Patient treatment expectations were high, with 63% expecting freedom from spasms and 62% expecting freedom from pain. Over half (53%) expected to be able to return to a normal routine (53%). The most common treatment reported was botulinum toxin (BoNT) (86%), followed by oral medication (58%) and physiotherapy/physical therapy (37%). Among patients treated on BoNT, 56% were fairly/very satisfied, 25% were fairly/very dissatisfied and 20% were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the outcome. In conclusion, this international survey highlights the broad impact of CD on several aspects of patient life. Taken overall, the survey suggests that that patients need to be better informed about their condition, treatments available and the limitations of those treatments. It may be that realistically managing patient expectations of treatment would reduce the dissatisfaction of some patients.

  12. Possible risk factors for primary adult onset dystonia: a case-control investigation by the Italian Movement Disorders Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, G.; Berardelli, A.; Abbruzzese, G.; Lepore, V.; Coviello, V.; Acquistapace, D.; Capus, L.; Carella, F.; De Berardinis, M. T.; Galardi, G.; Girlanda, P.; Maurri, S.; Albanese, A.; Bertolasi, L.; Liguori, R.; Rossi, A.; Santoro, L.; Tognoni, G.; Livrea, P.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Little is known about the aetiology of idiopathic adult onset dystonia. The Italian Movement Disorders Study Group promoted a case-control study on some hypothetical risk factors including past medical events, life events, life habits, occupational hazards, and family hystory of dystonia, parkinsonism, and tremor.
METHODS—Cases affected by idiopathic adult onset dystonia (age at symptom onset >20 years, duration of disease >one year and dystonia, and family history of postural tremor independently increased the risk of developing adult onset dystonia, whereas hypertension and cigarette smoking exerted a protective effect. The findings also suggested a positive association between local body injury—for example, previous ocular diseases and neck or trunk trauma—and dystonia of the same body part.
CONCLUSIONS—The results support the idea that environmental and genetic factors may both be important in the aetiology of adult onset dystonia, and suggest aetiological clues worthy of further analytical investigation.

 PMID:9436723

  13. [Muscle afferent block in the treatment of oromandibular dystonia. Difference in effect between masticatory and lingual muscles].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K

    2003-06-01

    Oromandibular dystonia is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by tonic or clonic involuntary spasms of the masticatory and lingual muscles. We treated 50 patients with this movement disorder by injection of lidocaine and alcohol into the masticatory or tongue muscles to block muscle afferents from muscle spindle. The patients were divided according to clinical features into four groups: jaw-closing, jaw-opening, jaw-deviation, and tongue dystonias. Objective evaluation of the symptoms before and after therapy was based on a clinical scaling protocol in terms of four parameters (mastication, speech, pain, and discomfort scales). Symptoms improved in all patients without major side effects. The overall objective improvement (60.2+/-29.5%) was significantly (P<0.005, ANOVA) lower in tongue dystonia (14.1%) than in jaw-closing dystonia (67.6%) and jaw-opening dystonia (68.3%). Although the response of the muscle afferent block to tongue dystonia was hardly satisfactory, this treatment is suggested to be effective for oromandibular dystonia.

  14. Recessive Mutations in the α3 (VI) Collagen Gene COL6A3 Cause Early-Onset Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V.; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M.; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  15. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  16. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  17. Deep brain stimulation in childhood: an effective treatment for early onset idiopathic generalised dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Jeremy R; Green, Alex L; Joint, Carole; Andrew, Morag; Gregory, Ralph P; Scott, Richard B; McShane, Michael A; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2007-01-01

    Background Early onset idiopathic generalised dystonia is a progressive and profoundly disabling condition. Medical treatment may ameliorate symptoms. However, many children have profound, intractable disability including the loss of ambulation and speech, and difficulties with feeding. Following the failure of medical management, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) has emerged as an alternative treatment for the disorder. Methods We describe four children who presented with dystonia. Results Following the failure of a range of medical therapies, DBS systems were implanted in the GPi in an attempt to ameliorate the children's disabilities. All children found dystonic movements to be less disabling following surgery. Compared with preoperative Burke, Fahn and Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale scores, postoperative scores at 6 months were improved. Conclusions DBS is effective in improving symptoms and function in children with idiopathic dystonia refractory to medical treatment. Whilst surgery is complex and can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications, this intervention should be considered following the failure of medical therapy. PMID:17460025

  18. Depression symptoms in movement disorders: comparing Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly M; Okun, Michael S; Fernandez, Hubert F; Jacobson, Charles E; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Bowers, Dawn

    2007-04-15

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and affects 30 to 50% of all patients. In contrast to the wealth of research on depression in PD, little is known about the occurrence of depression in other movement disorders. The primary objective of the current study was to determine whether the high prevalence of depression symptoms seen in PD is also found in other movement disorders, by directly comparing rates of specific depression symptoms and depression severity across PD, dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). Three hundred and fifty-four patients with PD, 83 patients with dystonia, and 53 patients with ET completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We found no significant between-groups differences for depression severity, frequency, or endorsement of specific depression symptoms. Forty-eight percent of PD patients, 37.3% of dystonia patients, and 34% of ET patients were found to be at least mildly depressed (BDI score of 10 or higher). The most commonly endorsed symptoms were fatigability, difficulty with work, anhedonia, and sleep disturbance. Clinicians should be aware that depression is a frequent problem in dystonia and ET, in addition to PD, and inquire about depression symptoms in these patients so that they can be appropriately treated.

  19. Abnormal surround inhibition does not affect asymptomatic limbs in people with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Laura; Kiernan, Dovin; Kiss, Zelma H T; Suchowersky, Oksana; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-09-14

    Surround inhibition is a neural mechanism hypothesized to facilitate goal-directed action by disinhibiting agonist muscle activity while simultaneously inhibiting antagonist and other uninvolved muscle activity. The present study was designed to investigate if abnormalities in surround inhibition are found in asymptomatic body parts (the hand) of people with focal cervical dystonia (neck). Participants with (n=7) and without (n=17) cervical dystonia completed a protocol in which they abducted their index finger while EMG was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (agonist) and abductor digiti minimi (uninvolved) muscles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the primary motor cortex at intervals ranging from 0 to 950+ms after the onset of agonist muscle activity. Motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes from both muscles were compared. In control participants, MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs at intervals from 0 to 480ms. Similarly, in the hands of participants with cervical dystonia - the asymptomatic body part - MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs from 0 to 175ms. These findings suggest that surround inhibition in people with focal dystonia may be intact in asymptomatic hands. In other words, abnormalities in surround inhibition may be restricted to the dystonic limb.

  20. Therapeutic immobilisation for small guitar player’s dystonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Waissman, Flavia; Pereira, João Santos; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2009-01-01

    The development of focal hand dystonia through repetitive tasks is a result of degradation of cortical somatosensory representation due to repetitive fast stimuli sufficient to alter the sensory-motor stimulus, harming the motor control. A sensory-motor training program can modify this disorder. A behavioural intervention focusing on movement could help reduce or eliminate these conditions. PMID:21686815

  1. Sensory dysfunction associated with repetitive strain injuries of tendinitis and focal hand dystonia: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Byl, N; Wilson, F; Merzenich, M; Melnick, M; Scott, P; Oakes, A; McKenzie, A

    1996-04-01

    Repetitive strain injuries are reaching epidemic levels among workers who perform heavy schedules of rapid alternating movements (eg., computer programmers, data entry workers) or repetitive, sustained, coordinated movements (eg., editors, writers, salespeople). The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with repetitive strain injury demonstrated degraded sensory motor performance with their hands. Sixty age-matched adults were recruited, with 15 each assigned to a healthy adult control group, a healthy musician control group, a tendinitis group, or a focal dystonia group. Four sensory motor subtests from the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test were given to the subjects according to a standardized protocol. Using multiple one-factor analyses of variance in the parametric or nonparametric mode followed by post hoc pairwise testing, no significant differences were found between the healthy controls and the musician controls. On the test of kinesthesia, using the left hand, subjects with tendinitis performed significantly worse than controls and subjects with focal dystonia. Compared with controls, subjects with focal dystonia did significantly worse on graphesthesia and manual form perception (part 1 and part 2). Subjects with focal dystonia also did significantly worse than subjects with tendinitis when using the left hand on graphesthesia and manual form perception (part 2). When treating patients with repetitive strain injury, discriminative sensory motor skills must be carefully assessed and may need to be addressed as part of an effective treatment program.

  2. A Patient With Focal Dystonia That Occurred Secondary to a Peripheral Neurogenic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minho; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Han, Yoo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. Patients with dystonia may experience uncontrollable twisting, repetitive movements, or abnormal posture. A 55-year-old man presented with an involuntary left forearm supination, which he had experienced for five years. There was no history of antecedent trauma to the wrist or elbow. Although conventional therapeutic modalities had been performed, the symptoms persisted. When he visited our hospital, electromyography was performed. Reduced conduction velocity was evident at the elbow-axilla segment of the left median nerve. We suspected that there was a problem on the median nerve between the elbow and the axilla. For this reason, we performed an ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging study. A spindle-shaped soft tissue mass was observed at the left median nerve that suggested the possibility of neurofibroma. Dystonia caused by traumatic or compressive peripheral nerve injury has often been reported, but focal dystonia due to a neurogenic tumor is extremely rare. Here, we report our case with a review of the literature. PMID:26361606

  3. Improvement of Isolated Myoclonus Phenotype in Myoclonus Dystonia after Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Frucht, Steven J.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Kopell, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus–dystonia is a condition that manifests predominantly as myoclonic jerks with focal dystonia. It is genetically heterogeneous with most mutations in the epsilon sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). In medically refractory cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to provide marked sustainable clinical improvement, especially in SGCE-positive patients. We present two patients with myoclonus–dystonia (one SGCE positive and the other SGCE negative) who have the isolated myoclonus phenotype and had DBS leads implanted in the bilateral globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods We review their longitudinal Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale scores along with their DBS programming parameters and compare them with published cases in the literature. Results Both patients demonstrated complete amelioration of all aspects of myoclonus within 6–12 months after surgery. The patient with the SGCE-negative mutation responded just as well as the patient who was SGCE positive. High-frequency stimulation (130 Hz) with amplitudes greater than 2.5 V provided therapeutic benefit. Discussion This case series demonstrates that high frequency GPi-DBS is effective in treating isolated myoclonus in myoclonus–dystonia, regardless of the presence of SGCE mutation. PMID:26989574

  4. Pallidal stimulation for primary generalised dystonia: effect on cognition, mood and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Torkamani, Mariam; Beigi, Mazda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Page, Donna; Madeley, Laura; Bhatia, Kailash; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in dystonia on cognition, mood, and quality of life and also assessed if DYT1 gene status influenced cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Fourteen patients with primary generalized dystonia (PGD) were assessed, measuring their estimated premorbid and current IQ, memory for words and faces, and working memory, language, executive function, and sustained attention, one month before and one year or more after surgery. Changes in mood and behaviour and quality of life were also assessed. There was a significant improvement of dystonia with GPi-DBS (69 % improvement in Burke-Fahn-Marsden score, p < 0.0001). Performance on five cognitive tests either improved or declined at post-surgical follow-up. Calculation of a reliable change index suggested that deterioration in sustained attention on the PASAT was the only reliable change (worse after surgery) in cognition with GPi-DBS. DYT1 gene status did not influence cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Depression, anxiety and apathy were not significantly altered, and ratings of health status on the EQ5D remained unchanged. In our sample, GPi-DBS was only associated with an isolated deficit on a test of sustained attention, confirming that GPi-DBS in PGD is clinically effective and safe, without adverse effects on the main domains of cognitive function. The dissociation between GPi-DBS improving dystonia, but not having a significant positive impact on the patients' QoL, warrants further investigation. PMID:24178706

  5. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  6. Pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with cervical dystonia and severe cervical dyskinesias with cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J; Loher, T; Pohle, T; Weber, S; Taub, E; Barlocher, C; Burgunder, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical treatment of complex cervical dystonia and of cervical dyskinesias associated with cervical myelopathy is challenging. In this prospective study, the long term effect of chronic pallidal stimulation in cervical dystonia and on combining the technique with spinal surgery in patients with severe cervical dyskinesias and secondary cervical myelopathy is described. Methods: Eight patients with a history of chronic dystonia who did not achieve adequate benefit from medical treatment or botulinum toxin injection participated in the study. Five patients had complex cervical dystonia with tonic postures and phasic movements. Three patients had rapidly progressive cervical myelopathy secondary to severe cervical dyskinesias and dystonia in the context of a generalised movement disorder. Quadripolar electrodes were implanted in the posteroventral lateral globus pallidus internus with stereotactic CT and microelectrode guidance. In the three patients with secondary cervical myelopathy, spinal surgery was performed within a few weeks and included multilevel laminectomies and a four level cervical corporectomy with spinal stabilisation. Results: Improvement of the movement disorder was noted early after pallidal surgery, but the full benefit could be appreciated only with a delay of several months during chronic stimulation. Three months after surgery, patients with cervical dystonia had improved by 38% in the severity score, by 54% in the disability score, and by 38% in the pain score of a modified version of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale. At a mean follow up of 20 months, the severity score had improved by 63%, the disability score by 69%, and the pain score by 50% compared with preoperatively. There was also sustained amelioration of cervical dyskinesias in the three patients who underwent spinal surgery. Lead fractures occurred in two patients. The mean amplitude needed for chronic deep brain stimulation was 3.8 V at a mean

  7. Genotype-phenotype correlations in THAP1 dystonia: molecular foundations and description of new cases

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Rudzińska, Monika; Bastian, Robert W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Puschmann, Andreas; Momčilović, Dragana; Vemula, Satya R.; Zhao, Yu

    2012-01-01

    An extensive variety of THAP1 sequence variants have been associated with focal, segmental and generalized dystonia with age of onset ranging from 3 to over 60 years. In previous work, we screened 1,114 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia (Neurology 2010;74:229-238) and identified 6 missense mutations in THAP1. For this report, we screened 750 additional subjects for mutations in coding regions of THAP1 and interrogated all published descriptions of THAP1 phenotypes (gender, age of onset, anatomical distribution of dystonia, family history and site of onset) to explore the possibility of THAP1 genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate a deeper understanding of THAP1 pathobiology. We identified 5 additional missense mutations in THAP1 (p.A7D, p.K16E, p.S21C, p.R29Q, and p.I80V). Three of these variants are associated with appendicular tremors, which were an isolated or presenting sign in some of the affected subjects. Abductor laryngeal dystonia and mild blepharospasm can be manifestations of THAP1 mutations in some individuals. Overall, mean age of onset for THAP1 dystonia is 16.8 years and the most common sites of onset are the arm and neck, and the most frequently affected anatomical site is the neck. In addition, over half of patients exhibit either cranial or laryngeal involvement. Protein truncating mutations and missense mutations within the THAP domain of THAP1 tend to manifest at an earlier age and exhibit more extensive anatomical distributions than mutations localized to other regions of THAP1. PMID:22377579

  8. Abnormalities of motor function, transcription and cerebellar structure in mouse models of THAP1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ortiz-Virumbrales, Maitane; Méneret, Aurelie; Morant, Andrika; Kottwitz, Jessica; Fuchs, Tania; Bonet, Justine; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Hof, Patrick R; Ozelius, Laurie J; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-12-20

    DYT6 dystonia is caused by mutations in THAP1 [Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein] and is autosomal dominant and partially penetrant. Like other genetic primary dystonias, DYT6 patients have no characteristic neuropathology, and mechanisms by which mutations in THAP1 cause dystonia are unknown. Thap1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, and most pathogenic THAP1 mutations are missense and are located in the DNA-binding domain. There are also nonsense mutations, which act as the equivalent of a null allele because they result in the generation of small mRNA species that are likely rapidly degraded via nonsense-mediated decay. The function of Thap1 in neurons is unknown, but there is a unique, neuronal 50-kDa Thap1 species, and Thap1 levels are auto-regulated on the mRNA level. Herein, we present the first characterization of two mouse models of DYT6, including a pathogenic knockin mutation, C54Y and a null mutation. Alterations in motor behaviors, transcription and brain structure are demonstrated. The projection neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei are especially altered. Abnormalities vary according to genotype, sex, age and/or brain region, but importantly, overlap with those of other dystonia mouse models. These data highlight the similarities and differences in age- and cell-specific effects of a Thap1 mutation, indicating that the pathophysiology of THAP1 mutations should be assayed at multiple ages and neuronal types and support the notion of final common pathways in the pathophysiology of dystonia arising from disparate mutations. PMID:26376866

  9. Abnormalities of motor function, transcription and cerebellar structure in mouse models of THAP1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ortiz-Virumbrales, Maitane; Méneret, Aurelie; Morant, Andrika; Kottwitz, Jessica; Fuchs, Tania; Bonet, Justine; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Hof, Patrick R; Ozelius, Laurie J; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-12-20

    DYT6 dystonia is caused by mutations in THAP1 [Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein] and is autosomal dominant and partially penetrant. Like other genetic primary dystonias, DYT6 patients have no characteristic neuropathology, and mechanisms by which mutations in THAP1 cause dystonia are unknown. Thap1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, and most pathogenic THAP1 mutations are missense and are located in the DNA-binding domain. There are also nonsense mutations, which act as the equivalent of a null allele because they result in the generation of small mRNA species that are likely rapidly degraded via nonsense-mediated decay. The function of Thap1 in neurons is unknown, but there is a unique, neuronal 50-kDa Thap1 species, and Thap1 levels are auto-regulated on the mRNA level. Herein, we present the first characterization of two mouse models of DYT6, including a pathogenic knockin mutation, C54Y and a null mutation. Alterations in motor behaviors, transcription and brain structure are demonstrated. The projection neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei are especially altered. Abnormalities vary according to genotype, sex, age and/or brain region, but importantly, overlap with those of other dystonia mouse models. These data highlight the similarities and differences in age- and cell-specific effects of a Thap1 mutation, indicating that the pathophysiology of THAP1 mutations should be assayed at multiple ages and neuronal types and support the notion of final common pathways in the pathophysiology of dystonia arising from disparate mutations.

  10. Correlation of Clinical Neuromusculoskeletal and Central Somatosensory Performance: Variability in Controls and Patients With Severe and Mild Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Byl, Nancy N.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Roberts, Tim; McKenzie, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHd) is a recalcitrant, disabling movement disorder, characterized by involuntary co-contractions of agonists and antagonists, that can develop in patients who overuse or misuse their hands. The aim of this study was to document clinical neuromusculoskeletal performance and somatosensory responses (magnetoencephalography) in healthy controls and in FHd subjects with mild versus severe hand dystonia. The performance of healthy subjects (n = 17) was significantly better than that of FHd subjects (n = 17) on all clinical parameters. Those with mild dystonia (n = 10) demonstrated better musculoskeletal skills, task-specific motor performance, and sensory discrimination, but the performance of sensory and fine motor tasks was slower than that of patients with severe dystonia. In terms of somatosensory evoked field responses (SEFs), FHd subjects demonstrated a significant difference in the location of the hand representation on the x and y axes, lower amplitude of SEFs integrated across latency, and a higher ratio of mean SEF amplitude to latency than the controls. Bilaterally,. those with FHd (mild and severe) lacked progressive sequencing of the digits from inferior to superior. On the affected digits, subjects with severe dystonia had a significantly higher ratio of SEF amplitude to latency and a significantly smaller mean volume of the cortical hand representation than those with mild dystonia. Severity of dystonia positively correlated with the ratio of SEF mean amplitude to latency (0.9029 affected, 0.8477 unaffected; p<0.01). The results of the present study strengthen the evidence that patients with FHd demonstrate signs of somatosensory degradation of the hand that correlates with clinical sensorimotor dysfunction, with characteristics of the dedifferentiation varying by the severity of hand dystonia. If these findings represent aberrant learning, then effective rehabilitation must incorporate the principles of neuroplasticity. Training must

  11. Cortical activation and inter-hemispheric sensorimotor coherence in individuals with arm dystonia due to childhood stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kukke, Sahana N.; de Campos, Ana Carolina; Damiano, Diane; Alter, Katharine E.; Patronas, Nicholas; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dystonia is a disabling motor disorder often without effective therapies. To better understand the genesis of dystonia after childhood stroke, we analyzed electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings in this population. Methods Resting spectral power of EEG signals over bilateral sensorimotor cortices (Powrest), resting inter-hemispheric sensorimotor coherence (Cohrest), and task-related changes in power (TRPow) and coherence (TRCoh) during wrist extension were analyzed in individuals with dystonia (age 20±3 years) and healthy volunteers (age 17±5 years). Results Ipsilesional TRPow decrease was significantly lower in patients than controls during the more affected wrist task. Force deficits of the affected wrist correlated with reduced alpha TRPow decrease on the ipsilesional and not the contralesional hemisphere. Cohrest was significantly lower in patients than controls, and correlated with more severe dystonia and poorer hand function. Powrest and TRCoh were similar between groups. Conclusions The association between weakness and cortical activation during wrist extension highlights the importance of ipsilesional sensorimotor activation on function. Reduction of Cohrest in patients reflects a loss of inter-hemispheric connectivity that may result from structural changes and neuroplasticity, potentially contributing to the development of dystonia. Significance Cortical and motor dysfunction are correlated in patients with childhood stroke and may in part explain the genesis of dystonia. PMID:25499610

  12. 1H-NMR metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with complex regional pain syndrome-related dystonia.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Axel; van der Plas, Anton A; van Dasselaar, Nick T; Deelder, André M; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Mayboroda, Oleg A

    2014-01-01

    In complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)-related dystonia, compelling evidence points to the involvement of the central nervous system, but the underpinning pathobiology is still unclear. Thus, to enable a hypothesis-free, unbiased view of the problem and to obtain new insight into the pathobiology of dystonia in CRPS, we applied an exploratory metabolomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with CRPS-related dystonia. (1)H-NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate modeling were used to investigate metabolic profiles of a total of 105 CSF samples collected from patients with CRPS-related dystonia and controls. We found a significantly different metabolic profile of CSF in CRPS patients compared to controls. The differences were already reflected in the first two principal components of the principal component analysis model, which is an indication that the variance associated with CRPS is stronger than variance caused by such classical confounders as gender, age, or individual differences. A supervised analysis generated a strong model pinpointing the most important metabolites contributed to the metabolic signature of patients with CRPS-related dystonia. From the set of identified discriminators, the most relevant metabolites were 2-keto-isovalerate, glucose, glutamine, and lactate, which all showed increased concentrations, and urea, which showed decreased concentration in CRPS subjects. Our findings point at a catabolic state in chronic CRPS patients with dystonia that is likely associated with inflammation.

  13. Patterns of Cortical Synchronization in Isolated Dystonia Compared With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miocinovic, Svjetlana; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Qasim, Salman; Ostrem, Jill L.; Starr, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Isolated dystonia and Parkinson disease (PD) are disorders of the basal gangliothalamocortical network. They have largely distinct clinical profiles, but both disorders respond to deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the same subcortical targets using similar stimulation paradigms, suggesting pathophysiologic overlap. We hypothesized that, similar to PD, isolated dystonia is associated with elevated cortical neuronal synchronization. OBJECTIVE To investigate the electrophysiologic characteristics of the sensorimotor cortex arm-related area using a temporary subdural electrode strip in patients with isolated dystonia and PD undergoing DBS implantation in the awake state. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study recruited patients scheduled for DBS at the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Data were collected from May 1, 2008, through April 1, 2015. Findings are reported for 22 patients with isolated cervical or segmental dystonia (8 with [DYST-ARM] and 14 without [DYST] arm symptoms] and 14 patients with akinetic rigid PD. Data were analyzed from November 1, 2014, through May 1, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cortical local field potentials, power spectral density, and phase-amplitude coupling (PAC). RESULTS Among our 3 groups that together included 36 patients, cortical PAC was present in primary motor and premotor arm-related areas for all groups, but the DYST group was less likely to exhibit increased PAC (P = .008). Similar to what has been shown for patients with PD, subthalamic DBS reversibly decreased PAC in a subset of patients with dystonia who were studied before and during intraoperative test stimulation (n = 4). At rest, broadband gamma (50–200 Hz) power in the primary motor cortex was greater in the DYST-ARM and PD groups compared with the DYST group, whereas alpha (8–13 Hz) and beta (13–30 Hz) power was comparable in all 3 groups. During movement, the DYST

  14. Differences in globus pallidus neuronal firing rates and patterns relate to different disease biology in children with dystonia

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, V M; Valentin, A; Rey, H G; Lumsden, D E; Elze, M C; Selway, R; Alarcon, G; Lin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology underlying different types of dystonia is not yet understood. We report microelectrode data from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) and globus pallidus externa (GPe) in children undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia and investigate whether GPi and GPe firing rates differ between dystonia types. Methods Single pass microelectrode data were obtained to guide electrode position in 44 children (3.3–18.1 years, median 10.7) with the following dystonia types: 14 primary, 22 secondary Static and 8 progressive secondary to neuronal brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Preoperative stereotactic MRI determined coordinates for the GPi target. Digitised spike trains were analysed offline, blind to clinical data. Electrode placement was confirmed by a postoperative stereotactic CT scan. Findings We identified 263 GPi and 87 GPe cells. Both GPi and GPe firing frequencies differed significantly with dystonia aetiology. The median GPi firing frequency was higher in the primary group than in the secondary static group (13.5 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.002) and higher in the NBIA group than in either the primary (25 Hz vs 13.5 Hz; p=0.006) or the secondary static group (25 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.00004). The median GPe firing frequency was higher in the NBIA group than in the secondary static group (15.9 Hz vs 7 Hz; p=0.013). The NBIA group also showed a higher proportion of regularly firing GPi cells compared with the other groups (p<0.001). A higher proportion of regular GPi cells was also seen in patients with fixed/tonic dystonia compared with a phasic/dynamic dystonia phenotype (p<0.001). The GPi firing frequency showed a positive correlation with 1-year outcome from DBS measured by improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS-m) score (p=0.030). This association was stronger for the non-progressive patients (p=0.006). Interpretation Pallidal firing rates and patterns differ significantly with dystonia aetiology

  15. Influence of development and aging on brain biopterin: implications for dopa-responsive dystonia onset.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Y; Kish, S J

    1998-08-01

    Reduction of biopterin (BP) due to a mutation in the GTP-cyclohydrolase I gene causes hereditary progressive dystonia/dopa-responsive dystonia (HPD/DRD). To determine whether an age-related BP decline may contribute to HPD/DRD onset (from 1 to 13 years of age), we measured brain BP levels in 57 normal subjects ranging in age from 1 day to 92 years. Putaminal BP showed a significant increase in postnatal period, reaching a plateau at 1 to 13 years of age, and a decrease in adulthood. The HPD/DRD onset in childhood is unlikely to be caused by a brain BP decline during the first decade of life, but that in adulthood could be related to the age-dependent decrease. PMID:9710058

  16. Sensory mapping of lip representation in brass musicians with embouchure dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshihiro; Schulz, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart; Elbert, Thomas; Pantev, Christo

    2004-04-01

    Embouchure dystonia is a focal task-specific disorder involving abnormal non-coordinated movements and involuntary muscle contraction around the mouth. In professional brass players it is often so disabling that patients have to limit or give up their occupation. We examined the somatosensory homuncular representation and measured gap detection sensitivity of the lips in eight former professional musicians affected by embouchure dystonia and eight control subjects. Relative to controls, the patients' digit, and especially the thumb, representations were shifted in a lateral direction towards the lip representational zone. Patients' upper lips showed decreased sensitivity compared to their lower lips (p < 0.01). This asymmetry result was absent in controls. Abnormal somatosensory reorganization may contribute to the disorder.

  17. [Botulinum toxin in the treatment of focal dystonias: own experience with botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Stefanoff, P; Kiliszek, M; Friedman, A

    2000-01-01

    During the last 5 years, 75 patients with focal dystonias were longitudinally treated with injections of botulinum toxin A. Each patient received 2-6 injections. The improvement was assessed after each injection and estimated as significant after 68.47% of injections, as mediocre after 23.42% of injections and none after 8.11% of the injections. The most significant improvement was obtained in patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, the worst effect was obtained in spasmodic torticollis. Varying responses were observed following repeated injections of botulinum toxin, the clinically assessed improvement did not decrease after successively applied doses. Side-effects occurred after 18% of the injections and were mostly mild and disappeared after short time. This study confirms the usefulness of botulinum toxin, which is an effective and safe treatment of focal dystonias. PMID:10849905

  18. Novel GNB1 missense mutation in a patient with generalized dystonia, hypotonia, and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Steinrücke, Sofia; Lohmann, Katja; Domingo, Aloysius; Rolfs, Arndt; Bäumer, Tobias; Spiegler, Juliane; Hartmann, Corinna; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Recently, exome sequencing has extended our knowledge of genetic causes of developmental delay through identification of de novo, germline mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta 1 (GNB1) in 13 patients with neurodevelopmental disability and a wide range of additional symptoms and signs including hypotonia in 11 and seizures in 10 of the patients. Limb/arm dystonia was found in 2 patients.(1). PMID:27668284

  19. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  20. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  1. The clinical phenomenology and associations of trick maneuvers in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Filip, Pavel; Šumec, Rastislav; Baláž, Marek; Bareš, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Sensory trick is an unusual clinical feature in cervical dystonia that attenuates disease symptoms by slight touch to a specific area of the face or head. Using a semi-quantitative questionnaire-based study of 197 patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia, we sought to determine probable pathophysiologic correlates, with the wider aim of examining its eventual clinical significance. The typical sensory trick, i.e., light touch, not necessitating the use of force leading to simple overpowering of dystonic activity, was present in 83 (42.1 %) patients. The vast majority of the patients required a specific sequence of sensorimotor inputs, including touch sensation on the face or different areas of the head, and also sensory and motor input of the hand itself. Deviations often led to a significant decrease in effectiveness and lack of expected benefit. Moreover, patients able to perform the maneuver reported compellingly higher subjective effect of botulinum toxin treatment (median 7 vs. 5 on a scale of 0-10; p < 0.0001) and lower depression score (median 10 vs. 14 on the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating scale; p < 0.001). Overall, the results point to marked disruption of sensorimotor networks in cervical dystonia. The mechanism of the sensory trick action may be associated with balancing the abnormal activation patterns by specific sensorimotor inputs. Its presence may be considered a positive predictive factor for responsiveness to botulinum toxin treatment. PMID:26645376

  2. The clinical phenomenology and associations of trick maneuvers in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Filip, Pavel; Šumec, Rastislav; Baláž, Marek; Bareš, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Sensory trick is an unusual clinical feature in cervical dystonia that attenuates disease symptoms by slight touch to a specific area of the face or head. Using a semi-quantitative questionnaire-based study of 197 patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia, we sought to determine probable pathophysiologic correlates, with the wider aim of examining its eventual clinical significance. The typical sensory trick, i.e., light touch, not necessitating the use of force leading to simple overpowering of dystonic activity, was present in 83 (42.1 %) patients. The vast majority of the patients required a specific sequence of sensorimotor inputs, including touch sensation on the face or different areas of the head, and also sensory and motor input of the hand itself. Deviations often led to a significant decrease in effectiveness and lack of expected benefit. Moreover, patients able to perform the maneuver reported compellingly higher subjective effect of botulinum toxin treatment (median 7 vs. 5 on a scale of 0-10; p < 0.0001) and lower depression score (median 10 vs. 14 on the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating scale; p < 0.001). Overall, the results point to marked disruption of sensorimotor networks in cervical dystonia. The mechanism of the sensory trick action may be associated with balancing the abnormal activation patterns by specific sensorimotor inputs. Its presence may be considered a positive predictive factor for responsiveness to botulinum toxin treatment.

  3. Sporadic and familial myoclonic dystonia: Report of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Roy, Arijit; Biswas, Atanu; Pal, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Myoclonic dystonia refers to a clinical syndrome characterized by rapid jerky movements along with dystonic posturing of the limbs. Clinically, it is characterized by sudden, brief, electric shock-like movements, mostly involving the upper extremities, shoulders, neck and trunk. Characteristically, the movements wane with consumption of small dose of alcohol in about 50% of cases. Additionally, dystonic contractions are observed in most of the patients in the affected body parts and some patients may exhibit cervical dystonia or graphospasm as well. It may manifest as an autosomal dominant condition or sometimes, as a sporadic entity, though there are doubts whether these represent cases with reduced penetrance. The condition is usually treated with a combination of an anticholinergic agent like, benztropine, pimozide and tetrabenazine. We report one sporadic case and one familial case where the father and the son are affected. The cases were collected from the Movement Disorders Clinic of Bangur Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata, West Bengal in a period of ten months. Myoclonic dystonia is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge, this series is the first one reported from our country. Videos of the patients are also provided with the article. PMID:27293342

  4. Genetic Diagnosis of Two Dopa-Responsive Dystonia Families by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-fang; Zhang, Yu-han; Guo, Ji-feng; Sun, Qi-ying; Mei, Jun-pu; Zhou, Han-lin; Guan, Li-ping; Tian, Jin-yong; Hu, Zheng-mao; Li, Jia-da; Xia, Kun; Yan, Xin-xiang; Tang, Bei-sha

    2014-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia, a rare disorder typically presenting in early childhood with lower limb dystonia and gait abnormality, responds well to levodopa. However, it is often misdiagnosed with the wide spectrum of phenotypes. By exome sequencing, we make a rapid genetic diagnosis for two atypical dopa-responsive dystonia pedigrees. One pedigree, presented with prominent parkinsonism, was misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease until a known mutation in GCH1 (GTP cyclohydrolase 1) gene (NM_000161.2: c.631_632delAT, p.Met211ValfsX38) was found. The other pedigree was detected with a new compound heterozygous mutation in TH (tyrosine hydroxylase) gene [(NM_000360.3: c.911C>T, p.Ala304Val) and (NM_000360.3: c.1358G>A, p.Arg453His)], whose proband, a pregnant woman, required a rapid and less-biased genetic diagnosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that exome sequencing could provide a precise and rapid genetic testing in the diagnosis of Mendelian diseases, especially for diseases with wide phenotypes. PMID:25181484

  5. Multiday Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Causes Clinically Insignificant Changes in Childhood Dystonia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Bertucco, Matteo; Young, Scott J; Lee, Annie A; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal motor cortex activity is common in dystonia. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation may alter cortical activity by decreasing excitability while anodal stimulation may increase motor learning. Previous results showed that a single session of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation can improve symptoms in childhood dystonia. Here we performed a 5-day, sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study, where we measured tracking and muscle overflow in a myocontrol-based task. We applied cathodal and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (2 mA, 9 minutes per day). For cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (7 participants), 3 subjects showed improvements whereas 2 showed worsening in overflow or tracking error. The effect size was small (about 1% of maximum voluntary contraction) and not clinically meaningful. For anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (6 participants), none showed improvement, whereas 5 showed worsening. Thus, multiday cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduced symptoms in some children but not to a clinically meaningful extent, whereas anodal transcranial direct current stimulation worsened symptoms. Our results do not support transcranial direct current stimulation as clinically viable for treating childhood dystonia.

  6. The effectiveness of physiotherapy for cervical dystonia: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Joke; Van der Velden, Kevin; Meirte, Jill; Van Daele, Ulrike; Truijen, Steven; Cras, Patrick; Mercelis, Rudy; De Hertogh, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Cervical dystonia is a form of adult-onset, focal dystonia characterized by involuntary contractions of the neck muscles, leading to a disabling, abnormal head posture. CD has a great impact on the activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life. Currently, the most widely used and recommended first line treatment is botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) injections. Physiotherapy is a potentially useful adjuvant, but little is known about its effectiveness. Consequently, our objective was to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy alone or as an adjuvant treatment to BoNT/A injections in cervical dystonia (CD) by means of a systematic literature review. Two online databases, PubMed and Web of Science, were searched for articles describing the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment for CD. After screening, based on predefined in- and exclusion criteria, 16 studies were retained. Their methodological quality was assessed according to Cochrane guidelines. The methodological quality of most studies was low. Examples of shortcomings are small sample sizes, lack of randomization or blinding, and diversity in therapeutic techniques and outcome measures. Only seven studies were clinical trials; the remaining were either case reports or case series. The reported physiotherapy treatments included EMG biofeedback training, muscular elongation, postural exercises and electrotherapy. Improvements in head position, pain, cervical range of motion, quality of life and ADL have been reported, which is promising. Cautious interpretation on the effectiveness of physiotherapy as an adjuvant therapy is required. Before firm conclusions can be drawn, additional high quality trials are needed.

  7. Persistent changes of corticostriatal plasticity in dt(sz) mutant hamsters after age-dependent remission of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Avchalumov, Y; Volkmann, C E; Rückborn, K; Hamann, M; Kirschstein, T; Richter, A; Köhling, R

    2013-10-10

    Abnormal plasticity in the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop has been suggested to represent a key factor in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In a model of primary paroxysmal dystonia, the dt(sz) mutant hamster, previous experiments have shown a strongly increased long-term potentiation (LTP) in comparison to non-dystonic control hamsters. These basal changes, i.e. in the absence of dystonia, were found in young animals at an age of 5 weeks, when the age-dependent dystonia in dt(sz) mutant reaches highest severity. In the present study we examined in corticostriatal slices (1) whether the increases in synaptic plasticity can be modulated by stressful stimuli which induce dystonic episodes in young mutant hamsters, and (2) whether increases of LTP persist after spontaneous remission of dystonia in animals older than 10 weeks. The present data show that in slices of young mutant hamsters the extent of LTP was not influenced by the presence of dystonia: In comparison to age-matched control hamsters, LTP was increased in mutant hamsters independent of preceding stressful stimulation. After remission of dystonia, i.e., in older dt(sz) mutant hamsters >10 weeks, only LTP could be elicited, while in preparations from age-matched control hamsters, either LTP or long-term depression developed, depending on previous behavioral challenge. We conclude that in mature brain, corticostriatal connections have the potential for changes in metaplasticity, while in dt(sz) mutant hamsters this metaplasticity is persistently infringed even though stress-inducible dystonic symptoms are lost.

  8. Effect of chronic pallidal deep brain stimulation on off period dystonia and sensory symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Loher, T; Burgunder, J; Weber, S; Sommerhalder, R; Krauss, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of chronic pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) on off period dystonia, cramps, and sensory symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: 16 patients (6 women, 10 men; mean age at surgery 65 years) suffering from advanced PD were followed up prospectively for one year after implantation of a monopolar electrode in the posteroventral lateral globus pallidus internus. Unilateral DBS was performed in 9 patients. 10 patients had bilateral procedures (contemporaneous bilateral surgery in 7 and staged bilateral surgery in 3 instances). The decision whether to perform unilateral or bilateral surgery depended on the clinical presentation of the patient. Patients were formally assessed preoperatively, at 3–5 days, 3 months, and 12 months after surgery. Results: In patients who underwent unilateral surgery, pain was present in 7 (78%), off dystonia in 5 (56%), cramps in 6 (67%), and dysaesthesia in 4 (44%). In patients who underwent bilateral surgery, pain was present in 7 (70%), off dystonia in 6 (60%), cramps in 7 (70%), and dysaesthesia in 4 (40%). With unilateral DBS, contralateral off period dystonia was improved by 100% at 1 year postoperatively, pain by 74%, cramps by 88%, and dysaesthesia by 100%. There was less pronounced amelioration of ipsilateral off period dystonia and sensory symptoms. With bilateral DBS, total scores for dystonia were improved by 86%, for pain by 90%, for cramps by 90%, and for dysaesthesia by 88%. The benefit appeared early at the first evaluation 3–5 days after surgery and was stable throughout the follow up period. Conclusions: Pallidal DBS yields major improvement of off period dystonia, cramps, and sensory symptoms in patients with advanced PD. PMID:12235307

  9. Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in a Trajectory-Constrained Self-Feeding Task: A Quantitative Index of Unsuppressed Motor Noise in Children With Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Francesca; Bertucco, Matteo; Casellato, Claudia; Bhanpuri, Nasir; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-10-01

    Motor speed and accuracy are both affected in childhood dystonia. Thus, deriving a speed-accuracy function is an important metric for assessing motor impairments in dystonia. Previous work in dystonia studied the speed-accuracy trade-off during point-to-point tasks. To achieve a more relevant measurement of functional abilities in dystonia, the present study investigates upper-limb kinematics and electromyographic activity of 8 children with dystonia and 8 healthy children during a trajectory-constrained child-relevant task that emulates self-feeding with a spoon and requires continuous monitoring of accuracy. The speed-accuracy trade-off is examined by changing the spoon size to create different accuracy demands. Results demonstrate that the trajectory-constrained speed-accuracy relation is present in both groups, but it is altered in dystonia in terms of increased slope and offset toward longer movement times. Findings are consistent with the hypothesis of increased signal-dependent noise in dystonia, which may partially explain the slow and variable movements observed in dystonia.

  10. Pallidal deep brain stimulation for the treatment of DYT6 dystonia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Shahnaz; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Parvaresh, Mansour; Rohani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the results of pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) in DYT6 dystonia. This will be the first report of DYT6 dystonia treated with pallidal DBS from Iran. A 21 years old male patient with DYT6 dystonia underwent bilateral deep brain stimulation. The target of DBS was the sensorimotor region of the posteroventral globus pallidus internus (GPi). DBS parameters included an amplitude of 2.7 V, frequency of 160 Hz, and pulse width of 90 μs which were adjusted according to the patient's response 12 months after surgery. Treatment outcome was measured by the patient’s Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) score. Before surgery, the patient's BFMDRS score was 32. However, BFMDRS score reduced to 7 at one year follow up after surgery (78% improvement of total score). Dystonic symptoms of extremities and mouth completely resolved. Also speech and swallowing function significantly improved. Although previous observations reported a poor to moderate response in speech, we found DBS as an effective treatment not only for dystonic features, but also for speech improvement of DYT6 dystonia. PMID:25250280

  11. CYP2U1 mutations in two Iranian patients with activity induced dystonia, motor regression and spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, A.; Schöls, L.; Schüle, R.; Tonekaboni, S.H.; Abolhassani, A.; Fadaee, M.; Rosti, R.O.; Gleeson, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. It is divided into two major groups, complicated and uncomplicated, based on the presence of additional features such as intellectual disability, ataxia, seizures, peripheral neuropathy and visual problems. SPG56 is an autosomal recessive form of HSP with complicated and uncomplicated manifestations, complicated being more common. CYP2U1 gene mutations have been identified as responsible for SPG56. Intellectual disability, dystonia, subclinical sensory motor neuropathy, pigmentary degenerative maculopathy, thin corpus callosum and periventricular white-matter hyperintensities were additional features noted in previous cases of SPG56. Here we identified two novel mutations in CYP2U1 in two unrelated patients by whole exome sequencing. Both patients had complicated HSP with activity-induced dystonia, suggesting dystonia as an additional finding in SPG56. Two out of 14 previously reported patients had dystonia, and the addition of our patients suggests dystonia in a quarter of SPG56 patients. Developmental regression has not been reported in SPG56 patients so far but both of our patients developed motor regression in infancy. PMID:27292318

  12. Homozygous mutation of VPS16 gene is responsible for an autosomal recessive adolescent-onset primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaodong; Chen, Xin; Wu, Song; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Xiejun; Zhang, Doudou; He, Sijie; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Mali; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zongyang; Luo, Kun; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Herein, we report the identification a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.156 C > A in VPS16, co-segregating with disease status in a Chinese consanguineous family with adolescent-onset primary dystonia by whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping. To assess the biological role of c.156 C > A homozygous mutation of VPS16, we generated mice with targeted mutation site of Vps16 through CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing approach. Vps16 c.156 C > A homozygous mutant mice exhibited significantly impaired motor function, suggesting that VPS16 is a new causative gene for adolescent-onset primary dystonia. PMID:27174565

  13. Cervical dystonia: effectiveness of a standardized physical therapy program; study design and protocol of a single blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions of the neck and abnormal head positions that affect daily life activities and social life of patients. Patients are usually treated with botulinum toxin injections into affected neck muscles to relief pain and improve control of head postures. In addition, many patients are referred for physical therapy to improve their ability to perform activities of daily living. A recent review on allied health interventions in cervical dystonia showed a lack of randomized controlled intervention studies regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions. Methods/design The (cost-) effectiveness of a standardized physical therapy program compared to regular physical therapy, both as add-on treatment to botulinum toxin injections will be determined in a multi-centre, single blinded randomized controlled trial with 100 cervical dystonia patients. Primary outcomes are disability in daily functioning assessed with the disability subscale of the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes are pain, severity of dystonia, active range of motion of the head, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Data will be collected at baseline, after six months and one year by an independent blind assessor just prior to botulinum toxin injections. For the cost effectiveness, an additional economic evaluation will be performed with the costs per quality adjusted life-year as primary outcome parameter. Discussion Our study will provide new evidence regarding the (cost-) effectiveness of a standardized, tailored physical therapy program for patients with cervical dystonia. It is widely felt that allied health interventions, including physical therapy, may offer a valuable supplement to the current therapeutic options. A positive outcome will lead to a greater use of the standardized physical therapy program. For the Dutch situation a positive outcome implies that the standardized

  14. Heterogeneity in primary dystonia: lessons from THAP1, GNAL, and TOR1A in Amish-Mennonites.

    PubMed

    Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Fuchs, Tania; San Luciano, Marta; Raymond, Deborah; Brashear, Alison; Ortega, Robert; Deik, Andres; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bressman, Susan B

    2014-05-01

    A founder mutation in the Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) gene causing primary dystonia was originally described in the Amish-Mennonites. However, there may be both genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of dystonia in this population that may also inform studies in other ethnic groups. Genotyping for THAP1 and for guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), α-activating activity polypeptide, olfactory type (GNAL) mutations and genotype-phenotype comparisons were performed for 76 individuals of Amish-Mennonites heritage with primary dystonia. Twenty-seven individuals had mutations in THAP1-most with the founder indel mutation-but two had different THAP1 mutations, 8 had mutations in GNAL, and 1 had a de novo GAG deletion in torsin 1A (TOR1A) (dystonia 1 [DYT1]). In the primary analysis comparing THAP1 carriers versus all non-THAP1, non-GNAL, non-TOR1A individuals, age at onset was lower in THAP1 carriers (mean age ± standard deviation, 15.5 ± 9.2 years [range, 5-38 years] vs. 39.2 ± 17.7 years [range, 1-70 years]; P < 0.001), and THAP1 carriers were more likely to have onset of dystonia in an arm (44.4% vs. 15.0%; P = 0.02) and to have arm involvement (88.9% vs. 22.5%; P < 0.01), leg involvement (51.9% vs. 10.0%; P = 0.01), and jaw/tongue involvement (33.3% vs. 7.5%; P = 0.02) involvement at their final examination. Carriers were less likely to have dystonia restricted to a single site (11.11% in carriers vs. 65.9% in noncarriers; P < 0.01) and were less likely to have dystonia onset in cervical regions (25.9% of THAP1 carriers vs. 52.5% of noncarriers; P = 0.04). Primary dystonia in the Amish-Mennonites is genetically diverse and includes not only the THAP1 indel founder mutation but also different mutations in THAP1 and GNAL as well as the TOR1A GAG deletion. Phenotype, particularly age at onset combined with final distribution, may be highly specific for the genetic etiology. PMID:24500857

  15. Oromandibular Dystonia: A Case Report of the Lateral Pterygoid Muscle Involvement and Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Alexoudi, Athanasia; Dalivigka, Zoi; Siatouni, Anna; Verentzioti, Anastasia; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present case report is to punctuate the importance of individualized therapy procedures and the accurate diagnosis of the muscles involved in oromandibular dystonia and underline the role of electromyography (EMG). We report a woman who presented sustained jaw movement towards the left, severe difficulty in jaw opening and jaw protrusion. The patient was treated with injections of botulinum A toxin in lateral pterygoid, masseter, platysma, sternoclidomastoid, temporalis muscles with EMG guidance. She experienced an 80% reduction of her symptoms after the first injection. In jaw deviation dystonia symptoms impressively respond to botulinum toxin treatment of the pterygoid muscle. Individualized therapy procedures are necessitated. PMID:27777710

  16. Characterization of human torsinA and its dystonia-associated mutant form.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zolkiewska, Anna; Zolkiewski, Michal

    2003-01-01

    Deletion of a single glutamate in torsinA correlates with early-onset dystonia, the most severe form of a neurological disorder characterized by uncontrollable muscle contractions. TorsinA is targeted to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) in eukaryotic cells. We investigated the processing and membrane association of torsinA and the dystonia-associated Glu-deletion mutant (torsinAdeltaE). We found that the signal sequence of torsinA (residues 1-20 from the 40 amino-acid long N-terminal hydrophobic region) is cleaved in Drosophila S2 cells, as shown by the N-terminal sequencing after partial protein purification. TorsinA is not secreted from S2 cells. Consistently, sodium carbonate extraction and Triton X-114 treatment showed that torsinA is associated with the ER membrane in CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. In contrast, a variant of torsinA that contains the native signal sequence without the hydrophobic region Ile24-Pro40 does not associate with the membranes in CHO cells, and a truncated torsinA without the 40 N-terminal amino acids is secreted in the S2 culture. Thus the 20-amino-acid-long hydrophobic segment in torsinA, which remains at the N-terminus after signal-peptide cleavage, is responsible for the membrane anchoring of torsinA. TorsinAdeltaE showed similar cleavage of the 20 N-terminal amino acids and membrane association properties similar to wild-type torsinA but, unlike the wild-type, torsinAdeltaE was not secreted in the S2 culture even after deletion of the membrane-anchoring segment. This indicates that the dystonia-associated mutation produces a structurally distinct, possibly misfolded, form of torsinA, which cannot be properly processed in the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12780349

  17. The role of mutations in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Schlicht, Felix; Svetel, Marina; Hinrichs, Frauke; Zittel, Simone; Graf, Julia; Lohnau, Thora; Schmidt, Alexander; Mir, Pablo; Krause, Patricia; Lang, Antony E; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Wolters, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Zeuner, Kirsten E; Altenmüller, Eckart; Naz, Sadaf; Chung, Sun Ju; Kostic, Vladimir S; Münchau, Alexander; Kühn, Andrea A; Brüggemann, Norbert; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Specific mutations in COL6A3 have recently been reported as the cause of isolated recessive dystonia, which is a rare movement disorder. In all patients, at least one mutation was located in Exons 41 and 42. In an attempt to replicate these findings, we assessed by direct sequencing the frequency of rare variants in Exons 41 and 42 of COL6A3 in 955 patients with isolated or combined dystonia or with another movement disorder with dystonic features. We identified nine heterozygous carriers of rare variants including five different missense mutations and an extremely rare synonymous variant. In these nine patients, we sequenced the remaining 41 coding exons of COL6A3 to test for a second mutation in the compound heterozygous state. In only one of them, a second rare variant was identified (Thr732Met + Pro3082Arg). Of note, this patient had been diagnosed with Parkinson´s disease (with dystonic posturing) due to homozygous PINK1 mutations. The COL6A3 mutations clearly did not segregate with the disease in the four affected siblings of this family. Further, there was no indication for a disease-modifying effect of the COL6A3 mutations since disease severity or age at onset did not correlate with the number of COL6A3 mutated alleles in this family. In conjunction with the relatively high frequency of homozygous carriers of reported mutations in publically available databases, our data call a causal role for variants in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia into question.

  18. A neuromorphic model of motor overflow in focal hand dystonia due to correlated sensory input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won Joon; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Motor overflow is a common and frustrating symptom of dystonia, manifested as unintentional muscle contraction that occurs during an intended voluntary movement. Although it is suspected that motor overflow is due to cortical disorganization in some types of dystonia (e.g. focal hand dystonia), it remains elusive which mechanisms could initiate and, more importantly, perpetuate motor overflow. We hypothesize that distinct motor elements have low risk of motor overflow if their sensory inputs remain statistically independent. But when provided with correlated sensory inputs, pre-existing crosstalk among sensory projections will grow under spike-timing-dependent-plasticity (STDP) and eventually produce irreversible motor overflow. Approach. We emulated a simplified neuromuscular system comprising two anatomically distinct digital muscles innervated by two layers of spiking neurons with STDP. The synaptic connections between layers included crosstalk connections. The input neurons received either independent or correlated sensory drive during 4 days of continuous excitation. The emulation is critically enabled and accelerated by our neuromorphic hardware created in previous work. Main results. When driven by correlated sensory inputs, the crosstalk synapses gained weight and produced prominent motor overflow; the growth of crosstalk synapses resulted in enlarged sensory representation reflecting cortical reorganization. The overflow failed to recede when the inputs resumed their original uncorrelated statistics. In the control group, no motor overflow was observed. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of the human sensorimotor system, it allows us to explain how correlated sensory input to anatomically distinct muscles is by itself sufficient to cause persistent and irreversible motor overflow. Further studies are needed to locate the source of correlation in sensory input.

  19. [Cervical echomyography in cervical dystonia and its application to the monitoring for muscle afferent block (MAB)].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Matsumoto, S; Sakamoto, T; Mizutani, K; Kaji, R

    2000-07-01

    Muscle afferent block (MAB) is an intramuscular injection of 0.5% lidocaine and pure ethanol with a volume ratio of 10:1, introduced as an alternative to botulinum toxin injection for focal dystonia and spasticity. As in the case of botulinum toxin injection, the precise localization of target muscles is crucial to obtain the maximal effect from MAB. For this purpose, we performed ultrasonography of cervical muscles (echomyography) in 20 patients with cervical dystonia (11 men, 9 women; mean age 46.1), with ultrasonograph SSD-5500 (Aloca Co. Ltd., Japan) and a 7.5 MHz linear probe. In untreated subjects, the boundaries of muscles could be easily identified, while they tended to become ambiguous after repeated MAB sessions. At rest, there were involuntary worm-like movements of a specific muscle group observed in all patients. Contrary to our expectation, in all but one patient abnormal contraction was limited only in a part of synergists responsible for the abnormal posture. In normal subjects there was no abnormal contraction at rest, and all the synergists were simultaneously activated by the voluntary neck deviation. Normal subjects could not mimick the pattern of muscle activity in dystonic patients. The echo-guided MAB was performed in 16 patients. We could easily observe the diffusion of lidocaine and ethanol into the targeted muscle, and injected portions of the muscle stopped their activities just after MAB. The effect persisted for 3-4 days in at least 5 out of 10 patients who had follow-up examination. On the other hand, the movement stopped only temporarily after the injection of saline or lidocaine only. In 3 out of 16 patients, some of the uninjected synergists were activated as if to substitute for the treated muscle just after the injection. We conclude that cervical echomyography is useful to investigate the pattern of muscle activity in cervical dystonia and to accurately localize the contracting muscles during MAB.

  20. Altered sensory feedbacks in pianist's dystonia: the altered auditory feedback paradigm and the glove effect

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Felicia P.-H.; Großbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether AAF can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al., 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in synchrony with a metronome on a MIDI-piano with three auditory feedback conditions: (1) normal feedback; (2) no feedback; (3) constant delayed feedback. Experiment 2 employs synchronization-continuation paradigm: 12 MD patients and 12 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in two phases: first in synchrony with a metronome, secondly continue the established tempo without the metronome. There are four experimental conditions, among them three are the same AAF as in Experiment 1 and 1 is related to altered tactile sensory input. The coefficient of variation of inter-onset intervals of the key depressions was calculated to evaluate fine motor control. Results: In both experiments, the healthy controls and the patients behaved very similarly. There is no difference in the regularity of playing between the two groups under any condition, and neither did AAF nor did altered tactile feedback have a beneficial effect on patients' fine motor control. Conclusions: The results of the two experiments suggest that in the context of our experimental designs, AAF and altered tactile feedback play a minor role in motor coordination in patients with musicians' dystonia. We propose that altered auditory and tactile feedback do not serve as effective sensory tricks and may not temporarily reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from MD in this experimental context. PMID:24381552

  1. Selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia: long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bergenheim, A Tommy; Nordh, Erik; Larsson, Eva; Hariz, Marwan I

    2015-01-01

    Objective 61 procedures with selective peripheral denervation for cervical dystonia were retrospectively analysed concerning surgical results, pain, quality of life (QoL) and recurrences. Methods The patients were assessed with the Tsui torticollis scale, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain and Fugl-Meyer scale for QoL. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, early postoperatively, at 6 months, then at a mean of 42 (13–165) months. All patients underwent electromyogram at baseline, which was repeated in cases who presented with recurrence of symptoms after surgery. Results Six months of follow-up was available for 55 (90%) of the procedures and late follow-up for 34 (56%). The mean score of the Tsui scale was 10 preoperatively. It improved to 4.5 (p<0.001) at 6 months, and 5.3 (p<0.001) at late follow-up. VAS for pain improved from 6.5 preoperatively to 4.2 (p<0.001) at 6 months and 4 (p<0.01) at late follow-up. The Fugl-Meyer score for QoL improved from 43.3 to 46.6 (p<0.05) at 6 months, and to 51.1 (p<0.05) at late follow-up. Major reinnervation and/or change in the dystonic pattern occurred following 29% of the procedures, and led in 26% of patients to reoperation with either additional denervation or pallidal stimulation. Conclusions Selective peripheral denervation remains a surgical option in the treatment of cervical dystonia when conservative measures fail. Although the majority of patients experience a significant relief of symptoms, there is a substantial risk of reinnervation and/or change in the pattern of the cervical dystonia. PMID:25362089

  2. Dysgraphia as a Mild Expression of Dystonia in Children with Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Renzo; Melani, Federico; Brancati, Claudia; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Brovedani, Paola; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Pellacani, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background Absence epilepsy (AE) is etiologically heterogeneous and has at times been associated with idiopathic dystonia. Objectives Based on the clinical observation that children with AE often exhibit, interictally, a disorder resembling writer’s cramp but fully definable as dysgraphia, we tested the hypothesis that in this particular population dysgraphia would represent a subtle expression of dystonia. Methods We ascertained the prevalence of dysgraphia in 82 children with AE (mean age 9.7) and average intelligence and compared them with 89 age-, gender- and class-matched healthy children (mean age 10.57) using tests for handwriting fluency and quality, based on which we divided patients and controls into four subgroups: AE/dysgraphia, AE without dysgraphia, controls with dysgraphia and healthy controls. We compared the blink reflex recovery cycle in children belonging to all four subgroups. Results We identified dysgraphia in 17/82 children with AE and in 7/89 controls (20.7 vs 7.8%; P = 0.016) with the former having a 3.4-times higher risk of dysgraphia regardless of age and gender (odd ratio: 3.49; 95% CI 1.2, 8.8%). The AE/dysgraphia subgroup performed worse than controls with dysgraphia in one test of handwriting fluency (P = 0.037) and in most trials testing handwriting quality (P< 0.02). In children with AE/dysgraphia the blink reflex showed no suppression at short interstimulus intervals, with a difference for each value emerging when comparing the study group with the three remaining subgroups (P<0.001). Conclusions In children with AE, dysgraphia is highly prevalent and has a homogeneous, distinctive pathophysiological substrate consistent with idiopathic dystonia. PMID:26132164

  3. The role of mutations in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Schlicht, Felix; Svetel, Marina; Hinrichs, Frauke; Zittel, Simone; Graf, Julia; Lohnau, Thora; Schmidt, Alexander; Mir, Pablo; Krause, Patricia; Lang, Antony E; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Wolters, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Zeuner, Kirsten E; Altenmüller, Eckart; Naz, Sadaf; Chung, Sun Ju; Kostic, Vladimir S; Münchau, Alexander; Kühn, Andrea A; Brüggemann, Norbert; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Specific mutations in COL6A3 have recently been reported as the cause of isolated recessive dystonia, which is a rare movement disorder. In all patients, at least one mutation was located in Exons 41 and 42. In an attempt to replicate these findings, we assessed by direct sequencing the frequency of rare variants in Exons 41 and 42 of COL6A3 in 955 patients with isolated or combined dystonia or with another movement disorder with dystonic features. We identified nine heterozygous carriers of rare variants including five different missense mutations and an extremely rare synonymous variant. In these nine patients, we sequenced the remaining 41 coding exons of COL6A3 to test for a second mutation in the compound heterozygous state. In only one of them, a second rare variant was identified (Thr732Met + Pro3082Arg). Of note, this patient had been diagnosed with Parkinson´s disease (with dystonic posturing) due to homozygous PINK1 mutations. The COL6A3 mutations clearly did not segregate with the disease in the four affected siblings of this family. Further, there was no indication for a disease-modifying effect of the COL6A3 mutations since disease severity or age at onset did not correlate with the number of COL6A3 mutated alleles in this family. In conjunction with the relatively high frequency of homozygous carriers of reported mutations in publically available databases, our data call a causal role for variants in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia into question. PMID:26872670

  4. [Three siblings with type 3 GM1-gangliosidosis--pathophysiology of dystonia and MRI findings].

    PubMed

    Uyama, E; Terasaki, T; Owada, M; Naito, M; Araki, S

    1990-08-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is a rare neurovisceral storage disease caused by an inherited deficiency of acid beta-galactosidase. The characteristic neurological feature of type 3 (adult or chronic) GM1-gangliosidosis is usually a slowly progressive dystonia with dysarthria due to predominant involvement of basal ganglia. About 20 adult patients with this disorder have been reported in the literature. However, there are no reports of 3 brothers with type 3 GM1-gangliosidosis, and MRI findings. Case 1 (proband): A 28-year-old man was hospitalized because of facial grimace, dysarthria, and generalized dystonia. He was born after normal pregnancy and delivery. His development was normal until 3 years of age when the difficulties of speaking and walking were noticed by his parents. These neurological abnormalities progressed slowly and facial grimace and dystonic movements occurred 7 years later. He could not walk at 22 years of age. On admission, he was bedridden with marked scoliosis and subluxation of the mandibule. The communication was possible only by pointing the words written on the board. Case 2: A 33-year-old man, elder brother of case 1, showed the similar neurological features and clinical course. Slit-lamp examination revealed corneal opacities which were located in the deep stroma. Case 3: A 33-year-old man, elder brother of case 1 or case 2. At age 10-11, he noted similar symptoms as case 1 or case 2. The severity of dystonia was milder than his brothers. A diagnosis of GM1-gangliosidosis in three patients was made on the basis of the following data.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Alteration in forward model prediction of sensory outcome of motor action in focal hand dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, André; Furuya, Shinichi; Karst, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a movement disorder affecting highly trained movements. Rather than being a pure motor disorder related to movement execution only, movement planning, error prediction, and sensorimotor integration are also impaired. Internal models (IMs), of which two types, forward and inverse models have been described and most likely processed in the cerebellum, are known to be involved in these tasks. Recent results indicate that the cerebellum may be involved in the pathophysiology of focal dystonia (FD). Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate whether an IM deficit plays a role in FD. We focused on the forward model (FM), which predicts sensory consequences of motor commands and allows the discrimination between external sensory input and input deriving from motor action. We investigated 19 patients, aged 19–59 and 19 healthy musicians aged 19–36 as controls. Tactile stimuli were applied to fingers II–V of both hands by the experimenter or the patient. After each stimulus the participant rated the stimulus intensity on a scale between 0 (no sensation) and 1 (maximal intensity). The difference of perceived intensity between self- and externally applied (EA) stimuli was then calculated for each finger. For assessing differences between patients and controls we performed a cluster analysis of the affected hand and the corresponding hand of the controls using the fingers II–V as variables in a 4-dimensional hyperspace (chance level = 0.5). Using a cluster analysis, we found a correct classification of the affected finger in 78.9–94.7%. There was no difference between patients and healthy controls of the absolute value of the perceived stimulus intensity. Our results suggest an altered FM function in focal hand dystonia. It has the potential of suggesting a neural correlate within the cerebellum and of helping integrate findings with regard to altered sensorimotor processing and altered prediction in FD in a single framework

  6. Arm Posturing in a Patient Following Stroke: Dystonia, Levitation, Synkinesis, or Spasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Irmady, Krithi; Jabbari, Bahman; Louis, Elan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-stroke movement disorders occur in up to 4% of stroke patients. The movements can be complex and difficult to classify, which presents challenges when attempting to understand the clinical phenomenology and provide appropriate treatment. Case Report We present a 64-year-old male with an unusual movement in the arm contralateral to his ischemic stroke. The primary feature of the movement was an involuntary elevation of the arm, occurring only when he was walking. Discussion The differential diagnosis includes dystonia, spontaneous arm levitation, synkinesis, and spasticity. We discuss each of these diagnostic possibilities in detail. PMID:26682091

  7. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Treatment of Focal Hand Dystonia: Update and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHD) is characterized by excessive and unwanted muscle activation in both the hand and arm resulting in impaired performance in particular tasks. Understanding the pathophysiology of FHD has progressed significantly for several decades and this has led to consideration of other potential therapies such as non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). A number of studies have been conducted to develop new therapy for FHD using transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. In this paper, we review previous studies and describe the potential therapeutic use of NIBS for FHD. We also discuss the future direction of NIBS to treat FHD. PMID:27240806

  8. Speech-activated Myoclonus Mimicking Stuttering in a Patient with Myoclonus–Dystonia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, David A.; Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired neurogenic stuttering has been considered a fairly uncommon clinical occurrence; speech-activated myoclonus is a rare entity that can mimic stuttering and is caused by a wide array of etiologies. Case Report Here we report a patient with myoclonus–dystonia syndrome (MDS), due to an identified disease-causing mutation, who displayed speech-activated myoclonus mimicking stuttering. Discussion In MDS, myoclonus has only infrequently been reported to affect speech. This case further expands the spectrum of conditions causing the rare clinical phenomenon of speech-activated myoclonus. PMID:27441098

  9. Task-specific dystonias: historical review--a new look at the classics.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J

    2013-03-01

    Although task-specific dystonias (TSD) have been described for almost two centuries, few entities have been characterised so variously as TSD. Over time TSD have been described as pure motor phenomena, "neurasthenic" symptoms, occupational hazards akin to repetitive strain, hysterical symptoms and finally… back to pure motor phenomena. A review of the classic literature can shed light on this subject and show that the same disease can be classified of different ways according to the dominant contemporary concepts over time. In any case, classic authors already defined TSD as motor phenomena of central origin. PMID:23052605

  10. Brain cortical activation during guitar-induced hand dystonia studied by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Pujol, J; Roset-Llobet, J; Rosinés-Cubells, D; Deus, J; Narberhaus, B; Valls-Solé, J; Capdevila, A; Pascual-Leone, A

    2000-09-01

    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a strongly task-related movement disorder. Typically, symptoms become apparent only when players execute specific overpracticed skilled exercises on their instrument. We therefore examined five guitarists with functional MRI during dystonic symptom provocation by means of an adapted guitar inside the magnet. The activation patterns obtained in comparable nondystonic guitarists and in the study patients when performing normal-hand exercise served as references. A 1.5-T system equipped with echo-speed gradients and single-shot echoplanar imaging software was used. Data acquisition was centered on the cortical motor system encompassed in eight contiguous slices. Dystonic musicians compared with both control situations showed a significantly larger activation of the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex that contrasted with a conspicuous bilateral underactivation of premotor areas. Our results coincide with studies of other dystonia types in that they show an abnormal recruitment of cortical areas involved in the control of voluntary movement. However, they do suggest that the primary sensorimotor cortex, rather than being underactive in idiopathic dystonic patients, may be overactive when tested during full expression of the task-induced movement disorder.

  11. Comparing health locus of control in patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia, Functional Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Haselden, Karen; Powell, Theresa; Drinnan, Mike; Carding, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Locus of Control (LoC) refers to an individuals' perception of whether they are in control of life events. Health Locus of Control refers to whether someone feels they have influence over their health. Health Locus of Control has not been studied in any depth in voice-disordered patients. The objective of this study was to examine Health Locus of Control in three patient groups: (1) Spasmodic Dysphonia, (2) Functional Dysphonia and (3) a nondysphonic group with Nonlaryngeal Dystonia. LoC was measured and compared in a total of 57 patients using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales (diagnostic specific) Form C. Internal, Chance, and Powerful others LoC were measured and comparisons were made using one-way analysis of variance. Contrary to expectations Internal LoC was found to be significantly higher in the Functional Dysphonia group when compared to the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in Chance or Powerful others LoC. The two organic groups, Spasmodic Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia, were more alike in Internal Health Locus of Control than the Functional Dysphonia group. The diagnostic nature of the groups was reflected in their LoC scores rather than their voice loss. These results contribute to the debate about the etiology of Spasmodic Dysphonia and will be of interest to those involved in the psychology of voice and those managing voice-disordered patients.

  12. What we can learn about hereditary dystonia from HSDI of the glottis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Eeg, Martin

    2012-02-01

    This study examined efficacy of the innate immune defence via the mannose binding lectin (MBL) in a cohort of 55 dystonic patients prospectively referred to the clinic with laryngeal mucosal complaints, who were placed on local steroids (budesonid inhaler, 400 μg 2 times daily) and antihistamines (fexofenadin 180 mg mostly 3 times daily) with adjuvant lifestyle corrections. Treatment efficacy of the larynx was assessed based on mucosal findings of the vocal folds examined with High speed mucosa studies comprising simultaneous high speed digital imagines (HSDI), kymography, electroglottography (EGG) and voice acoustics combined with a visual score of arytenoids oedema, as these measures are indicative of the magnitude of laryngitis. Lactose and gluten intolerance and immunological analyses of the innate system were made systematically. Results showed that the genetic aspects of immunology did not reveal a role for the innate immune system, represented by the mannose binding lectin (MBL). An unexpected positive effect of the larynx treatment on dystonia symptoms was found evidenced by reduction of dystonic complaints and more normative results of High speed mucosa, and a reduction of oedema of the inter arytenoids region. Symptoms relieve and better quality of life was observed on follow up for the dystonia complaints.

  13. Amplitude and timing of somatosensory cortex activity in Task Specific Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Dolberg, Rebecca; Hinkley, Leighton B. N.; Honma, Susanne; Zhu, Zhao; Findlay, Anne M.; Byl, Nancy N.; Nagarjan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD) is a movement disorder diagnosed in individuals performing repetitive hand behaviors. The extent to which processing anomalies in primary sensory cortex extend to other regions or across the two hemispheres is presently unclear. Methods In response to low/high rate and novel tactile stimuli on the affected and unaffected hands, magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to elaborate activity timing and amplitude in the primary somatosensory (S1) and secondary somatosensory/parietal ventral (S2/PV) cortices. MEG and clinical performance measures were collected from thirteen patients and matched controls. Results Compared to controls, subjects with tspFHD had increased response amplitude in S2/PV bilaterally in response to high rate and novel stimuli. Subjects with tspFHD also showed increased response latency (low rate, novel) of the affected digits in contralateral S1. For high rate, subjects with tspFHD showed increased response latency in ipsilateral S1 and S2/PV bilaterally. Activation differences correlated with functional sensory deficits (predicting a latency shift in S1), motor speed and muscle strength. Conclusions There are objective differences in the amplitude and timing of activity for both hands across contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory cortex in patients with tspFHD. Significance Knowledge of cortical processing abnormalities across S1 and S2/PV in dystonia should be applied towards the development of learning based sensorimotor interventions. PMID:21802357

  14. Mixed effectiveness of rTMS and retraining in the treatment of focal hand dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Kimberley, Teresa J.; Schmidt, Rebekah L. S.; Chen, Mo; Dykstra, Dennis D.; Buetefisch, Cathrin M.

    2015-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of dystonia remains uncertain, two primary factors implicated in the development of dystonic symptoms are excessive cortical excitability and impaired sensorimotor processing. The aim of this study was to determine the functional efficacy of an intervention combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and sensorimotor retraining. A randomized, single-subject, multiple baseline design with crossover was used to examine participants with focal hand dystonia (FHD) (n = 9). Intervention: 5 days rTMS + sensorimotor retraining (SMR) vs. Five days rTMS + control therapy (CTL) (which included stretching and massage). The rTMS was applied to the premotor cortex at 1 Hz at 80% resting motor threshold for 1200 pulses. For sensorimotor retraining, a subset of the Learning-based Sensorimotor Training program was followed. Each session in both groups consisted of rTMS followed immediately by 30 min of the therapy intervention (SMR or CTL). Contrary to our hypothesis, group analyses revealed no additional benefit from the SMR training vs. CTL. When analyzed across group however, there was significant improvement from the first baseline assessment in several measures, including tests of sensory ability and self-rated changes. The patient rated improvements were accompanied by a moderate effect size suggesting clinical meaningfulness. These results provide encouragement for further investigation of rTMS in FHD with a need to optimize a secondary intervention and determine likely responders vs. non-responders. PMID:26217209

  15. Pitfalls in phenylalanine loading test in the diagnosis of dopa-responsive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Opladen, Thomas; Hoffmann, Georg F; Kühn, Andrea A; Blau, Nenad

    2013-03-01

    Phenylalanine (Phe) loading test is a useful tool in the differential diagnosis of dopa-responsive dystonia due to autosomal dominant or recessive GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) deficiency or autosomal recessive sepiapterin reductase (SR) deficiency. In these patients hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase system is compromised due to subnormal tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) levels and hydroxylation of phenylalanine (Phe) to tyrosine (Tyr) is reduced with elevated Phe/Tyr ratio 1-2 h after oral Phe administration (100 mg/kg bw) administration. In healthy persons there is only a modest increase in Tyr production and blood Phe normalizes after 4 h. We report on a challenge with Phe (100 mg/kg bw) in a patient with dopa-responsive dystonia while on therapy with BH(4) and l-dopa. During Phe challenge Phe concentration remained below the normal range while a transient mild hypertyrosinemia was observed, leading to an extremely low Phe/Tyr ratio. A repeated test, after BH(4) withdrawal, reversed the findings and resulted normal. These data suggest activation of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase by BH(4). Thus, the Phe loading test should not be performed during substitution with BH(4).

  16. Mitochondrial ND3 as the novel causative gene for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Takahashi, Yuji; Gao, Zong-Liang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Chen, Xian-Wen; Goto, Jun; Lou, Jin-Ning; Tsuji, Shoji

    2009-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia (LDYT) is a mitochondrial disorder associated with variable combinations of vision loss and progressive generalized dystonia. LDYT is a unique oxidative phosphorylation disorder caused by mutations in mitochondrial ND6 or ND4 gene. In this paper, we describe a Chinese family with 18 LDYT patients. The comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial genome using resequencing microarray revealed a mutation (mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A)) substituting a threonine for a highly conserved alanine at codon 47 of MTND3 on the background of haplogroup D4b. Quantitative analysis of the heteroplasmy of the mutation revealed a homoplasmy in the leukocytes of all the affected individuals on the maternal side. This is the first description of the ND3 mutation causing LDYT. The mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A) mutation has recently been described in French and Korean patients with Leigh syndrome. These findings suggest that the clinical presentations associated with the mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A) mutation (ND3) are much wider, encompassing those of LDYT and Leigh syndrome. PMID:19458970

  17. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Vries, P M; Leenders, K L; van der Hoeven, J H; de Jong, B M; Kuiper, A J; Maurits, N M

    2007-11-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from forearm muscles. Although patients had no complaints concerning wrist movement and had no apparent difficulty in executing the task, they demonstrated lower mean EMG amplitude (flexor: 0.32 mV and extensor: 0.61 mV) than controls (flexor: 0.67 mV; P = 0.021 and extensor: 1.18 mV; P = 0.068; borderline significant). Mean extensor muscle contraction was prolonged in patients (1860 ms) compared with controls (1334 ms; P = 0.026). Variation in mean EMG amplitude over movements tended to be higher in patients (flexor: 43% and extensor: 35%) than controls (flexor: 34%; P = 0.072 and extensor: 26%; P = 0.073). These results suggest that CD patients also have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts at a subclinical level. This would support the concept that in dystonia, non-dystonic limbs are in a 'pre-dystonic state'.

  18. Subtle Microstructural Defects of the Cerebellum in a Knock-in Mouse Model of DYT1 Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chang-Hyun; Bernhard, Doug; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by involuntary twisting and repetitive movements. DYT1 dystonia is an inherited form of dystonia caused by a mutation in the TOR1A gene, which encodes torsinA. TorsinA is expressed in many regions of the nervous system, and the regions responsible for causing dystonic movements remain uncertain. Most prior studies have focused on the basal ganglia, although there is emerging evidence for abnormalities in the cerebellum too. In the current studies, we examined the cerebellum for structural abnormalities in a knock-in mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. The gross appearance of the cerebellum appeared normal in the mutant mice, but stereological measures revealed the cerebellum to be 5% larger in mutant compared to control mice. There were no changes in the numbers of Purkinje cells, granule cells, or neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. However, Golgi histochemical studies revealed Purkinje cells to have thinner dendrites, and fewer and less complex dendritic spines. There also was a higher frequency of heterotopic Purkinje cells displaced into the molecular layer. These results reveal subtle structural abnormalities of the cerebellum that are similar to those reported for the basal ganglia in the DYT1 knock-in mouse model. PMID:24121114

  19. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Voet, Caroline; le Polain de Waroux, Bernard; Forget, Patrice; Deumens, Ronald; Masquelier, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway) is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal) were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central) pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change. PMID:25254100

  20. Combined Anterior and Posterior Lumbar Rhizotomy for Treatment of Mixed Dystonia and Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Mohamed; Mahran, Mahmoud A.; Aboud, Ahmed; Mahran, Moustafa G.; Nasef, Marwa A.A.; Gaber, Mohamed; Sabry, Tamer; Ibrahim, Mohamed H.; Taha, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) can present with severe secondary dystonia with or without associated spasticity of their extremities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcomes of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy for the treatment of mixed hypertonia in the lower extremities of children with CP. METHODS: Fifty children with CP were subjected to combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies in a prospective study. Clinical outcome measurements were recorded preoperatively and were evaluated at 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The operative techniques were performed by laminotomy from L1-S1, and intraoperative monitoring was used in all cases. All patients underwent intensive postoperative physiotherapy programs. RESULTS: Changes in muscle tone, joint range of motion, and dystonia were significant (P = .000) at postoperative assessment visits. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the potential of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies to improve activities of daily living in children with CP and with mixed spasticity and dystonia. ABBREVIATIONS: BAD, Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale CAPR, combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy CP, cerebral palsy ITB, intrathecal baclofen MAS, modified Ashworth Scale ROM, range of motion SDR, selective dorsal rhizotomy PMID:27244465

  1. Heterogeneity in primary dystonia: lessons from THAP1, GNAL and TOR1A in Amish-Mennonites

    PubMed Central

    Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Fuchs, Tania; San Luciano, Marta; Raymond, Deborah; Brashear, Alison; Ortega, Robert; Deik, Andres; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background A founder mutation in the THAP1 gene causing primary dystonia was originally described in the Amish-Mennonites. However there may be both genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of dystonia in this population that may also inform studies in other ethnic groups. Methods Genotyping for THAP1, and GNAL mutations and genotype-phenotype comparisons were performed for 76 individuals of Amish-Mennonites heritage with primary dystonia. Results 27 had mutations in THAP1—most with the founder indel mutation, but two had different THAP1 mutations; 8 had mutations in GNAL; and 1 had a de novo GAG deletion in TOR1A. In the primary analysis comparing THAP1 carriers to all non-THAP1, non-GNAL, non-TOR1A individuals, age at onset was lower in THAP1 carriers (15.46±9.20, range 5–38 vs. 39.18±17.65, range 1–70, p<0.001), carriers were more likely to have onset of dystonia in an arm (44.4% vs. 15%, p=0.02), and to have arm (88.9% vs. 22.5%, p<0.01), leg (51.9% vs. 10% p=0.01), and jaw/tongue (33.3% vs. 7.5%, p=0.02) involvement at final examination. Carriers were less likely to have dystonia restricted to a single site (11.11% in carriers vs. 65.85% (p<0.01)), and less likely to have dystonia onset in cervical regions (25.9% THAP1 vs. 52.5% in non-carriers, p=0.04). Conclusions Primary dystonia in the Amish-Mennonites is genetically diverse, and includes not only the THAP1 indel founder mutation but also different mutations in THAP1 and GNAL as well as the TOR1A GAG deletion. Phenotype, particularly age at onset combined with final distribution, may be highly specific for the genetic etiology. PMID:24500857

  2. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  3. Differences in somatosensory hand organization in a healthy flutist and a flutist with focal hand dystonia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Byl, N N; McKenzie, A; Nagarajan, S S

    2000-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia is a disabling, involuntary disorder of movement that can disrupt a successful musician's career. This problem is difficult to treat, to some extent because we do not fully understand its origin. Somatosensory degradation has been proposed as one etiology. The purpose of this case study was to compare the differences in the somatosensory hand representation of two female flutists, one with focal dystonia of the left hand (digits 4 and 5) and one a healthy subject (the control). Noninvasive magnetic source imaging was performed on both subjects. The somatosensory evoked potentials of controlled taps to the fingers were measured with a 37-channel biomagnetometer and reported in terms of the neuronal organization, latency, amplitude, density, location, and spread of the digits on each axis (x, y, and z). The somatosensory representation of the involved hand of the flutist with dystonia differed from that of the healthy flutist. The magnetic fields evoked from the primary somatosensory cortex had a disorganized pattern of firing, with a short latency and excessive amplitude in the involved digits of the affected hand, as well as inconsistency (decreased density). In addition, the patterns of firing were different in terms of the location of the digits on the x, y, and z axes and sequential organization of the digits. This study confirms that somatosensory evoked magnetic fields can be used to describe the representation of the hand on the somatosensory cortex in area 3b. Degradation in the hand representation of the flutist with focal hand dystonia was evident, compared with the hand representation of the healthy flutist. It is not clear whether the sensory degradation was the cause or the consequence of the dystonia. The questions are whether re-differentiation of the representation could be achieved with aggressive sensory retraining and whether improvement in structure would be correlated with improvement in function.

  4. Combined cognitive–behavioural and mindfulness programme for people living with dystonia: a proof-of-concept study

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, H; Bernstein, C J; Davies, G; Tang, N K Y; Belhag, M; Tingle, A; Field, M; Foss, J; Lindahl, A; Underwood, M; Ellard, D R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To design and test the delivery of an intervention targeting the non-motor symptoms of dystonia and pilot key health and well-being questionnaires in this population. Design A proof-of-concept study to test the delivery, acceptability, relevance, structure and content for a 3-day group residential programme for the management of dystonia. Setting Participants were recruited from a single botulinum toxin clinic. The intervention was delivered in the community. Participants 14 participants consented to take part (2 withdrew prior to the starting of intervention). The average age was 60 years (range 44–77), 8 of whom were female. After drop-out, 9 participants completed the 3-day programme. Intervention A 3-day group residential programme. Primary and secondary outcome measures Process evaluation and interviews were carried out before and after the intervention to explore participant's views and expectations, as well as experiences of the intervention. Select questionnaires were completed at baseline, 1-month and 3-month follow-up. Results Although participants were not sure what to expect from the programme, they found it informative and for many this together with being in a group with other people with dystonia legitimised their condition. Mindfulness was accepted and adopted as a coping strategy. This was reflected in the 1-month follow-up. Conclusions We successfully delivered a 3-day residential programme to help those living with dystonia manage their condition. Further improvements are suggested. The quantitative outcome measures were acceptable to this group of patients with dystonia. PMID:27496234

  5. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  6. "ATP1A3" Mutations in Infants: A New Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism Phenotype Characterized by Motor Delay and Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashear, Allison; Mink, Jonathan W.; Hill, Deborah F.; Boggs, Niki; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stacy, Mark A.; Snively, Beverly; Light, Laney S.; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Morrison, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    We report new clinical features of delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia in two young children with mutations (R756H and D923N) in the "ATP1A3" gene. In adults, mutations in "ATP1A3" cause rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP, DYT12) with abrupt onset of fixed dystonia. The parents and children were examined and videotaped, and…

  7. DYT6 dystonia: review of the literature and creation of the UMD Locus-Specific Database (LSDB) for mutations in the THAP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Arnaud; Ea, Vuthy; Roubertie, Agathe; Martin, Mélanie; Coquart, Coline; Claustres, Mireille; Béroud, Christophe; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle

    2011-11-01

    By family-based screening, first Fuchs and then many other authors showed that mutations in THAP1 (THAP [thanatos-associated protein] domain-containing, apoptosis-associated protein 1) account for a substantial proportion of familial, early-onset, nonfocal, primary dystonia cases (DYT6 dystonia). THAP1 is the first transcriptional factor involved in primary dystonia and the hypothesis of a transcriptional deregulation, which was primarily proposed for the X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (DYT3 dystonia), provided thus a new way to investigate the possible mechanism underlying the development of dystonic movements. Currently, 56 families present with a THAP1 mutation; however, no genotype/phenotype relationship has been found. Therefore, we carried out a systematic review of the literature on the THAP1 gene to colligate all reported patients with a specific THAP1 mutation and the associated clinical signs in order to describe the broad phenotypic continuum of this disorder. To facilitate the comparison of the identified mutations, we created a Locus-Specific Database (UMD-THAP1 LSDB) available at http://www.umd.be/THAP1/. Currently, the database lists 56 probands and 43 relatives with the associated clinical phenotype when available. The identification of a larger number of THAP1 mutations and collection of high-quality clinical information for each described mutation through international collaborative effort will help investigating the structure-function and genotype-phenotype correlations in DYT6 dystonia. PMID:21793105

  8. Successful treatment of tardive lingual dystonia with botulinum toxin: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Johannes M H; Krause, Eike; Bötzel, Kai; Wetter, Thomas C

    2008-07-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a dreaded side effect of antipsychotic medication. Recommended treatments for TD may provide reliable improvement but can be, in turn, associated with additional adverse reactions. Recently, several reports have suggested that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in affected muscles may significantly improve TD. Here, we report a case of severe tongue protrusion dystonia secondary to an antipsychotic medication in a young man. Several approaches including clozapine, amisulpride, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, tiapride and clonazepam failed to improve the symptoms. Injection of 50 U of BTX-A (Dysport, Ipsen, Ettlingen, Germany) into each genioglossal muscle dramatically improved tongue protrusion within few days with a sustained effect. If reasonable precautions are taken, the application seems to be well tolerated with only minor side effects. A review of the literature that is part of this article adverts BTX-A injection as a potential beneficial approach of various kinds of TD. PMID:17936461

  9. A Rare Cervical Dystonia Mimic in Adults: Congenital Muscular Torticollis (Fibromatosis colli), a Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Uluer, Mehmet C; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Neglected or undiagnosed congenital muscular torticollis in adults is quite rare, although it is the third most common congenital deformity in the newborn (1). When left untreated at an early age, deficits in lateral and rotational range of motion can occur along with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities that develop over time. Subtle cases can go unnoticed until early adulthood, with predominant fibrotic replacement in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) making physical therapy and chemodenervation mostly ineffective. Surgical intervention, in these cases, can prove effective in alleviating pain, improving function and cosmesis (2). We report an update on a previously reported case, misdiagnosed as cervical dystonia, which had undergone partial myectomy of the anterior belly of the SCM with some relief of symptoms but without total resolution after the correct diagnosis of fibromatosis colli (3).

  10. A Rare Cervical Dystonia Mimic in Adults: Congenital Muscular Torticollis (Fibromatosis colli), a Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Uluer, Mehmet C.; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Neglected or undiagnosed congenital muscular torticollis in adults is quite rare, although it is the third most common congenital deformity in the newborn (1). When left untreated at an early age, deficits in lateral and rotational range of motion can occur along with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities that develop over time. Subtle cases can go unnoticed until early adulthood, with predominant fibrotic replacement in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) making physical therapy and chemodenervation mostly ineffective. Surgical intervention, in these cases, can prove effective in alleviating pain, improving function and cosmesis (2). We report an update on a previously reported case, misdiagnosed as cervical dystonia, which had undergone partial myectomy of the anterior belly of the SCM with some relief of symptoms but without total resolution after the correct diagnosis of fibromatosis colli (3). PMID:26869987

  11. Dystonia in an adolescent on risperidone following the discontinuation of methylphenidate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guler, Gulen; Yildirim, Veli; Kutuk, Meryem Ozlem; Toros, Fevziye

    2015-04-30

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with common comorbidities that include oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety disorder, and affective disorders. Because of these comorbidities, drug combination treatments and drug-drug interactions are becoming increasingly more frequent. The present case report describes an acute dystonic reaction following the abrupt discontinuation of methylphenidate from a drug regimen with risperidone. The patient experienced acute dystonic reactions on three separate occasions when he forgot to take his methylphenidate medication. The present report informs clinicians about the possible side effects, such as dystonia, when psychostimulant and antipsychotic drug combinations are altered and suggests that the abrupt cessation of stimulants may lead to the development of movement disorders. Therefore, appropriate care is necessary when changing the dose of a drug or abruptly discontinuing a drug from a combination of psychostimulants and antipsychotics.

  12. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Del Sette, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. PMID:26005350

  13. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan

    2009-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  14. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan; Standaert, David G; Pisani, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  15. Dynamic cortical gray matter volume changes after botulinum toxin in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Pasman, Jaco W; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2015-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in focal dystonia have reported on cerebral reorganization after botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections. With the exception of microstructural changes, alterations in gray matter volume after BoNT have not been explored. In this study, we sought to determine whether BoNT influences gray matter volume in a group of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. We analyzed whole brain gray matter volume in a sample of CD patients with VBM analysis. In patients, scans were repeated immediately before and some weeks after BoNT injections; controls were only scanned once. We analyzed 1) BoNT-related gray matter volume changes within patients; 2) gray matter volume differences between patients and controls; and 3) correlations between gray matter volume and disease duration and disease severity. The pre- and post-BoNT treatment analysis revealed an increase of gray matter volume within the right precentral sulcus, at the lateral border of the premotor cortex. In comparison to healthy controls, CD patients had reduced gray matter volume in area 45 functionally corresponding to the left ventral premotor cortex. No gray matter volume increase was found for CD patients in comparison to controls. Gray matter volume of the left supramarginal gyrus and left premotor cortex correlated positively with disease duration, and that of the right inferior parietal lobule correlated negatively with disease severity. We have identified structural, yet dynamic gray matter volume changes in CD. There were specific gray matter volume changes related to BoNT injections, illustrating indirect central consequences of modified peripheral sensory input. As differences were exclusively seen in higher order motor areas relevant to motor planning and spatial cognition, these observations support the hypothesis that deficits in these cognitive processes are crucial in the pathophysiology of CD.

  16. Disordered plasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex in focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yohei; Ueki, Yoshino; Lin, Peter; Vorbach, Sherry; Mima, Tatsuya; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Hallett, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Interventional paired associative stimulation (PAS) can induce plasticity in the cortex, and this plasticity was previously shown to be disordered in the primary motor cortex in focal hand dystonia (FHD). This study aimed to test whether associative plasticity is abnormal in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in FHD and whether PAS modulates excitatory or inhibitory interneurons within the cortex. Ten FHD patients and 10 healthy volunteers were studied. We investigated the changes in single- and double-pulse somatosensory-evoked potentials before and after PAS, which consisted of peripheral electrical nerve stimulation and subsequent transcranial magnetic stimulation over S1. Four sessions of somatosensory-evoked potentials recordings were performed: before PAS, and immediately, 15 and 30 min after PAS. We compared the time course of the somatosensory-evoked potentials between the FHD and healthy groups. In the single-pulse condition, the P27 amplitudes were significantly higher in FHD immediately after PAS than before PAS, while no changes were observed in healthy subjects. In the double-pulse condition, significant differences in the suppression ratio of P27 were found immediately after and 15 min after PAS, while there were no significant differences in healthy subjects. The P27 suppression tended to normalize toward the level of the healthy volunteer group. In FHD, PAS transiently induced an abnormal increase in excitability in S1. In addition, intracortical inhibition in S1 was found to increase as well. This abnormal plasticity of the intracortical neurons in S1 may contribute to the pathophysiology of dystonia. PMID:19151081

  17. Motor cortical hyperexcitability in idiopathic scoliosis: could focal dystonia be a subclinical etiological factor?

    PubMed Central

    Tormos, José María; Barrios, Carlos; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown; however, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the spine deformity could be the expression of a subclinical nervous system disorder. A defective sensory input or an anomalous sensorimotor integration may lead to an abnormal postural tone and therefore the development of a spine deformity. Inhibition of the motor cortico-cortical excitability is abnormal in dystonia. Therefore, the study of cortico-cortical inhibition may shed some insight into the dystonia hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of IS. Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study cortico-cortical inhibition and facilitation in nine adolescents with IS, five teenagers with congenital scoliosis (CS) and eight healthy age-matched controls. The effect of a previous conditioning stimulus (80% intensity of resting motor threshold) on the amplitude of the motor-evoked potential induced by the test stimulus (120% of resting motor threshold) was examined at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The results of healthy adolescents and those with CS showed a marked inhibitory effect of the conditioning stimulus on the response to the test stimulus at interstimulus intervals shorter than 6 ms. These findings do not differ from those reported for normal adults. However, children with IS revealed an abnormally reduced cortico-cortical inhibition at the short ISIs. Cortico-cortical inhibition was practically normal on the side of the scoliotic convexity while it was significantly reduced on the side of the scoliotic concavity. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that a dystonic dysfunction underlies in IS. Asymmetrical cortical hyperexcitability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IS and represents an objective neurophysiological finding that could be used clinically. PMID:20033462

  18. Defective inhibition and inter-regional phase synchronization in pianists with musician's dystonia: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, María Herrojo; Senghaas, Patricia; Grossbach, Michael; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Bangert, Marc; Hummel, Friedhelm; Gerloff, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2009-08-01

    Recent neurophysiological studies have associated focal-task specific dystonia (FTSD) with impaired inhibitory function. However, it remains unknown whether FTSD also affects the inhibition (INH) of long-term overlearned motor programs. Consequently, we investigated in a Go/NoGo paradigm the neural correlates associated with the activation (ACT) and inhibition of long-term overlearned motor memory traces in pianists with musician's dystonia (MD), a form of FTSD, during a relevant motor task under constraint timing conditions with multichannel EEG. In NoGo trials, the movement related cortical potentials showed a positive shift after the NoGo signal related to inhibition and was significantly smaller over sensorimotor areas in musicians with MD. Further, we observed an increase at 850-900 ms in the power of beta oscillations which was significantly weaker for the patient group. The role of the inter-electrode phase coupling in the sensorimotor integration of inhibitory processes turned out to be the most relevant physiological marker: the global phase synchronization during INH exhibited an increase between 230 and 330 ms and 7-8 Hz, increase which was significantly smaller for pianists with MD. This effect was due to a weaker phase synchronization between the supplementary motor cortex and left premotor and sensorimotor electrodes in patients. Thus, our findings support the hypothesis of a deficient phase coupling between the neuronal assemblies required to inhibit motor memory traces in patients with MD. EMG recorded from the right flexor pollicis longus muscle confirmed that patients with MD had a disrupted INH in NoGo trials.

  19. Mental rotation of body parts and non-corporeal objects in patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Fiorio, Mirta; Tinazzi, Michele; Ionta, Silvio; Fiaschi, Antonio; Moretto, Giuseppe; Edwards, Mark J; Bhatia, Kailash P; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2007-06-11

    Mental rotation of body parts is performed through inner simulation of actual movements, and is likely to rely upon cortical and subcortical systems (e.g. motor and premotor areas and basal ganglia) involved in motor planning and execution. Studies indicate that sensory and motor deficits, such as for example pain, limb amputation or focal hand dystonia, bring about a specific impairment in mental rotation of the affected body parts. Here we explored the ability of patients affected by idiopathic cervical dystonia (CD) to mentally rotate affected (neck) and unaffected (hands and feet) body districts. The experimental stimuli consisted of realistic photos of left or right hands or feet and the head of a young men with a black patch on the left or the right eye. As non-corporeal stimulus the front view of a car with a black patch on the left or the right headlight was used. The stimuli were presented at six different degrees of orientations. Twelve CD patients and 12 healthy participants were asked to verbally report whether the hands or feet were left or right, or whether the patch was on the left or the right eye or headlight. Reaction times and accuracy in performing the laterality tasks on the four stimuli were collected. Results showed that CD patients are slow in mental rotation of stimuli representing body parts, namely hand, foot and head. This abnormality was not due to a general impairment in mental rotation per se, since patients' ability to rotate a non-corporeal object (a car) was not significantly different from that of healthy participants. We posit that the deficit in mental rotation of body parts in CD patients may derive from a defective integration of body- and world-related knowledge, a process that is likely to allow a general representation of "me in the external world".

  20. Negative Dystonia of the Palate: A Novel Entity and Diagnostic Consideration in Hypernasal Speech

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine F.; Simonyan, Kristina; Brin, Mitchell F.; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the first documented series of patients with negative dystonia (ND) of the palate, including clinical symptoms, functional MRI findings, and management options. Study Design Case series ascertained from clinical research centers that evaluated patients with both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorders. Methods Between July 1983 and March 2013, data was collected on patient demographics, disease characteristics, functional MRI findings, long-term management options, and outcomes. We sought patients whose clinical examination demonstrated absent palatal movement on speaking, despite normal palatal activity on other activities. Results Five patients (2 males, 3 females) met clinical criteria. All patients presented with hypernasal speech without associated dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed absent palatal movement on speaking despite intact gag reflexes, normal palate elevation on swallowing, and normal cranial nerve examinations. Other cranial and/or limb dystonias were present in four patients (80.0%). Three patients (60.0%) had previously failed oral pharmacologic therapy. Two patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, which demonstrated an overall decrease of cortical and subcortical activation during production of symptomatic syllables and asymptomatic coughing. Management included speech therapy (all patients) and palatal lift (2 patients) with limited improvement. Calcium hydroxyapatite injection (1 patient) into the soft palate and Passavants’ ridge was beneficial. Conclusions This is the first report of ND of the palate. Characteristic findings were task-specific absent palatal movement with speech, despite normal movement on swallowing, coughing, and an intact gag reflex, as well as disorder-specific decreased brain activation on functional MRI. A diagnosis of ND of the palate should be considered for patients who present with hypernasal speech. Level of Evidence 4. PMID:25646795

  1. Chemical enhancement of torsinA function in cell and animal models of torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Songsong; Hewett, Jeffrey W.; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Lu, Jun; Buckley, Amber Clark; Burdette, Alexander J.; Chen, Pan; Nery, Flavia C.; Li, Yuqing; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Movement disorders represent a significant societal burden for which therapeutic options are limited and focused on treating disease symptomality. Early-onset torsion dystonia (EOTD) is one such disorder characterized by sustained and involuntary muscle contractions that frequently cause repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner with reduced penetrance, EOTD is caused in most cases by the deletion of a glutamic acid (ΔE) in the DYT1 (also known as TOR1A) gene product, torsinA. Although some patients respond well to anticholingerics, therapy is primarily limited to either neurosurgery or chemodenervation. As mutant torsinA (ΔE) expression results in decreased torsinA function, therapeutic strategies directed toward enhancement of wild-type (WT) torsinA activity in patients who are heterozygous for mutant DYT1 may restore normal cellular functionality. Here, we report results from the first-ever screen for candidate small molecule therapeutics for EOTD, using multiple activity-based readouts for torsinA function in Caenorhabditis elegans, subsequent validation in human DYT1 patient fibroblasts, and behavioral rescue in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. We exploited the nematode to rapidly discern chemical effectors of torsinA and identified two classes of antibiotics, quinolones and aminopenicillins, which enhance WT torsinA activity in two separate in vivo assays. Representative molecules were assayed in EOTD patient fibroblasts for improvements in torsinA-dependent secretory function, which was improved significantly by ampicillin. Furthermore, a behavioral defect associated with an EOTD mouse knock-in model was also rescued following administration of ampicillin. These combined data indicate that specific small molecules that enhance torsinA activity represent a promising new approach toward therapeutic development for EOTD, and potentially for other diseases involving the processing of mutant proteins. PMID

  2. Alternating hemidystonia following traumatic brain injury as an unusual presentation of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buerger, Kelly J; Salazar, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old man presented to the neurotrauma intensive care unit following blunt head injury. MRI revealed subarachnoid haemorrhage and multiple intraparenchymal haemorrhages suggesting severe brain injury. During recovery, the patient displayed intermittent episodes of alternating hemibody spasms with decerebrate/decorticate dystonic posturing. Episodes presented with autonomic dysregulation including hyperthermia, diaphoresis, tachypnoea, tachycardia and hypertension. Concern for seizure activity prompted simultaneous video monitoring and EEG testing. Results were without epileptiform activity suggesting against seizure as cause for alternating hemibody spasms. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) was considered despite the unusual presentation. Intravenous hydromorphone was used for treatment, which relieved symptoms of autonomic dysregulation and dystonic posturing. PAID syndrome was diagnosed based on presentation with intermittent episodes of dystonia, autonomic dysregulation, absence of epileptiform activity and rapid response to opioid treatment. This case illustrates the clinical variability of this uncommon syndrome because alternating hemidystonia as main manifestation has not been previously described.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Drooling in Children With Progressive Dystonia: A Case Series of Patients With MEGDEL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blommaert, Dorian; van Hulst, Karen; Hoogen, Frank J A van den; Erasmus, Corrie E; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2016-09-01

    Drooling is a common problem in children with progressive dystonia. The authors noted a 58% incidence of drooling in 22/38 children with MEGDEL, a rare neurodegenerative cause of dystonia and report on the clinical course of four patients. Drooling of varying severity and subsequent respiratory problems were treated at the authors' multidisciplinary saliva-control outpatient clinic. One patient improved on antireflux medication, the second after medication with drooling as side effect was changed. Two other patients underwent salivary gland surgery, one of whom significantly improved; the other died shortly after surgery. The heterogeneity of the cases presented shows the need for stepwise and personalized treatment. The authors recommend the following: (1) optimize the treatment of the underlying neurological condition and replace medication that stimulates saliva secretion; (2) treat constipation, scoliosis, and gastroesophageal reflux if there is still a risk of chronic aspiration of saliva; (3) perform more intense/invasive treatment (botulinum toxin, salivary gland surgery). PMID:27229007

  4. British Neurotoxin Network recommendations for managing cervical dystonia in patients with a poor response to botulinum toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Marie-Helene; Humberstone, Miles; Grunewald, Richard; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections are an effective treatment for cervical dystonia. Approximately 20% of patients eventually stop BoNT treatment, mostly because of treatment failure. These recommendations review the different therapeutic interventions for optimising the treatment in secondary poor responder patients. Immunoresistance has become less common over the years, but the diagnosis has to be addressed with a frontalis test or an Extensor Digitorum Brevis test. In case of immunoresistance to BoNT-A, we discuss the place the different therapeutic options (BoNT-A holidays, BoNT-B injections, alternative BoNT-A injections, deep brain stimulation). When poor responders are not immunoresistant, they benefit from reviewing (1) injections technique with electromyography or ultrasound guidance, (2) muscles selection and (3) dose of BoNT. In addition, in both scenarios, a holistic approach including drug treatment, retraining and psychological support is valuable in the management of these complex and severe cervical dystonia. PMID:26976927

  5. Integrated EMG feedback in the management of spasmodic torticollis and focal dystonia: a prospective study of 80 patients.

    PubMed

    Korein, J; Brudny, J

    1976-01-01

    In summary, then, without consideration of specific circuits or transmitter agents, one can conceive of a hypothetical model that involves both learning and the functional nature of the defect in torticollis and focal dystonia to describe the results obtained. The model must be further elaborated upon and tested, preferably in a quantitative manner. Naturally, the specific finding of a defective transmitter agent (e.g., GABA) such as described in parkinsonian syndrome (dopamine) or the interruption of a specific pathway that causes and improves a dyskinesia is desirable. In this chapter we have described the use of integrated EMG feedback for the treatment of focal dystonia or spasmodic torticollis. Although we have achieved significant results, it remains clear that further research in the treatment of these disorders is required. However, since this treatment does not require medication or surgery and the possibility for significant improvement is greater than 40%, it should be attempted in patients with focal dystonia or torticollis prior to other forms of therapy. SFT should be considered as a standard mode in the medical armamentarium used for the treatment of these disorders, either primarily or in conjunction with other forms of medical, surgical, and physical therapy.

  6. Altered Activation of Protein Kinase PKR and Enhanced Apoptosis in Dystonia Cells Carrying a Mutation in PKR Activator Protein PACT*

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Lauren S; Bragg, D. Cristopher; Sharma, Nutan; Camargos, Sarah; Cardoso, Francisco; Patel, Rekha C

    2015-01-01

    PACT is a stress-modulated activator of the interferon-induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). Stress-induced phosphorylation of PACT is essential for PACT's association with PKR leading to PKR activation. PKR activation leads to phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α inhibition of protein synthesis and apoptosis. A recessively inherited form of early-onset dystonia DYT16 has been recently identified to arise due to a homozygous missense mutation P222L in PACT. To examine if the mutant P222L protein alters the stress-response pathway, we examined the ability of mutant P222L to interact with and activate PKR. Our results indicate that the substitution mutant P222L activates PKR more robustly and for longer duration albeit with slower kinetics in response to the endoplasmic reticulum stress. In addition, the affinity of PACT-PACT and PACT-PKR interactions is enhanced in dystonia patient lymphoblasts, thereby leading to intensified PKR activation and enhanced cellular death. P222L mutation also changes the affinity of PACT-TRBP interaction after cellular stress, thereby offering a mechanism for the delayed PKR activation in response to stress. Our results demonstrate the impact of a dystonia-causing substitution mutation on stress-induced cellular apoptosis. PMID:26231208

  7. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  8. Modulation of Muscle Tone and Sympathovagal Balance in Cervical Dystonia Using Percutaneous Stimulation of the Auricular Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kampusch, Stefan; Kaniusas, Eugenijus; Széles, Jozsef C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary, and sustained contractions of cervical muscles. Current ways of treatment focus on alleviating symptomatic muscle activity. Besides pharmacological treatment, in severe cases patients may receive neuromodulative intervention such as deep brain stimulation. However, these (highly invasive) methods have some major drawbacks. For the first time, percutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (pVNS) was applied in a single case of primary cervical dystonia. Auricular vagus nerve stimulation was already shown to modulate the (autonomous) sympathovagal balance of the body and proved to be an effective treatment in acute and chronic pain, epilepsy, as well as major depression. pVNS effects on cervical dystonia may be hypothesized to rely upon: (i) the alteration of sensory input to the brain, which affects structures involved in the genesis of motoric and nonmotoric dystonic symptoms; and (ii) the alteration of the sympathovagal balance with a sustained impact on involuntary movement control, pain, quality of sleep, and general well-being. The presented data provide experimental evidence that pVNS may be a new alternative and minimally invasive treatment in primary cervical dystonia. One female patient (age 50 years) suffering from therapy refractory cervical dystonia was treated with pVNS over 20 months. Significant improvement in muscle pain, dystonic symptoms, and autonomic regulation as well as a subjective improvement in motility, sleep, and mood were achieved. A subjective improvement in pain recorded by visual analog scale ratings (0-10) was observed from 5.42 to 3.92 (medians). Muscle tone of the mainly affected left and right trapezius muscle in supine position was favorably reduced by about 96%. Significant reduction of muscle tone was also achieved in sitting and standing positions of the patient. Habituation to stimulation leading to reduced stimulation efficiency was observed and

  9. Modulation of Muscle Tone and Sympathovagal Balance in Cervical Dystonia Using Percutaneous Stimulation of the Auricular Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kampusch, Stefan; Kaniusas, Eugenijus; Széles, Jozsef C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary, and sustained contractions of cervical muscles. Current ways of treatment focus on alleviating symptomatic muscle activity. Besides pharmacological treatment, in severe cases patients may receive neuromodulative intervention such as deep brain stimulation. However, these (highly invasive) methods have some major drawbacks. For the first time, percutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (pVNS) was applied in a single case of primary cervical dystonia. Auricular vagus nerve stimulation was already shown to modulate the (autonomous) sympathovagal balance of the body and proved to be an effective treatment in acute and chronic pain, epilepsy, as well as major depression. pVNS effects on cervical dystonia may be hypothesized to rely upon: (i) the alteration of sensory input to the brain, which affects structures involved in the genesis of motoric and nonmotoric dystonic symptoms; and (ii) the alteration of the sympathovagal balance with a sustained impact on involuntary movement control, pain, quality of sleep, and general well-being. The presented data provide experimental evidence that pVNS may be a new alternative and minimally invasive treatment in primary cervical dystonia. One female patient (age 50 years) suffering from therapy refractory cervical dystonia was treated with pVNS over 20 months. Significant improvement in muscle pain, dystonic symptoms, and autonomic regulation as well as a subjective improvement in motility, sleep, and mood were achieved. A subjective improvement in pain recorded by visual analog scale ratings (0-10) was observed from 5.42 to 3.92 (medians). Muscle tone of the mainly affected left and right trapezius muscle in supine position was favorably reduced by about 96%. Significant reduction of muscle tone was also achieved in sitting and standing positions of the patient. Habituation to stimulation leading to reduced stimulation efficiency was observed and

  10. Exome sequencing identifies GCDH (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase) mutations as a cause of a progressive form of early-onset generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Marti-Masso, Jose Felix; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Makarov, Vladimir; López de Munain, Adolfo; Gorostidi, Ana; Bergareche, Alberto; Yoon, Seungtai; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2012-03-01

    Dystonias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders characterized by involuntary, sustained muscular contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, and abnormal postures. In this study, we describe an autosomal recessive family that presents with a progressive and early-onset form of generalized dystonia. The nuclear family consists of two healthy parents and two affected daughters. To elucidate the genetic causes underlying disease, whole-exome sequencing analysis was performed in one affected sibling, followed by validation, biochemical analyses and MRI brain imaging. A homozygous, disease-segregating mutation (p.Val400Met) was identified in the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) gene at chromosome 19p13. The mutation, in an amino acid that is highly conserved among species, was absent in large number of neurologically normal individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased 3-hydroxy glutaric acid present in urine samples from both patients. MRI imaging revealed a T2 and flair hyperintense signal in lenticular nuclei with bilateral and symmetrical distribution. We conclude that both GCDH activity and GCDH mutation analysis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive forms of early-onset generalized dystonia and that mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism is one important pathway in the development of dystonia. As lysine restriction and L: -carnitine supplementation are important treatments for GCDH deficiency, identification of this deficiency in patients with progressive forms of early-onset generalized dystonia has potential treatment implications.

  11. Cervical dystonia and pain: characteristics and treatment patterns from CD PROBE (Cervical Dystonia Patient Registry for Observation of OnabotulinumtoxinA Efficacy).

    PubMed

    Charles, P David; Adler, Charles H; Stacy, Mark; Comella, Cynthia; Jankovic, Joseph; Manack Adams, Aubrey; Schwartz, Marc; Brin, Mitchell F

    2014-07-01

    To compare profiles of subjects with and without cervical dystonia (CD)-associated pain, to evaluate the contribution of pain and the motor component of CD on quality of life, and to compare the initial botulinum toxin treatment paradigm between pain groups, baseline data were used from the CD Patient Registry for Observation of OnabotulinumtoxinA Efficacy (CD PROBE), a multicenter, prospective, observational registry designed to capture real-world practices and outcomes for onabotulinumtoxinA CD treatment. Subjects were divided into no/mild pain [Pain Numeric Rating Scale (PNRS) score 0-3] and moderate/severe pain groups (PNRS score 4-10). Descriptive and differential statistics were utilized to compare groups. 1,037 subjects completed the first treatment session, reported baseline botulinum toxin status, and completed baseline PNRS. Those with no/mild pain were significantly older at baseline. Those subjects with moderate/severe pain had higher Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale Severity (17.7 ± 5.1 vs. 16.2 ± 5.6, p < 0.0001) and Disability (12.7 ± 6.1 vs. 7.5 ± 5.6, p < 0.0001). CD subjects with moderate/severe pain received a higher mean dose (177.3 ± 82.9 vs. 158.0 ± 67.1 U, p = 0.0001) of onabotulinumtoxinA and were injected in more muscles (4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 3.7 ± 1.2, p < 0.0001) at initial treatment. CD PROBE clearly demonstrates the frequency of pain in CD and substantiates its importance when determining an optimal treatment paradigm. Future analyses of CD PROBE will further our understanding of the treatment patterns and outcomes related to onabotulinumtoxinA therapy for this disabling condition.

  12. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  13. Abnormal functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia: Mutual information analysis in EEG

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Lin, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Hallett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate functional connectivity (FC) in focal hand dystonia (FHD) patients to understand the pathophysiology underlying their abnormality in movement. We recorded EEG from 58 electrodes in 15 FHD patients and 15 healthy volunteers during rest and a simple finger-tapping task that did not induce any dystonic symptoms. We investigated the mutual information (MI), which provides a quantitative measure of linear and nonlinear coupling, in the alpha, beta and gamma bands. Mean MI of all 58 channels and mean of the channels of interest (COIs) representative of regional FC over sensorimotor areas (C3, CP3, C4, CP4, FCz and Cz) were evaluated. For both groups, we found enhanced MI during the task compared to the rest condition specifically in the beta and gamma bands for mean MI of all channels, and in all bands for mean MI of COIs. Comparing the FHD patients to the healthy volunteers, for both rest and task, there was reduced MI in the beta band for both mean MI of all channels and mean MI of COIs. Regarding the properties of the connectivity in the beta band, we found that the majority of the MI differences were from linear connectivity. The abnormal beta band FC in FHD patients suggests deficient brain connectivity. PMID:21506166

  14. Effective behavioral treatment of focal hand dystonia in musicians alters somatosensory cortical organization.

    PubMed

    Candia, Victor; Wienbruch, Christian; Elbert, Thomas; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Ray, William

    2003-06-24

    New perspectives in neurorehabilitation suggest that behavioral treatments of movement disorders may modify the functional organization of central somatosensory neural networks. On the basis of the assumption that use-dependent reorganization in these networks contributes to the fundamental abnormalities seen in focal dystonia, we treated 10 affected musicians and measured the concomitant somatosensory changes by using whole-head magnetoencephalography. We found that effective treatment, using the method of sensory motor retuning, leads to alterations in the functional organization of the somatosensory cortex. Specifically, before treatment, somatosensory relationships of the individual fingers differ between the affected and unaffected hands, whereas after treatment, finger representations contralateral to the dystonic side become more similar to the less-affected side. Further, somatosensory finger representations are ordered more according to homuncular principles after treatment. In addition, the observed physiologic changes correlated with behavioral data. These results confirm that plastic changes in parallel with emergent neurological dysfunction may be reversed by context-specific, intensive training-based remediation.

  15. Sensory trick phenomenon improves motor control in pianists with dystonia: prognostic value of glove-effect.

    PubMed

    Paulig, Jakobine; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Großbach, Michael; Boullet, Laurent; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a task-specific movement disorder that causes loss of voluntary motor control while playing the instrument. A subgroup of patients displays the so-called sensory trick: alteration of somatosensory input, e.g., by wearing a latex glove, may result in short-term improvement of motor control. In this study, the glove-effect in pianists with MD was quantified and its potential association with MD-severity and outcome after treatment was investigated. Thirty affected pianists were included in the study. Music instrument digital interface-based scale analysis was used for assessment of fine motor control. Therapeutic options included botulinum toxin, pedagogical retraining and anticholinergic medication (trihexyphenidyl). 19% of patients showed significant improvement of fine motor control through wearing a glove. After treatment, outcome was significantly better in patients with a significant pre-treatment sensory trick. We conclude that the sensory trick may have a prognostic value for the outcome after treatment in pianists with MD.

  16. Eyes on MEGDEL: distinctive basal ganglia involvement in dystonia deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; van Hasselt, Peter M; Barić, Ivo; Burlina, Alberto; Darin, Niklas; Hörster, Friederike; Coker, Mahmut; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Krumina, Zita; Naess, Karin; Ngu, Lock H; Pronicka, Ewa; Riordan, Gilian; Santer, Rene; Wassmer, Evangeline; Zschocke, Johannes; Schiff, Manuel; de Meirleir, Linda; Alowain, Mohammed A; Smeitink, Jan A M; Morava, Eva; Kozicz, Tamas; Wevers, Ron A; Wolf, Nicole I; Willemsen, Michel A

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric movement disorders are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without a (genetic) diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition can lead to the diagnosis. MEGDEL syndrome (3-MethylGlutaconic aciduria, Deafness, Encephalopathy, Leigh-like syndrome MIM #614739) is a clinically and biochemically highly distinctive dystonia deafness syndrome accompanied by 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, severe developmental delay, and progressive spasticity. Mutations are found in SERAC1, encoding a phosphatidylglycerol remodeling enzyme essential for both mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Based on the homogenous phenotype, we hypothesized an accordingly characteristic MRI pattern. A total of 43 complete MRI studies of 30 patients were systematically reevaluated. All patients presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern with five characteristic disease stages affecting the basal ganglia, especially the putamen. In stage 1, T2 signal changes of the pallidum are present. In stage 2, swelling of the putamen and caudate nucleus is seen. The dorsal putamen contains an "eye" that shows no signal alteration and (thus) seems to be spared during this stage of the disease. It later increases, reflecting progressive putaminal involvement. This "eye" was found in all patients with MEGDEL syndrome during a specific age range, and has not been reported in other disorders, making it pathognomonic for MEDGEL and allowing diagnosis based on MRI findings. PMID:25642805

  17. [Use of citrulline malate (stimol) in patients with autonomic dystonia associated with arterial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Oknin, V Iu; Fedotova, A V; Veĭn, A M

    1999-01-01

    To study possibilities of a therapeutic correction of asthenic syndrome in individuals with chronic arterial hypotension with malate citrulline, the study was made of 12 women and 3 men with psychoautonomic syndrome (autonomic dystonia), combined with chronic constitutional arterial hypotension. Their age was from 27 to 45 years (mean age--37.6). A control group comprised 14 healthy individuals. Both a state of autonomic nervous system and manifestations of arterial hyportension were analyzed by means of complex scored questionnaires. Mental condition was assessed by the tests of Spilberger (evaluation of reactive and personal anxiety) and of Beck (estimation of depressive manifestations). In all the examined individuals with chronic arterial hypotension, there was psychoautonomic syndrome combined with complaints to asthenic manifestations, namely, to low performance and fatigue. Stimol was prescribed in the form of 50% solution in daily dose of 6 g (3 administrations). The therapy resulted in regression of clinical manifestations of both psychoautonomic syndrome and asthenic symptoms. A mechanism of the drug's action works through favourable changes in cerebral and muscular cells, that, in turn, had an influence on other manifestations of psychoautonomic syndrome. PMID:11530455

  18. Physical therapy program for cervical dystonia: a study of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Mariana Araujo Ribeiro; Chien, Hsin Fen; Sekeff-Sallem, Flávio Augusto; Barbosa, Egberto Reis

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is the best therapeutic option inpatients with cervical dystonia (CD), but physical therapy (PT) can be added to the treatment to achieve better results. Forty of our 70 patients with CD were en-rolled in a controlled open study. Subjects were divided into two groups: G1 (intervention group comprising patients receiving BTX and PT) and G2 (control group comprising patients receiving BTX only). Both groups were assessed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). On the TWSTRS, significant improvements in disease severity were seen in G1 and G2 but significant improvements on the pain and disability subscales were seen only in G1 patients.There was a significant difference only on the pain sub-scale between G2 and G1 following treatment. An analysis of the physical aspects of SF-36 showed significant improvement in G1 on three subscales. An intergroup difference was also seen on two subscales.Regarding emotional aspects, G1 showed a significant improvement on three subscales. A significant difference on two subscales was also seen between G2 and G1 following treatment. BTX plus PT treatment achieved symptom relief in patients with CD and improved their quality of life.

  19. Trick maneuvers in cervical dystonia: investigation of movement- and touch-related changes in polymyographic activity.

    PubMed

    Wissel, J; Müller, J; Ebersbach, G; Poewe, W

    1999-11-01

    Antagonistic gestures or trick maneuvers are well-known clinical features to reduce or abolish dystonic posturing in cervical dystonia (CD). The maneuvers typically consist of a finger touch to the facial skin but their physiology remains unknown. To determine the temporal profile of geste maneuver performance, 25 patients with idiopathic CD were studied by means of polymyography of six cervical muscles prior to any botulinum toxin treatment. Two piezoelectric elements fixed to a fingertip of the hand involved in the trick maneuver and to the facial target region, respectively, were used to relate the essential points of the trick maneuver time course (start of geste-arm movement, facial contact, end of contact, end of movement) to changes in polymyographic activity. Thirteen patients (52%) showed marked reductions of electromyographic (EMG) activity (> or =50% in at least one muscle) during arm movement, definitely prior to contact between fingers and facial target area; in the remaining 12 patients (48%), geste-related EMG effects were confined to facial-finger contact. These results might indicate different physiological mechanisms in clinically indistinguishable antagonistic gestures.

  20. Microfluidic platform to evaluate migration of cells from patients with DYT1 dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward Y.; Hettich, Jasmin; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Microfluidic platforms for quantitative evaluation of cell biologic processes allow low cost and time efficient research studies of biological and pathological events, such as monitoring cell migration by real-time imaging. In healthy and disease states, cell migration is crucial in development and wound healing, as well as to maintain the body's homeostasis. New Method The microfluidic chambers allow precise measurements to investigate whether fibroblasts carrying a mutation in the TOR1A gene, underlying the hereditary neurologic disease - DYT1 dystonia, have decreased migration properties when compared to control cells. Results We observed that fibroblasts from DYT1 patients showed abnormalities in basic features of cell migration, such as reduced velocity and persistence of movement. Comparison with Existing Method The microfluidic method enabled us to demonstrate reduced polarization of the nucleus and abnormal orientation of nuclei and Golgi inside the moving DYT1 patient cells compared to control cells, as well as vectorial movement of single cells. Conclusion We report here different assays useful in determining various parameters of cell migration in DYT1 patient cells as a consequence of the TOR1A gene mutation, including a microfluidic platform, which provides a means to evaluate real-time vectorial movement with single cell resolution in a three-dimensional environment. PMID:24880044

  1. Cholinergic dysfunction alters synaptic integration between thalamostriatal and corticostriatal inputs in DYT1 dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, G.; Tassone, A.; Mandolesi, G.; Puglisi, F.; Ponterio, G.; Martella, G.; Madeo, G.; Bernardi, G.; Standaert, D.G.; Bonsi, P.; Pisani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Projections from thalamic intralaminar nuclei convey sensory signals to striatal cholinergic interneurons. These neurons respond with a pause in their pacemaking activity, enabling synaptic integration with cortical inputs to medium spiny neurons (MSNs), thus playing a crucial role in motor function. In mice with the DYT1 dystonia mutation, stimulation of thalamostriatal axons, mimicking a response to salient events, evoked a shortened pause and triggered an abnormal spiking activity in interneurons. This altered pattern caused a significant rearrangement of the temporal sequence of synaptic activity mediated by M1 and M2 muscarinic receptors in MSNs, consisting of an increase in postsynaptic currents and a decrease of presynaptic inhibition, respectively. Consistent with a major role of acetylcholine, either lowering cholinergic tone or antagonizing postsynaptic M1 muscarinic receptors normalized synaptic activity. Our data demonstrate an abnormal time-window for synaptic integration between thalamostriatal and corticostriatal inputs which might alter the action selection process, thereby predisposing DYT1 gene mutation carriers to develop dystonic movements. PMID:22933784

  2. The sensory consequences of repetitive strain injury in musicians: focal dystonia of the hand.

    PubMed

    Byl, N; Hamati, D; Melnick, M; Wilson, F; McKenzie, A

    1996-01-01

    Some individuals with repetitive strain injury (RSI) develop focal dystonia of the hand (FDh), a disorder of motor control manifested in a specific context during skilled, hand movements. This descriptive study was designed to determine if musicians with FDh had reduced tactile discrimination. Ten healthy adults and ten patients with FDh participated in the study. From the standardized Sensory Integration and Praxis Test, five subtests were selected to measure tactile discrimination. The Paired Wilcoxon Test was used to analyze, meaningful, planned pairwise differences by side and by group. The two groups performed similarly on the three tests measuring tactile motor perception (Finger Identification, Localization and Kinesthesia). However, those with FDh performed significantly worse than the healthy comparison group on two tactile perceptual tasks: (1) Graphesthesia, right affected (P < 0.003) and left unaffected (p < 0.005); and (2) Manual Form Perception (stereognosis) on the right affected (P < 0.002) and left unaffected (P < 0.002). It is possible that the somatosensory differences as measured by tactile discrimination tasks represent some degradation of the hand representation following prolonged, repetitive, near simultaneous sensory stimulation of adjacent digits. Tactile discrimination should be tested in patients with RSI to detect potential risks for developing FDh. Effective treatment of patients with RSI including FDh may need to target the somatosensory deficits in order to restore stress-free motor movements.

  3. Effective behavioral treatment of focal hand dystonia in musicians alters somatosensory cortical organization

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Victor; Wienbruch, Christian; Elbert, Thomas; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Ray, William

    2003-01-01

    New perspectives in neurorehabilitation suggest that behavioral treatments of movement disorders may modify the functional organization of central somatosensory neural networks. On the basis of the assumption that use-dependent reorganization in these networks contributes to the fundamental abnormalities seen in focal dystonia, we treated 10 affected musicians and measured the concomitant somatosensory changes by using whole-head magnetoencephalography. We found that effective treatment, using the method of sensory motor retuning, leads to alterations in the functional organization of the somatosensory cortex. Specifically, before treatment, somatosensory relationships of the individual fingers differ between the affected and unaffected hands, whereas after treatment, finger representations contralateral to the dystonic side become more similar to the less-affected side. Further, somatosensory finger representations are ordered more according to homuncular principles after treatment. In addition, the observed physiologic changes correlated with behavioral data. These results confirm that plastic changes in parallel with emergent neurological dysfunction may be reversed by context-specific, intensive training-based remediation. PMID:12771383

  4. Physical therapy program for cervical dystonia: a study of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Mariana Araujo Ribeiro; Chien, Hsin Fen; Sekeff-Sallem, Flávio Augusto; Barbosa, Egberto Reis

    2012-01-01

    Summary Botulinum toxin (BTX) is the best therapeutic option in patients with cervical dystonia (CD), but physical therapy (PT) can be added to the treatment to achieve better results. Forty of our 70 patients with CD were enrolled in a controlled open study. Subjects were divided into two groups: G1 (intervention group comprising patients receiving BTX and PT) and G2 (control group comprising patients receiving BTX only). Both groups were assessed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). On the TWSTRS, significant improvements in disease severity were seen in G1 and G2 but significant improvements on the pain and disability subscales were seen only in G1 patients. There was a significant difference only on the pain sub-scale between G2 and G1 following treatment. An analysis of the physical aspects of SF-36 showed significant improvement in G1 on three subscales. An intergroup difference was also seen on two subscales. Regarding emotional aspects, G1 showed a significant improvement on three subscales. A significant difference on two subscales was also seen between G2 and G1 following treatment. BTX plus PT treatment achieved symptom relief in patients with CD and improved their quality of life. PMID:23402680

  5. Eyes on MEGDEL: distinctive basal ganglia involvement in dystonia deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; van Hasselt, Peter M; Barić, Ivo; Burlina, Alberto; Darin, Niklas; Hörster, Friederike; Coker, Mahmut; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Krumina, Zita; Naess, Karin; Ngu, Lock H; Pronicka, Ewa; Riordan, Gilian; Santer, Rene; Wassmer, Evangeline; Zschocke, Johannes; Schiff, Manuel; de Meirleir, Linda; Alowain, Mohammed A; Smeitink, Jan A M; Morava, Eva; Kozicz, Tamas; Wevers, Ron A; Wolf, Nicole I; Willemsen, Michel A

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric movement disorders are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without a (genetic) diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition can lead to the diagnosis. MEGDEL syndrome (3-MethylGlutaconic aciduria, Deafness, Encephalopathy, Leigh-like syndrome MIM #614739) is a clinically and biochemically highly distinctive dystonia deafness syndrome accompanied by 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, severe developmental delay, and progressive spasticity. Mutations are found in SERAC1, encoding a phosphatidylglycerol remodeling enzyme essential for both mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Based on the homogenous phenotype, we hypothesized an accordingly characteristic MRI pattern. A total of 43 complete MRI studies of 30 patients were systematically reevaluated. All patients presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern with five characteristic disease stages affecting the basal ganglia, especially the putamen. In stage 1, T2 signal changes of the pallidum are present. In stage 2, swelling of the putamen and caudate nucleus is seen. The dorsal putamen contains an "eye" that shows no signal alteration and (thus) seems to be spared during this stage of the disease. It later increases, reflecting progressive putaminal involvement. This "eye" was found in all patients with MEGDEL syndrome during a specific age range, and has not been reported in other disorders, making it pathognomonic for MEDGEL and allowing diagnosis based on MRI findings.

  6. Focal dystonia and the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Perruchoud, David; Murray, Micah M.; Lefebvre, Jeremie; Ionta, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Performing accurate movements requires preparation, execution, and monitoring mechanisms. The first two are coded by the motor system, the latter by the sensory system. To provide an adaptive neural basis to overt behaviors, motor and sensory information has to be properly integrated in a reciprocal feedback loop. Abnormalities in this sensory-motor loop are involved in movement disorders such as focal dystonia, a hyperkinetic alteration affecting only a specific body part and characterized by sensory and motor deficits in the absence of basic motor impairments. Despite the fundamental impact of sensory-motor integration mechanisms on daily life, the general principles of healthy and pathological anatomic–functional organization of sensory-motor integration remain to be clarified. Based on the available data from experimental psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging, we propose a bio-computational model of sensory-motor integration: the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE). Aiming at direct therapeutic implementations and with the final target of implementing novel intervention protocols for motor rehabilitation, our main goal is to provide the information necessary for further validating the SMILE model. By translating neuroscientific hypotheses into empirical investigations and clinically relevant questions, the prediction based on the SMILE model can be further extended to other pathological conditions characterized by impaired sensory-motor integration. PMID:24999327

  7. What can we learn from animal models of focal hand dystonia?

    PubMed

    Byl, N N

    2003-10-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHd) is a disabling disorder of hand control characterized by a loss of inhibition and involuntary co-contractions of agonists and antagonists that can develop in motivated, productive individuals performing highly repetitive, intensive hand tasks. It is our hypothesis that FHd can result from aberrant learning. We summarize three behavioral animal models (Nancymae aotus owl monkeys and Sprague Dawley rats) that provide evidence supporting aberrant learning as one origin of FHd. Hand task behaviors that increase the risk for repetitive strain injury-FHd include: attended, precise, repetitive behaviors that involve near coincident inputs-outputs (e.g. rapid reversal of agonists-antagonists, stereotypical movements, stressful end range motions, cutaneous stimulation across broad surfaces). High force, vibration, congenital abnormalities, and stress can further increase the risk. The central consequences of aberrant learning include large sensory receptive fields (rfs), significant overlap of rfs across adjacent digits and across glabrous and dorsal surfaces, and the persistence of digital representations across a broad cortical distance (>600 microm). Behavioral animal models are valid for the study of FHd etiology and could logically be applied to study the effects of pharmaceutical, surgical, anatomical, and behavioral enrichment intervention strategies, but these models may have limitations in the study of the recovery of fine motor, articulated, interdigitated movements following progressive, learning based, complex sensorimotor training. PMID:14615674

  8. Speed-accuracy testing on the Apple iPad provides a quantitative test of upper extremity motor performance in children with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-11-01

    The currently available scales for quantitative measurement of the severity of childhood dystonia require human observer ratings and provide poor granularity in the scores for individual limbs. We evaluated the use of new-generation high-quality touchscreens (an iPad) according with the Fitts law, which is a mathematical model that takes into account the relation between movement time and the task accuracy. We compared the abilities of healthy subjects and children with dystonia. The linear relation described by Fitts law held for all the groups. The movement time and the information transmitted were age and severity related. Our results provide evidence for the usability and validity of using Fitts law as a quantitative diagnostic tool in children with dystonia. Furthermore, testing on touchscreen tablets may help to guide the design of user interfaces to maximize the communication rate for children who depend upon assistive communication devices.

  9. Shorter pulse generator longevity and more frequent stimulator adjustments with pallidal DBS for dystonia versus other movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Pawan V.; Almeida, Leonardo; Smelser, Luke B.; Huang, He; Guthrie, Barton L.; Walker, Harrison C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation has become a routine therapy for movement disorders, but it is relatively invasive and costly. Although stimulation intensity relates to battery longevity, less is known about how diagnosis and stimulation target contribute to this clinical outcome. Here we evaluate battery longevity in movement disorders patients who were treated at a tertiary referral center. Objective: To compare single channel pulse generator longevity in patients with movement disorders. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, we evaluated 470 consecutive Soletra implants for routine care. Battery longevity was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analyses, and group comparisons were performed with the log rank mean test. The frequency of clinic encounters for ongoing care was evaluated across diagnoses with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: The mean pulse generator longevity was 44.9±1.4 months. Pallidal DBS for dystonia was associated with shorter battery longevity than subthalamic and thalamic DBS for Parkinson's disease and essential tremor (28.1±2.1 versus 47.1±1.8 and 47.8±2.6 months, respectively, mean ± standard error, p<0.001), and dystonia patients required more frequent clinic visits for routine care (F=6.0, p=0.003). Pallidal DBS for Parkinson's disease and thalamic DBS for cerebellar outflow tremor were associated with shorter battery longevity, as well (35.3±4.6 and 26.4±4.3 months, respectively). Conclusions: Pallidal DBS for dystonia was associated with shorter battery longevity and more frequent stimulator adjustments versus DBS for Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. Characteristics of the stimulation target and disease pathophysiology both likely contribute to battery longevity in patients with movement disorders. PMID:24548586

  10. The impact of stress on motor performance in skilled musicians suffering from focal dystonia: Physiological and psychological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos I; Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2016-05-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that stress can modulate motor function. However, the impact of stress on motor performance of musicians suffering from focal dystonia (FDM) remains unknown. The current study assessed motor performance in 20 FDM patients and 16 healthy musicians (HM) before and under stress. Stress was manipulated using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Motor performance was evaluated based on analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity and temporal variability, while electrocardiography (ECG) and the level of free cortisol were used to test for objective alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Finally, the psychological profiles of both groups were analyzed using three psycho-diagnostic standardized questionnaires. Results showed that patients' motor impairments did not change under acute stressful conditions. However, an increase in muscular co-contractions was observed, reflecting a physiological muscular response under stressful conditions. Psycho-diagnostic analysis revealed higher levels of psychological traits related to elevated anxiety, stress and perfectionism in 40% of the patients. Although the motor outcome between those patients and those with an opposing psychological profile did not differ, patients characterized by stressful and perfectionistic personalities had, on average, developed dystonia about ten years earlier than the rest of the patients. The current study suggests that acute stress conditions may not have any direct impact on fine motor control of FDM patients. However psychological traits associated with increased stress, anxiety and perfectionism may have a long-lasting effect on the motor function of affected musicians, by promoting the acceleration or even the triggering of dystonia. PMID:27033741

  11. A retrospective study to assess resource utilization in patients with cervical dystonia in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Raluy-Callado, Mireia; Gabriel, Sylvie; Dinet, Jérôme; Wang, Meng; Wasiak, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cervical dystonia (CD) is a hypertonic condition caused by damage to the central nervous system. Very few studies have assessed the overall economic burden of the disease. The objective of this study was to describe the utilization of health care resources of patients with CD in the UK primary care setting, using a large population-based database. Patients and methods Adults with a first diagnosis of CD between January 1, 2007 and January 31, 2011, who were registered to a general practitioner (GP) practice contributing to The Health Improvement Network (THIN), were included. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were assessed at the time of diagnosis. Health care resource utilization and pharmacological treatment were investigated at the end of the first and second year after diagnosis. Results Overall, 4,024 newly diagnosed patients with CD were identified, with average age at diagnosis of 45 years old; 65.3% were female. Depression in the year prior to diagnosis was the most common comorbidity. Primary care utilization was high in the first year, with 99.2% of patients visiting their GP (on average 6.2 times), and 43% visiting a nurse (on average 2.5 times). Patients were most commonly referred to an orthopedic surgeon, and 15.9% reported at least one physiotherapy visit. In the second year, utilization was similar. Prescriptions of at least one of the investigated treatments were found in 82.0% and 45.3%, in the first and second year, respectively. Conclusion Findings suggest a high number of new CD cases are being identified in primary care, but not all will be referred to secondary care. Health care resource utilization was compared with that of all patients registered in THIN, which is representative of the UK, and the adjusted usage of primary care resources was found to be similar to that of the THIN population. PMID:25834443

  12. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette Syndrome and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Iaccarino, Leonardo; Perani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Primary dystonia (pD) is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioral changes. GTS and obsessive–compulsive disorders are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting that a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and post-synaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-receptors bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments. PMID:25295029

  13. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Hinkley, Leighton B. N.; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12–30 Hz) and high gamma (65–90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p < 0.05, 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) corrected] in high gamma power during movements of the affected hand was identified over ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex in the period prior to (−575 ms) and following (725 ms) button press. Furthermore, an increase (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) in beta power suppression following movement of the affected hand was identified over visual cortex in patients with tspFHD. For movements of the unaffected hand, a significant (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) increase in beta power suppression was identified over secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) in the period following button press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity. PMID:23226140

  14. Dementia with Lewy bodies presenting marked tongue protrusion and bite due to lingual dystonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-06-22

    We report the patient of a 53-year-old woman who developed subacute-onset marked tonge protrusion and bite. She was diagnosed as dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from the clinical features including progressive cognitive decline, visual hallucinations, parkinsonism, and severe insomnia and depression, and the radiological finding of low dopamine transported uptake in basal ganglia by Dat SCAN and low blood circulation in occipital lobe of cerebrum. The patient received 600 mg doses of levodopa for over a year, followed by rotigotine and ropinirole with a rapid increase of dosage. It is believed that these treatments stimulated and sensitized dopamine D1 receptors, thereby inducing lingual dystonia. Furthermore, the patient demonstrated dyspnea and attacks of apnea caused by the closure of bilateral vocal cords due to laryngeal dyskinesia. After initiation of the neuroleptic, olanzapine, for a short duration, the high dose of levodopa overlapped with neuroleptic sensitivity, suggesting DOPA-induced dystonia and dyskinesia. This interaction can sometimes lead to lethal adverse events, and must be considered very important when treating patients with DLB. PMID:27212676

  15. Impact of Neu-botulinumtoxinA on the Severity and Quality of Life of Cervical Dystonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jagota, Priya; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Boonrod, Nonglak; Singmaneesakulchai, Surat; Boonpang, Kamolwan; Sringean, Jirada; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia (CD) is a debilitating neurological disorder that may gravely affect a patient’s quality of life (QoL). Botulinum toxin treatment has been approved as a first-line treatment for this condition. This study aims to look at the efficacy and impact on the QoL of neu-botulinumtoxinA, a newer and cheaper botulinum toxin type A, in patients with CD. Methods This is a prospective, open-label, single-arm study. CD patients were recruited and evaluated for severity of CD using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS), and for QoL using the Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24), and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Results Twenty patients were recruited. Significant improvement was shown in part 1 and total TWSTRS score and total CDQ-24 scores. Analysis of individual items of the TWSTRS scale showed significant improvement in rotation, duration of CD, and work ability. Significant improvements in the QoL were also seen in some items of the stigma, emotional wellbeing, and energy/fatigue domains of the CDQ-24 and SF-36 questionnaires. Discussion Neu-botulinumtoxinA is efficacious in treating CD symptoms and improving QoL of patients with CD. A larger, double-blinded study is needed to study the extent of improvements. PMID:27536464

  16. Association Analysis of NALCN Polymorphisms rs1338041 and rs61973742 in a Chinese Population with Isolated Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Jing; Cao, Bei; Chen, Yongping; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Song, Wei; Zhao, Bi; Wu, Ying; Shang, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a possible association between cervical dystonia (CD) and a sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) gene. However, the association between NALCN and CD was largely unknown in Asian population. The present study was carried out to examine the associations between the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1338041 and rs61973742 in the NALCN gene and CD in a Chinese population. Methods. In a cohort of 201 patients with isolated CD, we genotyped the two SNPs rs1338041 and rs61973742 using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We also included 289 unrelated, age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) from the same region. Result. No significant differences were observed in either the genotype distributions or the minor allele frequencies (MAFs) of the two SNPs between the CD patients and the HCs. There were no significant differences between early-onset and late-onset CD patients, between patients with and without a positive family history of dystonia, or between patients with and without tremor or sensory tricks. Conclusion. Lack of association between the SNPs of NALCN and CD suggests that the SNPs of NALCN do not play a role in CD in a Chinese population. PMID:27239368

  17. Ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells generates mice with seizures, dystonia, hyperactivity, and impaired oral behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gantois, Ilse; Fang, Ke; Jiang, Luning; Babovic, Daniela; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Ferreri, Vincenzo; Teper, Yaroslav; Jupp, Bianca; Ziebell, Jenna; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina M.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Nally, Rachel; Schütz, Günter; Waddington, John; Egan, Gary F.; Drago, John

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease is characterized by death of striatal projection neurons. We used a Cre/Lox transgenic approach to generate an animal model in which D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1a)+ cells are progressively ablated in the postnatal brain. Striatal Drd1a, substance P, and dynorphin expression is progressively lost, whereas D2 dopamine receptor (Drd2) and enkephalin expression is up-regulated. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis demonstrated early elevation of the striatal choline/creatine ratio, a finding associated with extensive reactive striatal astrogliosis. Sequential MRI demonstrated a progressive reduction in striatal volume and secondary ventricular enlargement confirmed to be due to loss of striatal cells. Mutant mice had normal gait and rotarod performance but displayed hindlimb dystonia, locomotor hyperactivity, and handling-induced electrographically verified spontaneous seizures. Ethological assessment identified an increase in rearing and impairments in the oral behaviors of sifting and chewing. In line with the limbic seizure profile, cell loss, astrogliosis, microgliosis, and down-regulated dynorphin expression were seen in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This study specifically implicates Drd1a+ cell loss with tail suspension hindlimb dystonia, hyperactivity, and abnormal oral function. The latter may relate to the speech and swallowing disturbances and the classic sign of tongue-protrusion motor impersistence observed in Huntington's disease. In addition, the findings of this study support the notion that Drd1a and Drd2 are segregated on striatal projection neurons. PMID:17360497

  18. Factors influencing the therapeutic effect of muscle afferent block for oromandibular dystonia and dyskinesia: implications for their distinct pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2002-10-01

    Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary masticatory and/or lingual muscle contractions. Muscle afferent block (MAB) by injecting anaesthetic and alcohol intramuscularly is recently used for the treatment of OMD. To study the factors affecting the efficacy of MAB, 44 patients with OMD were treated by local injection of lidocaine and ethanol. They were divided into four groups (spastic, rhythmic, dyskinetic, and task-specific) according to the pattern of incisal movement and involuntary contraction. We used a clinical scaling protocol in terms of four parameters (mastication, speech, pain, and discomfort) to evaluate the change of symptoms objectively. The relationship of improvement in clinical scores with various parameters was assessed statistically. The overall objective improvement was 60.2 +/- 29.5%. The scores decreased significantly (P<0.0001, paired t-test) after MAB. The maximal incisal velocity significantly correlated inversely with the clinical improvement, and MAB was particularly effective for spastic contraction. Dyskinetic and rhythmic groups showed variable and significantly less improvements than the spastic group. MAB is highly effective for OMD, but not for the patients with dyskinetic symptoms. The jaw movement pattern is an important factor for predicting the outcome. The difference in the response to MAB in OMD and oral and/or orofacial dyskinesia suggests the distinct pathophysiology between the two.

  19. Hypermanganesemia with Dystonia, Polycythemia and Cirrhosis (HMDPC) due to mutation in the SLC30A10 gene.

    PubMed

    Mukhtiar, Khairunnisa; Ibrahim, Shahnaz; Tuschl, Karin; Mills, Phillipa

    2016-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for metabolic pathways but it can be toxic when present in excessive amounts in the body. Hypermanganesemia along with dystonia, polycythemia, characteristic MRI brain findings in the basal ganglia, and chronic liver disease are the hallmarks of an inherited Mn transporter defect due to mutations in the SLC30A10 gene. We are reporting three siblings who presented with features of dystonia, polycythemia, MRI brain showing basal ganglia hyperintensity on T1 weighted images and chronic liver disease. Blood Mn levels were markedly elevated in the affected patients. Mutation analysis of DNA samples of the affected children confirmed a homozygous missense mutation in SLC30A10. Chelation therapy with intravenous disodium calcium edetate was started in two siblings and led to a marked decrease in whole blood Mn. Oral Penicillamine was later added to the therapy which further improved blood Mn levels. This is a rare disorder and is one of the potentially treatable inherited metal storage disorders. It can be fatal if left untreated. Penicillamine may be an effective alternative to disodium calcium edetate.

  20. dtorsin, the Drosophila Ortholog of the Early-Onset Dystonia TOR1A (DYT1), Plays a Novel Role in Dopamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Doherty, Olugbenga M.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Gusella, James F.; O'Donnell, Janis M.; Ito, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans. At least 15 genetic loci (DYT1-15) have been identified and some of these genes have been cloned. TOR1A (formally DYT1), the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. However, the function of torsinA has yet to be fully understood. Here, we have generated and characterized a complete loss-of-function mutant for dtorsin, the only Drosophila ortholog of TOR1A. Null mutation of the X-linked dtorsin was semi-lethal with most male flies dying by the pre-pupal stage and the few surviving adults being sterile and slow moving, with reduced cuticle pigmentation and thin, short bristles. Third instar male larvae exhibited locomotion defects that were rescued by feeding dopamine. Moreover, biochemical analysis revealed that the brains of third instar larvae and adults heterozygous for the loss-of-function dtorsin mutation had significantly reduced dopamine levels. The dtorsin mutant showed a very strong genetic interaction with Pu (Punch: GTP cyclohydrolase), the ortholog of the human gene underlying DYT14 dystonia. Biochemical analyses revealed a severe reduction of GTP cyclohydrolase protein and activity, suggesting that dtorsin plays a novel role in dopamine metabolism as a positive-regulator of GTP cyclohydrolase protein. This dtorsin mutant line will be valuable for understanding this relationship and potentially other novel torsin functions that could play a role in human dystonia. PMID:22022556

  1. Hemodynamic reactions to circulatory stress tests in patients with neurocirculatory dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mäntysaari, M

    1984-01-01

    The hemodynamic reactions of 30 patients with neurocirculatory dystonia (NCD, DaCosta's syndrome) were compared to those of 30 healthy controls during the isometric handgrip test, orthostatic test, Valsalva test and the cold pressor test. The effects of hyperventilation on the ability to hold the breath were studied in both groups using the hyperventilation test. The patients and controls were young men, who were doing their conscript service, and the average age was 20 years in both groups. The diagnosis of NCD was made using the criteria described by Friedman (1947). The patients had several symptoms related to the cardiorespiratory system, the intensity of which varied from time to time and were not closely related to physical effort. In order to exclude organic diseases that could have caused the symptoms the patients were required to have no history of chronic organic diseases. They were also required to have no infectious diseases nor to be convalescents when participating in this study and to have a normal ECG and a normal thorax x-ray. The controls were anamnestically free from chronic diseases. The changes in the blood pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, peripheral vascular resistance and the systolic time intervals during the four tests were measured noninvasively using sphygmomanometry, electro-, phono- and impedance cardiography. The ability to hold the breath after a deep inspiration was similar in the two groups. Immediately after hyperventilation the ability to hold the breath did not improve in the NCD group as much as in the control group. In the orthostatic test the rise in the mean blood pressure was only momentarily greater in the control group than in the NCD group, and the heart rate increased about equally in the two groups. The transthoracic impedance increased significantly more in the controls than in the patients in the head-up position. The alterations in the systolic time intervals immediately after the changes of

  2. Striving for more good days: patient perspectives on botulinum toxin for the treatment of cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Poliziani, Michele; Koch, Marco; Liu, Xierong

    2016-01-01

    Background The recommended reinjection interval for botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) formulations in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD) is generally ≥12 weeks, though intervals ≥10 weeks are approved for incobotulinumtoxinA in Europe. However, recurring symptoms can occur before the end of this period. Using qualitative research, we sought a greater understanding of disease burden, unmet patient needs, and barriers to treatment. Methods We conducted online semistructured, focus-group discussions, and online forum follow-up discussions among patients with CD, focusing on disease burden, patient needs, injection cycle preferences, and relationships with health care professionals. A subset of patients was also questioned in telephone interviews about individual experiences of CD and BoNT treatment. All participants were UK residents who had received onabotulinumtoxinA or abobotulinumtoxinA for CD for ≥1 year. Results Thirty-one patients (81% female; mean duration of CD 16.4 [range 4–31] years; mean BoNT injection cycle length 12.8 weeks) participated in the online focus-group and forum follow-up discussions. Of these, seven patients participated in telephone interviews. All had recurring symptoms between treatments, which substantially impacted on their work, family, and social life. Symptom severity fluctuated throughout an injection cycle and differed between patients and across injection cycles. Participants’ relationships with health care professionals and treatment satisfaction varied greatly. Many participants wanted longer-lasting and/or more stable symptom relief with shorter and/or more flexible injection intervals, according to individual needs. Lack of health care resources, long journeys to treatment centers, and immunogenicity/side-effect concerns were perceived as the main barriers to more flexible treatment. Conclusion The high burden of recurring primary and secondary symptoms of CD considerably affects patients’ quality of life. Patient

  3. The curse of motor expertise: Use-dependent focal dystonia as a manifestation of maladaptive changes in body representation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Focal task-specific dystonia (FTSD) impairs not only motor dexterity, but also somatosensory perception involved in well-trained behavioral tasks. Occupations that carry a risk of developing FTSD include musician, writer, painter, surgeon, and golfer, which are characterized by repetitive and precise motor actions over a prolonged period. Behavioral studies have uncovered various undesirable effects of FTSD on sensorimotor functions, such as a loss of independent movement control, unintended muscular co-activation, awkward limb posture, and impairment of fine discrimination of tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Studies using neuroimaging and noninvasive brain stimulation techniques have related such sensorimotor malfunctions to maladaptive neuroplastic changes in the sensorimotor system, including the primary motor and somatosensory areas, premotor area, cerebellum, and basal ganglia. In this review, we summarize recent empirical findings regarding phenomenological and pathophysiological abnormalities associated with the development of FTSD. We particularly focused on maladaptive alterations of body representations underlying the degradation of fine motor control and somatosensory perception in FTSD patients.

  4. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y.; Simpson, Michael A.; Chong, W. K.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Woltjer, Randy L.; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M.; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R.; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A. M.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C.; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Enns, Caroline A.; Hayflick, Susan J.; Clayton, Peter T.; Mills, Philippa B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  5. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y; Simpson, Michael A; Chong, W K; Jacques, Thomas S; Woltjer, Randy L; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A M; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A; Enns, Caroline A; Hayflick, Susan J; Clayton, Peter T; Mills, Philippa B; Kurian, Manju A; Wilson, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  6. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

    PubMed

    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27545679

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Cervical Dystonia: Effect of Site and Repetition in a Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pirio Richardson, Sarah; Tinaz, Sule; Chen, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD) population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor cortex (MC), dorsal premotor cortex (dPM), supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC), -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM), -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC), -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM), and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA) with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1) to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6). The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01859247 PMID:25923718

  8. Reduced Number of Pigmented Neurons in the Substantia Nigra of Dystonia Patients? Findings from Extensive Neuropathologic, Immunohistochemistry, and Quantitative Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Diego; Geraci-Erck, Maria; Peng, Hui; Rabin, Marcie L.; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias (Dys) represent the third most common movement disorder after essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). While some pathogenetic mechanisms and genetic causes of Dys have been identified, little is known about their neuropathologic features. Previous neuropathologic studies have reported generically defined neuronal loss in various cerebral regions of Dys brains, mostly in the basal ganglia (BG), and specifically in the substantia nigra (SN). Enlarged pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys patients with and without specific genetic mutations (e.g., GAG deletions in DYT1 dystonia) have also been described. Whether or not Dys brains are associated with decreased numbers or other morphometric changes of specific neuronal types is unknown and has never been addressed with quantitative methodologies. Methods Quantitative immunohistochemistry protocols were used to estimate neuronal counts and volumes of nigral pigmented neurons in 13 SN of Dys patients and 13 SN of age-matched control subjects (C). Results We observed a significant reduction (∼20%) of pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys compared to C (p<0.01). Neither significant volumetric changes nor evident neurodegenerative signs were observed in the remaining pool of nigral pigmented neurons in Dys brains. These novel quantitative findings were confirmed after exclusion of possible co-occurring SN pathologies including Lewy pathology, tau-neurofibrillary tangles, β-amyloid deposits, ubiquitin (ubiq), and phosphorylated-TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (pTDP43)-positive inclusions. Discussion A reduced number of nigral pigmented neurons in the absence of evident neurodegenerative signs in Dys brains could indicate previously unconsidered pathogenetic mechanisms of Dys such as neurodevelopmental defects in the SN. PMID:26069855

  9. Dimerization of the DYT6 dystonia protein, THAP1, requires residues within the coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Sengel, Cem; Gavarini, Sophie; Sharma, Nutan; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bragg, D Cristopher

    2011-09-01

    Thanatos-associated [THAP] domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) is a DNA-binding protein that has been recently associated with DYT6 dystonia, a hereditary movement disorder involving sustained, involuntary muscle contractions. A large number of dystonia-related mutations have been identified in THAP1 in diverse patient populations worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that THAP1 oligomerizes with itself via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain, raising the possibility that DYT6 mutations in this region might affect this interaction. In this study, we examined the ability of wild-type THAP1 to bind itself and the effects on this interaction of the following disease mutations: C54Y, F81L, ΔF132, T142A, I149T, Q154fs180X, and A166T. The results confirmed that wild-type THAP1 associated with itself and most of the DYT6 mutants tested, except for the Q154fs180X variant, which loses most of the coiled-coil domain because of a frameshift at position 154. However, deletion of C-terminal residues after position 166 produced a truncated variant of THAP1 that was able to bind the wild-type protein. The interaction of THAP1 with itself therefore required residues within a 13-amino acid region (aa 154-166) of the coiled-coil domain. Further inspection of this sequence revealed elements highly consistent with previous descriptions of leucine zippers, which serve as dimerization domains in other transcription factor families. Based on this similarity, a structural model was generated to predict how hydrophobic residues in this region may mediate dimerization. These observations offer additional insight into the role of the coiled-coil domain in THAP1, which may facilitate future analyses of DYT6 mutations in this region. PMID:21752024

  10. Dimerization of the DYT6 dystonia protein, THAP1, requires residues within the coiled-coil domain

    PubMed Central

    Sengel, Cem; Gavarini, Sophie; Sharma, Nutan; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2011-01-01

    THAP1 is a DNA binding protein that has been recently associated with DYT6 dystonia, a hereditary movement disorder involving sustained, involuntary muscle contractions. A large number of dystonia-related mutations have been identified in THAP1 in diverse patient populations worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that THAP1 oligomerizes with itself via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain, raising the possibility that DYT6 mutations in this region might affect this interaction. In this study we examined the ability of wild-type THAP1 to bind itself and the effects on this interaction of the following disease mutations: C54Y, F81L, ΔF132, T142A, I149T, Q154fs180X, and A166T. The results confirmed that wild-type THAP1 associated with itself and most of the DYT6 mutants tested, except for the Q154fs180X variant, which loses most of the coiled-coil domain due to a frameshift at position 154. However, deletion of C-terminal residues after position 166 produced a truncated variant of THAP1 that was able to bind the wild-type protein. The interaction of THAP1 with itself therefore required residues within a 13-amino acid region (aa 154–166) of the coiled-coil domain. Further inspection of this sequence revealed elements highly consistent with previous descriptions of leucine zippers, which serve as dimerization domains in other transcription factor families. Based on this similarity, a structural model was generated to predict how hydrophobic residues in this region may mediate dimerization. These observations offer additional insight into the role of the coiled-coil domain in THAP1, which may facilitate future analyses of DYT6 mutations in this region. PMID:21752024

  11. Quantitative EEG analysis of depth electrode recordings from several brain regions of mutant hamsters with paroxysmal dystonia discloses frequency changes in the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Gernert, M; Richter, A; Rundfeldt, C; Löscher, W

    1998-05-01

    Computerized EEG spectral analyses of depth electrode recordings from striatum (caudate/putamen; CPu), globus pallidus (GP), and parietal cortex (pCtx) were performed before and after dystonic attacks in freely moving mutant dt(sz) hamsters with paroxysmal dystonia. In these hamsters, sustained attacks of abnormal movements and postures can be reproducibly induced by stress, such as placing the animals in a new environment. Data recorded from mutant hamsters were compared with recordings from age-matched nondystonic control hamsters. The predominant EEG changes in CPu and GP of dystonic hamsters were significant decreases in the high-frequency beta2 range and there was a tendency to increase in delta and theta activities. These changes were seen both before and after onset of dystonic attacks, indicating a permanent disturbance of neural activities in the basal ganglia of dystonic animals. No such changes were seen in the pCtx. Furthermore, no epileptic or epileptiform activity was seen in any of the recordings, substantiating a previous notion from cortical and hippocampal recordings that paroxysmal dystonia in these mutant hamsters has no epileptogenic basis. The present finding of abnormal synchronization of neural activity in the CPu and GP of dystonic hamsters adds to the belief that the striatopallidal-thalamocortical circuit is the most likely site in which to search for the unknown defect in primary (idiopathic) dystonia. As suggested by this study, quantitative EEG analysis can increase the likelihood of detecting subtle EEG abnormalities in different types of idiopathic dystonia and thereby improves our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of this movement disorder.

  12. Expanding the phenotype in aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency: characterization of the molecular defect in a 63-year-old woman with generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Vaithilingam, Jathana; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Wevers, Ron A

    2016-06-01

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is an organic aciduria due to mutations in the ACY1 gene. It is considered much underdiagnosed. Most individuals known to be affected by ACY1 deficiency have presented with neurologic symptoms. We report here a cognitively normal 63-year-old woman who around the age of 12 years had developed dystonic symptoms that gradually evolved into generalized dystonia. Extensive investigations, including metabolic diagnostics and diagnostic exome sequencing, were performed to elucidate the cause of dystonia. Findings were only compatible with a diagnosis of ACY1 deficiency: the urinary metabolite pattern with N-acetylated amino acids was characteristic, there was decreased ACY1 activity in immortalized lymphocytes, and two compound heterozygous ACY1 mutations were detected, one well-characterized c.1057C>T (p.Arg353Cys) and the other novel c.325A>G (p.Arg109Gly). Expression analysis in HEK293 cells revealed high residual activity of the enzyme with the latter mutation. However, following co-transfection of cells with stable expression of the c.1057C>T variant with either wild-type ACY1 or the c.325A>G mutant, only the wild-type enhanced ACY1 activity and ACY1 presence in the Western blot, suggesting an inhibiting interference between the two variants. Our report extends the clinical spectrum of ACY1 deficiency to include dystonia and indicates that screening for organic acidurias deserves consideration in patients with unexplained generalized dystonia. PMID:26686503

  13. Functional Aspects of Gait in Essential Tremor: A Comparison with Age-Matched Parkinson’s Disease Cases, Dystonia Cases, and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Rao, Ashwini K.

    2015-01-01

    Background An understanding of the functional aspects of gait and balance has wide ramifications. Individuals with balance disorders often restrict physical activity, travel, and social commitments to avoid falling, and loss of balance confidence, itself, is a source of disability. We studied the functional aspects of gait in patients with essential tremor (ET), placing their findings within the context of two other neurological disorders (Parkinson’s disease [PD] and dystonia) and comparing them with age-matched controls. Methods We administered the six-item Activities of Balance Confidence (ABC-6) Scale and collected data on number of falls and near-falls, and use of walking aids in 422 participants (126 ET, 77 PD, 46 dystonia, 173 controls). Results Balance confidence was lowest in PD, intermediate in ET, and relatively preserved in dystonia compared with controls. This ordering reoccurred for each of the six ABC-6 items. The number of near-falls and falls followed a similar ordering. Use of canes, walkers, and wheelchairs was elevated in ET and even greater in PD. Several measures of balance confidence (ABC-6 items 1, 4, 5, and 6) were lower in torticollis cases than in those with blepharospasm, although the two groups did not differ with respect to falls or use of walking aids. Discussion Lower balance confidence, increased falls, and greater need for walking aids are variably features of a range of movement disorder patients compared to age-matched controls. While most marked among PD patients, these issues affected ET patients as well and, to a small degree, some patients with dystonia. PMID:26056611

  14. EEG oscillatory patterns are associated with error prediction during music performance and are altered in musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, María Herrojo; Strübing, Felix; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2011-04-15

    Skilled performance requires the ability to monitor ongoing behavior, detect errors in advance and modify the performance accordingly. The acquisition of fast predictive mechanisms might be possible due to the extensive training characterizing expertise performance. Recent EEG studies on piano performance reported a negative event-related potential (ERP) triggered in the ACC 70 ms before performance errors (pitch errors due to incorrect keypress). This ERP component, termed pre-error related negativity (pre-ERN), was assumed to reflect processes of error detection in advance. However, some questions remained to be addressed: (i) Does the electrophysiological marker prior to errors reflect an error signal itself or is it related instead to the implementation of control mechanisms? (ii) Does the posterior frontomedial cortex (pFMC, including ACC) interact with other brain regions to implement control adjustments following motor prediction of an upcoming error? (iii) Can we gain insight into the electrophysiological correlates of error prediction and control by assessing the local neuronal synchronization and phase interaction among neuronal populations? (iv) Finally, are error detection and control mechanisms defective in pianists with musician's dystonia (MD), a focal task-specific dystonia resulting from dysfunction of the basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal circuits? Consequently, we investigated the EEG oscillatory and phase synchronization correlates of error detection and control during piano performances in healthy pianists and in a group of pianists with MD. In healthy pianists, the main outcomes were increased pre-error theta and beta band oscillations over the pFMC and 13-15 Hz phase synchronization, between the pFMC and the right lateral prefrontal cortex, which predicted corrective mechanisms. In MD patients, the pattern of phase synchronization appeared in a different frequency band (6-8 Hz) and correlated with the severity of the disorder. The present

  15. Rating scales for cervical dystonia: a critical evaluation of tools for outcome assessment of botulinum toxin therapy.

    PubMed

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Hefter, Harald; Stenner, Andrea; Reichel, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is the therapy of choice for all forms of cervical dystonia (CD), but treatment regimens still vary considerably. The interpretation of treatment outcome is mainly based on the clinical experience and on the scientific value of the rating scales applied. The aim of this review is to describe the historical development of rating scales for the assessment of CD and to provide an appraisal of their advantages and drawbacks. The Tsui score and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) have been widely employed in numerous clinical studies as specific instruments for CD. The obvious advantage of the Tsui score is its simplicity so that it can be easily implemented in clinical routine. The TWSTRS allows a more sophisticated assessment of functional features of CD, but only the Tsui score includes a rating for tremor. Other benefits of the TWSTRS are the disability and pain subscales, but despite its value in clinical trials, it might be too complex for routine clinical practice. None of the rating scales used at present has been rigorously tested for responsiveness to detect significant changes in clinical status after therapeutic interventions. Moreover, clinical data support a new classification of CD leading to a differentiation between head and neck subtypes. As the current rating scales are not able to cover all these aspects of the disorder, further research is needed to develop a valid and reliable instrument which considers the most current classification of CD.

  16. Developing a Deep Brain Stimulation Neuromodulation Network for Parkinson Disease, Essential Tremor, and Dystonia: Report of a Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    O’Suilleabhain, Padraig E.; Sanghera, Manjit; Patel, Neepa; Khemani, Pravin; Lacritz, Laura H.; Chitnis, Shilpa; Whitworth, Louis A.; Dewey, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a process to improve patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), and dystonia. Methods We employed standard quality improvement methodology using the Plan-Do-Study-Act process to improve patient selection, surgical DBS lead implantation, postoperative programming, and ongoing assessment of patient outcomes. Results The result of this quality improvement process was the development of a neuromodulation network. The key aspect of this program is rigorous patient assessment of both motor and non-motor outcomes tracked longitudinally using a REDCap database. We describe how this information is used to identify problems and to initiate Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles to address them. Preliminary outcomes data is presented for the cohort of PD and ET patients who have received surgery since the creation of the neuromodulation network. Conclusions Careful outcomes tracking is essential to ensure quality in a complex therapeutic endeavor like DBS surgery for movement disorders. The REDCap database system is well suited to store outcomes data for the purpose of ongoing quality assurance monitoring. PMID:27711133

  17. AbobotulinumtoxinA in the management of cervical dystonia in the United Kingdom: a budget impact analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abogunrin, Seye; Brand, Sarah; Desai, Kamal; Dinet, Jerome; Gabriel, Sylvie; Harrower, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia (CD) can be effectively managed by a combination of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) and conventional therapy (skeletal muscle relaxants and rehabilitative therapy), but the costs of different interventions in the UK vary. Methods A budget impact model was developed from the UK payer perspective with a 5-year time horizon to evaluate the effects of changing market shares of abobotulinumtoxinA, onabotulinumtoxinA, and incobotulinumtoxinA, and best supportive care from the UK payer perspective. Epidemiological and resource use data were retrieved from the published literature and clinical expert opinion. Deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the parameters most influential on the budgetary findings under base case assumptions. Results Under base case assumptions, an increased uptake of abobotulinumtoxinA showed an accumulated savings of £2,250,992 by year 5. Treatment per patient per year with onabotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA costs more when compared to treatment with abobotulinumtoxinA. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the prevalence of CD, dose per injection of each of the BoNT-As, and time to reinjection of incobotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA influenced the base case findings most. Conclusion There is potential for cost savings associated with the greater use of abobotulinumtoxinA rather than other BoNT-A treatments, permitting more patients to benefit more from effective BoNT-A treatment with a fixed budget. PMID:26392782

  18. Towards the classification of DYT6 dystonia mutants in the DNA-binding domain of THAP1

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Sébastien; Muller, Isabelle; Gervais, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor THAP1 (THanatos Associated Protein 1) has emerged recently as the cause of DYT6 primary dystonia, a type of rare, familial and mostly early-onset syndrome that leads to involuntary muscle contractions. Many of the mutations described in the DYT6 patients fall within the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (THAP domain) of THAP1 and are believed to negatively affect DNA binding. Here, we have used an integrated approach combining spectroscopic (NMR, fluorescence, DSF) and calorimetric (ITC) methods to evaluate the effect of missense mutations, within the THAP domain, on the structure, stability and DNA binding. Our study demonstrates that none of the mutations investigated failed to bind DNA and some of them even bind DNA stronger than the wild-type protein. However, some mutations could alter DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore, the most striking effect is the decrease of stability observed for mutations at positions affecting the zinc coordination, the hydrophobic core or the C-terminal AVPTIF motif, with unfolding temperatures ranging from 46°C for the wild-type to below 37°C for two mutations. These findings suggest that reduction in population of folded protein under physiological conditions could also account for the disease. PMID:22844099

  19. Towards the classification of DYT6 dystonia mutants in the DNA-binding domain of THAP1.

    PubMed

    Campagne, Sébastien; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain; Gervais, Virginie

    2012-10-01

    The transcription factor THAP1 (THanatos Associated Protein 1) has emerged recently as the cause of DYT6 primary dystonia, a type of rare, familial and mostly early-onset syndrome that leads to involuntary muscle contractions. Many of the mutations described in the DYT6 patients fall within the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (THAP domain) of THAP1 and are believed to negatively affect DNA binding. Here, we have used an integrated approach combining spectroscopic (NMR, fluorescence, DSF) and calorimetric (ITC) methods to evaluate the effect of missense mutations, within the THAP domain, on the structure, stability and DNA binding. Our study demonstrates that none of the mutations investigated failed to bind DNA and some of them even bind DNA stronger than the wild-type protein. However, some mutations could alter DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore, the most striking effect is the decrease of stability observed for mutations at positions affecting the zinc coordination, the hydrophobic core or the C-terminal AVPTIF motif, with unfolding temperatures ranging from 46°C for the wild-type to below 37°C for two mutations. These findings suggest that reduction in population of folded protein under physiological conditions could also account for the disease. PMID:22844099

  20. [Chronobiologic aspects of autogenic training. Thermometric findings of autogenic training in relation to diurnal periodicity in autonomic dystonia patients].

    PubMed

    Stetter, F

    1985-01-01

    In a cohort of patients suffering from neuro-dystonia a group of test subjects well acquainted with the techniques of autogenous training and another consisting of patients unfamiliar with these techniques were compared with regard to the rise in the skin temperature in their fingers at various times of the day. Furthermore, the connection between the personal perception of warmth of the test subjects during autogenous training and the actually measured increase the temperature was observed: 1. In the test group as well as among the controls two different patterns of reaction with regard to diurnal fluctuations of the skin temperature occurred which were interpreted as so-called "morning types" and "evening types" respectively. 2. The increase in temperature induced by autogenous training in the test group was always higher than the one in the group of controls. 3. Subject to the circadian reaction pattern of the skin temperature there were fluctuations related to the actual time of day with regard to the increases in temperature induced by autogenous training. 4. There was merely a "slight" correlation between the personal experience or warmth and the measured temperature increase, and the intensity of the temperature experience seems to be influenced more by the relative initial value of the skin temperature than by the objectifyable temperature increase. These results are discussed with regard to practical consequences for the acquisition of autogenous training and its therapeutic application with neuro-dystonic patients. PMID:4002890

  1. Minimal Change in the Cytoplasmic Calcium Dynamics in Striatal GABAergic Neurons of a DYT1 Dystonia Knock-In Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Sadahiro; Koh, Jin-Young; Wang, Kai; Ho, K. W. David; Harata, N. Charles

    2013-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is the most common hereditary form of primary torsion dystonia. This autosomal-dominant disorder is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause sustained twisting and repetitive movements. It is caused by an in-frame deletion in the TOR1A gene, leading to the deletion of a glutamic acid residue in the torsinA protein. Heterozygous knock-in mice, which reproduce the genetic mutation in human patients, have abnormalities in synaptic transmission at the principal GABAergic neurons in the striatum, a brain structure that is involved in the execution and modulation of motor activity. However, whether this mutation affects the excitability of striatal GABAergic neurons has not been investigated in this animal model. Here, we examined the excitability of cultured striatal neurons obtained from heterozygous knock-in mice, using calcium imaging as indirect readout. Immunofluorescence revealed that more than 97% of these neurons are positive for a marker of GABAergic neurons, and that more than 92% are also positive for a marker of medium spiny neurons, indicating that these are mixed cultures of mostly medium spiny neurons and a few (~5%) GABAergic interneurons. When these neurons were depolarized by field stimulation, the calcium concentration in the dendrites increased rapidly and then decayed slowly. The amplitudes of calcium transients were larger in heterozygous neurons than in wild-type neurons, resulting in ~15% increase in cumulative calcium transients during a train of stimuli. However, there was no change in other parameters of calcium dynamics. Given that calcium dynamics reflect neuronal excitability, these results suggest that the mutation only slightly increases the excitability of striatal GABAergic neurons in DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24260480

  2. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Ajjuri, Rami R.; Henderson, Benjamin W.; Doherty, Olugbenga M.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; O'Donnell, Janis M.; Ito, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1), the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG) deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303) in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the wild type and the

  3. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Naoto; Hendriks, William T.; Dhakal, Jyotsna; Vaine, Christine A.; Liu, Christina; Shin, David; Shin, Kyle; Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Dy, Marisela; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha; Sharma, Nutan; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS) composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′), was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:26769797

  4. Factors influencing response to Botulinum toxin type A in patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia: results from an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Zakine, Benjamin; Maisonobe, Pascal; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Real-life data on response to Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) in cervical dystonia (CD) are sparse. An expert group of neurologists was convened with the overall aim of developing a definition of treatment response, which could be applied in a non-interventional study of BoNT-A-treated subjects with CD. Design International, multicentre, prospective, observational study of a single injection cycle of BoNT-A as part of normal clinical practice. Setting 38 centres across Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Portugal, Russia and the UK. Participants 404 adult subjects with idiopathic CD. Most subjects were women, aged 41–60 years and had previously received BoNT-A. Outcome measures Patients were classified as responders if they met all the following four criteria: magnitude of effect (≥25% improvement Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale), duration of effect (≥12-week interval between the BoNT-A injection day and subject-reported waning of treatment effect), tolerability (absence of severe related adverse event) and subject's positive Clinical Global Improvement (CGI). Results High rates of response were observed for magnitude of effect (73.6%), tolerability (97.5%) and subject's clinical global improvement (69.8%). The subjective duration of effect criterion was achieved by 49.3% of subjects; 28.6% of subjects achieved the responder definition. Factors most strongly associated with response were age (<40 years; OR 3.9, p<0.05) and absence of baseline head tremor (OR 1.5; not significant). Conclusions Three of four criteria were met by most patients. The proposed multidimensional definition of response appears to be practical for routine practice. Unrealistically high patient expectation and subjectivity may influence the perception of a quick waning of effect, but highlights that this aspect may be a hurdle to response in some patients. Clinical registration number (NCT00833196; ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID

  5. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  6. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation of the trigeminal roots, analysis of the jaw jerk reflex, recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex, and a magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain. Results The neuromuscular responses of the left- and right-side bilateral trigeminal motor potentials showed a high degree of symmetry in latency (1.92 ms and 1.96 ms, respectively) and amplitude (11 mV and 11.4 mV, respectively), whereas the jaw jerk reflex amplitude of the right and left masseters was 5.1 mV and 8.9 mV, respectively. The test stimulus for the recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex evoked both silent periods at an interstimulus interval of 150 ms. The duration of the second silent period evoked by the test stimulus was 61 ms and 54 ms on the right and left masseters, respectively, which was greater than that evoked by the conditioning stimulus (39 ms and 35 ms, respectively). Conclusions We found evidence of activation and peripheral sensitization of the nociceptive fibers, the primary and secondary nociceptive neurons in the central nervous system, and the endogenous pain control systems (including both the inhibitory and facilitatory processes), in the tested subject. These data suggest that bruxism and central orofacial pain can coexist, but are two independent symptoms, which may explain why numerous experimental and clinical studies fail to reach unequivocal conclusions. PMID:24165294

  7. Structures of TorsinA and its disease-mutant complexed with an activator reveal the molecular basis for primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Demircioglu, F Esra; Sosa, Brian A; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde L; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of early onset primary dystonia, a neuromuscular disease, is a glutamate deletion (ΔE) at position 302/303 of TorsinA, a AAA+ ATPase that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. While the function of TorsinA remains elusive, the ΔE mutation is known to diminish binding of two TorsinA ATPase activators: lamina-associated protein 1 (LAP1) and its paralog, luminal domain like LAP1 (LULL1). Using a nanobody as a crystallization chaperone, we obtained a 1.4 Å crystal structure of human TorsinA in complex with LULL1. This nanobody likewise stabilized the weakened TorsinAΔE-LULL1 interaction, which enabled us to solve its structure at 1.4 Å also. A comparison of these structures shows, in atomic detail, the subtle differences in activator interactions that separate the healthy from the diseased state. This information may provide a structural platform for drug development, as a small molecule that rescues TorsinAΔE could serve as a cure for primary dystonia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17983.001 PMID:27490483

  8. The Zebrafish Homologue of the Human DYT1 Dystonia Gene Is Widely Expressed in CNS Neurons but Non-Essential for Early Motor System Development

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Jonathan J.; Torres, Gonzalo E.; Burton, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is caused by mutation of the TOR1A gene, resulting in the loss of a single glutamic acid residue near the carboxyl terminal of TorsinA. The neuronal functions perturbed by TorsinA[ΔE] are a major unresolved issue in understanding the pathophysiology of dystonia, presenting a critical roadblock to developing effective treatments. We identified and characterized the zebrafish homologue of TOR1A, as a first step towards elucidating the functions of TorsinA in neurons, in vivo, using the genetically-manipulable zebrafish model. The zebrafish genome was found to contain a single alternatively-spliced tor1 gene, derived from a common ancestral locus shared with the dual TOR1A and TOR1B paralogues found in tertrapods. tor1 was expressed ubiquitously during early embryonic development and in multiple adult tissues, including the CNS. The 2.1 kb tor1 mRNA encodes Torsin1, which is 59% identical and 78% homologous to human TorsinA. Torsin1 was expressed as major 45 kDa and minor 47 kDa glycoproteins, within the cytoplasm of neurons and neuropil throughout the CNS. Similar to previous findings relating to human TorsinA, mutations of the ATP hydrolysis domain of Torsin1 resulted in relocalization of the protein in cultured cells from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope. Zebrafish embryos lacking tor1 during early development did not show impaired viability, overt morphological abnormalities, alterations in motor behavior, or developmental defects in the dopaminergic system. Torsin1 is thus non-essential for early development of the motor system, suggesting that important CNS functions may occur later in development, consistent with the critical time window in late childhood when dystonia symptoms usually emerge in DYT1 patients. The similarities between Torsin1 and human TorsinA in domain organization, expression pattern, and cellular localization suggest that the zebrafish will provide a useful model to understand the neuronal functions of Torsins

  9. [Features of the influence of functional pathology of the digestive system combining with neurocirculatory dystonia on quality of life of students' population].

    PubMed

    Chirva, O V

    2013-11-01

    The study of 139 persons from organized student population is presented. The results of the frequency of occurrence of functional diseases of the digestive system combining with neurocirculatory dystonia in this age group are illustrated. It is shown that all indices of the quality of life are decreased in patients with comorbid functional disorders according to the results of the questionnaire «SF-36 Health Status Survey» (SF-36). The most pronounced reduction was set for such indices as RP, GH, VT, RE and MH and was more typical for patients with irritable bowel syndrome and the "overlap syndrome" of functional disorders of the digestive system combining with the autonomic dysfunction. High degree of reduction of the "mental health component» (MH sum) in all groups was demonstrated which confirms the particular impact of functional pathology on the psychological state of young persons.

  10. Treatment effectiveness for patients with a history of repetitive hand use and focal hand dystonia: a planned, prospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Byl, N N; McKenzie, A

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies show that rapid, nearly simultaneous, stereotypical repetitive fine motor movements can degrade the sensory representation of the hand and lead to a loss of normal motor control with a target task, referred to as occupational hand cramps or focal hand dystonia. The purpose of this prospective follow-up study was to determine whether symptomatic patients in jobs demanding high levels of repetition could be relieved of awkward, involuntary hand movements following sensory discriminative retraining complemented by a home program of sensory exercises, plus traditional posture, relaxation, mobilization, and fitness exercises. Twelve patients participated in the study. They all had occupational hand cramps, as diagnosed by a neurologist. Each patient was evaluated by a trained, independent research assistant before treatment and three to six months after treatment, by use of a battery of sensory, motor, physical, and functional performance tests. Care was provided by a physical therapist or a supervised physical therapist student in an outpatient clinic. Patients were asked to stop performing the target task and to come once a week for supervised treatment that included 1) heavy schedules of sensory training with and without biofeedback to restore the sensory representation of the hand, and 2) instructions in stress-free hand use, mirror imagery, mental rehearsal, and mental practice techniques designed to stop the abnormal movements and facilitate normal hand control. Patients were instructed in therapeutic exercises to be performed in the home to improve postural alignment, reduce neural tension, facilitate relaxation, and promote cardiopulmonary fitness. Following the defined treatment period, all patients were independent in activities of daily living, and all but one patient returned to work. Significant gains were documented in motor control, motor accuracy; sensory discrimination, and physical performance (range of motion, strength, posture, and

  11. siRNA knock-down of mutant torsinA restores processing through secretory pathway in DYT1 dystonia cells

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Jeffrey W.; Nery, Flávia C.; Niland, Brian; Ge, Pei; Tan, Pamela; Hadwiger, Philipp; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Sah, Dinah W.Y.; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2008-01-01

    Most cases of the dominantly inherited movement disorder, early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) are caused by a mutant form of torsinA lacking a glutamic acid residue in the C-terminal region (torsinAΔE). TorsinA is an AAA+ protein located predominantly in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear envelope apparently involved in membrane structure/movement and processing of proteins through the secretory pathway. A reporter protein Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) shows a reduced rate of secretion in primary fibroblasts from DYT1 patients expressing endogenous levels of torsinA and torsinAΔE when compared with control fibroblasts expressing only torsinA. In this study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides were identified, which downregulate the levels of torsinA or torsinAΔE mRNA and protein by over 65% following transfection. Transfection of siRNA for torsinA message in control fibroblasts expressing Gluc reduced levels of luciferase secretion compared with the same cells non-transfected or transfected with a non-specific siRNA. Transfection of siRNA selectively inhibiting torsinAΔE message in DYT fibroblasts increased luciferase secretion when compared with cells non-transfected or transfected with a non-specific siRNA. Further, transduction of DYT1 cells with a lentivirus vector expressing torsinA, but not torsinB, also increased secretion. These studies are consistent with a role for torsinA as an ER chaperone affecting processing of proteins through the secretory pathway and indicate that torsinAΔE acts to inhibit this torsinA activity. The ability of allele-specific siRNA for torsinAΔE to normalize secretory function in DYT1 patient cells supports its potential role as a therapeutic agent in early onset torsion dystonia. PMID:18258738

  12. Employees with Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... training to coworkers and supervisors Keyboarding and Mousing: Speech recognition software Large-key keyboards and on-screen keyboard ... PC while seated. JAN suggested the use of speech recognition software, rest breaks as needed, and the use ...

  13. Current status of cannabis treatment of multiple sclerosis with an illustrative case presentation of a patient with MS, complex vocal tics, paroxysmal dystonia, and marijuana dependence treated with dronabinol.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Rosse, Richard B; Connor, Julie M; Burket, Jessica A; Murphy, Mary E; Fox, Fiona J

    2008-05-01

    Pain, spasticity, tremor, spasms, poor sleep quality, and bladder and bowel dysfunction, among other symptoms, contribute significantly to the disability and impaired quality of life of many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Motor symptoms referable to the basal ganglia, especially paroxysmal dystonia, occur rarely and contribute to the experience of distress. A substantial percentage of patients with MS report subjective benefit from what is often illicit abuse of extracts of the Cannabis sativa plant; the main cannabinoids include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and cannabidiol. Clinical trials of cannabis plant extracts and synthetic delta9-THC provide support for therapeutic benefit on at least some patient self-report measures. An illustrative case is presented of a 52-year-old woman with MS, paroxysmal dystonia, complex vocal tics, and marijuana dependence. The patient was started on an empirical trial of dronabinol, an encapsulated form of synthetic delta9-THC that is usually prescribed as an adjunctive medication for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. The patient reported a dramatic reduction of craving and illicit use; she did not experience the "high" on the prescribed medication. She also reported an improvement in the quality of her sleep with diminished awakenings during the night, decreased vocalizations, and the tension associated with their emission, decreased anxiety and a decreased frequency of paroxysmal dystonia.

  14. A dystonia-like movement disorder with brain and spinal neuronal defects is caused by mutation of the mouse laminin β1 subunit, Lamb1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi Bessie; Tewari, Ambika; Salameh, Johnny; Arystarkhova, Elena; Hampton, Thomas G; Brashear, Allison; Ozelius, Laurie J; Khodakhah, Kamran; Sweadner, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    A new mutant mouse (lamb1t) exhibits intermittent dystonic hindlimb movements and postures when awake, and hyperextension when asleep. Experiments showed co-contraction of opposing muscle groups, and indicated that symptoms depended on the interaction of brain and spinal cord. SNP mapping and exome sequencing identified the dominant causative mutation in the Lamb1 gene. Laminins are extracellular matrix proteins, widely expressed but also known to be important in synapse structure and plasticity. In accordance, awake recording in the cerebellum detected abnormal output from a circuit of two Lamb1-expressing neurons, Purkinje cells and their deep cerebellar nucleus targets, during abnormal postures. We propose that dystonia-like symptoms result from lapses in descending inhibition, exposing excess activity in intrinsic spinal circuits that coordinate muscles. The mouse is a new model for testing how dysfunction in the CNS causes specific abnormal movements and postures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11102.001 PMID:26705335

  15. Widespread Lewy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Li, Abi; Schneider, Susanne A.; Holton, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert; Kidd, Desmond; Chataway, Jeremy; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Lees, Andrew J.; Hardy, John; Revesz, Tamas; Houlden, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The 2 major types of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) are the pantothenate kinase type 2 (PANK2)-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) and NBIA2 or infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) due to mutations in the phospholipase A2, group VI (PLA2G6) gene. We have recently demonstrated clinical heterogeneity in patients with mutations in the PLA2G6 gene by identifying a poorly defined subgroup of patients who present late with dystonia and parkinsonism. We report the clinical and genetic features of 7 cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Brain was available in 5 cases with an age of death ranging from 8 to 36 years and showed widespread alpha-synuclein-positive Lewy pathology, which was particularly severe in the neocortex, indicating that the Lewy pathology spread corresponded to Braak stage 6 and was that of the “diffuse neocortical type”. In 3 cases there was hyperphosphorylated tau accumulation in both cellular processes as threads and neuronal perikarya as pretangles and neurofibrillary tangles. Later onset cases tended to have less tau involvement but still severe alpha-synuclein pathology. The clinical and neuropathological features clearly represent a link between PLA2G6 and parkinsonian disorders. PMID:20619503

  16. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van; Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A-TWinnipeg: Pathogenesis of rare ATM missense mutation c.6200C>A with decreased protein expression and downstream signaling, early-onset dystonia, cancer, and life-threatening radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kotoka; Fike, Francesca; Haghayegh, Sara; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Dawson, Angelika J; Dörk, Thilo; Gatti, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We studied 10 Mennonite patients who carry the c.6200C>A missense mutation (p.A2067D) in the ATM gene, all of whom exhibited a phenotypic variant of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is characterized by early-onset dystonia and late-onset mild ataxia, as previously described. This report provides the pathogenetic evidence for this mutation on cellular functions. Several patients have developed cancer and subsequently experienced life-threatening adverse reactions to radiation (radiotoxicity) and/or chemotherapy. As the c.6200C>A mutation is, thus far, unique to the Mennonite population and is always associated with the same haplotype or haplovariant, it was important to rule out any possible confounding DNA variant on the same haplotype. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from Mennonite patients expressed small amounts of ATM protein, which had no autophosphorylation activity at ATM Ser1981, and trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets. A-T lymphoblastoid cells stably transfected with ATM cDNA which had been mutated for c.6200C>A did not show a detectable amount of ATM protein. The same stable cell line with mutated ATM cDNA also showed a trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets SMC1pSer966 and KAP1pSer824. From these results, we conclude that c.6200A is the disease-causing ATM mutation on this haplotype. The presence of at least trace amounts of ATM kinase activity on some immunoblots may account for the late-onset, mild ataxia of these patients. The cause of the dystonia remains unclear. Because this dystonia-ataxia phenotype is often encountered in the Mennonite population in association with cancer and adverse reactions to chemotherapy, an early diagnosis is important. PMID:25077176

  18. Assignment of the dystonia-parkinsonism syndrome locus, DYT3, to a small region within a 1.8-Mb YAC contig of Xq13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Haberhausen, G.; Schmitt, I.; Koehler, A.

    1995-09-01

    A YAC contig was constructed of Xq13.1 in order to sublocalize the X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) syndrome locus, DYT3. The contig spans a region of {approximately}1.8 Mb and includes loci DXS453/DXS348/IL2R{gamma}/GJB1/CCG1/DXS559. For the construction of the contig, nine sequence-tagged sites and four short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) were isolated. The STRPs, designated as 4704 No. 6 (DXS7113), 4704 No. 7 (DXS7114), 67601 (DXS7117), and B4Pst (DXS7119) were assigned to a region flanked by DXS348 proximally and by DXS559 distally. Their order was DXS348/4704 No. 6/4704 No. 7/67601/B4Pst/DXS559. They were applied to the analysis of allelic association and of haplotypes in 47 not-obviously-related XDP patients and in 105 Filipino male controls. The same haplotype was found at loci 67601 (DXS7117) and B4Pst (DXS7119) in 42 of 47 patients. This percentage of common haplotypes decreased at the adjacent loci. The findings, together with the previous demonstration of DXS559 being the distal flanking marker of DYT3, assign the disease locus to a small region in Xq13.1 defined by loci 67601 (DXS7117) and B4Pst (DXS7119). The location of DYT3 was born out by the application of a newly developed likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium. 28 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  19. Dysport and Botox at a ratio of 2.5:1 units in cervical dystonia: a double-blind, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Hee-Tae; Chung, Sun Ju; Kim, Jong-Min; Cho, Jin Whan; Lee, Jee-Young; Lee, Ha Neul; You, Sooyeoun; Oh, Eungseok; Jeong, Heejeong; Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Han-Joon; Lee, Won Yong; Jeon, Beom S

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to compare Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA, Ipsen Biopharm, Slough, UK) and Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA, Allergan, Irvine, CA, USA) at a 2.5:1 ratio in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD). A Dysport/Botox ratio of lower than 3:1 was suggested as a more appropriate conversion ratio, considering its higher efficacy and more frequent incidence of adverse effects not only in the treatment of CD but also in other focal movement disorders. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, non-inferiority, two-period crossover study was done in CD, with a duration of at least 18 months. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment for the first period with Dysport or Botox, and they were followed up for 16 weeks after the injection. After a 4-week washout period, they were switched to the other formulation and then followed up for 16 weeks. The primary outcome was the changes in the Tsui scale between the baseline value and that at 1 month after each injection. A total of 103 patients were enrolled, and 94 completed the study. Mean changes in the Tsui scale between baseline and 4 weeks after each injection tended to favor Botox; however, this was not statistically significant (4.0 ± 3.9 points for the Dysport treatment vs. 4.8 ± 4.1 points for Botox; 95% confidence interval, -0.1-1.7; P = 0.091). The mean change of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale score, the proportion of improvement in clinical global impression and patient global impression, and the incidences of adverse events were not significantly different between the two treatments. With regard to safety and efficacy, Dysport was not inferior to Botox in patients with CD at a conversion factor of 2.5:1. [clinicaltrial.gov: NCT00950664

  20. Genetic Analysis of PLA2G6 in 22 Indian Families with Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy, Atypical Late-Onset Neuroaxonal Dystrophy and Dystonia Parkinsonism Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Mohammad Iqbal; Bhat, Vishwanath; Gopinath, Sindhura; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B.; Sinha, Sanjib; Nagappa, Madhu; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Mahadevan, Anita; Narayanappa, Gayathri; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Kumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PLA2G6 were identified in patients with a spectrum of neurodegenerative conditions, such as infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD), atypical late-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (ANAD) and dystonia parkinsonism complex (DPC). However, there is no report on the genetic analysis of families with members affected with INAD, ANAD and DPC from India. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to perform genetic analysis of 22 Indian families with INAD, ANAD and DPC. DNA sequence analysis of the entire coding region of PLA2G6 identified 13 different mutations, including five novel ones (p.Leu224Pro, p.Asp283Asn, p.Arg329Cys, p.Leu491Phe, and p.Arg649His), in 12/22 (54.55%) families with INAD and ANAD. Interestingly, one patient with INAD was homozygous for two different mutations, p.Leu491Phe and p.Ala516Val, and thus harboured four mutant alleles. With these mutations, the total number of mutations in this gene reaches 129. The absence of mutations in 10/22 (45.45%) families suggests that the mutations could be in deep intronic or promoter regions of this gene or these families could have mutations in a yet to be identified gene. The present study increases the mutation landscape of PLA2G6. The present finding will be useful for genetic diagnosis, carrier detection and genetic counselling to families included in this study and other families with similar disease condition. PMID:27196560

  1. The CACNA1B R1389H variant is not associated with myoclonus-dystonia in a large European multicentric cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; R'bibo, Léa; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Batla, Amit; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Pittman, Alan M.; Hardy, John; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Gasser, Thomas; Lohmann, Ebba; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a very rare movement disorder, caused in ∼30–50% of cases by mutations in SGCE. The CACNA1B variant c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) was recently reported as the likely causative mutation in a single 3-generation Dutch pedigree with five subjects affected by a unique dominant M-D syndrome and cardiac arrhythmias. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed by direct sequencing the frequency of CACNA1B c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) in a cohort of 520 M-D cases, in which SGCE mutations had been previously excluded. A total of 146 cases (28%) had a positive family history of M-D. The frequency of the variant was also assessed in 489 neurologically healthy controls and in publicly available data sets of genetic variation (1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server and Exome Aggregation Consortium). The variant was detected in a single sporadic case with M-D, but in none of the 146 probands with familial M-D. Overall, the variant was present at comparable frequencies in M-D cases (1 out of 520; 0.19%) and healthy controls (1 out of 489; 0.2%). A similar frequency of the variant was also reported in all publicly available databases. These results do not support a causal association between the CACNA1B c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) variant and M-D. PMID:26157024

  2. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon; Flynn, Alexandra; Macaluso, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    This series of columns has 2 main goals: (1) to explain the use of class warnings by the US Food and Drug Administration and (2) to increase clinicians' awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients being treated with antipsychotic medications and why it is appropriate and good practice to refrain from immediately assuming the diagnosis is tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD). This first column in the series will focus on the second goal, which will then serve as a case example for the first goal. Clinicians should refrain from jumping to a diagnosis of TD because a host of other causes need to be ruled out first before inferring iatrogenic causation. The causal relationship between chronic treatment with dopamine antagonists and TD is based on pharmacoepidemiology (ie, the prevalence of such movement disorders is higher in individuals receiving chronic treatment with such agents than in a control group). There is nothing pathognomonic about movement disorders, nor is there any test that can currently prove a drug caused a movement disorder in a specific individual. Another goal of this series is to describe the types of research that would be needed to establish whether a specific agent has a meaningful risk of causing TD. In this first column of the series, we present the case of a patient who developed orofacial dyskinesia while being treated with aripiprazole. In this case, the movement disorder was prematurely called TD, which led to a malpractice lawsuit. This case highlights a number of key questions clinicians are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice. We then review data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for 2 movement disorders, TD and spontaneous dyskinesia. Subsequent columns in this series will review: (1) unique aspects of the psychopharmacology of aripiprazole, (2) the limited and inconsistent data in the literature concerning the causal relationship between aripiprazole and TD, (3) the use of

  3. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon; Flynn, Alexandra; Macaluso, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    This series of columns has 2 main goals: (1) to explain the use of class warnings by the US Food and Drug Administration and (2) to increase clinicians' awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients being treated with antipsychotic medications and why it is appropriate and good practice to refrain from immediately assuming the diagnosis is tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD). This first column in the series will focus on the second goal, which will then serve as a case example for the first goal. Clinicians should refrain from jumping to a diagnosis of TD because a host of other causes need to be ruled out first before inferring iatrogenic causation. The causal relationship between chronic treatment with dopamine antagonists and TD is based on pharmacoepidemiology (ie, the prevalence of such movement disorders is higher in individuals receiving chronic treatment with such agents than in a control group). There is nothing pathognomonic about movement disorders, nor is there any test that can currently prove a drug caused a movement disorder in a specific individual. Another goal of this series is to describe the types of research that would be needed to establish whether a specific agent has a meaningful risk of causing TD. In this first column of the series, we present the case of a patient who developed orofacial dyskinesia while being treated with aripiprazole. In this case, the movement disorder was prematurely called TD, which led to a malpractice lawsuit. This case highlights a number of key questions clinicians are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice. We then review data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for 2 movement disorders, TD and spontaneous dyskinesia. Subsequent columns in this series will review: (1) unique aspects of the psychopharmacology of aripiprazole, (2) the limited and inconsistent data in the literature concerning the causal relationship between aripiprazole and TD, (3) the use of

  4. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 3: Clinical Trial Data.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Macaluso, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. This column reviews clinical trial data to assess whether those data support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD when used as an augmentation strategy to treat MDD. To date, no randomized, placebo-controlled trials have established a definitive link between exposure to aripiprazole and TD in patients with MDD. One long-term, open-label, safety trial examined aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy in individuals with MDD and found a rare occurrence (4/987, 0.4%, the confidence interval of which overlaps with zero) of an adverse event termed TD. In all 4 cases, the observed movements resolved within weeks of aripiprazole discontinuation, suggesting that they were either amenable to treatment or represented an acute syndrome rather than TD. No cases of TD were reported in the registration trials for the MDD indication for aripiprazole. These data were presented in a pooled analysis of

  5. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 4: Case Report Data.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-05-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and reviewed preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. The third column in this series reviewed the registration trial data for aripiprazole across all of its indications and found a raw incidence of TD ranging from 0.004 (4 out of 987) in long-term studies of the drug as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder to 0.0016 (19 out of 11,897) based on all short-term (ie, weeks to <6 mo) and long-term (6 mo to 1 y) studies combined. This fourth column in the series reviews the "real-world" data on aripiprazole and assesses whether these data also support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD. The "real-world" data consist of case reports from the medical literature and the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We found 37 cases in the medical literature reporting what was termed TD in association with aripiprazole treatment as well as 27 case reports suggesting improvement in

  6. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  7. The survival of vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons is dependent upon dystonin.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; De Repentigny, Y; Kothary, R; Sugimoto, T

    2006-01-01

    The vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory ganglia and their peripheral tissues were examined in wild type and dystonia musculorum mice to assess the effect of dystonin loss of function on chemoreceptive neurons. In the mutant mouse, the number of vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons was severely decreased (70% reduction) when compared with wild type littermates. The mutation also reduced the size of the circumvallate papilla (45% reduction) and the number of taste buds (89% reduction). In addition, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the dystonin mutation reduced the number of PGP 9.5-, calcitonin gene-related peptide-, P2X3 receptor- and tyrosine hydroxylase-containing neurons. Their peripheral endings also decreased in the taste bud and epithelium of circumvallate papillae. These data together suggest that the survival of vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons is dependent upon dystonin. PMID:16289886

  8. Dystonin deficiency reduces taste buds and fungiform papillae in the anterior part of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Terayama, R; Yamaai, T; De Repentigny, Y; Kothary, R; Sugimoto, T

    2007-01-19

    The anterior part of the tongue was examined in wild type and dystonia musculorum mice to assess the effect of dystonin loss on fungiform papillae. In the mutant mouse, the density of fungiform papillae and their taste buds was severely decreased when compared to wild type littermates (papilla, 67% reduction; taste bud, 77% reduction). The mutation also reduced the size of these papillae (17% reduction) and taste buds (29% reduction). In addition, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the dystonin mutation reduced the number of PGP 9.5 and calbindin D28k-containing nerve fibers in fungiform papillae. These data together suggest that dystonin is required for the innervation and development of fungiform papillae and taste buds. PMID:17156752

  9. Spontaneous and induced mouse mutations with cerebellar dysfunctions: behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2007-04-01

    Grid2(Lc) (Lurcher), Grid2(ho) (hot-foot), Rora(sg) (staggerer), nr (nervous), Agtpbp1(pcd) (Purkinje cell degeneration), Reln(rl) (reeler), and Girk2(Wv) (Weaver) are spontaneous mutations with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and deficits in motor coordination tasks requiring balance and equilibrium. In addition to these signs, the Dst(dt) (dystonia musculorum) spinocerebellar mutant displays dystonic postures and crawling. More recently, transgenic models with human spinocerebellar ataxia mutations and alterations in calcium homeostasis have been shown to exhibit cerebellar anomalies and motor coordination deficits. We describe neurochemical characteristics of these mutants with respect to regional brain metabolism as well as amino acid and biogenic amine concentrations, uptake sites, and receptors.

  10. A primate genesis model of focal dystonia and repetitive strain injury: I. Learning-induced dedifferentiation of the representation of the hand in the primary somatosensory cortex in adult monkeys.

    PubMed

    Byl, N N; Merzenich, M M; Jenkins, W M

    1996-08-01

    In this study we tested a neuroplasticity/learning origins hypothesis for repetitive strain injuries (RSIs), including occupationally induced focal dystonia. Repetitive movements produced in a specific form and in an appropriate behavioral context cause a degradation of the sensory feedback information controlling fine motor movements, resulting in the "learned" genesis of RSIs. Two adult New World owl monkeys were trained at a behavioral task that required them to maintain an attended grasp on a hand grip that repetitively and rapidly (20 msec) opened and closed over short distances. The monkeys completed 300 behavioral trials per day (1,100 to 3,000 movement events) with an accuracy of 80 to 90%. A movement control disorder was recorded in both monkeys. Training was continued until the performance accuracy dropped to below 50%. We subsequently conducted an electrophysiologic mapping study of the representations of the hand within the primary somatosensory (SI) cortical zone. The hand representation in the true primary somatosensory cortical field, SI area 3b, was found to be markedly degraded in these monkeys, as characterized by (1) a dedifferentiation of cortical representations of the skin of the hand manifested by receptive fields that were 10 to 20 times larger than normal, (2) the emergence of many receptive fields that covered the entire glabrous surface of individual digits or that extended across the surfaces of two or more digits, (3) a breakdown of the normally sharply segregated area 3b representations of volar glabrous and dorsal hairy skin of the hand, and (4) a breakdown of the local shifted-overlap receptive field topography of area 3b, with many digital receptive fields overlapping the fields of neurons sampled in cortical penetrations up to more than four times farther apart than normal. Thus, rapid, repetitive, highly stereotypic movements applied in a learning context can actively degrade cortical representations of sensory information guiding

  11. An open-label cohort study of the improvement of quality of life and pain in de novo cervical dystonia patients after injections with 500 U botulinum toxin A (Dysport)

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, H; Benecke, R; Erbguth, F; Jost, W; Reichel, G; Wissel, J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It remains to be determined whether the benefits of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on cervical dystonia (CD) motor symptoms extend to improvements in patient's quality of life (QoL). This analysis of a large, multicentre study was conducted with the aim of investigating changes in QoL and functioning among de novo patients receiving 500 U BoNT-A (abobotulinumtoxinA; Dysport) for the treatment of the two most frequent forms of CD, predominantly torticollis and laterocollis. Design A prospective, open-label study of Dysport (500 U; Ipsen Biopharm Ltd) administered according to a defined intramuscular injection algorithm. Setting German and Austrian outpatient clinics. Participants 516 male and female patients (aged ≥18 years) with de novo CD. The majority of patients had torticollis (78.1%). 35 patients had concomitant depression (MedDRA-defined). Main outcome measures Change from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 in Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24) total and subscale scores, patient diary items (‘day-to-day capacities and activities’, ‘pain’ and ‘duration of pain’) and global assessment of pain. Results Significant improvements were observed in CDQ-24 total and subscale scores at week 4 and were sustained up to week 12 (p<0.001). Changes in CDQ-24 scores did not significantly differ between the torticollis and laterocollis groups or between patients with or without depression. There were also significant reductions in patient diary item scores for activities of daily living, pain and pain duration at weeks 4 and 12 (p<0.001). Pain relief (less or no pain) was reported by 66% and 74.1% of patients at weeks 4 and 12, respectively. Changes in pain parameters demonstrated a positive relationship with change in Tsui score. Conclusions After standardised open-label treatment with Dysport 500 U, improvements in QoL and pain intensity up to 12 weeks in patients with CD were observed. PMID:23604344

  12. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Samantha F; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Bonin, Sawyer R; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  13. [Transition from malum coxae senile to the arthrosis deformans concept. A summary of the best known theories and classifications].

    PubMed

    Rauschmann, M A; Habermann, B; Thomann, K D

    2001-11-01

    The disease of degenerative arthritis has been known for thousands of years. Paleopathology has provided findings of ancient degenerative alterations. Furthermore, physicians in classical antiquity described several forms of joint diseases. A challenging problem was the therapy, which was limited at that time. For centuries all joint diseases were subsumed under the term"rheumatism." In 1683 Thomas Sydenham, who suffered himself from gout, first differentiated this joint disease from the larger group of rheumatic joint diseases. Another early classification was undertaken by John Haygarth in 1779. He differentiated gout from malum coxae senilis and the chronic rheumatic diseases. The different theories and the resulting classifications were influenced by different disciplines such as surgery, internal medicine, pathology, anatomy, neurology, microbiology, and radiology. This investigation includes the time period from the early nineteenth century until 1925 when the word "arthrosis" was first used in a medical publication. This investigation is based on research at the library of the German Museum for Orthopedic History and Science as well on the systematic search for articles in different German journals such as Zeitschrift für Orthopddie and Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Röntgenstrahlen. It includes almost all important books and publications about degenerative arthritis for this time period. In the past there were many different descriptions for degenerative arthritis. The establishment of X-rays and new methods in histology and microbiology and the aspect of biomechanical theories led to a better understanding of the different diseases. The authors tried to construct new classifications without the knowledge of the causal and formal pathogenesis. This is the reason for the large number of different classifications, which had to be revised after a short period of time. This publication gives an overview about the most important articles and books which led to the classification currently in use.

  14. [THE INFLUENCE OF A COMBINATION OF MODERN DRUGS NUCLEINAT AND ALFAGIN ON THE CONCENTRATION OF CIRCULATING IMMUNE COMPLEXES AND THEIR MOLECULAR COMPOSITION IN THE SERUM OF PATIENTS WITH IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME ON THE BACKGROUND OF NEUROCIRCULATORY DYSTONIA IN COMPLEX MEDICAL REHABILITATION].

    PubMed

    Krivulya, I G; Teryshin, V A; Sotskaya, Y A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the combination nucleinat and alfagin in a complex of medical rehabilitation at the level of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in serum of patients and their molecular composition with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), against neurocirculatory dystonia (NeD). It is established that the combination of nucleinat and alfagin in medical rehabilitation of patients with this comorbid disorders contributes to the normalization of the total concentration of the CEC and their molecular composition, which indicates the validity of the application of the pathogenesis combinations of drugs in complex medical rehabilitation of patients with lBS against NCD. PMID:27491155

  15. Use of transmitochondrial cybrids to assign a complex I defect to the mitochondrial DNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene mutation at nucleotide pair 14459 that causes Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jun, A S; Trounce, I A; Brown, M D; Shoffner, J M; Wallace, D C

    1996-01-01

    A heteroplasmic G-to-A transition at nucleotide pair (np) 14459 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene has been identified as the cause of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and/or pediatric-onset dystonia in three unrelated families. This ND6 np 14459 mutation changes a moderately conserved alanine to a valine at amino acid position 72 of the ND6 protein. Enzymologic analysis of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) with submitochondrial particles isolated from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts revealed a 60% reduction (P < 0.005) of complex I-specific activity in patient cell lines compared with controls, with no differences in enzymatic activity for complexes II plus III, III and IV. This biochemical defect was assigned to the ND6 np 14459 mutation by using transmitochondrial cybrids in which patient Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines were enucleated and the cytoplasts were fused to a mtDNA-deficient (p 0) lymphoblastoid recipient cell line. Cybrids harboring the np 14459 mutation exhibited a 39% reduction (p < 0.02) in complex I-specific activity relative to wild-type cybrid lines but normal activity for the other complexes. Kinetic analysis of the np 14459 mutant complex I revealed that the Vmax of the enzyme was reduced while the Km remained the same as that of wild type. Furthermore, specific activity was inhibited by increasing concentrations of the reduced coenzyme Q analog decylubiquinol. These observations suggest that the np 14459 mutation may alter the coenzyme Q-binding site of complex I. PMID:8622678

  16. The BiP molecular chaperone plays multiple roles during the biogenesis of torsinA, an AAA+ ATPase associated with the neurological disease early-onset torsion dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zacchi, Lucía F; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Bell, Samantha L; Millen, Linda; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Thomas, Philip J; Zolkiewski, Michal; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-05-01

    Early-onset torsion dystonia (EOTD) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary and sustained muscle contractions that can lead to paralysis and abnormal posture. EOTD is associated with the deletion of a glutamate (ΔE) in torsinA, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident AAA(+) ATPase. To date, the effect of ΔE on torsinA and the reason that this mutation results in EOTD are unclear. Moreover, there are no specific therapeutic options to treat EOTD. To define the underlying biochemical defects associated with torsinAΔE and to uncover factors that might be targeted to offset defects associated with torsinAΔE, we developed a yeast torsinA expression system and tested the roles of ER chaperones in mediating the folding and stability of torsinA and torsinAΔE. We discovered that the ER lumenal Hsp70, BiP, an associated Hsp40, Scj1, and a nucleotide exchange factor, Lhs1, stabilize torsinA and torsinAΔE. BiP also maintained torsinA and torsinAΔE solubility. Mutations predicted to compromise specific torsinA functional motifs showed a synthetic interaction with the ΔE mutation and destabilized torsinAΔE, suggesting that the ΔE mutation predisposes torsinA to defects in the presence of secondary insults. In this case, BiP was required for torsinAΔE degradation, consistent with data that specific chaperones exhibit either pro-degradative or pro-folding activities. Finally, using two independent approaches, we established that BiP stabilizes torsinA and torsinAΔE in mammalian cells. Together, these data define BiP as the first identified torsinA chaperone, and treatments that modulate BiP might improve symptoms associated with EOTD. PMID:24627482

  17. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 2: Preclinical and Early Phase Human Proof of Concept Studies.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients treated with antipsychotics. The first column in this series began with the case of a 76-year-old man with major depressive disorder who developed orofacial dyskinesias while being treated with aripiprazole as an antidepressant augmentation strategy. It was alleged that a higher than intended dose of aripiprazole (ie, 20 mg/d for 2 wk followed by 10 mg/d for 4 wk instead of the intended dose of 2 mg/d) was the cause of the dyskinetic movements in this man, and the authors were asked to review the case and give their opinion. The principal basis for this theory of causation was the class warning about TD in the package insert for aripiprazole. The rationale for concluding aripiprazole caused TD in the 76-year-old man led to this series of columns about aripiprazole, its potential--if any--to cause TD, and the presence of a class warning about TD in its package insert. The central point is to illustrate why class warnings exist and their implications for practice. The first column in this series focused on the historical background, incidence, prevalence, risk factors, and clinical presentations of tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias and concluded with a discussion of diagnostic considerations explaining why clinicians should avoid making a diagnosis of TD until a thorough differential diagnosis has been considered. This second column in the series reviews the pharmacology of aripiprazole and the preclinical and phase I translational human studies that suggest aripiprazole should have a low to nonexistent risk of causing TD compared with other antipsychotics. The third column in the series

  18. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 2: Preclinical and Early Phase Human Proof of Concept Studies.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients treated with antipsychotics. The first column in this series began with the case of a 76-year-old man with major depressive disorder who developed orofacial dyskinesias while being treated with aripiprazole as an antidepressant augmentation strategy. It was alleged that a higher than intended dose of aripiprazole (ie, 20 mg/d for 2 wk followed by 10 mg/d for 4 wk instead of the intended dose of 2 mg/d) was the cause of the dyskinetic movements in this man, and the authors were asked to review the case and give their opinion. The principal basis for this theory of causation was the class warning about TD in the package insert for aripiprazole. The rationale for concluding aripiprazole caused TD in the 76-year-old man led to this series of columns about aripiprazole, its potential--if any--to cause TD, and the presence of a class warning about TD in its package insert. The central point is to illustrate why class warnings exist and their implications for practice. The first column in this series focused on the historical background, incidence, prevalence, risk factors, and clinical presentations of tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias and concluded with a discussion of diagnostic considerations explaining why clinicians should avoid making a diagnosis of TD until a thorough differential diagnosis has been considered. This second column in the series reviews the pharmacology of aripiprazole and the preclinical and phase I translational human studies that suggest aripiprazole should have a low to nonexistent risk of causing TD compared with other antipsychotics. The third column in the series

  19. Genetics Home Reference: dopa-responsive dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the first of three steps in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). The SPR ... is involved in the last step of tetrahydrobiopterin production. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several protein building blocks ( amino ...

  20. Temporal Expectation in Focal Hand Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avanzino, Laura; Martino, Davide; Martino, Isadora; Pelosin, Elisa; Vicario, Carmelo M.; Bove, Marco; Defazio, Gianni; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Patients with writer's cramp present sensory and representational abnormalities relevant to motor control, such as impairment in the temporal discrimination between tactile stimuli and in pure motor imagery tasks, like the mental rotation of corporeal and inanimate objects. However, only limited information is available on the ability of patients…

  1. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  2. Respiratory Dynamics and Speech Intelligibility in Speakers with Generalized Dystonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBlance, Gary R.; Rutherford, David R.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared respiratory function during quiet breathing and monologue, in six adult dystonic subjects and a control group of four neurologically intact adults. Dystonic subjects showed a faster breathing rate, less rhythmic breathing pattern, decreased lung volume, and apnea-like periods. Decreased speech intelligibility was related to…

  3. Genetics Home Reference: deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually develop a gradual decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia) in their forties. The lifespan of ... Bäzner H, Krauss JK, Hennerici MG, Bauer MF. Clinical and molecular findings in a patient with a ...

  4. [Functional cramps or functional dystonias in writers and musicians].

    PubMed

    Chamagne, P

    1986-01-01

    The clinical evaluation in the "dystonies of function" or "impaired dexterity" reveals certain physical anomalies which either appear spontaneously or are triggered by specific tests: abnormal postures involving the trunck, head, and upper limb. During the professional gesture the physiological "pulley effect" on flexor tendons is accompanied with an interference effect produced by the displacement of the segments; this, adds up to an unbalance of the digital kinetic chain, building a locked functional system. The antagonist muscles begin to supply the deficiency of the agonist muscles. In addition, patients with a characteristic psychological ground suffer a more acute "disorganization" or a performing career.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: task-specific focal dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset primary dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  10. A resolution designating September 2016 as "National Dystonia Awareness Month" and raising awareness and understanding of the disorder of dystonia.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Isakson, Johnny [R-GA

    2016-09-29

    09/29/2016 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6286; text as passed Senate: CR S6277-6278) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Axonopathy in the Central Nervous System Is the Hallmark of Mice with a Novel Intragenic Null Mutation of Dystonin.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Kiel, Kirsten; Jottini, Stefano; Wohlsein, Peter; Habierski, Andre; Seibel, Katharina; Vogel, Tanja; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Teichmann, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Dystonia musculorum is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the dystonin gene. It has been described in mice and humans where it is called hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy. Mutated mice show severe movement disorders and die at the age of 3-4 weeks. This study describes the discovery and molecular, clinical, as well as pathological characterization of a new spontaneously occurring mutation in the dystonin gene in C57BL/6N mice. The mutation represents a 40-kb intragenic deletion allele of the dystonin gene on chromosome 1 with exactly defined deletion borders. It was demonstrated by Western blot, mass spectrometry, and immunohistology that mice with a homozygous mutation were entirely devoid of the dystonin protein. Pathomorphological lesions were restricted to the brain stem and spinal cord and consisted of swollen, argyrophilic axons and dilated myelin sheaths in the white matter and, less frequently, total chromatolysis of neurons in the gray matter. Axonal damage was detected by amyloid precursor protein and nonphosphorylated neurofilament immunohistology. Axonopathy in the central nervous system (CNS) represents the hallmark of this disease. Mice with the dystonin mutation also showed suppurative inflammation in the respiratory tract, presumably due to brain stem lesion-associated food aspiration, whereas skeletal muscles showed no pathomorphological changes. This study describes a novel mutation in the dystonin gene in mice leading to axonopathy in the CNS. In further studies, this model may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and may elucidate the complex interactions of dystonin with various other cellular proteins especially in the CNS. PMID:27401753

  12. Writer's Cramp

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  13. Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  14. Focal dystonia: advances in brain imaging and understanding of fine motor control in musicians.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews the neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic foundations of music performance and learning. Music performance is regarded as complex voluntary sensorimotor behavior that becomes automated during extensive practice with auditory feedback. It involves all motor, somatosensory, and auditory areas of the brain. Because of the life-long plasticity of neuronal connections, practicing a musical instrument results first in a temporary and later in a stable increase in the amount of nerve tissue devoted to various component tasks. Motor and somatosensory brain regions corresponding to specific subtasks of music performance are larger in musicians starting younger than age 10 years than in the general population. In rare cases, overuse of movement patterns may induce a degradation of motor memory that results in a loss of voluntary control of movements, called musician's cramp. Specific therapeutic options for this condition are reviewed.

  15. Extrapyramidal Motor Dysfunction and Resultant Orofacial Dystonia Post-Cocaine Abuse: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigated the consequences of cocaine use and resultant extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. The study focused on a female client, post-long-term drug abuse with concomitant untreated head trauma, experiencing extraneous motor movements of the lips, tongue, jaw, and upper and lower extremities. The goals of this study were to (a)…

  16. Dystonia as acute adverse reaction to cough suppressant in a 3-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, A; Incorpora, G; Ruggieri, M

    2001-01-01

    Cough suppressant preparations containing mixtures of dextromethorphan or codeine with antihistamines, decongestants (sympathomimetic), expectorants and antipyretics with either sedative or anticholinergic activity have been associated with dystonic reactions in children. We report on a 3-year-old girl who presented with episodic stiffness and abnormal posturing with rigidity after arbitrary maternal administration of a mixture of methylcodeine and extract from Hedera plant. PMID:11587381

  17. [Laboratory studies of the effect of Pavulon on the blood pressure in induced autonomic dystonias].

    PubMed

    Tica, A; Georgescu, D; Oţoiu, M; Deberth, H

    1977-01-01

    In experimental studies performed in dogs Pavulon enhances the hypertensive effects of para- and orthosympathicomymetics (nicotinelike and liberation of cathecholamine respectively), parasympaticolytics lowering essentially the rise of the blood pressure induced by Pavulon, which sympathicolytics--depending on the dose administered--can decrease until zero. These facts have a significant role in the anesthesia and intensive care practice.

  18. [Efficacy and safety of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of rare forms of muscular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Chernukha, T N; Zabrodets, G V; Gleb, O V

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования — оценка эффективности и безопасности ритмической транскраниальной магнитной стимуляции (рТМС) при лечении мышечных дистоний (МД). Материал и методы. Были пролечены 72 пациента с сегментарными, генерализованными формами дистонии, писчим спазмом, оромандибулярной дистонией. Степень дистонии оценивали по шкале Burke—Fahn—Marsden. Результаты и заключение. Курс лечения методом рТМС на область моторной коры уменьшал степень дистонического гиперкинеза, наблюдалось достоверное уменьшение показателей по шкале Burke—Fahn—Marsden (р<0,05). Данный метод обладал хорошей переносимостью, лишь 1 пациент пожелал прервать лечение в связи с подергиванием мышц лица при рТМС; побочных эффектов зарегистрировано не было. Полученные результаты лечения позволяют рекомендовать более широкое внедрение данного метода в комплексное лечение и реабилитацию пациентов с редкими формами МД.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... juvenile Paget disease: Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatasemia with bone disease These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... familial osteoectasia hyperostosis corticalis deformans juvenilis hyperphosphatasemia ... idiopathic idiopathic hyperphosphatasia JPD juvenile Paget's ...

  20. Episodic cervical dystonia associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. A case of adult-onset Sandifer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, M; van der Westhuizen, L R; Gledhill, R F

    2001-12-01

    Sandifer syndrome is a dystonic movement disorder described in children with severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. We now report a patient who had the features of Sandifer syndrome first developing in adult life. Onset of dystonic episodes followed closely the occurrence of a Bell's palsy, while symptoms of peptic oesophagitis had been present for several months beforehand. Successful symptomatic treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux was accompanied by cessation of the dystonic episodes. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of the abnormal movements in Sandifer syndrome are discussed. PMID:11714563

  1. [Was Beethoven's deafness caused by Paget's disease? Report of findings and study of skull fragments of Ludwig van Beethoven].

    PubMed

    Jesserer, H; Bankl, H

    1986-10-01

    Paget's disease of bone (osteitis deformans) has been repeatedly named as a possible cause for Ludwig van Beethoven's deafness. In 1985 a descendent of Franz Romeo Seligmann (a Viennese medical historian who in 1863 had studied Beethoven's mortal remains on the occasion of their relocation) presented to us three bone fragments allegedly from Beethoven's cranium. They represented fragments of the left parietal bone and the occiputum. It was possible to prove nearly with certainty that these bone fragments actually are Beethoven's. They did not show signs of Paget's disease of bone. It must therefore be concluded that Beethoven's deafness was not caused by Paget's osteitis deformans.

  2. [Was Beethoven's deafness caused by Paget's disease? Report of findings and study of skull fragments of Ludwig van Beethoven].

    PubMed

    Jesserer, H; Bankl, H

    1986-10-01

    Paget's disease of bone (osteitis deformans) has been repeatedly named as a possible cause for Ludwig van Beethoven's deafness. In 1985 a descendent of Franz Romeo Seligmann (a Viennese medical historian who in 1863 had studied Beethoven's mortal remains on the occasion of their relocation) presented to us three bone fragments allegedly from Beethoven's cranium. They represented fragments of the left parietal bone and the occiputum. It was possible to prove nearly with certainty that these bone fragments actually are Beethoven's. They did not show signs of Paget's disease of bone. It must therefore be concluded that Beethoven's deafness was not caused by Paget's osteitis deformans. PMID:3540490

  3. Localization to Xq22 and clinical update of a family with X-linked recessive mental retardation with progression sensorineural deafness, progressive tapeto-retinal degeneration and dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Schwartz, C.; Huggins, K.; Barker, D.; Stevenson, R.; Arena, J.F.; Gedde-Dahl, T.; Mikkelsen, M.; Mellgren, S.; Anderson, K. ||||

    1994-07-15

    In a reinvestigation of a six-generation Norwegian family, originally reported with non-syndromic X-linked recessive deafness by Mohr and Mageroy, we have demonstrated several syndromic manifestations. The 10 clinically characterized affected males range in age from 14-61 years, and show progressive mental deterioration and visual disability. Ophthalmological and electrophysiological studies showed myopia, decreased visual acuity, combined cone-rod dystrophy as well as central areolar dystrophy by means of ERG. Brain CT-scans showed cortical and central atrophy without predilection to specific areas. Linkage analysis, using X-chromosomal RFLPs and CA-repeats, yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.37 with linkage to DXS17. DXS17 is localized to Xq22. One recombinant with COL4A5 (deficient in Alport syndrome) was observed. Results from the studies of this family will be important in reclassification of non-syndromic X-linked deafness since the family now represents syndromic deafness and XLMR with a specific phenotype.

  4. A novel splice-site mutation in ALS2 establishes the diagnosis of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a family with early onset anarthria and generalized dystonias.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Saima; Foo, Jia Nee; Vu, Anthony; Azim, Saad; Silver, David L; Mansoor, Atika; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Abbasi, Sumiya; Hashmi, Asraf Hussain; Janjua, Jamal; Khalid, Sumbal; Tai, E Shyong; Yeo, Gene W; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A) in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3) encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes.

  5. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in ALS2 Establishes the Diagnosis of Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a Family with Early Onset Anarthria and Generalized Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Anthony; Azim, Saad; Silver, David L.; Mansoor, Atika; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Abbasi, Sumiya; Hashmi, Asraf Hussain; Janjua, Jamal; Khalid, Sumbal; Tai, E. Shyong; Yeo, Gene W.; Khor, Chiea Chuen

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of childhood neurological disorders remains challenging given the overlapping clinical presentation across subgroups and heterogeneous presentation within subgroups. To determine the underlying genetic cause of a severe neurological disorder in a large consanguineous Pakistani family presenting with severe scoliosis, anarthria and progressive neuromuscular degeneration, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping accompanied by whole-exome sequencing in two affected first cousins and their unaffected parents to find the causative mutation. We identified a novel homozygous splice-site mutation (c.3512+1G>A) in the ALS2 gene (NM_020919.3) encoding alsin that segregated with the disease in this family. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ALS2 are known to cause juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), one of the many neurological conditions having overlapping symptoms with many neurological phenotypes. RT-PCR validation revealed that the mutation resulted in exon-skipping as well as the use of an alternative donor splice, both of which are predicted to cause loss-of-function of the resulting proteins. By examining 216 known neurological disease genes in our exome sequencing data, we also identified 9 other rare nonsynonymous mutations in these genes, some of which lie in highly conserved regions. Sequencing of a single proband might have led to mis-identification of some of these as the causative variant. Our findings established a firm diagnosis of juvenile ALS in this family, thus demonstrating the use of whole exome sequencing combined with linkage analysis in families as a powerful tool for establishing a quick and precise genetic diagnosis of complex neurological phenotypes. PMID:25474699

  6. [Dose-response relationship in the treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622)--a phase II study].

    PubMed

    Mezaki, T; Kaji, R; Kimura, J; Mannen, T

    1995-09-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin type A has been the treatment of choice for spasmodic torticollis for several years. Although previous reports demonstrate its effectiveness and safety, the treatment strategy has been empirical. The present study, using the freeze-dried crystalline botulinum toxin type A (AGN 191622; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA), aimed to compare the efficacy among three treatment groups divided into low, medium and high dosage levels. Fifty-one patients who entered the study were grouped into low-dose (60 units/session), medium-dose (120 units/session) and high-dose (240 units/session) groups. Two patients (one in low-dose group and the other in high-dose group) were excluded from the assessment of efficacy because they dropped out in the early phase of the study. One experienced worsening of an existing psychosis and the other developed an acute respiratory infection. Injection sites were decided individually by palpation. If the clinical response was not satisfactory four weeks after an injection, the patient was re-injected with the same dose of toxin. The follow-up period was 14 weeks from the initial injection. The results showed that the high-dose group improved more than the other groups in the parameters of severity of symptoms and subjective benefit (p = 0.000). Also, fewer injections were required in the high-dose group to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Although the mean reduction in Tsui's score was not statistically significant among the groups, the "marked improvement" was seen more frequently in the high-dose group (p = 0.033). Unfavorable adverse effects including excessive weakness and dysphasia were always mild and transient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Noxious electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor and vagina induces transient voiding dysfunction in a rabbit survival model of pelvic floor dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Spettel, Sara; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M.; Dubin, Andrew H.; De, Elise J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Existing data supports a relationship between pelvic floor dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms. We developed a survival model of pelvic floor dysfunction in the rabbit and evaluated cystometric (CMG), electromyographic (EMG) and ambulatory voiding behavior. Materials and Methods Twelve female adult virgin rabbits were housed in metabolic cages to record voiding and defecation. Anesthetized CMG/EMG was performed before and after treatment animals (n=9) received bilateral tetanizing needle stimulation to the pubococcygeous (PC) muscle and controls (n=3) sham needle placement. After 7 days all animals were subjected to tetanizing transvaginal stimulation and CMG/EMG. After 5 days a final CMG/EMG was performed. Results Of rabbits that underwent needle stimulation 7 of 9 (78%) demonstrated dysfunctional CMG micturition contractions versus 6 of 12 (50%) after transvaginal stimulation. Needle stimulation of the PC musculature resulted in significant changes in: basal CMG pressure, precontraction pressure change, contraction pressure, interval between contractions and postvoid residual; with time to 3rd contraction increased from 38 to 53 minutes (p=0.008 vs. prestimulation). Vaginal noxious stimulation resulted in significant changes in: basal CMG pressure and interval between contractions; with time to 3rd contraction increased from 37 to 46 minutes (p=0.008 vs. prestimulation). Changes in cage parameters were primarily seen after direct needle stimulation. Conclusions In a majority of animals, tetanizing electrical stimulation of the rabbit pelvic floor resulted in voiding changes suggestive of pelvic floor dysfunction as characterized by a larger bladder capacity, longer interval between contractions and prolonged contraction duration. PMID:26682025

  8. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome • Cervical dystonia (abnormal neck movements) • Seizures in epilepsy Of the studies examined here, only two looked ... caused by levodopa. HD, Tourette Syndrome, Cervical Dystonia, Epilepsy There is not enough evidence* to show whether ...

  9. [X-ray diagnosis of retropatellar diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wahlers, B

    1979-08-01

    The article reports on a comprehensive, stepwise diagnosis in diseases of the knee joints. This includes a description of the indication, the technique of taking x-ray films, and x-ray findings, as well as arthrography of the femoropatellar joint in retropatellar diseases such as chondropathia patellae, osteochondrosis dissecans, traumas of the knee joints and arthrosis deformans.

  10. Multifocal nodular periostitis associated with prolonged voriconazole therapy in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Asad; Kenney, Charles V; McKiernan, Fergus E

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of painful, nodular periostitis in a lung transplant recipient on long-term voriconazole therapy. Symptoms, signs, and laboratory abnormalities resolved quickly after drug withdrawal. The presentation more closely resembles periostitis deformans than hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, suggesting that the fluoride moiety of voriconazole may be pathogenic for this condition. Clinicians should be aware of this association.

  11. Meige Syndrome: What’s in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, blepharospasm is associated with involuntary movements of the platysma, lower face and masticatory muscles. Similarly, masticatory dystonia may occur in isolation or in combination with dystonia of other cranial and cervical muscles. The non-possessive and possessive forms of Meige and Brueghel syndromes have been variably and imprecisely ascribed to various anatomical variations of craniocervical dystonia. Herein, the origin of eponymic terms as applied to craniocervical dystonia is reviewed as support for proposed elimination of these eponyms from clinical usage. Although the term “segmental craniocervical dystonia” more accurately captures the combination of blepharospasm and dystonia of other head and neck muscles, delineation of craniocervical subphenotypes is essential for etiological/genetic and treatment studies. To conclude, the clinical features, epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic management of segmental craniocervical dystonia are examined with a particular focus on “blepharospasm-plus” subphenotypes. PMID:19457699

  12. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  13. The Phenotypic Spectrum of DYT24 Due to ANO3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Charlesworth, Gavin; Cordivari, Carla; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Batla, Amit; Houlden, Henry; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Genes causing primary dystonia are rare. Recently, pathogenic mutations in the anoctamin 3 gene (ANO3) have been identified to cause autosomal dominant craniocervical dystonia and have been assigned to the dystonia locus dystonia-24 (DYT24). Here, we expand on the phenotypic spectrum of DYT24 and provide demonstrative videos. Moreover, tremor recordings were performed, and back-averaged electroencephalography, sensory evoked potentials, and C-reflex studies were carried out in two individuals who carried two different mutations in ANO3. Ten patients from three families are described. The age at onset ranged from early childhood to the forties. Cervical dystonia was the most common site of onset followed by laryngeal dystonia. The characteristic feature in all affected individuals was the presence of tremor, which contrasts DYT24 from the typical DYT6 phenotype. Tremor was the sole initial manifestation in some individuals with ANO3 mutations, leading to misdiagnosis as essential tremor. Electrophysiology in two patients with two different mutations showed co-contraction of antagonist muscles, confirming dystonia, and a 6-Hz arm tremor at rest, which increased in amplitude during action. In one of the studied patients, clinically superimposed myoclonus was observed. The duration of the myoclonus was in the range of 250 msec at about 3 Hz, which is more consistent with subcortical myoclonus. In summary, ANO3 causes a varied phenotype of young-onset or adult-onset craniocervical dystonia with tremor and/or myoclonic jerks. Patients with familial cervical dystonia who also have myoclonus-dystonia as well as patients with prominent tremor and mild dystonia should be tested for ANO3 mutations. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:24442708

  14. DYT6 in Brazil: Genetic Assessment and Clinical Characteristics of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique F.; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Raskin, Salmo; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo C.; Teive, Hélio Afonso G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several genes associated with dystonia have been identified. A mutation in one of these, THAP1 (DYT6), is linked to isolated dystonia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of THAP1 gene mutations and the clinical characteristics of patients with these mutations in a clinical population in Brazil. Methods Seventy-four patients presenting with dystonia involving the cervical muscles and without mutations in the TOR1A (DYT1) gene or any other movement disorders were recruited at a movement disorders clinic between June 2008 and June 2009. All the patients underwent clinical examination and were screened for mutations of the THAP1 gene. Results Three patients had the novel p.Gln97Ter THAP1 nonsense mutation in heterozygosis. One of them had no family history of dystonia. Symptoms in this patient first appeared in his right arm, and the condition progressed to the generalized form. The other two patients belonged to the same family (cousins). Symptoms in the first patient started in her right arm at the age of 18 years and the condition progressed to the segmental form. The second patient, who carried the p.Arg169Gln missense mutation, developed dystonia in her left arm at the age of 6 years. The condition progressed to generalized dystonia. Discussion We conclude that THAP1 mutations are also a cause, albeit uncommon, of segmental and generalized dystonia in the Brazilian population. PMID:24757586

  15. Acquired hemidystonia in childhood: a clinical and neuroradiological study of thirteen patients.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, N; Zorzi, G; Grisoli, M; Rumi, V; Broggi, G; Angelini, L

    1996-09-01

    A retrospective study of 13 patients (4 males/9 females) with acquired hemidystonia in childhood is reported. The mean age of onset of hemidystonia was 6.4 years (range 1-13.4 years); the mean duration of dystonia at the time of last follow-up was 11.4 years (range 3.6-23 years). Hemidystonia was caused by ischemic infarction in 9 patients and was attributed to perinatal trauma in 1; in 4 of the 9 patients with stroke and in the remaining 3 patients laboratory investigations were suggestive of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Eleven of the 13 patients had delayed onset of dystonia: between 1 month and 8.9 years (mean 3.4 years). Ten patients had neuroradiological evidence of contralateral basal ganglia damage. A history of hemiparesis and evidence of striatal damage on CT or MRI were important risk factors for the development of dystonia. Response to medical treatment (trihexyphenidyl dose as high as 40 mg daily) in 5 patients was disappointing; 4 of the 5 patients who underwent functional stereotaxic operations were improved, but dystonia was still present at the end of the follow-up. Our study provides additional evidence that lesions of the striatum may induce dystonia, supporting the theory of striatopallido-thalamic disconnection. Furthermore, our results indicate that the occurrence of delayed dystonia must be considered in the diagnostic approach to childhood-onset dystonia. PMID:8888043

  16. [Possibilities of treatment of dystonic syndromes with akineton].

    PubMed

    Karabanov, A V; Illarioshkin, S N

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of dystonia is a complex problem of current neurology due to the etiological and neurochemical heterogeneity of this clinical syndrome. Central cholinolytics is a most effective group of drugs for patients with dystonia and dystonic tremor. The authors present the results of the successful treatment with biperiden (akineton), a centrally active anticholinergic drug with additional peripheral choline- and ganglion-blocking effect in cervical dystonia. The time of response to treatment and duration of clinical effect, its possible predictors are analyzed. Perspectives of using cholinolytics in treatment of different forms of dystonic hyperkineses are discussed.

  17. Periostitis secondary to prolonged voriconazole therapy in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, David P; Granata, Jaymes D; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2011-11-09

    This article reports a case of perostitis deformans in a lung transplantation patient taking the fluoride-containing medication voriconazole, a relatively new and potent anti-fungal. The patient had a normal range of motion in all joints and a normal gait. On radiographs at presentation, multifocal areas of periostitis were visualized involving the left-hand first, second, and third proximal phalanx shafts. Similar periostitis was present on the left-hand third, fourth, and fifth middle phalanx shafts. Plain radiographs of the right hand also demonstrated multifocal periostitis of the third and fourth proximal and middle phalanges. Aggressive periostitis at the level of the right fourth proximal and middle phalanges was also present. Given her long-term treatment with voriconazole and a presentation consistent with periostitis deformans, voriconazole was presumed to be the offending agent and was replaced with itraconazole. The patient's symptoms resolved shortly after withdrawal of voriconazole.Voriconazole-associated periostitis has only recently been reported in the literature. Food and Drug Administration-approved in 2002, voriconazole is efficacious in treating serious, invasive fungal infections that are generally seen in immunocompromised patients. Due to the novel nature of voriconazole and the uncommon indications for its long-term use, the periostitis deformans described in this article may be unfamiliar to the orthopedic surgeon. Consequently, a patient presenting with bone pain and periosteal involvement on plain radiographs may provoke a broad, expensive, and ultimately unnecessary diagnostic evaluation. The clinical case and imaging findings presented here can help to promote understanding of this benign condition and its simple cure: voriconazole discontinuation.

  18. Arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination of 2 patients with suspected disk derangement.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, G; Holmlund, A; Nordenram, A; Wredmark, T

    1984-02-01

    2 patients with a history of reciprocal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking were visually examined with arthroscopy of their right side TMJs. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed no signs of arthrosis deformans. One patient with significantly reduced opening ability combined with occasional disappearance of TMJ clicks showed advanced arthrotic changes of cartilage which were not visible radiographically. The other patient with unimpaired function also had a severe arthrotic lesion in the clicking joint. In neither case did the disk appear to be displaced. It is concluded that arthroscopy yields additional information for TMJ diagnosis which cannot be achieved by clinical and radiographic examination alone.

  19. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients.

  20. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients. PMID:18688939

  1. Fungal remains in Pleistocene ground squirrel dung from Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozynski, Kris A.; Carter, Adrian; Day, Richard G.

    1984-11-01

    Fungi in dung of the Arctic ground squirrel ( Spermophilus parryii) collected near Dominion Creek, Yukon Territory, Canada, have a radiocarbon age of 12,200 ± 100 yr B.P. Most of the fungal remains are assignable to modern taxa, and most of these are either widespread saprobes or nonspecific coprophiles. However, specimens identified as Chaetomium simile and Thecaphora deformans represent fungi that may be more characteristic of rodent dung than that of other animals, inviting consideration of dung fungi as a potential source of paleontological data.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene SERAC1 impair mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking and cause dystonia and deafness. Nat Genet. 2012 ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  3. Clinical Pearls in Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Howard D

    2016-08-01

    Hyperkinetic movements, such as tremor, myoclonus, chorea, and dystonia, occur in many neurologic and medical conditions. Accurate clinical evaluation is the important first step for the proper diagnosis and treatment of patients with abnormal movements.

  4. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), be genetic ( ...

  5. [Deep brain stimulation in the treatment of torticollis and Meige syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sobstyl, Michał; Ząbek, Mirosław

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established and accepted treatment modality of generalized dystonia. The stereotactic target to be approached with DBS leads is the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Bilateral GPi stimulation in patients suffering from primary generalized dystonia reduced dystonic movement not only in the trunk and limbs but also in the neck and face. These observations have led to the use of GPi stimulation in patients with severe torticollis and Meige syndrome refractory to pharmacological agents as well to botulinum toxin injections. An increasing number of reports indicate the effectiveness of GPi stimulation in the treatment of intractable focal and segmental dystonia. Moreover, DBS can be performed simultaneously on both sides during one operative session. This treatment modality is reversible and safer when compared to stereotactic ablative techniques. In future, DBS can become an alternative treatment for intractable focal and segmental dystonia.

  6. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation for Writer's Cramp

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Bum; Park, Hae Kwan; Rha, Hyoung Kyun

    2009-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of idiopathic focal hand dystonia characterized by muscle cramps that accompany execution of the writing task specifically. There has been renewed interest in neurosurgical procedures for the treatment of dystonia over the past several years. In particular, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has received increasing attention as a therapeutic option for patients with dystonia. However, to date, limited reporters made investigations into DBS in relation to the Writer's cramp. In this case, unilateral Ventro-oralis complex (Vo) DBS resulted in a major improvement in patient's focal dystonic movement disorders. Her post-operative Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating (BFMDR) scale demonstrated 1 compared with pre-operative BFMDR scale 4. We conclude that thalamic Vo complex DBS may be an important neurosurgical therapeutic option for Writer's cramp. PMID:19707494

  7. Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Questions Dyskinesia Dystonia Prognosis Symptoms Smell Loss Español Life with Parkinson's Anxiety & Depression Diet Dexterity Driving Exercise Fatigue Navigating the System Books & Resources Employment Issues Finding the Right Doctor ...

  8. Clinical Pearls in Tremor and Other Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Howard D

    2016-08-01

    Hyperkinetic movements, such as tremor, myoclonus, chorea, and dystonia, occur in many neurologic and medical conditions. Accurate clinical evaluation is the important first step for the proper diagnosis and treatment of patients with abnormal movements. PMID:27643901

  9. [Movement disorders in David Copperfield].

    PubMed

    Garćia Ruiz, P J; Gulliksen, L L

    1999-01-01

    Charles Dickens' novels are a source of vivid neurological descriptions. Besides Pickwickian syndrome, many other neurological descriptions can be found in Dickens' novels. David Copperfield contains several characters with movement disorders including generalized dystonia (Mr. Uriah Heep), restless legs syndrome (the waiter), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr. Creakle). These neurological descriptions an probably based on the observation of actual patients. PMID:10570623

  10. [Clinical features of spastic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu S; Golubev, V L; Debrianskaia, M B

    1995-01-01

    Clinical, neurological, endoscopic, psychological findings, questionnaire data on vegetative sphere, diaphragm x-ray, articulation test and Viene test system evidence obtained on 25 patients with phonic spasm confirm organic neurological nature of spastic dysphonia as focal muscular dystonia. This condition can be accompanied with tremor, rotatory, winking and writers' spasms, oromandibular dystonia. As indicated by positive treatment outcomes, combined treatment of phonic spasm with GABA-ergic drugs of clonazepam (antelepsin) and baclofen, orthophonic voice correction, physiotherapy is pathogenetically justified.

  11. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular. PMID:27695243

  12. Concomitant Appearance of Pisa Syndrome and Striatal Hand in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay; Mehndiratta, Manmohan

    2011-01-01

    Pisa syndrome is (PS) usually seen in patients receiving antipsychotic drugs and characterised by lateral flexion of trunk and axial dystonia. It is believed that antipsychotic drugs lead to dopamine blockage causing PS. We describe a Parkinson’s disease patient who was doing well with levodopa/carbidopa for 3 years and developed lateral flexion of trunk. His abnormal posture used to completely improve upon lying down position. He also had striatal hand deformity suggestive of focal dystonia. PMID:24868401

  13. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular.

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Associated with Underlying Ataxia Syndromes: A Case Series and Discussion of Issues

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Genko; Thompson, Amanda; Foote, Kelly D.; Limotai, Natlada; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Maling, Nicholas; Malaty, Irene A.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Subramony, Sankarasubramoney H.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been utilized to treat various symptoms in patients suffering from movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor. Though ataxia syndromes have not been formally or frequently addressed with DBS, there are patients with ataxia and associated medication refractory tremor or dystonia who may potentially benefit from therapy. Methods A retrospective database review was performed, searching for cases of ataxia where tremor and/or dystonia were addressed by utilizing DBS at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration between 2008 and 2011. Five patients were found who had DBS implantation to address either medication refractory tremor or dystonia. The patient's underlying diagnoses included spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), fragile X associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a case of idiopathic ataxia (ataxia not otherwise specified [NOS]), spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17), and a senataxin mutation (SETX). Results DBS improved medication refractory tremor in the SCA2 and the ataxia NOS patients. The outcome for the FXTAS patient was poor. DBS improved dystonia in the SCA17 and SETX patients, although dystonia did not improve in the lower extremities of the SCA17 patient. All patients reported a transient gait dysfunction postoperatively, and there were no reports of improvement in ataxia-related symptoms. Discussion DBS may be an option to treat tremor, inclusive of dystonic tremor in patients with underlying ataxia; however, gait and other symptoms may possibly be worsened. PMID:25120941

  15. Mitochondrial RNase P RNAs in ascomycete fungi: lineage-specific variations in RNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Seif, Elias R; Forget, Lise; Martin, Nancy C; Lang, B Franz

    2003-09-01

    The RNA subunit of mitochondrial RNase P (mtP-RNA) is encoded by a mitochondrial gene (rnpB) in several ascomycete fungi and in the protists Reclinomonas americana and Nephroselmis olivacea. By searching for universally conserved structural elements, we have identified previously unknown rnpB genes in the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of two fission yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Schizosaccharomyces octosporus; in the budding yeast Pichia canadensis; and in the archiascomycete Taphrina deformans. The expression of mtP-RNAs of the predicted size was experimentally confirmed in the two fission yeasts, and their precise 5' and 3' ends were determined by sequencing of cDNAs generated from circularized mtP-RNAs. Comparative RNA secondary structure modeling shows that in contrast to mtP-RNAs of the two protists R. americana and N. olivacea, those of ascomycete fungi all have highly reduced secondary structures. In certain budding yeasts, such as Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, we find only the two most conserved pairings, P1 and P4. A P18 pairing is conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives, whereas nearly half of the minimum bacterial consensus structure is retained in the RNAs of fission yeasts, Aspergillus nidulans and Taphrina deformans. The evolutionary implications of the reduction of mtP-RNA structures in ascomycetes will be discussed.

  16. Effects of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koy, Anne; Hellmich, Martin; Pauls, K Amande M; Marks, Warren; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fricke, Oliver; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Secondary dystonia encompasses a heterogeneous group with different etiologies. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory. There are only limited data on the therapeutic outcomes of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The published literature regarding deep brain stimulation and secondary dystonia was reviewed in a meta-analysis to reevaluate the effect on cerebral palsy. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was chosen as the primary outcome measure. Outcome over time was evaluated and summarized by mixed-model repeated-measures analysis, paired Student t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Twenty articles comprising 68 patients with cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation assessed by the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale were identified. Most articles were case reports reflecting great variability in the score and duration of follow-up. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was 64.94 ± 25.40 preoperatively and dropped to 50.5 ± 26.77 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 23.6% (P < .001) at a median follow-up of 12 months. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale disability score was 18.54 ± 6.15 preoperatively and 16.83 ± 6.42 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 9.2% (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between severity of dystonia and clinical outcome (P < .05). Deep brain stimulation can be an effective treatment option for dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In view of the heterogeneous data, a prospective study with a large cohort of patients in a standardized setting with a multidisciplinary approach would be helpful in further evaluating the role of deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Striatal cholinergic interneurons in isolated generalized dystonia—rationale and perspectives for stem cell-derived cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Capetian, Philipp; Pauly, Martje Gesine; Azmitia, Luis Manuel; Klein, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Interneurons comprise a minority of the striatal neuronal population of roughly 5%. However, this heterogeneous population is of particular interest as it fulfills an important relay function in modulating the output of the only type of striatal projection neurons, i.e., the medium spiny neuron (MSN).One subtype of this heterogenous group, the cholinergic interneuron, is of particular scientific interest as there is a relevant body of evidence from animal models supporting its special significance in the disease process. The development of protocols for directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) into striatal interneurons provides a unique opportunity to derive in vitro those cell types that are most severely affected in dystonia.In this review we first aim to give a concise overview about the normal function of striatal interneurons and their dysfunction in dystonia in order to identify the most relevant interneuronal subtype for the pathogenesis of dystonia. Secondly we demonstrate how knowledge about the embryonic development of striatal interneurons is of particular help for the development of differentiation protocols from PSC and by this depict potential ways of deriving in vitro disease models of dystonia. We furthermore address the question as to whether cell replacement therapies might represent a beneficial approach for the treatment of dystonia. PMID:25120431

  18. TorsinA hypofunction causes abnormal twisting movements and sensorimotor circuit neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chun-Chi; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Jou, Stephanie; Chi, Frank; Dauer, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Lack of a preclinical model of primary dystonia that exhibits dystonic-like twisting movements has stymied identification of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of the disease. The classical familial form of primary dystonia is caused by the DYT1 (ΔE) mutation in TOR1A, which encodes torsinA, AAA+ ATPase resident in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticular/nuclear envelope. Here, we found that conditional deletion of Tor1a in the CNS (nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/–) or isolated CNS expression of DYT1 mutant torsinA (nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/ΔE) causes striking abnormal twisting movements. These animals developed perinuclear accumulation of ubiquitin and the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1 in discrete sensorimotor regions, followed by neurodegeneration that was substantially milder in nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/ΔE compared with nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/– animals. Similar to the neurodevelopmental onset of DYT1 dystonia in humans, the behavioral and histopathological abnormalities emerged and became fixed during CNS maturation in the murine models. Our results establish a genetic model of primary dystonia that is overtly symptomatic, and link torsinA hypofunction to neurodegeneration and abnormal twisting movements. These findings provide a cellular and molecular framework for how impaired torsinA function selectively disrupts neural circuits and raise the possibility that discrete foci of neurodegeneration may contribute to the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24937429

  19. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD. PMID:27143711

  20. Clinical, motor, and biological correlates of depressive disorders after focal subcortical lesions.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, E C; Jackson, J G; Price, S T; Wilson, A N; Kirsh, A D; Dever, G E

    1997-01-01

    The authors studied depression after focal subcortical lesions (SCLs) in 45 highly selected subjects. Secondary major depression (secondary MD) occurred in 20.0%, depressive disorder NOS (secondary DDNOS) in 4.4%, and secondary dysthymia in 0.0%. secondary MD after SCLs was associated with pallidal lesions (88.9%) and dystonia without geste antagonistique; subjects with secondary DDNOS had nigrotegmental lesions and parkinsonism. Depressive severity after SCLs correlated positively with severity of parkinsonism and dystonia. Pallidal lesions disrupting neurotransmitter systems and pallidothalamic and parietal input to the frontal lobe may lead to secondary MD, whereas nigrotegmental lesions may predispose to secondary MD forme fruste (secondary DDNOS) through disruption of mesocortical frontal or nigrostriatal dopamine tracts. Patients should be closely followed over several years for depression after such lesions, especially when accompanied by parkinsonism or dystonia without geste antagonistique.

  1. A subtle mimicker in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Maria Vittoria De; Giacomo, Roberta Di; Muzio, Antonio Di; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Movement disorder emergencies include any movement disorder which develops over hours to days, in which failure to appropriately diagnose and manage can result in patient morbidity or mortality. Movement disorder emergencies include acute dystonia: sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements. Acute dystonia is a serious challenge for emergency room doctors and neurologists, because of the high probability of misdiagnosis, due to the presence of several mimickers including partial seizures, meningitis, localized tetanus, serum electrolyte level abnormalities, strychnine poisoning, angioedema, malingering, catatonia, and conversion. Methods: We describe 2 examples, accompanied by videos, of acute drug-induced oro-mandibular dystonia, both subsequent to occasional haloperidol intake. Results: Management and treatment of this movement disorder are often difficult: neuroleptics withdrawal, treatment with benzodiazepines, and anticholinergics are recommended. Conclusion: Alternative treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27741141

  2. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis – a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  3. Use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of patients with neurological disorders: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Smania, Nicola; Colosimo, Carlo; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Sandrini, Giorgio; Picelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this survey was to provide an overview of important issues relating to therapeutic strategies based on botulinum toxin type A injection for the treatment of patients with neurological disorders. Two hundred and ten physicians from neurology and neurorehabilitation units in Italian hospitals answered a questionnaire exploring some clinical aspects of the use of botulinum toxin type A in patients with spasticity/dystonia. 66% of the physicians treated patients with dystonia, 80% treated adults with spasticity, and 35% treated children with cerebral palsy. Palpation with no instrumental guidance was the injection technique most commonly used for treating patients with dystonia, spasticity and cerebral palsy; 57% of the physicians evaluated patients instrumentally before toxin injection, while 45% assessed post-injection improvements by instrumental means; 78% of the physicians prescribed (when appropriate) rehabilitation procedures after toxin injection. Our results seem to show that the routine use of botulinum toxin in clinics is far from standardized. PMID:24598392

  4. [Tuberculous sacroiliitis in a patient with Gaucher disease].

    PubMed

    Lukina, E A; Mamonov, V E; Lukina, K A; Khomenko, V A; Pisetskiĭ, M M; Iatsyk, G A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited enzymatic defect resulting from a deficiency of acid [3-glucosidase, a lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of cell metabolic products. The major clinical manifestations of GD are hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, and bony involvement varying from asymptomatic osteopenia to severest osteoporosis and ischemic necrosis to develop irreversible orthopedic defects. Timely enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant glucosidase makes it possible to arrest disease progression and to prevent damage to the vital organs. However, GD in adult patients is frequently diagnosed in the presence of occurring osteoarticular lesions (arthrosis deformans, abnormal fractures). In these instances, besides enzyme replacement therapy, high-quality orthopedic care is required. The description of the case history of a patient undergoing splenectomy in childhood is given as a clinical example of severe osteoarticular lesion in GD and complex differential diagnosis with the intercurrent disease extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24137954

  5. Comparative genomics of Taphrina fungi causing varying degrees of tumorous deformity in plants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Isheng J; Tanaka, Eiji; Masuya, Hayato; Tanaka, Ryusei; Hirooka, Yuuri; Endoh, Rikiya; Sahashi, Norio; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-04-01

    Taphrina fungi are biotrophic plant pathogens that cause plant deformity diseases. We sequenced the genomes of four Taphrina species-Taphrina wiesneri, T. deformans, T. flavorubra, and T. populina-which parasitize Prunus, Cerasus, and Populus hosts with varying severity of disease symptoms. High levels of gene synteny within Taphrina species were observed, and our comparative analysis further revealed that these fungi may utilize multiple strategies in coping with the host environment that are also found in some specialized dimorphic species. These include species-specific aneuploidy and clusters of highly diverged secreted proteins located at subtelomeres. We also identified species differences in plant hormone biosynthesis pathways, which may contribute to varying degree of disease symptoms. The genomes provide a rich resource for investigation into Taphrina biology and evolutionary studies across the basal ascomycetes clade. PMID:24682155

  6. Pathology in skeletons of Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis from southern South America.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Analía A; Macnie, Silvina V; Goodall, R Natalie P; Boy, Claudia C

    2016-06-15

    Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis is frequently seen off the coast of southern South America, where it feeds among coastal kelp beds and occasionally strands. We searched for macroscopic evidence of skeletal lesions in 78 specimens of Peale's dolphin from 2 museum collections, which contain almost all of the species' skeletons known in collections worldwide. Thirty-two specimens (41%) had some type of osteological abnormalities. In 21 cases (66%), congenital deformations were the most predominant abnormality found. Acquired lesions included (1) induced trauma: abnormal curvature (n=5 specimens) and fractures (n=2); (2) infectious diseases: spondylo-osteomyelitis (n=3); and (3) degenerative diseases: exostoses (n=8) and spondylosis deformans (n=4). It is noteworthy that all of these animals died incidentally in gillnet entanglement and were presumably healthy at the time of death. The effect that different osseous lesions may have on an animal's quality of life may depend on the area of the spine affected and the number of vertebrae involved.

  7. A case report of cemento-ossifying fibroma.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Hashmi G; Jindal, M K; Ahmad, Samshad

    2010-06-01

    The concept of 'fibro-osseous lesions' of bone evolved over the last several decades to include two major entities: fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma as well as the other less common lesions such as florid osseous dysplasia, periapical dysplasia, focal sclerosing osteomyelitis, proliferative periostitis of garrie and ostitis deformans. The cemento-ossifying fibroma is a central neoplasm of bone as well as periodontium which has caused considerable controversy because of confusion of terminology and criteria of diagnosis. The cemento-ossifying fibroma is odontogenic in origin where as ossifying fibroma of bony origin. This article reports a case of an 11-year-old male who came to us with the history of swelling at the maxillary anterior region causing difficulty in closing of mouth as well as mastication.

  8. Management of aripiprazole-induced tardive Pisa syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Pettorruso, Mauro; Di Nicola, Marco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Pisa syndrome (PS) is characterized by an abnormally sustained posture with flexion of the body and head to one side and slight axial rotation of the trunk. PS has been related to the use of neuroleptics and is clinically classified as either an acute or a tardive dystonia. This is the first report describing a case of late-onset PS, occurring in a young patient treated with aripiprazole for 2 years. To establish optimal treatment management, we reviewed the literature on aripiprazole-induced PS and tardive dystonia. In light of current knowledge, we proposed a multistep algorithm to aid in the clinical management of this condition.

  9. Sensory trick with metoclopramide-associated tardive tremor.

    PubMed

    Shprecher, David

    2012-01-01

    Tardive tremor is a 3-5 Hz bilateral resting and action tremor, associated with the use of dopamine receptor blocking drugs, accompanied by other tardive movement disorders and responsive to tetrabenazine or clozapine. We describe a case of a sensory trick associated with tardive tremor which raises important points about semiology and management. First, the presence of a sensory trick with tardive limb tremor suggests that the disorder may be a form of dystonia. Second, further study of osteopathic manipulative therapy for treatment of dystonia or tardive tremor is supported by a symptomatic response observed in our case.

  10. Adult onset asymmetric upper limb tremor misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease: A clinical and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Ruge, Diane; Edwards, Mark J; Terranova, Carmen; Katschnig, Petra; Carrillo, Fatima; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Dickson, John; Lees, Andrew J; Quinn, Niall; Mir, Pablo; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-01-01

    Summary Approximately 10% of subjects thought clinically to have early Parkinson’s disease (PD) have normal dopaminergic functional imaging (SWEDDs – Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficit). SWEDDs are a heterogeneous group. Here we aimed to delineate clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of a distinct subgroup of SWEDDs patients from PD and to clarify the underlying pathophysiology of this subgroup as a form of parkinsonism or dystonia. Therefore we compared clinical details of 25 patients referred with a diagnosis of tremor-dominant PD but with normal DaT SPECT scans (SWEDDs) with 12 tremor-dominant PD patients with abnormal DaT SPECT scans. We performed tremor analysis using accelerometry in the following patients with 1) SWEDDs, 2) PD, 3) primary segmental dystonia with dystonic limb tremor and 4) essential tremor (ET). We used transcranial magnetic stimulation with a facilitatory paired associative stimulation (PAS) paradigm to test if sensorimotor plasticity in SWEDDs resembled the pattern seen in PD, dystonia or ET. Although PD and SWEDDs patients shared several clinical features, the lack of true bradykinesia, occurrence of dystonia, and position- and task-specificity of tremor favoured a diagnosis of SWEDDs, whereas re-emergent tremor, true fatiguing or decrement, good response to dopaminergic drugs as well as presence of nonmotor symptoms made PD more likely. Basic tremor parameters overlapped between SWEDDs, PD, segmental dystonia and ET. However, a combination of re-emergent tremor and highest tremor amplitude in the resting condition was characteristic of PD tremor, while SWEDDs, dystonia and ET subjects had the highest tremor amplitude during action. Both SWEDDs and segmental dystonia patients exhibited an exaggerated pattern of sensorimotor plasticity in response to the PAS paradigm, with spread of excitation to an adjacent hand muscle. In contrast, PD patients showed no response to PAS, and the response of ET patients was no

  11. Perioperative use of botulinum toxin for movement disorder-induced cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, C H; Zimmerman, R S; Lyons, M K; Simeone, F; Brin, M F

    1996-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia or tics of the nuchal muscles can develop serious cervical spine disease. We report a series of four patients who received botulinum toxin injections to control their movement disorders prior to their required surgery. One patient with cervical tic-induced radiculomyelopathy required botulinum toxin injection postoperatively to facilitate stabilization of the cervical fusion. Two patients with torticollis-induced cervical radiculomyelopathy, and one patient with dystonia-induced C5 fracture, had botulinum toxin injected preoperatively to facilitate postoperative recovery. Botulinum toxin appears to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of cervical movement disorders prior to or following surgery for associated cervical spine disease.

  12. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  13. Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] KNOPE1, a class 1 KNOX orthologue to Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNAT1, is misexpressed during hyperplasia of leaf curl disease.

    PubMed

    Testone, Giulio; Bruno, Leonardo; Condello, Emiliano; Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Alessandro; Mele, Giovanni; Tartarini, Andrea; Spanò, Laura; Innocenti, Anna Maria; Mariotti, Domenico; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice; Giannino, Donato

    2008-01-01

    Class 1 KNOTTED-like (KNOX) transcription factors control cell meristematic identity. An investigation was carried out to determine whether they maintain this function in peach plants and might act in leaf curliness caused by the ascomycete Taphrina deformans. KNOPE1 function was assessed by overexpression in Arabidopsis and by yeast two-hybrid assays with Arabidopsis BELL proteins. Subsequently, KNOPE1 mRNA and zeatin localization was monitored during leaf curl disease. KNOPE1 and Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) proteins fell into the same phyletic group and recognized the same BELL factors. 35S:KNOPE1 Arabidopsis lines exhibited altered traits resembling those of BP-overexpressing lines. In peach shoot apical meristem, KNOPE1 was expressed in the peripheral and central zones but not in leaf primordia, identically to the BP expression pattern. These results strongly suggest that KNOPE1 must be down-regulated for leaf initiation and that it can control cell meristem identity equally as well as all class 1 KNOX genes. Leaves attacked by T. deformans share histological alterations with class 1 KNOX-overexpressing leaves, including cell proliferation and loss of cell differentiation. Both KNOPE1 and a cytokinin synthesis ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE gene were found to be up-regulated in infected curled leaves. At early disease stages, KNOPE1 was uniquely triggered in the palisade cells interacting with subepidermal mycelium, while zeatin vascular localization was unaltered compared with healthy leaves. Subsequently, when mycelium colonization and asci development occurred, both KNOPE1 and zeatin signals were scattered in sectors of cell disorders. These results suggest that KNOPE1 misexpression and de novo zeatin synthesis of host origin might participate in hyperplasia of leaf curl disease.

  14. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  15. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  16. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  17. [Abnormal movements. Historical notes].

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, P J

    Most of the knowledge about movement disorders comes from the last fifty years. However, the ancients made some remarkable neurological depictions. We still can find some neurological descriptions including Parkinson's disease in the Bible, and the ancient writings of Atreya and Susruta. In addition, classic tests provide us of valuable information on historical personages, including the dystonia of Alexander the Great.

  18. Neurologic aspects of spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, D B; Donovan, D T; Sulek, M; Viswanath, N S; Inbody, G P; Nudelman, H B

    1990-08-01

    We discuss the etiology of 100 spasmodic dysphonia patients. Seventy-one patients had underlying essential tremor, 25 had Meige's syndrome, 12 were hypothyroid, and 27 had either a functional disturbance or focal dystonia. Six patients had intermittent breathy dysphonia. A large corpus of spasmodic dysphonia patients have organic neurolaryngeal disease.

  19. Kinematic and Electromyographic Tools for Characterizing Movement Disorders in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scholle, Hans C.; Jinnah, H. A.; Arnold, Dirk; Biedermann, Frank H. W.; Faenger, Bernd; Grassme, Roland; Hess, Ellen J.; Schumann, Nikolaus P.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing interest in rodent models for movement disorders has led to an increasing need for more accurate and precise methods for both delineating the nature of abnormal movements and measuring their severity. These studies describe application of simultaneous high-speed video kinematics with multi-channel EMG to characterize the movement disorder exhibited by tottering mutant mice. These mice provide a uniquely valuable model because they exhibit paroxysmal dystonia superimposed on mild baseline ataxia, permitting the examination of these two different problems within the same animals. At baseline with mild ataxia, the mutants exhibited poorly coordinated movements with increased variation of stance and swing times, and slower spontaneous walking velocities. The corresponding EMG showed reduced mean amplitudes of biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL), and poorly modulated EMG activities during the step cycle. Attacks of paroxysmal dystonia were preceded by trains of EMG bursts with doublets and triplets simultaneously in the BF and VL followed by more sustained co-activation. These EMG characteristics are consistent with the clinical phenomenology of the motor phenotype of tottering mice as a baseline of mild ataxia with intermittent attacks of paroxysmal dystonia. The EMG characteristics of ataxia and dystonia in the tottering mice also are consistent with EMG studies of other ataxic or dystonic animals and humans. These studies provide insights into how these methods can be used for delineating movement disorders in mice, and for how they may be compared with similar disorders of humans. PMID:20077474

  20. Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabas, Gabor, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This special edition explores the serious genetic disorder, Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND), which is characterized by severe dystonia, spasticity, speech impairment, renal disease, varying degrees of cognitive deficit, and, especially, compulsive self-injury. The information provided is based on experience at the Matheny School and Hospital (New…

  1. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n = 461), segmental (n = 68), or generalized dystonia (n = 38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  2. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n=461), segmental (n=68), or generalized dystonia (n=38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  3. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  4. Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy: Benefits and Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdolsek, Helena Aniansson; Olesch, Christine; Antolovich, Giuliana; Reddihough, Dinah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spasticity and dystonia in children with cerebral palsy has been treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (RCH) since 1999. Methods: The records of children having received or still receiving ITB during the period September 1999 until August 2005 were studied to evaluate…

  5. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the…

  6. Profile of extrapyramidal manifestations in 85 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Netravathi, M; Purushottam, Meera; Jain, Sanjeev; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and type of extrapyramidal signs (EPS) in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 1, 2 and 3. Eighty-five patients with genetically confirmed SCA (SCA1=40, SCA2=28, SCA3=17) were evaluated for the prevalence and types of EPS. Forty-one SCA patients (48.2%) had one or more types of EPS. The prevalence of EPS was 60.7% in SCA2, 52.9% in SCA3, and 37.5% in SCA1. Among SCA2 patients, bradykinesia was the most frequent (35.3%), followed by reduced facial expression, postural tremor and dystonia (29.4% each), rest tremor, titubation and rigidity (23.5% each), and lip/jaw tremor and chorea (11.8% each). In SCA3 the common EPS were bradykinesia (44.4%), staring look, postural tremor and dystonia (33.3% each), and reduced facial expression and rigidity (22.2% each). In SCA1, staring look was the most common (53.3%), followed by dystonia and bradykinesia (33.3% each), and postural tremor (26.7%). In all three groups, there was no significant difference in the mean length of repeat of the abnormal allele between those with and without EPS. To conclude bradykinesia, staring look, dystonia and postural tremor were the most frequent EPS observed in SCA. In SCA1, these signs were seen more often in younger patients with early onset of symptoms.

  7. A Mutation Affecting the Sodium/Proton Exchanger, "SLC9A6," Causes Mental Retardation with Tau Deposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbern, James Y.; Neumann, Manuela; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Feldman, Gerald; Norris, Joy W.; Friez, Michael J.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Stevenson, Roger; Sima, Anders A. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied a family with severe mental retardation characterized by the virtual absence of speech, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, late-onset ataxia, weakness and dystonia. Post-mortem examination of two males revealed widespread neuronal loss, with the most striking finding being neuronal and glial tau deposition in a pattern reminiscent…

  8. Genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing other movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Nicola; Tai, Yen F

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will discuss the contributions of structural and functional imaging to the diagnosis and management of genetic and degenerative diseases that lead to the occurrence of movement disorders. We will mainly focus on Huntington's disease, Wilson's disease, dystonia, and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, as they are the more commonly encountered clinical conditions within this group. PMID:27432681

  9. Atlas-based functional radiosurgery: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Stancanello, J.; Romanelli, P.; Pantelis, E.; Sebastiano, F.; Modugno, N.

    2009-02-15

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as dystonia and neuropathic pain, may respond poorly to medical therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) may alleviate dystonia and neuropathic pain, respectively. A noninvasive alternative to DBS is radiosurgical ablation [internal pallidotomy (IP) and medial thalamotomy (MT)]. The main technical limitation of radiosurgery is that targets are selected only on the basis of MRI anatomy, without electrophysiological confirmation. This means that, to be feasible, image-based targeting must be highly accurate and reproducible. Here, we report on the feasibility of an atlas-based approach to targeting for functional radiosurgery. In this method, masks of the GPi, CMN, and medio-dorsal nucleus were nonrigidly registered to patients' T1-weighted MRI (T1w-MRI) and superimposed on patients' T2-weighted MRI (T2w-MRI). Radiosurgical targets were identified on the T2w-MRI registered to the planning CT by an expert functional neurosurgeon. To assess its feasibility, two patients were treated with the CyberKnife using this method of targeting; a patient with dystonia received an IP (120 Gy prescribed to the 65% isodose) and a patient with neuropathic pain received a MT (120 Gy to the 77% isodose). Six months after treatment, T2w-MRIs and contrast-enhanced T1w-MRIs showed edematous regions around the lesions; target placements were reevaluated by DW-MRIs. At 12 months post-treatment steroids for radiation-induced edema and medications for dystonia and neuropathic pain were suppressed. Both patients experienced significant relief from pain and dystonia-related problems. Fifteen months after treatment edema had disappeared. Thus, this work shows promising feasibility of atlas-based functional radiosurgery to improve patient condition. Further investigations are indicated for optimizing treatment dose.

  10. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  11. Preserved dichotomy but highly irregular and burst discharge in the basal ganglia in alert dystonic rats at rest.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Deepak; Chaniary, Kunal D; Baron, Mark S

    2015-10-22

    Despite its prevalence, the underlying pathophysiology of dystonia remains poorly understood. Using our novel tri-component classification algorithm, extracellular neuronal activity in the globus pallidus (GP), STN, and the entopeduncular nucleus (EP) was characterized in 34 normal and 25 jaundiced dystonic Gunn rats with their heads restrained while at rest. In normal rats, neurons in each nucleus were similarly characterized by two physiologically distinct types: regular tonic with moderate discharge frequencies (mean rates in GP, STN and EP ranging from 35-41 spikes/s) or irregular at slower frequencies (17-20 spikes/s), with a paucity of burst activity. In dystonic rats, these nuclei were also characterized by two distinct principal neuronal patterns. However, in marked difference, in the dystonic rats, neurons were primarily slow and highly irregular (12-15 spikes/s) or burst predominant (14-17 spikes/s), with maintained modest differences between nuclei. In GP and EP, with increasing severity of dystonia, burstiness was moderately further increased, irregularity mildly further increased, and discharge rates mildly further reduced. In contrast, these features did not appreciably change in STN with worsening dystonia. Findings of a lack of bursting in GP, STN and EP in normal rats in an alert resting state and prominent bursting in dystonic Gunn rats suggest that cortical or other external drive is normally required for bursting in these nuclei and that spontaneous bursting, as seen in dystonia and Parkinson's disease, is reflective of an underlying pathophysiological state. Moreover, the extent of burstiness appears to most closely correlate with the severity of the dystonia.

  12. Successful treatment of posttraumatic hemiballismus with intrathecal baclofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Gerard E

    2006-09-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy is widely used in the management of spastic hypertonia and dystonia resulting from a multitude of conditions that present with upper motor neuron syndrome signs, such as cerebral palsy, stroke, brain and spinal injuries, and multiple sclerosis. We report successful management of posttraumatic hemiballismus and dystonia with ITB in a 43-yr-old man who sustained a traumatic brain injury secondary to an assault in 1978. He subsequently developed hemiballismus in the right lower limb and dystonia of the distal right upper limb spreading proximally to involve the shoulder. The ballistic movement of the lower limb was severe enough to cause the patient to fall out of his chair and limit his ability to perform activities of daily living safely. He had been on various oral medications and received botulinum toxin and phenol injections, but none alleviated the symptoms. The patient elected to receive the ITB pump. Before ITB, he had an average of 10-12 ballism episodes of the right lower limb per hour. During observed episodes, the right hip would flex up to about 90 degrees, with a fully extended knee. After ITB pump implantation and upward dose titration, the frequency of ballistic right leg movements decreased to about three per day, and the right hip flexed to only 30 degrees. In addition, there was increased ability to isolate individual distal joint movements in the right lower limb. The patient currently receives 202.4 microg/day ITB and continues to benefit almost 6 yrs after ITB pump implantation. This report highlights the emerging role of ITB in managing movement disorders other than dystonia spastic hypertonia and dystonia. PMID:16924190

  13. Cervical neuro-muscular syndrome: discovery of a new disease group caused by abnormalities in the cervical muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takayoshi; Ii, Kunio; Hojo, Shuntaro; Sano, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study of whiplash injury found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause autonomic dystonia. Further research has found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause headache, chronic fatigue syndrome, vertigo, and dizziness. We named this group of diseases cervical neuro-muscular syndrome. Patients treated within a 2-year period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2004 reported good outcomes in 83.8% for headache, 88.4% for vertigo and dizziness, 84.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome, 88.0% for autonomic dystonia, and 83.7% for whiplash-associated disorder. A large number of outpatients present with general malaise, including many general physical complaints without identifiable cause. We propose that treatment of the cervical muscle is effective for general malaise.

  14. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  15. Pseudodystonic hand posturing contralateral to a metastasis of the parietal association cortex.

    PubMed

    Coria, F; Blanco Martín, A I; Rivas Vilas, M D

    2000-10-01

    A 56 year-old patient, with a history of surgically removed breast cancer three years earlier, presented with incoordination of hand movements while playing piano. Neurological examination disclosed mild position sensory loss and limb-kinetic apraxia of the distal part of the right upper extremity. The most conspicuous neurological sign was a dystonic posturing of the right hand, which was only elicited when the patient outstretched her arms with the eyes closed. MRI revealed a metastatic lesion involving the left parietal cortex. The association of focal dystonic postures with lesions of the parietal association cortex indicates that dystonia may feature damage of brain cortical areas far from the basal ganglia. In addition, this provides support to the hypothesis that impairment of sensory pathways may play a role in the origin of some hyperkinetic movement disorders, such as dystonia and athetosis.

  16. Development of an intraoral device for social inclusion of a physically disabled patient.

    PubMed

    de Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Díaz-Serrano, Kranya Victoria; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Mantovani, Carolina Paes Torres; De Rossi, Andiara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the use of an intraoral assistive technology for a patient with idiopathic generalized muscular dystonia, presenting temporomandibular disorder and severe anterior tooth mobility and diastema. A multidisciplinary team developed an intraoral device to provide typing and painting functions, and promote relaxation of masticatory muscles without compromising the teeth and supporting tissue structures. The occlusal splint associated with the device promoted muscle relaxation and relief of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction, in this case with generalized muscle dystonia, allowing typing and painting with her mouth without causing tooth mobility or occlusal alteration. This intraoral device has low cost, easy adaptation and was efficient in TMD symptoms. Furthermore, the patient returned to her rehabilitation allowing performance of her duties without compromising dental structures, facilitating the social and the digital inclusion.

  17. Meige's Syndrome: Rare Neurological Disorder Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    PubMed

    Debadatta, Mohapatra; Mishra, Ajay K

    2013-07-01

    Meige's syndrome is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm. Its pathophysiology is not clearly determined. A 35-year-old female presented to psychiatric department with blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia with clinical provisional diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (Conversion Disorder). After thorough physical examination including detailed neurological exam and psychiatric evaluation no formal medical or psychiatric diagnosis could be made. The other differential diagnoses of extra pyramidal symptom, tardive dyskinesia, conversion disorder, anxiety disorder were ruled out by formal diagnostic criteria. Consequently with suspicion of Meige's syndrome she was referred to the department of Neurology and the diagnosis was confirmed. Hence, Meige's syndrome could be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder such as conversion disorder or anxiety disorder because clinical features of Meige's syndrome are highly variable and affected by psychological factors and also can be inhibited voluntarily to some extent.

  18. Acute nontraumatic torticollis in a patient with right lower quadrant pain: case report.

    PubMed

    Yaylak, Faik; Zeren, Sezgin; Bayhan, Zülfü; Bademci, Refik; Devir, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    Right lower quadrant pain is one of the most common symptoms of the emergency patients. For accurate diagnosis and treatment; the patients must be questioned and examined very well. Also accompanying conditions due to right lower quadrant pain may be noticed. In this case presentation, we discussed a patient who was presented with right lower quadrant pain and cervical dystonia. By limiting the usage of metoclopramide the patient was followed seamlessly. In this case presentation we want to accentuate that a patient who with abdominal pain may be presented with rare symptoms such of dystonia. In such conditions a detailed anamnesis and physical examination are the first steps of the evaluation to prevent potential hazardous outcomes. In particular, a surgeon must be always carefully while taking history and examining the patient.

  19. Visuo-motor and cognitive procedural learning in children with basal ganglia pathology.

    PubMed

    Mayor-Dubois, C; Maeder, P; Zesiger, P; Roulet-Perez, E

    2010-06-01

    We investigated procedural learning in 18 children with basal ganglia (BG) lesions or dysfunctions of various aetiologies, using a visuo-motor learning test, the Serial Reaction Time (SRT) task, and a cognitive learning test, the Probabilistic Classification Learning (PCL) task. We compared patients with early (<1 year old, n=9), later onset (>6 years old, n=7) or progressive disorder (idiopathic dystonia, n=2). All patients showed deficits in both visuo-motor and cognitive domains, except those with idiopathic dystonia, who displayed preserved classification learning skills. Impairments seem to be independent from the age of onset of pathology. As far as we know, this study is the first to investigate motor and cognitive procedural learning in children with BG damage. Procedural impairments were documented whatever the aetiology of the BG damage/dysfunction and time of pathology onset, thus supporting the claim of very early skill learning development and lack of plasticity in case of damage.

  20. Torsins Are Essential Regulators of Cellular Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grillet, Micheline; Dominguez Gonzalez, Beatriz; Sicart, Adria; Pöttler, Maria; Cascalho, Ana; Billion, Karolien; Hernandez Diaz, Sergio; Swerts, Jef; Naismith, Teresa V; Gounko, Natalia V; Verstreken, Patrik; Hanson, Phyllis I; Goodchild, Rose E

    2016-08-01

    Torsins are developmentally essential AAA+ proteins, and mutation of human torsinA causes the neurological disease DYT1 dystonia. They localize in the ER membranes, but their cellular function remains unclear. We now show that dTorsin is required in Drosophila adipose tissue, where it suppresses triglyceride levels, promotes cell growth, and elevates membrane lipid content. We also see that human torsinA at the inner nuclear membrane is associated with membrane expansion and elevated cellular lipid content. Furthermore, the key lipid metabolizing enzyme, lipin, is mislocalized in dTorsin-KO cells, and dTorsin increases levels of the lipin substrate, phosphatidate, and reduces the product, diacylglycerol. Finally, genetic suppression of dLipin rescues dTorsin-KO defects, including adipose cell size, animal growth, and survival. These findings identify that torsins are essential regulators of cellular lipid metabolism and implicate disturbed lipid biology in childhood-onset DYT1 dystonia. PMID:27453503

  1. Acquisition and reacquisition of motor coordination in musicians.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    Precise control of movement timing plays a key role in musical performance. This motor skill requires coordination across multiple joints and muscles, which is acquired through extensive musical training from childhood. However, extensive training has a potential risk of causing neurological disorders that impair fine motor control, such as task-specific tremor and focal dystonia. Recent technological advances in measurement and analysis of biological data, as well as noninvasive manipulation of neuronal activities, have promoted the understanding of computational and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of dexterous movements through musical practice and rehabilitation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the behavioral and neurophysiological basis of motor virtuosity and disorder in musicians, representative extremes of human motor skill. We also report novel evidence of effects of noninvasive neurorehabilitation that combined transcranial direct-current stimulation and motor rehabilitation over multiple days on musician's dystonia, which offers a promising therapeutic means.

  2. Acute movement disorders in children: experience from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Jatinder Singh

    2015-03-01

    We describe acute movement disorders in 92 children, aged 5 days to 15 years, from an Indian tertiary hospital. Eighty-nine children had hyperkinetic movement disorders, with myoclonus in 25, dystonia in 21, choreoathetosis in 19, tremors in 15, and tics in 2. Tetany and tetanus were seen in 5 and 2 children, respectively. Hypokinetic movement disorders included acute parkinsonism in 3 children. Noninflammatory and inflammatory etiology were present in 60 and 32 children, respectively. Benign neonatal sleep myoclonus in 16 and opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome in 7 accounted for the majority of myoclonus cases. Vitamin B12 deficiency in 13 infants was the most common cause of tremors. Rheumatic fever and encephalitis were the most common causes of acute choreoathetosis. Acute dystonia had metabolic etiology in 6 and encephalitis and drugs in 3 each. Psychogenic movement disorders were seen in 4 cases only, although these patients may be underreported. PMID:25296919

  3. Neurology of musical performance.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart

    2008-08-01

    Performing music at a professional level requires the integration of multimodal sensory and motor information and precise monitoring of the performance via auditory feedback. In the context of Western classical music, musicians are forced to reproduce highly controlled movements almost perfectly with a high reliability. These specialised sensorimotor skills are acquired during extensive training periods over many years. The superior skills of musicians are mirrored in functional and structural plastic adaptations of sensorimotor and auditory systems of the brain. Auditory-sensorimotor integration, for example, is accompanied by rapid modulations of neuronal connectivity in the time range of 20 minutes. Finally, dysfunctional plasticity in musicians, known as musician's dystonia, leads to deterioration of extensively trained fine motor skills. Musician's dystonia may be caused by training induced dysplasticity with pathological fusion of central nervous representations in sensorimotor cortical and subcortical brain regions.

  4. Neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Ney, John P; Joseph, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the current and most neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A), beginning with relevant historical data, neurochemical mechanism at the neuromuscular junction. Current commercial preparations of BoNT-A are reviewed, as are immunologic issues relating to secondary failure of BoNT-A therapy. Clinical uses are summarized with an emphasis on controlled clinical trials (as appropriate), including facial movement disorders, focal neck and limb dystonias, spasticity, hypersecretory syndromes, and pain. PMID:19300614

  5. [Local anesthesia selection algorithm in patients with concomitant somatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Chkadua, T Z; Ivanova, M D; Brusova, L A; Pogabalo, I V; Rassadina, A V; Savvateeva, D M

    2016-01-01

    Clinical analysis of the nasolabial complex in patients suffering of the unilateral cleft lip and palate deformity after cheilorhinoplasty is presented in the article. Functional disorders such as nasal breathe impairment and it's relation to the nasolabial muscle dystonia in the dependency of primary cheilorhinoplasty type are analyzed. The plan of surgical treatment as well as the postoperative rehabilitation using the botulotoxin injections is offered. PMID:27636761

  6. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sweadner, Kathleen J; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T; Snively, Beverly M; Cook, Jared F; Ozelius, Laurie J; Markello, Thomas C; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient's ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  7. FTL mutation in a Chinese pedigree with neuroferritinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wang; Li, Hong-Fu; Zheng, Yi-Cen; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a rare autosomal dominant movement disorder caused by mutations of the FTL gene.(1) It is clinically characterized by adult-onset progressive extrapyramidal syndrome, including chorea, dystonia, and parkinsonism.(2) Brain MRI demonstrates the deposition of iron and ferritin in the basal ganglia.(3) To date, several Caucasian families and 2 Japanese families have been reported worldwide.(2) We present a Chinese neuroferritinopathy pedigree with 5 patients and the FTL mutation. PMID:27158664

  8. Jerky dystonic shoulder following infarction of the posterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    The syndrome of the jerky dystonic hand is recognized as a consequence of infarction of the posterior thalamus. A patient with multiple risk factors for stroke developed jerky dystonia of more proximal involvement, affecting the shoulder and speech, several months after a stroke affecting the posterior thalamic region. The cause for the proximal, rather than distal, upper limb involvement, is unclear, and is not apparent from the distribution of the lesion on neuroimaging. Injections of botulinum toxin significantly improved the symptoms.

  9. Thermography in mass screening investigations of industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehter, A. I.; Ginsburg, L. I.; Traktinsky, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    The role of thermography in screening, directed to diagnose breast diseases, chronic tonsillitis, neurocirculatory dystonia, gall bladder dyskinesia, sinusitis, and to detect the character of influence of harmful factors on workers organisms is studied. The investigations demonstrate a possibility of a successful utilization of thermography in mass prophylactive examinations in order to diagnose these diseases, but the problem of breast tumors diagnostics demands the following investigations.

  10. Using MDEFT MRI Sequences to Target the GPi in DBS Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Jens; Debove, Ines; Lachenmayer, Lenard; Schüpbach, Michael; Oertel, Markus Florian; Wiest, Roland; Pollo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent advances in different MRI sequences have enabled direct visualization and targeting of the Globus pallidus internus (GPi) for DBS surgery. Modified Driven Equilibrium Fourier Transform (MDEFT) MRI sequences provide high spatial resolution and an excellent contrast of the basal ganglia with low distortion. In this study, we investigate if MDEFT sequences yield accurate and reliable targeting of the GPi and compare direct targeting based on MDEFT sequences with atlas-based targeting. Methods 13 consecutive patients considered for bilateral GPi-DBS for dystonia or PD were included in this study. Preoperative targeting of the GPi was performed visually based on MDEFT sequences as well as by using standard atlas coordinates. Postoperative CT imaging was performed to calculate the location of the implanted leads as well as the active electrode(s). The coordinates of both visual and atlas based targets were compared. The stereotactic coordinates of the lead and active electrode(s) were calculated and projected on the segmented GPi. Results On MDEFT sequences the GPi was well demarcated in most patients. Compared to atlas-based planning the mean target coordinates were located significantly more posterior. Subgroup analysis showed a significant difference in the lateral coordinate between dystonia (LAT = 19.33 ± 0.90) and PD patients (LAT = 20.67 ± 1.69). Projected on the segmented preoperative GPi the active contacts of the DBS electrode in both dystonia and PD patients were located in the inferior and posterior part of the structure corresponding to the motor part of the GPi. Conclusions MDEFT MRI sequences provide high spatial resolution and an excellent contrast enabling precise identification and direct visual targeting of the GPi. Compared to atlas-based targeting, it resulted in a significantly different mean location of our target. Furthermore, we observed a significant variability of the target among the PD and dystonia subpopulation suggesting

  11. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sweadner, Kathleen J; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T; Snively, Beverly M; Cook, Jared F; Ozelius, Laurie J; Markello, Thomas C; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient's ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative.

  12. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Snively, Beverly M.; Cook, Jared F.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient’s ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  13. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  14. Quantification of gait in dystonic Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Chaniary, Kunal D; Baron, Mark S; Rice, Ann C; Wetzel, Paul A; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Shapiro, Steven M

    2009-06-15

    Spontaneously jaundiced Gunn rats exposed to sulfadimethoxine develop bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) with hearing loss and dystonia, closely resembling the human syndrome. We recently characterized the electromyographic activity in this animal model supporting our clinical impression of dystonia. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, non-invasive method to quantify the motor deficits in dystonic rodents. On postnatal day 16, Gunn rats were treated with 100mg/kg of sulfadimethoxine or saline. On postnatal day 31, the ventral view of the animals was videotaped while the animals walked inside a Plexiglas chamber. Individual video frames were reviewed and specific gait parameters including hindlimb spread, step length ratio variability, stance/swing ratio and walking speed were compared between dystonic and non-dystonic jaundiced and non-jaundiced littermates. Data analysis demonstrated statistically significant increases in hindlimb spread and step length ratio variability and decreases in walking speed in dystonic animals as compared to controls. This study demonstrates a valuable technique to objectively characterize dystonia in Gunn rats, which could have wide use for other experimental movement disorders as well. PMID:19464517

  15. Motor control investigation of dystonic cerebral palsy: A pilot study of passive knee trajectory.

    PubMed

    Androwis, Ghaith J; Michael, Peter A; Jewaid, Darine; Nolan, Karen J; Strongwater, Allan; Foulds, Richard A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand dystonia in CP and be able to objectively distinguish between individuals who experience spasticity, dystonia, or a combination of these conditions while evaluating the effect of 2Hz vestibular stimulation. Selected outcome measures included knee ROM, angular velocity and acceleration and all measures increased post vestibular stimulation; these results are indications of a possible reduction in the level of disability. The current investigation also identified an unexpected and unique behavior of the knee in children with dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) that was noticed while administering the Pendulum Knee Drop test (PKD) at approximately 0.4 rad (a mid-angle between full extension and zero vertical). There was a catch-like phenomenon at the described mid-angle in dystonic individuals. These results may suggest that dystonia is not a velocity dependent hypersensitivity of reflexes, but may include position dependent muscle reflexes and co-contractions. This reinforces the need for a more precise objective measure or perhaps a modified measure such as a mid-angle PKD test. Furthermore, based on the results obtained through the modified technique, beneficial alterations can be made to the form of treatment such as: robotic therapy or physical therapy that specifically accommodates the unique motor control disorder in individuals with dystonic CP. PMID:26737309

  16. Enhanced P1-N1 auditory evoked potential in patients with musicians' cramp.

    PubMed

    Lim, Vanessa K; Bradshaw, John L; Nicholls, Michael E R; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2005-12-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were examined in patients with musician's cramp (focal dystonia) in order to determine whether these patients have electrophysiological changes in a sensory system that is not usually associated with symptoms. All participants were professional guitarists and were required to listen to 2,000 monaurally presented stimuli (middle C, with duration of 7 ms). During one block, 250 stimuli were presented to one ear. Once a block was finished, another block was presented in the other ear; in total there were eight blocks of stimuli. During this task, EEGs from 10 scalp electrodes and one bipolar eye channel were continuously recorded. There were no significant latency or topographical differences in the electrophysiological recordings. However, there was a significant group difference in the peak-to-peak amplitude of the P1-N1a component. The patients had a larger peak-to-peak difference than controls (1.63 vs. 0.62 microV). The P1 and N1a are cortically generated potentials. Patients with focal dystonia had an increase in activity compared to controls when processing simple auditory stimuli. Such changes in electrophysiological responses may be a result of increases in excitation or lack of inhibition; alternatively the changes may represent cross-modal maladaptive plasticity from the somatosensory modality to the auditory modality. Thus, this study provides further evidence that patients with focal dystonia have alterations of the central nervous system that are not limited to their symptomatic sensory domain.

  17. Increase of glucose consumption in basal ganglia, thalamus and frontal cortex of patients with spasmodic torticollis

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, F.; Bressi, S.; Antoni, M.

    1994-05-01

    The pathophysiology of spasmodic torticollis, a focal dystonia involving neck muscles, is still unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed either an increase as well as a decrease of regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu) in basal ganglia. In the present study, [18F]FDG and PET was used to measure rCMRglu in 10 patients with spasmodic torticollis (mean age 50.37 {plus_minus} 11.47) and 10 age matched controls. All cases with a short disease duration, were untreated. A factorial analysis of variance revealed a significant bilateral increase of glucose consumption in caudate nucleus and pallidum/putamen complex (p>0.004) and in the cerebellum (p>0.001). The rCMRglu increase in the motor/premotor cortex and in the thalamus reached a trend towards significance (p<0.05). These preliminary data show enhanced metabolism in basal ganglia and cerebellum as the functional correlate of focal dystonia. A recently proposed model suggests that dystonia would be the consequence of a putaminal hyperactivity, leading to the breakdown of the pallidal inhibitory control on thalamus and thalamo-cortical projections.

  18. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations.

  19. Muscle hyperalgesia is widespread in patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, Diana E; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2013-12-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) frequently show prominent sensory abnormalities in their affected limb, which may extend proximally and even to unaffected body regions. This study examines whether sensory dysfunction is observed in unaffected body parts of CRPS patients, and investigates whether the extent of dysfunction is similar for the various sensory modalities. Quantitative sensory testing was performed in the unaffected extremities and cheeks of 48 patients with CRPS of the arm (31 with dystonia), and the results were compared with values obtained among healthy controls. The most prominent abnormality was the pressure pain threshold, which showed a consistent pattern of higher sensitivity in unaffected contralateral arms and unaffected legs, as well as the cheek, and demonstrated the largest effect sizes. The cheeks of CRPS patients showed thermal hypoesthesia and hyperalgesia as well as a loss of vibration detection. Except for a lower vibration threshold in the contralateral leg of CRPS patients with dystonia, no differences in sensory modalities were found between CRPS patients with and without dystonia. These results point to a general disturbance in central pain processing in patients with CRPS, which may be attributed to impaired endogenous pain control. Since pressure pain is the most deviant sensory abnormality in both unaffected and affected body regions of CRPS patients, this test may serve as an important outcome parameter in future studies and may be used as a tool to monitor the course of the disease.

  20. Neuronal Nuclear Membrane Budding Occurs during a Developmental Window Modulated by Torsin Paralogs.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Lauren M; Liang, Chun-Chi; Dauer, William T

    2016-09-20

    DYT1 dystonia is a neurodevelopmental disease that manifests during a discrete period of childhood. The disease is caused by impaired function of torsinA, a protein linked to nuclear membrane budding. The relationship of NE budding to neural development and CNS function is unclear, however, obscuring its potential role in dystonia pathogenesis. We find NE budding begins and resolves during a discrete neurodevelopmental window in torsinA null neurons in vivo. The developmental resolution of NE budding corresponds to increased torsinB protein, while ablating torsinB from torsinA null neurons prevents budding resolution and causes lethal neural dysfunction. Developmental changes in torsinB also correlate with NE bud formation in differentiating DYT1 embryonic stem cells, and overexpression of torsinA or torsinB rescues NE bud formation in this system. These findings identify a torsinA neurodevelopmental window that is essential for normal CNS function and have important implications for dystonia pathogenesis and therapeutics. PMID:27653693