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Sample records for dystrophy grmd model

  1. Predictive markers of clinical outcome in the GRMD dog model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, Inès; Pinto-Mariz, Fernanda; Yada, Erica; Desquilbet, Loïc; Savino, Wilson; Silva-Barbosa, Suse Dayse; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Blot, Stéphane; Butler-Browne, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    In the translational process of developing innovative therapies for DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy), the last preclinical validation step is often carried out in the most relevant animal model of this human disease, namely the GRMD (Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy) dog. The disease in GRMD dogs mimics human DMD in many aspects, including the inter-individual heterogeneity. This last point can be seen as a drawback for an animal model but is inherently related to the disease in GRMD dogs closely resembling that of individuals with DMD. In order to improve the management of this inter-individual heterogeneity, we have screened a combination of biomarkers in sixty-one 2-month-old GRMD dogs at the onset of the disease and a posteriori we addressed their predictive value on the severity of the disease. Three non-invasive biomarkers obtained at early stages of the disease were found to be highly predictive for the loss of ambulation before 6 months of age. An elevation in the number of circulating CD4+CD49dhi T cells and a decreased stride frequency resulting in a reduced spontaneous speed were found to be strongly associated with the severe clinical form of the disease. These factors can be used as predictive tests to screen dogs to separate them into groups with slow or fast disease progression before their inclusion into a therapeutic preclinical trial, and therefore improve the reliability and translational value of the trials carried out on this invaluable large animal model. These same biomarkers have also been described to be predictive for the time to loss of ambulation in boys with DMD, strengthening the relevance of GRMD dogs as preclinical models of this devastating muscle disease. PMID:25261568

  2. Effects of an Immunosuppressive Treatment in the GRMD Dog Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Barthélémy, Inès; Uriarte, Ane; Drougard, Carole; Unterfinger, Yves; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Blot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The GRMD (Golden retriever muscular dystrophy) dog has been widely used in pre-clinical trials targeting DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy), using in many cases a concurrent immune-suppressive treatment. The aim of this study is to assess if such a treatment could have an effect on the disease course of these animals. Seven GRMD dogs were treated with an association of cyclosporine A (immunosuppressive dosage) and prednisolone (2 mg/kg/d) during 7 months, from 2 to 9 months of age. A multi-parametric evaluation was performed during this period which allowed us to demonstrate that this treatment had several significant effects on the disease progression. The gait quality as assessed by 3D-accelerometry was dramatically improved. This was consistent with the evolution of other parameters towards a significant improvement, such as the clinical motor score, the post-tetanic relaxation and the serum CK levels. In contrast the isometric force measurement as well as the histological evaluation argued in favor of a more severe disease progression. In view of the disease modifying effects which have been observed in this study it should be concluded that immunosuppressive treatments should be used with caution when carrying out pre-clinical studies in this canine model of DMD. They also highlight the importance of using a large range of multi-parametric evaluation tools to reliably draw any conclusion from trials involving dystrophin-deficient dogs, which reproduce the complexity of the human disease. PMID:23185260

  3. Levels of α7 integrin and laminin-α2 are increased following prednisone treatment in the mdx mouse and GRMD dog models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wuebbles, Ryan D; Sarathy, Apurva; Kornegay, Joe N; Burkin, Dean J

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease for which there is no cure and limited treatment options. Prednisone is currently the first line treatment option for DMD and studies have demonstrated that it improves muscle strength. Although prednisone has been used for the treatment of DMD for decades, the mechanism of action of this drug remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that the α7β1 integrin is a major modifier of disease progression in mouse models of DMD and is therefore a target for drug-based therapies. In this study we examined whether prednisone increased α7β1 integrin levels in mdx mouse and GRMD dog models and myogenic cells from humans with DMD. Our results show that prednisone promotes an increase in α7 integrin protein in cultured myogenic cells and in the muscle of mdx and GRMD animal models of DMD. The prednisone-mediated increase in α7 integrin was associated with increased laminin-α2 in prednisone-treated dystrophin-deficient muscle. Together, our results suggest that prednisone acts in part through increased merosin in the muscle basal lamina and through sarcolemmal stabilization of α7β1 integrin in dystrophin-deficient muscle. These results indicate that therapies that target an increase in muscle α7β1 integrin, its signaling pathways and/or laminin could be therapeutic in DMD.

  4. Histological comparison of the smooth uterine muscle of healthy golden retriever bitches, carriers of the progressive muscular dystrophy (GRMD) gene, and GRMD-affected bitches.

    PubMed

    Brolio, M P; Cima, D S; Miglino, M A; Ambrósio, C E

    2014-11-10

    There is evidence to suggest that weakness of the pelvic and/or uterine musculature may negatively affect the obstetric performance of women who carry the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The golden retriever dog is the ideal animal model for preclinical studies of progressive muscular dystrophy, and this model is referred to as "golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD)". This study evaluated and compared the histopathological aspects of the uterine muscle of eleven dogs: health, n=4; carriers of GRMD gene, n=5; and affected females, n=2. The obtained results showed that the uterine muscle of healthy dogs was exclusively composed of type III collagen, while a predominance of type I collagen and small amounts of type III were observed in the uterine muscle of the carriers. The myometrium of the affected bitches showed small quantities of both collagen types. The differences noted in the three evaluated groups suggest that female carrier and those individuals affected by muscular dystrophy had collagen alteration and muscle fiber commitment in the uterine muscle, a deficiency which could directly influence the composition and function of this tissue. In addition, this information is highly relevant to the reproductive management of these animals. This data open important venues for translate reproductive protocols for women, who carry the dystrophin gene.

  5. Comprehensive longitudinal characterization of canine muscular dystrophy by serial NMR imaging of GRMD dogs.

    PubMed

    Thibaud, J-L; Azzabou, N; Barthelemy, I; Fleury, S; Cabrol, L; Blot, S; Carlier, P G

    2012-10-01

    The Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog is the closest animal counterpart of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans and has, for this reason, increasingly been used in preclinical therapeutic trials for this disease. The aim of this study was to describe the abnormalities in canine dystrophic muscle non-invasively, quantitatively, thoroughly and serially by means of NMR imaging. Thoracic and pelvic limbs of five healthy and five GRMD dogs were imaged in a 3T NMR scanner at 2, 4, 6 and 9months of age. Standard and fat-saturated T(1)-, T(2)- and proton-density-weighted images were acquired. A measurement of T(1) and a two-hour kinetic study of muscle enhancement after gadolinium-chelate injection were also performed. Ten out of the 15 indices evaluated differed between healthy and GRMD dogs. The maximal relative enhancement after gadolinium injection and the proton-density-weighted/T(2)-weighted signal ratio were the most discriminating indices. Inter-muscle heterogeneity was found to vary significantly for most of the indices. The body of data that has been acquired here will help in designing and interpreting preclinical trials using dystrophin-deficient dogs.

  6. Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs: Local or systemic?

    PubMed Central

    Kerkis, Irina; Ambrosio, Carlos E; Kerkis, Alexandre; Martins, Daniele S; Zucconi, Eder; Fonseca, Simone AS; Cabral, Rosa M; Maranduba, Carlos MC; Gaiad, Thais P; Morini, Adriana C; Vieira, Natassia M; Brolio, Marina P; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A; Miglino, Maria A; Zatz, Mayana

    2008-01-01

    Background The golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs represent the best available animal model for therapeutic trials aiming at the future treatment of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have obtained a rare litter of six GRMD dogs (3 males and 3 females) born from an affected male and a carrier female which were submitted to a therapeutic trial with adult human stem cells to investigate their capacity to engraft into dogs muscles by local as compared to systemic injection without any immunosuppression. Methods Human Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hIDPSC) were transplanted into 4 littermate dogs aged 28 to 40 days by either arterial or muscular injections. Two non-injected dogs were kept as controls. Clinical translation effects were analyzed since immune reactions by blood exams and physical scores capacity of each dog. Samples from biopsies were checked by immunohistochemistry (dystrophin markers) and FISH for human probes. Results and Discussion We analyzed the cells' ability in respect to migrate, engraftment, and myogenic potential, and the expression of human dystrophin in affected muscles. Additionally, the efficiency of single and consecutive early transplantation was compared. Chimeric muscle fibers were detected by immunofluorescence and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using human antibodies and X and Y DNA probes. No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. We showed that hIDPSC presented significant engraftment in GRMD dog muscles, although human dystrophin expression was modest and limited to several muscle fibers. Better clinical condition was also observed in the dog, which received monthly arterial injections and is still clinically stable at 25 months of age. Conclusion Our data suggested that systemic multiple deliveries seemed more effective than local injections. These findings open important avenues for further

  7. Levels of inflammation and oxidative stress, and a role for taurine in dystropathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy dog model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Jessica R; Duong, Marisa N; Turner, Rufus; Le Guiner, Caroline; Boyatzis, Amber; Kettle, Anthony J; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2016-10-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal skeletal muscle wasting disease presenting with excessive myofibre necrosis and increased inflammation and oxidative stress. In the mdx mouse model of DMD, homeostasis of the amino acid taurine is altered, and taurine administration drastically decreases muscle necrosis, dystropathology, inflammation and protein thiol oxidation. Since the severe pathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog model more closely resembles the human DMD condition, we aimed to assess the generation of oxidants by inflammatory cells and taurine metabolism in this species. In muscles of 8 month GRMD dogs there was an increase in the content of neutrophils and macrophages, and an associated increase in elevated myeloperoxidase, a protein secreted by neutrophils that catalyses production of the highly reactive hypochlorous acid (HOCl). There was also increased chlorination of tyrosines, a marker of HOCl generation, increased thiol oxidation of many proteins and irreversible oxidative protein damage. Taurine, which functions as an antioxidant by trapping HOCl, was reduced in GRMD plasma; however taurine was increased in GRMD muscle tissue, potentially due to increased muscle taurine transport and synthesis. These data indicate a role for HOCl generated by neutrophils in the severe dystropathology of GRMD dogs, which may be exacerbated by decreased availability of taurine in the blood. These novel data support continued research into the precise roles of oxidative stress and taurine in DMD and emphasise the value of the GRMD dogs as a suitable pre-clinical model for testing taurine as a therapeutic intervention for DMD boys.

  8. RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION IN UNSEDATED DOGS WITH GOLDEN RETRIEVER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    DeVanna, Justin C.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Bogan, Janet R.; Dow, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  9. Respiratory dysfunction in unsedated dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    DeVanna, Justin C; Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Hawkins, Eleanor C

    2014-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation.

  10. Canine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and their use in therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Janet R; Bogan, Daniel J; Childers, Martin K; Li, Juan; Nghiem, Peter; Detwiler, David A; Larsen, C Aaron; Grange, Robert W; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna K; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce P; Howard, James F; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Schatzberg, Scott J; Styner, Martin A; Flanigan, Kevin M; Xiao, Xiao; Hoffman, Eric P

    2012-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which the loss of dystrophin causes progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Potential therapies that carry substantial risk, such as gene- and cell-based approaches, must first be tested in animal models, notably the mdx mouse and several dystrophin-deficient breeds of dogs, including golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Affected dogs have a more severe phenotype, in keeping with that of DMD, so may better predict disease pathogenesis and treatment efficacy. Various phenotypic tests have been developed to characterize disease progression in the GRMD model. These biomarkers range from measures of strength and joint contractures to magnetic resonance imaging. Some of these tests are routinely used in clinical veterinary practice, while others require specialized equipment and expertise. By comparing serial measurements from treated and untreated groups, one can document improvement or delayed progression of disease. Potential treatments for DMD may be broadly categorized as molecular, cellular, or pharmacologic. The GRMD model has increasingly been used to assess efficacy of a range of these therapies. A number of these studies have provided largely general proof-of-concept for the treatment under study. Others have demonstrated efficacy using the biomarkers discussed. Importantly, just as symptoms in DMD vary among patients, GRMD dogs display remarkable phenotypic variation. Though confounding statistical analysis in preclinical trials, this variation offers insight regarding the role that modifier genes play in disease pathogenesis. By correlating functional and mRNA profiling results, gene targets for therapy development can be identified.

  11. Canine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Use in Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Janet R.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Childers, Martin K.; Li, Juan; Nghiem, Peter; Detwiler, David A.; Larsen, C. Aaron; Grange, Robert W.; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna K.; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce P.; Howard, James F.; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Schatzberg, Scott J.; Styner, Martin A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Xiao, Xiao; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which the loss of dystrophin causes progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Potential therapies that carry substantial risk, such as gene and cell-based approaches, must first be tested in animal models, notably the mdx mouse and several dystrophin-deficient breeds of dogs, including golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Affected dogs have a more severe phenotype, in keeping with that of DMD, so may better predict disease pathogenesis and treatment efficacy. We and others have developed various phenotypic tests to characterize disease progression in the GRMD model. These biomarkers range from measures of strength and joint contractures to magnetic resonance imaging. Some of these tests are routinely used in clinical veterinary practice, while others require specialized equipment and expertise. By comparing serial measurements from treated and untreated groups, one can document improvement or delayed progression of disease. Potential treatments for DMD may be broadly categorized as molecular, cellular, or pharmacologic. The GRMD model has increasingly been used to assess efficacy of a range of these therapies. While some of these studies have largely provided general proof-of-concept for the treatment under study, others have demonstrated efficacy using the biomarkers discussed. Importantly, just as symptoms in DMD vary among patients, GRMD dogs display remarkable phenotypic variation. While confounding statistical analysis in preclinical trials, this variation offers insight regarding the role that modifier genes play in disease pathogenesis. By correlating functional and mRNA profiling results, gene targets for therapy development can be identified. PMID:22218699

  12. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Soslow, Jonathan H.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M.; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N.; Markham, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. Methods We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ months) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. Results We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. Conclusion These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively. PMID:26672735

  13. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  14. The value of mammalian models for duchenne muscular dystrophy in developing therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Banks, Glen B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. There is no effective treatment and patients typically die in approximately the third decade. DMD is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. There are three mammalian models of DMD that have been used to understand better the pathogenesis of disease and develop therapeutic strategies. The mdx mouse is the most widely used model of DMD that displays some features of muscle degeneration, but the pathogenesis of disease is comparatively mild. The severity of disease in mice lacking both dystrophin and utrophin is similar to DMD, but one has to account for the discrete functions of utrophin. Canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (cxmd) is the best representation of DMD, but the phenotype of the most widely used golden retriever (GRMD) model is variable, making functional endpoints difficult to ascertain. Although each mammalian model has its limitations, together they have been essential for the development of several treatment strategies for DMD that target dystrophin replacement, disease progression, and muscle regeneration.

  15. MRI-based quantification of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential to provide non-invasive and objective biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic effect in DMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated scheme to quantify MRI features of golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), a canine model of DMD. Our method was applied to a natural history data set and a hydrodynamic limb perfusion data set. The scheme is composed of three modules: pre-processing, muscle segmentation, and feature analysis. The pre-processing module includes: calculation of T2 maps, spatial registration of T2 weighted (T2WI) images, T2 weighted fat suppressed (T2FS) images, and T2 maps, and intensity calibration of T2WI and T2FS images. We then manually segment six pelvic limb muscles. For each of the segmented muscles, we finally automatically measure volume and intensity statistics of the T2FS images and T2 maps. For the natural history study, our results showed that four of six muscles in affected dogs had smaller volumes and all had higher mean intensities in T2 maps as compared to normal dogs. For the perfusion study, the muscle volumes and mean intensities in T2FS were increased in the post-perfusion MRI scans as compared to pre-perfusion MRI scans, as predicted. We conclude that our scheme successfully performs quantitative analysis of muscle MRI features of GRMD.

  16. Sparing of the dystrophin-deficient cranial sartorius muscle is associated with classical and novel hypertrophy pathways in GRMD dogs.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Peter P; Hoffman, Eric P; Mittal, Priya; Brown, Kristy J; Schatzberg, Scott J; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Wang, Zuyi; Kornegay, Joe N

    2013-11-01

    Both Duchenne and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) are caused by dystrophin deficiency. The Duchenne muscular dystrophy sartorius muscle and orthologous GRMD cranial sartorius (CS) are relatively spared/hypertrophied. We completed hierarchical clustering studies to define molecular mechanisms contributing to this differential involvement and their role in the GRMD phenotype. GRMD dogs with larger CS muscles had more severe deficits, suggesting that selective hypertrophy could be detrimental. Serial biopsies from the hypertrophied CS and other atrophied muscles were studied in a subset of these dogs. Myostatin showed an age-dependent decrease and an inverse correlation with the degree of GRMD CS hypertrophy. Regulators of myostatin at the protein (AKT1) and miRNA (miR-539 and miR-208b targeting myostatin mRNA) levels were altered in GRMD CS, consistent with down-regulation of myostatin signaling, CS hypertrophy, and functional rescue of this muscle. mRNA and proteomic profiling was used to identify additional candidate genes associated with CS hypertrophy. The top-ranked network included α-dystroglycan and like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Proteomics demonstrated increases in myotrophin and spectrin that could promote hypertrophy and cytoskeletal stability, respectively. Our results suggest that multiple pathways, including decreased myostatin and up-regulated miRNAs, α-dystroglycan/like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, spectrin, and myotrophin, contribute to hypertrophy and functional sparing of the CS. These data also underscore the muscle-specific responses to dystrophin deficiency and the potential deleterious effects of differential muscle involvement.

  17. Anatomical and mesoscopic characterization of the dystrophic diaphragm: An in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging study in the Golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog.

    PubMed

    Thibaud, J L; Matot, B; Barthélémy, I; Fromes, Y; Blot, S; Carlier, P G

    2017-04-01

    Because respiratory failure remains a major issue in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy patients, respiratory muscles are a key target of systemic therapies. In the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dogs, the disease shows strong clinical and histological similarities with the human pathology, making it a valuable model for preclinical therapeutic trials. We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging anatomical study of the diaphragm in GRMD dogs and healthy controls. Both T1- and T2-weighted images of the diaphragm of seven healthy and thirteen GRMD dogs, from 3 to 36 months of age, were acquired on a 3 tesla NMR scanner. Abnormalities of texture and shape were revealed and consisted of increases in signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in signal heterogeneity on both T1- and T2-weighted images of the dystrophic diaphragm. These abnormalities were associated with a significant thickening of the muscle and we identified a clear 8-mm-threshold distinguishing clinically preserved GRMD dogs from those more severely affected. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of NMR imaging of the diaphragm and depicted several anatomical and mesoscopic anomalies in the dystrophic diaphragm. NMR imaging of the diaphragm shows a promise as an outcome measure in preclinical trials using GRMD dogs.

  18. Morphological and ultrastructural evaluation of the golden retriever muscular dystrophy trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle.

    PubMed

    Lessa, Thais Borges; de Abreu, Dilayla Kelly; Rodrigues, Márcio Nogueira; Brólio, Marina Pandolphi; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease, characterized by atrophy and muscle weakness. The respiratory failure is a common cause of early death in patients with DMD. Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a canine model which has been extensively used for many advances in therapeutics applications. As the patients with DMD, the GRMD frequently died from cardiac and respiratory failure. Observing the respiratory failure in DMD is one of the major causes of mortality we aimed to describe the morphological and ultrastructural data of trachea, lungs (conductive and respiratory portion of the system), and diaphragm muscle using histological and ultrastructural analysis. The diaphragm muscle showed discontinuous fibers architecture, with different diameter; a robust perimysium inflammatory infiltrate and some muscle cells displayed central nuclei. GRMD trachea and lungs presented collagen fibers and in addition, the GRMD lungs showed higher of levels collagen fibers that could limit the alveolar ducts and alveoli distension. Therefore, the most features observed were the collagen areas and fibrosis. We suggested in this study that the collagen remodeling in the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle may increase fibrosis and affect the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle function that can be a major cause of respiratory failure that occur in patients with DMD.

  19. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  20. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  1. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials.

  2. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  3. Long-Term Systemic Myostatin Inhibition via Liver-Targeted Gene Transfer in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sleeper, Meg M.; Forbes, Sean C.; Morine, Kevin J.; Reynolds, Caryn; Singletary, Gretchen E.; Trafny, Dennis; Pham, Jennifer; Bogan, Janet; Kornegay, Joe N.; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn A.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked recessive disease affecting 1 in 3,500 newborn boys for which there is no effective treatment or cure. One novel strategy that has therapeutic potential for DMD is inhibition of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass that may also promote fibrosis. Therefore, our goal in this study was to evaluate systemic myostatin inhibition in the golden retriever model of DMD (GRMD). GRMD canines underwent liver-directed gene transfer of a self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 8 vector designed to express a secreted dominant-negative myostatin peptide (n=4) and were compared with age-matched, untreated GRMD controls (n=3). Dogs were followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 13 months to assess cross-sectional area and volume of skeletal muscle, then euthanized so that tissue could be harvested for morphological and histological analysis. We found that systemic myostatin inhibition resulted in increased muscle mass in GRMD dogs as assessed by MRI and confirmed at tissue harvest. We also found that hypertrophy of type IIA fibers was largely responsible for the increased muscle mass and that reductions in serum creatine kinase and muscle fibrosis were associated with long-term myostatin inhibition in GRMD. This is the first report describing the effects of long-term, systemic myostatin inhibition in a large-animal model of DMD, and we believe that the simple and effective nature of our liver-directed gene-transfer strategy makes it an ideal candidate for evaluation as a novel therapeutic approach for DMD patients. PMID:21787232

  4. Pharmacologic Management of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Target Identification and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Spurney, Christopher F.; Nghiem, Peter P.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked human disorder in which absence of the protein dystrophin causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. For the sake of treatment development, over and above definitive genetic and cell-based therapies, there is considerable interest in drugs that target downstream disease mechanisms. Drug candidates have typically been chosen based on the nature of pathologic lesions and presumed underlying mechanisms and then tested in animal models. Mammalian dystrophinopathies have been characterized in mice (mdx mouse) and dogs (golden retriever muscular dystrophy [GRMD]). Despite promising results in the mdx mouse, some therapies have not shown efficacy in DMD. Although the GRMD model offers a higher hurdle for translation, dogs have primarily been used to test genetic and cellular therapies where there is greater risk. Failed translation of animal studies to DMD raises questions about the propriety of methods and models used to identify drug targets and test efficacy of pharmacologic intervention. The mdx mouse and GRMD dog are genetically homologous to DMD but not necessarily analogous. Subcellular species differences are undoubtedly magnified at the whole-body level in clinical trials. This problem is compounded by disparate cultures in clinical trials and preclinical studies, pointing to a need for greater rigor and transparency in animal experiments. Molecular assays such as mRNA arrays and genome-wide association studies allow identification of genetic drug targets more closely tied to disease pathogenesis. Genes in which polymorphisms have been directly linked to DMD disease progression, as with osteopontin, are particularly attractive targets. PMID:24936034

  5. Characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers in a natural history study of golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Wang, Jiahui; Ahn, Mihye; Shiloh-Malawsky, Yael; Chahin, Nizar; Elmore, Sandra; Bagnell, C Robert; Wilber, Kathy; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Kornegay, Joe N

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers can quantify disease progression in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) via a natural history study. The proximal pelvic limbs of ten GRMD and eight normal dogs were scanned at 3, 6, and 9-12 months of age. Several MRI imaging and texture analysis biomarkers were quantified in seven muscles. Almost all MRI biomarkers readily distinguished GRMD from control dogs; however, only selected biomarkers tracked with longitudinal disease progression. The biomarkers that performed best were full-length muscle volume and a texture analysis biomarker, termed heterogeneity index. The biceps femoris, semitendinosus and cranial sartorius muscles showed differential progression in GRMD versus control dogs. MRI features in GRMD dogs showed dynamic progression that was most pronounced over the 3- to 6-month period. Volumetric biomarkers and water map values correlated with histopathological features of necrosis/regeneration at 6-months. In conclusion, selected MRI biomarkers (volume and heterogeneity index) in particular muscles (biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and cranial sartorius) adjusted for age effect allow distinction of differential longitudinal progression in GRMD dogs. These biomarkers may be used as surrogate outcome measures in preclinical GRMD trials.

  6. Jagged 1 rescues the Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Natassia M.; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S.; Moreira, Yuri B.; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P.; Marshall, Jamie L.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M.; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Duchenne muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of Muscular Dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveal that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PMID:26582133

  7. Muscle function recovery in golden retriever muscular dystrophy after AAV1-U7 exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Barthélémy, Inès; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Beley, Cyriaque; Griffith, Graziella; Benchaouir, Rachid; le Hir, Maëva; Unterfinger, Yves; Lorain, Stéphanie; Dreyfus, Patrick; Voit, Thomas; Carlier, Pierre; Blot, Stéphane; Garcia, Luis

    2012-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from lesions of the gene encoding dystrophin. These usually consist of large genomic deletions, the extents of which are not correlated with the severity of the phenotype. Out-of-frame deletions give rise to dystrophin deficiency and severe DMD phenotypes, while internal deletions that produce in-frame mRNAs encoding truncated proteins can lead to a milder myopathy known as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Widespread restoration of dystrophin expression via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated exon skipping has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse model and in cardiac muscle after percutaneous transendocardial delivery in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) model. Here, a set of optimized U7snRNAs carrying antisense sequences designed to rescue dystrophin were delivered into GRMD skeletal muscles by AAV1 gene transfer using intramuscular injection or forelimb perfusion. We show sustained correction of the dystrophic phenotype in extended muscle areas and partial recovery of muscle strength. Muscle architecture was improved and fibers displayed the hallmarks of mature and functional units. A 5-year follow-up ruled out immune rejection drawbacks but showed a progressive decline in the number of corrected muscle fibers, likely due to the persistence of a mild dystrophic process such as occurs in BMD phenotypes. Although AAV-mediated exon skipping was shown safe and efficient to rescue a truncated dystrophin, it appears that recurrent treatments would be required to maintain therapeutic benefit ahead of the progression of the disease.

  8. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Giardina, Bruno; Bozzi, Manuela; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG) is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1) have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review focuses specifically on the animal (murine and others) model systems that have been developed with the aim of directly engineering DAG1 in order to study the DG function in skeletal muscle as well as in other tissues. In the last years, conditional animal models overcoming the embryonic lethality of the DG knock-out in mouse have been generated and helped clarifying the crucial role of DG in skeletal muscle, while an increasing number of studies on knock-in mice are aimed at understanding the contribution of single amino acids to the stability of DG and to the possible development of muscular dystrophy.

  9. Proteomics profiling of urine reveals specific titin fragments as biomarkers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Jeremy; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Leger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Udd, Bjarne; Wong, Brenda; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2014-07-01

    Diagnosis of muscular dystrophies is currently based on invasive methods requiring muscle biopsies or blood tests. The aim of the present study was to identify urinary biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, the urinary proteomes of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and healthy donors were compared with a bottom-up proteomic approach. Label-free analysis of more than 1100 identified proteins revealed that 32 of them were differentially expressed between healthy controls and DMD patients. Among these 32 proteins, titin showed the highest fold change between healthy subjects and DMD patients. Interestingly, most of the sequenced peptides belong to the N-terminal and C-terminal parts of titin, and the presence of the corresponding fragments in the urine of DMD patients was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Analysis of a large cohort of DMD patients and age-matched controls (a total of 104 individuals aged from 3 to 20 years) confirmed presence of the N-ter fragment in all but two patients. In two DMD patients aged 16 and 20 years this fragment was undetectable and two healthy controls of 16 and 19 years with serum CK >800 IU/L demonstrated a low level of the fragment. N- and C-terminal titin fragments were also detected in urine from patients with other muscular dystrophies such as Becker muscular dystrophy and Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (type 1D, 2D and 2J) but not in neurogenic spinal muscular atrophy. They were also present in urine of dystrophin-deficient animal models (GRMD dogs and mdx mice). Titin is the first urinary biomarker that offers the possibility to develop a simple, non-invasive and easy-to-use test for pre-screening of muscular dystrophies, and may also prove to be useful for the non-invasive follow up of DMD patients under treatment.

  10. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  11. Microdystrophin Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in the Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Terjung, Ronald L; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency results in lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Substituting missing dystrophin with abbreviated microdystrophin has dramatically alleviated disease in mouse DMD models. Unfortunately, translation of microdystrophin therapy has been unsuccessful in dystrophic dogs, the only large mammalian model. Approximately 70% of the dystrophin-coding sequence is removed in microdystrophin. Intriguingly, loss of ≥50% dystrophin frequently results in severe disease in patients. To test whether the small gene size constitutes a fundamental design error for large mammalian muscle, we performed a comprehensive study using 22 dogs (8 normal and 14 dystrophic). We delivered the ΔR2-15/ΔR18-19/ΔR20-23/ΔC microdystrophin gene to eight extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscles in six dystrophic dogs using Y713F tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-9 (2.6 × 1013 viral genome (vg) particles/muscle). Robust expression was observed 2 months later despite T-cell infiltration. Major components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) were restored by microdystrophin. Treated muscle showed less inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification. Importantly, therapy significantly preserved muscle force under the stress of repeated cycles of eccentric contraction. Our results have established the proof-of-concept for microdystrophin therapy in dystrophic muscles of large mammals and set the stage for clinical trial in human patients. PMID:23319056

  12. Microdystrophin ameliorates muscular dystrophy in the canine model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Terjung, Ronald L; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-04-01

    Dystrophin deficiency results in lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Substituting missing dystrophin with abbreviated microdystrophin has dramatically alleviated disease in mouse DMD models. Unfortunately, translation of microdystrophin therapy has been unsuccessful in dystrophic dogs, the only large mammalian model. Approximately 70% of the dystrophin-coding sequence is removed in microdystrophin. Intriguingly, loss of ≥50% dystrophin frequently results in severe disease in patients. To test whether the small gene size constitutes a fundamental design error for large mammalian muscle, we performed a comprehensive study using 22 dogs (8 normal and 14 dystrophic). We delivered the ΔR2-15/ΔR18-19/ΔR20-23/ΔC microdystrophin gene to eight extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscles in six dystrophic dogs using Y713F tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-9 (2.6 × 10(13) viral genome (vg) particles/muscle). Robust expression was observed 2 months later despite T-cell infiltration. Major components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) were restored by microdystrophin. Treated muscle showed less inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification. Importantly, therapy significantly preserved muscle force under the stress of repeated cycles of eccentric contraction. Our results have established the proof-of-concept for microdystrophin therapy in dystrophic muscles of large mammals and set the stage for clinical trial in human patients.

  13. [Potential of the zebrafish model to study congenital muscular dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Ryckebüsch, Lucile

    2015-10-01

    In order to better understand the complexity of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) and develop new strategies to cure them, it is important to establish new disease models. Due to its numerous helpful attributes, the zebrafish has recently become a very powerful animal model for the study of CMD. For some CMD, this vertebrate model is phenotypically closer to human pathology than the murine model. Over the last few years, researchers have developed innovative techniques to screen rapidly and on a large scale for muscle defects in zebrafish. Furthermore, new genome editing techniques in zebrafish make possible the identification of new disease models. In this review, the major attributes of zebrafish for CMD studies are discussed and the principal models of CMD in zebrafish are highlighted.

  14. Physical therapy assessment tools to evaluate disease progression and phenotype variability in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gaiad, T P; Silva, M B; Silva, G C A; Caromano, F A; Miglino, M A; Ambrósio, C E

    2011-10-01

    Dogs suffering from Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) present symptoms that are similar to human patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Phenotypic variability is common in both cases and correlates with disease progression and response to therapy. Physical therapy assessment tools were used to study disease progression and assess phenotypic variability in dogs with GRMD. At 5 (T0), 9 (T1), 13 (T2) and 17 (T3)months of age, the physical features, joint ranges of motion (ROM), limb and thorax circumferences, weight and creatine kinase (CK) levels were assessed in 11 dogs with GRMD. Alterations of physical features were higher at 13 months, and different disease progression rates were observed. Passive ROM decreased until 1 year old, which was followed by a decline of elbow and tarsal ROM. Limb and thorax circumferences, which were corrected for body weight, decreased significantly between T0 and T3. These measurements can be used to evaluate disease progression in dogs with GRMD and to help discover new therapies for DMD patients.

  15. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model.

  16. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy About half of people with muscular dystrophy have ... muscles Muscle pain and stiffness Learning disabilities Becker muscular dystrophy Signs and symptoms are similar to those of ...

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Corneal Endothelial Dystrophy in Boston Terriers: A Spontaneous, Canine Model for Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thomasy, Sara M.; Cortes, Dennis E.; Hoehn, Alyssa L.; Calderon, Allison C.; Li, Jennifer Y.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Boston Terriers (BTs) have a greater prevalence of corneal endothelial dystrophy (CED), in comparison to other canine breeds. Similar to Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), this condition is characterized by endothelial cell degeneration with secondary corneal edema. This study assessed corneal morphology using in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) in BTs with and without CED. Methods The corneas of 16 BTs with CED and 15 unaffected, age-matched BTs underwent clinical evaluation and were imaged using IVCM and FD-OCT. A two-sample t-test or Mann-Whitney rank sum test were used to statistically compare parameters between groups. Data are presented as mean ± SD or median (range). Results Mean age did not significantly differ between affected and unaffected dogs at 10.0 ± 2.0 and 10.6 ± 2.4 years, respectively (P = 0.437). Females (69%) were overrepresented among the CED-affected dogs. In CED patients, IVCM demonstrated endothelial polymegathism and pleomorphism. Corneal endothelial density was significantly less (P < 0.001) in dogs with CED (1026 ± 260 cells/mm2) versus age-matched controls (2297 ± 372 cells/mm2). Fourier-domain OCT demonstrated a significant increase (P < 0.01) in central corneal and endothelium-Descemet's complex thickness in dogs with CED versus age-matched controls at 1019 (485–1550) or 536 (464–650) μm and 32 (22–56) or 25 (15–34) μm, respectively. Conclusions Corneal endothelial dystrophy in BTs is a bilateral, adult-onset condition that shares many similarities with FECD. Thus, CED could serve as a spontaneous disease model to study the pathogenesis of and develop novel treatments for FECD. PMID:27454658

  18. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  19. Histopathological Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle with Specific Reference to Mouse Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Rebecca L; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-12-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of degenerative diseases for which many mouse models are available. These models are frequently used to assess potential therapeutic interventions and histological evaluation of multiple muscles is an important part of this assessment. Histological evaluation is especially useful when combined with tests of muscle function. This unit describes a protocol for necropsy, processing, cryosectioning, and histopathological evaluation of murine skeletal muscles, which is applicable to both models of muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular conditions. Key histopathological features of dystrophic muscle are discussed using the mdx mouse (a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) as an example. Optimal handling during dissection, processing and sectioning is vital to avoid artifacts that can confound or prevent future analyses. Muscles carefully processed using this protocol are suitable for further evaluation using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, special histochemical stains, and immuoblotting. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Analysing regenerative potential in zebrafish models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A J; Currie, P D

    2014-11-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. Clinically hypotonia is present from birth, with progressive muscle weakness and wasting through development. For the most part, CMDs can mechanistically be attributed to failure of basement membrane protein laminin-α2 sufficiently binding with correctly glycosylated α-dystroglycan. The majority of CMDs therefore arise as the result of either a deficiency of laminin-α2 (MDC1A) or hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (dystroglycanopathy). Here we consider whether by filling a regenerative medicine niche, the zebrafish model can address the present challenge of delivering novel therapeutic solutions for CMD. In the first instance the readiness and appropriateness of the zebrafish as a model organism for pioneering regenerative medicine therapies in CMD is analysed, in particular for MDC1A and the dystroglycanopathies. Despite the recent rapid progress made in gene editing technology, these approaches have yet to yield any novel zebrafish models of CMD. Currently the most genetically relevant zebrafish models to the field of CMD, have all been created by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis. Once genetically relevant models have been established the zebrafish has several important facets for investigating the mechanistic cause of CMD, including rapid ex vivo development, optical transparency up to the larval stages of development and relative ease in creating transgenic reporter lines. Together, these tools are well suited for use in live-imaging studies such as in vivo modelling of muscle fibre detachment. Secondly, the zebrafish's contribution to progress in effective treatment of CMD was analysed. Two approaches were identified in which zebrafish could potentially contribute to effective therapies. The first hinges on the augmentation of functional redundancy within the system, such as upregulating alternative laminin chains in the candyfloss

  1. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-04-09

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs.

  3. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  4. Longitudinal in vivo muscle function analysis of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Decostre, Valérie; Vignaud, Alban; Matot, Béatrice; Huguet, Aline; Ledoux, Isabelle; Bertil, Emilie; Gjata, Bernard; Carlier, Pierre G; Gourdon, Geneviève; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common adult muscle dystrophy. In view of emerging therapies, which use animal models as a proof of principle, the development of reliable outcome measures for in vivo longitudinal study of mouse skeletal muscle function is becoming crucial. To satisfy this need, we have developed a device to measure ankle dorsi- and plantarflexion torque in rodents. We present an in vivo 8-month longitudinal study of the contractile properties of the skeletal muscles of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1. Between 4 and 12 months of age, we observed a reduction in muscle strength in the ankle dorsi- and plantarflexors of DMSXL compared to control mice although the strength per muscle cross-section was normal. Mild steady myotonia but no abnormal muscle fatigue was also observed in the DMSXL mice. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis performed at the end of the study showed respectively reduced muscle cross-section area and smaller muscle fibre diameter in DMSXL mice. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out longitudinal in vivo studies of muscle function over several months in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy confirming the feasibility of this method to test preclinical therapeutics.

  5. Identification of muscle-specific microRNAs in serum of muscular dystrophy animal models: promising novel blood-based markers for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideya; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Ito, Naoki; Kishi, Soichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hashido, Kazuo

    2011-03-30

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Creatine kinase (CK) is generally used as a blood-based biomarker for muscular disease including DMD, but it is not always reliable since it is easily affected by stress to the body, such as exercise. Therefore, more reliable biomarkers of muscular dystrophy have long been desired. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, ∼22 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs which play important roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been reported that miRNAs exist in blood. In this study, we hypothesized that the expression levels of specific serum circulating miRNAs may be useful to monitor the pathological progression of muscular diseases, and therefore explored the possibility of these miRNAs as new biomarkers for muscular diseases. To confirm this hypothesis, we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs in serum of the dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy mouse model, mdx, and the canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan dog model (CXMD(J)), by real-time PCR. We found that the serum levels of several muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133a and miR-206) are increased in both mdx and CXMD(J). Interestingly, unlike CK levels, expression levels of these miRNAs in mdx serum are little influenced by exercise using treadmill. These results suggest that serum miRNAs are useful and reliable biomarkers for muscular dystrophy.

  6. Successful gene therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient dog: a large model of cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-02-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod-cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone-rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone-rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18-72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22-29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone-rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment.

  7. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  8. What do mouse models of muscular dystrophy tell us about the DAPC and its components?

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    There are over 30 mouse models with mutations or inactivations in the dystrophin-associated protein complex. This complex is thought to play a crucial role in the functioning of muscle, as both a shock absorber and signalling centre, although its role in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy is not fully understood. The first mouse model of muscular dystrophy to be identified with a mutation in a component of the dystrophin-associated complex (dystrophin) was the mdx mouse in 1984. Here, we evaluate the key characteristics of the mdx in comparison with other mouse mutants with inactivations in DAPC components, along with key modifiers of the disease phenotype. By discussing the differences between the individual phenotypes, we show that the functioning of the DAPC and consequently its role in the pathogenesis is more complicated than perhaps currently appreciated.

  9. [Macular dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Souied, E; Kaplan, J; Coscas, G; Soubrane, G

    2003-09-01

    Macular dystrophies are a group of hereditary disorders of the macula occurring in children or young adults. The most frequent in France will be presented in detail: Best disease, Stargardt macular dystrophy, cone dystrophy, X-linked retinoschisis, pattern dystrophy, and malattia leventinese. Molecular biology studies have now mapped and identified the genes involved in these macular dystrophies. Analysis of the features of fundus examination will lead to further examinations such as fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, optical coherent tomography, electroretinography, or electrooculography, in order to confirm the diagnosis. We will also present the differential diagnosis of each of these macular dystrophies.

  10. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqing; Cline, Melissa S.; Osborne, Robert J.; Tuttle, Daniel L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Donohue, John Paul; Hall, Megan P.; Shiue, Lily; Swanson, Maurice S.; Thornton, Charles A.; Ares, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is associated with expression of expanded CTG DNA repeats as RNA (CUGexp RNA). To test whether CUGexp RNA creates a global splicing defect, we compared skeletal muscle of two mouse DM1 models, one expressing a CTGexp transgene, and another homozygous for a defective Mbnl1 gene. Strong correlation in splicing changes for ~100 new Mbnl1-regulated exons indicates loss of Mbnl1 explains >80% of the splicing pathology due to CUGexp RNA. In contrast, only about half of mRNA level changes can be attributed to loss of Mbnl1, indicating CUGexp RNA has Mbnl1-independent effects, particularly on mRNAs for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We propose that CUGexp RNA causes two separate effects: loss of Mbnl1 function, disrupting splicing, and loss of another function that disrupts ECM mRNA regulation, possibly mediated by MBNL2. These findings reveal unanticipated similarities between DM1 and other muscular dystrophies. PMID:20098426

  11. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  12. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the ...

  13. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  14. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  15. Sildenafil reduces respiratory muscle weakness and fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Percival, Justin M; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Adams, Marvin E; Adamo, Candace M; Beavo, Joseph A; Froehner, Stanley C

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Loss of dystrophin initiates a progressive decline in skeletal muscle integrity and contractile capacity which weakens respiratory muscles including the diaphragm, culminating in respiratory failure, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients. At present, corticosteroid treatment is the primary pharmacological intervention in DMD, but has limited efficacy and adverse side effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new safe, cost-effective, and rapidly implementable treatments that slow disease progression. One promising new approach is the amplification of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) signalling pathways with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. PDE5 inhibitors serve to amplify NO signalling that is attenuated in many neuromuscular diseases including DMD. We report here that a 14-week treatment of the mdx mouse model of DMD with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (Viagra(®), Revatio(®)) significantly reduced mdx diaphragm muscle weakness without impacting fatigue resistance. In addition to enhancing respiratory muscle contractility, sildenafil also promoted normal extracellular matrix organization. PDE5 inhibition slowed the establishment of mdx diaphragm fibrosis and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. Sildenafil also normalized the expression of the pro-fibrotic (and pro-inflammatory) cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sildenafil-treated mdx diaphragms accumulated significantly less Evans Blue tracer dye than untreated controls, which is also indicative of improved diaphragm muscle health. We conclude that sildenafil-mediated PDE5 inhibition significantly reduces diaphragm respiratory muscle dysfunction and pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study provides new insights into the therapeutic utility of targeting defects in NO

  16. Adaptations to exercise training and contraction-induced muscle injury in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Abresch, R Ted; Fowler, William M

    2002-11-01

    This article reviews the current status of exercise training and contraction-induced muscle-injury investigations in animal models of muscular dystrophy. Most exercise-training studies have compared the adaptations of normal and dystrophic muscles with exercise. Adaptation of diseased muscle to exercise occurs at many levels, starting with the extracellular matrix, but also involves cytoskeletal architecture, muscle contractility, repair mechanisms, and gene regulation. The majority of exercise-injury investigations have attempted to determine the susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient muscles to contraction-induced injury. There is some evidence in animal models that diseased muscle can adapt and respond to mechanical stress. However, exercise-injury studies show that dystrophic muscles have an increased susceptibility to high mechanical forces. Most of the studies involving exercise training have shown that muscle adaptations in dystrophic animals were qualitatively similar to the adaptations observed in control muscle. Deleterious effects of the dystrophy usually occur only in older animals with advanced muscle fiber degeneration or after high-resistive eccentric training. The main limitations in applying these conclusions to humans are the differences in phenotypic expression between humans and genetically homologous animal models and in the significant biomechanical differences between humans and these animal models.

  17. Engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived myogenic progenitors in a dominant model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Baik, June; Clee, Mark; Kyba, Michael; Tupler, Rossella; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2009-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) consist of a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, recessive or dominant, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening. To date, no effective treatment is available. Experimental strategies pursuing muscle regeneration through the transplantation of stem cell preparations have brought hope to patients affected by this disorder. Efficacy has been demonstrated in recessive MD models through contribution of wild-type nuclei to the muscle fiber heterokaryon; however, to date, there has been no study investigating the efficacy of a cell therapy in a dominant model of MD. We have recently demonstrated that Pax3-induced embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived myogenic progenitors are able to engraft and improve muscle function in mdx mice, a recessive mouse model for Duchenne MD. To assess whether this therapeutic effect can be extended to a dominant type of muscle disorder, here we transplanted these cells into FRG1 transgenic mice, a dominant model that has been associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Our results show that Pax3-induced ES-derived myogenic progenitors are capable of significant engraftment after intramuscular or systemic transplantation into Frg1 mice. Analyses of contractile parameters revealed functional improvement in treated muscles of male mice, but not females, which are less severely affected. This study is the first to use Frg1 transgenic mice to assess muscle regeneration as well as to support the use of a cell-based therapy for autosomal dominant types of MD.

  18. Engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived myogenic progenitors in a dominant model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Radbod; Baik, June; Clee, Mark; Kyba, Michael; Tupler, Rossella; Perlingeiro, Rita C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) consist of a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, recessive or dominant, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening. To date, no effective treatment is available. Experimental strategies pursuing muscle regeneration through the transplantation of stem cell preparations have brought hope to patients affected by this disorder. Efficacy has been demonstrated in recessive MD models through contribution of wild-type nuclei to the muscle fiber heterokaryon, however to date, there has been no study investigating the efficacy of a cell therapy in a dominant model of MD. We have recently demonstrated that Pax3-induced embryonic stem (ES) cell- derived myogenic progenitors are able to engraft and improve muscle function in mdx mice, a recessive mouse model for Duchenne MD. To assess whether this therapeutic effect can be extended to a dominant type of muscle disorder, here we transplanted these cells into FRG1 transgenic mice, a dominant model that has been associated with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Our results show that Pax3-induced ES-derived myogenic progenitors are capable of significant engraftment after intramuscular or systemic transplantation into Frg1 mice. Analyses of contractile parameters revealed functional improvement in treated muscles of male mice, but not females, which are less severely affected. This study is the first to use Frg1 transgenic mice to assess muscle regeneration as well as to support the use of a cell-based therapy for autosomal dominant types of MD. PMID:19682990

  19. Characterization of dystrophin deficient rats: a new model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Larcher, Thibaut; Lafoux, Aude; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD.

  20. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  1. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 MAR 2011 - 30 APR 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this work is to increase the availability of critical mouse models of human muscular dystrophy (MD...3 W81XWH-11-1-0330 Cox, Gregory A 4 4 11 11 12 Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy W81XWH-11-1-0330 Gregory A

  2. Progressive muscle proteome changes in a clinically relevant pig model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Thomas; Kemter, Elisabeth; Flenkenthaler, Florian; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Otte, Kathrin A.; Blutke, Andreas; Krause, Sabine; Walter, Maggie C.; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard; Arnold, Georg J.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by genetic deficiency of dystrophin and characterized by massive structural and functional changes of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to terminal muscle failure. We recently generated a novel genetically engineered pig model reflecting pathological hallmarks of human DMD better than the widely used mdx mouse. To get insight into the hierarchy of molecular derangements during DMD progression, we performed a proteome analysis of biceps femoris muscle samples from 2-day-old and 3-month-old DMD and wild-type (WT) pigs. The extent of proteome changes in DMD vs. WT muscle increased markedly with age, reflecting progression of the pathological changes. In 3-month-old DMD muscle, proteins related to muscle repair such as vimentin, nestin, desmin and tenascin C were found to be increased, whereas a large number of respiratory chain proteins were decreased in abundance in DMD muscle, indicating serious disturbances in aerobic energy production and a reduction of functional muscle tissue. The combination of proteome data for fiber type specific myosin heavy chain proteins and immunohistochemistry showed preferential degeneration of fast-twitch fiber types in DMD muscle. The stage-specific proteome changes detected in this large animal model of clinically severe muscular dystrophy provide novel molecular readouts for future treatment trials. PMID:27634466

  3. Generation of muscular dystrophy model rats with a CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Fujii, Wataru; Tsuboi, Masaya; Tanihata, Jun; Teramoto, Naomi; Takeuchi, Shiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-07-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene encoding Dystrophin. DMD model animals, such as mdx mice and canine X-linked muscular dystrophy dogs, have been widely utilized in the development of a treatment for DMD. Here, we demonstrate the generation of Dmd-mutated rats using a clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system, an RNA-based genome engineering technique that is also adaptive to rats. We simultaneously targeted two exons in the rat Dmd gene, which resulted in the absence of Dystrophin expression in the F0 generation. Dmd-mutated rats exhibited a decline in muscle strength, and the emergence of degenerative/regenerative phenotypes in the skeletal muscle, heart, and diaphragm. These mutations were heritable by the next generation, and F1 male rats exhibited similar phenotypes in their skeletal muscles. These model rats should prove to be useful for developing therapeutic methods to treat DMD.

  4. Histological study of masseter muscle in a mouse muscular dystrophy model (mdx mouse).

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kasahara, N; Amano, M; Yoshii, M; Watanabe, H; Ide, Y

    2000-08-01

    Histological changes in the masseter muscle were observed over time in mdx mice, a muscular dystrophy model. It was found that marked necrosis occurs about the time of weaning at around 4 weeks of age; then the tissue actively regenerates at 8 weeks and stabilizes as regenerated muscle with centronuclei at 15 weeks old. This study examined the centronucleus in regenerated muscle. The process from necrosis to regeneration in muscle fibers occurs a little later in the masseter muscle than in other limbic muscles. Regenerated muscles observed around 15 weeks after birth showed a moth-eaten appearance. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation of transverse sections of muscle fibers revealed that myofibrils surrounded lost regions in the area showing a moth-eaten appearance. Thus, some defensive mechanism may affect the ability of muscle fibers to maintain a function close to normal in mdx mice even though the muscle fibers develop muscular dystrophy. The function of the masseter muscle drastically changes from sucking to mastication behavior at around 4 weeks, and this was considered to influence the morphological changes in the muscle tissue. The moth-eaten appearance seen at 15 weeks may represent an appropriate myofibril reconstruction preventing invasion of the lost regions.

  5. The nitric oxide-donor molsidomine modulates the innate inflammatory response in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zordan, Paola; Sciorati, Clara; Campana, Lara; Cottone, Lucia; Clementi, Emilio; Querini, Patrizia-Rovere; Brunelli, Silvia

    2013-09-05

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in muscle remodeling and repair after acute and chronic damage, in particular in muscular dystrophies, a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases leading to muscular degeneration. Defect of nitric oxide (NO) generation is a key pathogenic event in muscular dystrophies, thus NO donors have been explored as new therapeutics for this disease. We have investigated the immune-modulating effect of one of such drugs, molsidomine, able to slow the progression of muscular dystrophy in the α-Sarcoglican-null mice, a model for the limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D, sharing several hallmarks of muscle degeneration with other muscular dystrophies. α-Sarcoglican-null mice were treated with molsidomine and drug effects on the inflammatory infiltrates and on muscle repair were assessed at selected time points. We found that molsidomine treatment modulates effectively the characteristics of the inflammatory infiltrate within dystrophic muscles, enhancing its healing function. Initially molsidomine amplified macrophage recruitment, promoting a more efficient clearance of cell debris and effective tissue regeneration. At a later stage molsidomine decreased significantly the extent of the inflammatory infiltrate, whose persistence exacerbates muscle damage: most of the remaining macrophages displayed characteristics of the transitional population, associated with reduced fibrosis and increased preservation of the muscle tissue. The dual action of molsidomine, the already known NO donation and the immunomodulatory function we now identified, suggests that it has a unique potential in tissue healing during chronic muscle damage. This, alongside its already approved use in human, makes molsidomine a drug with a significant therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophies.

  6. Age-dependent effect of myostatin blockade on disease severity in a murine model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Stephanie A; Millay, Douglas P; Sargent, Michelle A; McNally, Elizabeth M; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2006-06-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a muscle-specific secreted peptide that functions to limit muscle growth through an autocrine regulatory feedback loop. Loss of MSTN activity in cattle, mice, and humans leads to a profound phenotype of muscle overgrowth, associated with more and larger fibers and enhanced regenerative capacity. Deletion of MSTN in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy enhances muscle mass and reduces disease severity. In contrast, loss of MSTN activity in the dyW/dyW mouse model of laminin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, a much more severe and lethal disease model, does not improve all aspects of muscle pathology. Here we examined disease severity associated with myostatin (mstn-/-) deletion in mice nullizygous for delta-sarcoglycan (scgd-/-), a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Early loss of MSTN activity achieved either by monoclonal antibody administration or by gene deletion each improved muscle mass, regeneration, and reduced fibrosis in scgd-/- mice. However, antibody-mediated inhibition of MSTN in late-stage dystrophic scgd-/- mice did not improve disease. These findings suggest that MSTN inhibition may benefit muscular dystrophy when instituted early or if disease is relatively mild but that MSTN inhibition in severely affected or late-stage disease may be ineffective.

  7. [Research progress on disease models and gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Li, Tongyu; Liang, Ping

    2016-05-25

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked, recessive and lethal genetic disease, which usually caused by gene mutations and the underlying mechanisms are complicated and diverse. The causal gene of DMD is the largest one in human that locates in the region of Xp21.2, encoding dystrophin. Currently there is no effective treatment for DMD patients. The treatment of DMD depends on gene mutation and molecular mechanism study of the disease, which requires reliable disease models such as mdx mouse model. Recently, researchers have increasingly discovered gene therapy strategies for DMD, and the efficacy has been demonstrated in DMD animal models. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cell technology can provide patient-specific cell source, offering a new platform for mechanism and therapy study of DMD.

  8. Advanced Gene Therapy for Treatment of Cardiomyopathy and Respiratory Insufficiency in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    lasting and elevated gene expression in cardiac and skeletal muscles in murine, canine, and rhesus monkey models, suggesting the feasibility of using...patients. Juvenile GRMD dogs will be administered a single dose of vector to the intrapleural space and serially assessed for respiratory function

  9. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    DOE PAGES

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; ...

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamicsmore » and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.« less

  10. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.

  11. A novel early onset phenotype in a zebrafish model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Gupta, Vandana A.; Dowling, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in infancy that is associated with severe morbidities (particularly wheelchair dependence) and early mortality. It is caused by recessive mutations in the LAMA2 gene that encodes a subunit of the extracellular matrix protein laminin 211. At present, there are no treatments for this disabling disease. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system for the identification of novel therapies. However, drug discovery in the zebrafish is largely dependent on the identification of phenotypes suitable for chemical screening. Our goal in this study was to elucidate novel, early onset abnormalities in the candyfloss (caf) zebrafish, a model of MDC1A. We uncovered and characterize abnormalities in spontaneous coiling, the earliest motor movement in the zebrafish, as a fully penetrant change specific to caf mutants that is ideal for future drug testing. PMID:28241031

  12. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD.

  13. Corneal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2009-01-01

    The term corneal dystrophy embraces a heterogenous group of bilateral genetically determined non-inflammatory corneal diseases that are restricted to the cornea. The designation is imprecise but remains in vogue because of its clinical value. Clinically, the corneal dystrophies can be divided into three groups based on the sole or predominant anatomical location of the abnormalities. Some affect primarily the corneal epithelium and its basement membrane or Bowman layer and the superficial corneal stroma (anterior corneal dystrophies), the corneal stroma (stromal corneal dystrophies), or Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium (posterior corneal dystrophies). Most corneal dystrophies have no systemic manifestations and present with variable shaped corneal opacities in a clear or cloudy cornea and they affect visual acuity to different degrees. Corneal dystrophies may have a simple autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive Mendelian mode of inheritance. Different corneal dystrophies are caused by mutations in the CHST6, KRT3, KRT12, PIP5K3, SLC4A11, TACSTD2, TGFBI, and UBIAD1 genes. Knowledge about the responsible genetic mutations responsible for these disorders has led to a better understanding of their basic defect and to molecular tests for their precise diagnosis. Genes for other corneal dystrophies have been mapped to specific chromosomal loci, but have not yet been identified. As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. Main differential diagnoses include various causes of monoclonal gammopathy, lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase deficiency, Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage diseases (mucopolysaccharidoses

  14. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  15. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Wnt signaling pathway improves central inhibitory synaptic transmission in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Espinoza, Claudia; Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Cuitino, Loreto; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-02-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) that connects the cytoskeleton, plasma membrane and the extracellular matrix has been related to the maintenance and stabilization of channels and synaptic receptors, which are both essential for synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission. The dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) exhibits a significant reduction in hippocampal GABA efficacy, which may underlie the altered synaptic function and abnormal hippocampal long-term plasticity exhibited by mdx mice. Emerging studies have implicated Wnt signaling in the modulation of synaptic efficacy, neuronal plasticity and cognitive function. We report here that the activation of the non-canonical Wnt-5a pathway and Andrographolide, improves hippocampal mdx GABAergic efficacy by increasing the number of inhibitory synapses and GABA(A) receptors or GABA release. These results indicate that Wnt signaling modulates GABA synaptic efficacy and could be a promising novel target for DMD cognitive therapy.

  17. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD.

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of PKCθ Counteracts Muscle Disease in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marrocco, V; Fiore, P; Benedetti, A; Pisu, S; Rizzuto, E; Musarò, A; Madaro, L; Lozanoska-Ochser, B; Bouché, M

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. We previously showed that genetic ablation of Protein Kinase C θ (PKCθ) in mdx, the mouse model of DMD, improves muscle healing and regeneration, preventing massive inflammation. To establish whether pharmacological targeting of PKCθ in DMD can be proposed as a therapeutic option, in this study we treated young mdx mice with the PKCθ inhibitor Compound 20 (C20). We show that C20 treatment led to a significant reduction in muscle damage associated with reduced immune cells infiltration, reduced inflammatory pathways activation, and maintained muscle regeneration. Importantly, C20 treatment is efficient in recovering muscle performance in mdx mice, by preserving muscle integrity. Together, these results provide proof of principle that pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ in DMD can be considered an attractive strategy to modulate immune response and prevent the progression of the disease.

  19. Fuchs dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... KR. The corneal dystrophies. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ... stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, ...

  20. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Like for Teens With MD? en español Distrofia muscular Aside from seeing the telethon on Labor ... which weakens different muscle groups in various ways: Duchenne (pronounced: due-SHEN) muscular dystrophy (DMD) , the most ...

  1. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects about 1 out of every 3,500 boys. (Girls can carry the gene that causes the disease, ... and heart problems. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy affects boys and girls equally. Symptoms usually start when kids are between ...

  2. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  3. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leo H; Tawil, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a clinically recognizable and relatively common muscular dystrophy. It is inherited mostly as an autosomal dominant disease or in a minority of cases, in a digenic pattern. The disease manifestation is variable and most likely dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors. We review the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and genetics of the disease, present the recently elucidated molecular pathogenesis, discuss the pathology and the possible consequence of the inflammation seen in the muscle biopsies, and consider future treatments.

  4. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  5. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, Darren R.; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A.; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T.; Weiss, Michael D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUGexp) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUGexp mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSALR) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSALR mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSALR mice, including a reduction in the CUGexp mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUGexp mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSALR mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  6. Animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from basic mechanisms to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Joe W; Hakim, Chady H; McIntosh, Mark A; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, there is no cure. A highly promising therapeutic strategy is to replace or repair the defective dystrophin gene by gene therapy. Numerous animal models of DMD have been developed over the last 30 years, ranging from invertebrate to large mammalian models. mdx mice are the most commonly employed models in DMD research and have been used to lay the groundwork for DMD gene therapy. After ~30 years of development, the field has reached the stage at which the results in mdx mice can be validated and scaled-up in symptomatic large animals. The canine DMD (cDMD) model will be excellent for these studies. In this article, we review the animal models for DMD, the pros and cons of each model system, and the history and progress of preclinical DMD gene therapy research in the animal models. We also discuss the current and emerging challenges in this field and ways to address these challenges using animal models, in particular cDMD dogs.

  7. Animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from basic mechanisms to gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Joe W.; Hakim, Chady H.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, there is no cure. A highly promising therapeutic strategy is to replace or repair the defective dystrophin gene by gene therapy. Numerous animal models of DMD have been developed over the last 30 years, ranging from invertebrate to large mammalian models. mdx mice are the most commonly employed models in DMD research and have been used to lay the groundwork for DMD gene therapy. After ~30 years of development, the field has reached the stage at which the results in mdx mice can be validated and scaled-up in symptomatic large animals. The canine DMD (cDMD) model will be excellent for these studies. In this article, we review the animal models for DMD, the pros and cons of each model system, and the history and progress of preclinical DMD gene therapy research in the animal models. We also discuss the current and emerging challenges in this field and ways to address these challenges using animal models, in particular cDMD dogs. PMID:25740330

  8. Ringo: discordance between the molecular and clinical manifestation in a golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Eder; Valadares, Marcos Costa; Vieira, Natássia M; Bueno, Carlos R; Secco, Mariane; Jazedje, Tatiana; da Silva, Helga Cristina Almeida; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2010-01-01

    Of the various genetic homologues to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog, which presents a variable but usually severe and progressive muscle weakness, has the closest relevance to DMD in both clinical severity and histopathological change. Among 77 GRMD dogs born in our colony in Brazil, we have identified a very mildly affected dog, Ringo, born July 2003. Among his descendants, at least one male, Suflair, is also showing a mild course. In an attempt to better characterize these two dogs, we studied the pattern of muscle proteins expression in Ringo and Suflair, as compared to severely affected and normal control dogs. Dystrophin was absent in both and utrophin was overexpressed in a pattern similar to the observed in severely affected dogs. Understanding the mechanism that is protecting Ringo and Suflair from the deleterious effect of the dystrophin gene mutation is of utmost interest. In addition it points out that the clinical impact of therapeutic trials should be interpreted with caution.

  9. Breaches of the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Miao; Feng, Gang; Hu, Huaiyu; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-11-07

    A subset of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has central nervous system manifestations. There are good mouse models for these CMDs that include POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout and Large(myd) mice with all exhibiting defects in dentate gyrus. It is not known how the abnormal dentate gyrus is formed during the development. In this study, we conducted a detailed morphological examination of the dentate gyrus in adult and newborn POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout, and Large(myd) mice by immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses. We observed that the pial basement membrane overlying the dentate gyrus was disrupted and there was ectopia of granule cell precursors through the breached pial basement membrane. Besides these, the knockout dentate gyrus exhibited reactive gliosis in these mouse models. Thus, breaches in the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

  10. Age of onset of RNA toxicity influences phenotypic severity: evidence from an inducible mouse model of myotonic dystrophy (DM1).

    PubMed

    Gladman, Jordan T; Mandal, Mahua; Srinivasan, Varadamurthy; Mahadevan, Mani S

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. It is caused by an expanded (CTG)n tract in the 3' UTR of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene. This causes nuclear retention of the mutant mRNA into ribonuclear foci and sequestration of interacting RNA-binding proteins (such as muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1)). More severe congenital and childhood-onset forms of the disease exist but are less understood than the adult disease, due in part to the lack of adequate animal models. To address this, we utilized transgenic mice over-expressing the DMPK 3' UTR as part of an inducible RNA transcript to model early-onset myotonic dystrophy. In mice in which transgene expression was induced during embryogenesis, we found that by two weeks after birth, mice reproduced cardinal features of myotonic dystrophy, including myotonia, cardiac conduction abnormalities, muscle weakness, histopathology and mRNA splicing defects. Notably, these defects were more severe than in adult mice induced for an equivalent period of exposure to RNA toxicity. Additionally, the utility of the model was tested by over-expressing MBNL1, a key therapeutic strategy being actively pursued for treating the disease phenotypes associated with DM1. Significantly, increased MBNL1 in skeletal muscle partially corrected myotonia and splicing defects present in these mice, demonstrating the responsiveness of the model to relevant therapeutic interventions. Furthermore, these results also represent the first murine model for early-onset DM1 and provide a tool to investigate the effects of RNA toxicity at various stages of development.

  11. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  12. Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction Is Present without Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy-2F and Is Prevented after Claudin-5 Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Schultz, Eric J.; Slabaugh, Jessica L.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in several members of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex lead to skeletal and cardiomyopathies. Cardiac care for these muscular dystrophies consists of management of symptoms with standard heart medications after detection of reduced whole heart function. Recent evidence from both Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and animal models suggests that myocardial dysfunction is present before myocardial damage or deficiencies in whole heart function, and that treatment prior to heart failure symptoms may be beneficial. To determine whether this same early myocardial dysfunction is present in other muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathies, we conducted a physiological assessment of cardiac function at the tissue level in the δ-sarcoglycan null mouse model (Sgcd−/−) of Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F. Baseline cardiac contractile force measurements using ex vivo intact linear muscle preparations, were severely depressed in these mice without the presence of histopathology. Virotherapy withclaudin-5 prevents the onset of cardiomyopathy in another muscular dystrophy model. After virotherapy with claudin-5, the cardiac contractile force deficits in Sgcd−/− mice are no longer significant. These studies suggest that screening Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy patients using methods that detect earlier functional changes may provide a longer therapeutic window for cardiac care. PMID:27999547

  13. Laminin-111 protein therapy prevents muscle disease in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Jachinta E; Gurpur, Praveen B; Burkin, Dean J

    2009-05-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin results in reduced sarcolemmal integrity and increased susceptibility to muscle damage. The alpha(7)beta(1)-integrin is a laminin-binding protein up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of DMD patients and in the mdx mouse model. Transgenic overexpression of the alpha(7)-integrin alleviates muscle disease in dystrophic mice, making this gene a target for pharmacological intervention. Studies suggest laminin may regulate alpha(7)-integrin expression. To test this hypothesis, mouse and human myoblasts were treated with laminin and assayed for alpha(7)-integrin expression. We show that laminin-111 (alpha(1), beta(1), gamma(1)), which is expressed during embryonic development but absent in normal or dystrophic skeletal muscle, increased alpha(7)-integrin expression in mouse and DMD patient myoblasts. Injection of laminin-111 protein into the mdx mouse model of DMD increased expression of alpha(7)-integrin, stabilized the sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscle from exercised-induced damage. These findings demonstrate that laminin-111 is a highly potent therapeutic agent for the mdx mouse model of DMD and represents a paradigm for the systemic delivery of extracellular matrix proteins as therapies for genetic diseases.

  14. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  15. Developmental Changes in the ECG of a Hamster Model of Muscular Dystrophy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Thomas G.; Kale, Ajit; McCue, Scott; Bhagavan, Hemmi N.; VanDongen, Case

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant autonomic signaling is being increasingly recognized as an important symptom in neuromuscular disorders. The δ-sarcoglycan-deficient BIO TO-2 hamster is recognized as a good model for studying mechanistic pathways and sequelae in muscular dystrophy and heart failure, including autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. Recent studies using the TO-2 hamster model have provided promising preclinical results demonstrating the efficacy of gene therapy to treat skeletal muscle weakness and heart failure. Methods to accelerate preclinical testing of gene therapy and new drugs for neuromuscular diseases are urgently needed. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate a rapid non-invasive screen for characterizing the ANS imbalance in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Electrocardiograms were recorded non-invasively in conscious ∼9-month old TO-2 hamsters (n = 10) and non-myopathic F1B control hamsters (n = 10). Heart rate was higher in TO-2 hamsters than controls (453 ± 12 bpm vs. 311 ± 25 bpm, P < 0.01). Time domain heart rate variability, an index of parasympathetic tone, was lower in TO-2 hamsters (12.2 ± 3.7 bpm vs. 38.2 ± 6.8, P < 0.05), as was the coefficient of variance of the RR interval (2.8 ± 0.9% vs. 16.2 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05) compared to control hamsters. Power spectral analysis demonstrated reduced high frequency and low frequency contributions, indicating autonomic imbalance with increased sympathetic tone and decreased parasympathetic tone in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Similar observations in newborn hamsters indicate autonomic nervous dysfunction may occur quite early in life in neuromuscular diseases. Our findings of autonomic abnormalities in newborn hamsters with a mutation in the δ-sarcoglycan gene suggest approaches to correct modulation of the heart rate as prevention or therapy for muscular dystrophies. PMID:22629245

  16. Structural and functional alterations of muscle fibres in the novel mouse model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Brocca, Lorenza; Pansarasa, Orietta; Rinaldi, Chiara; Tupler, Rossella; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2007-11-01

    We recently generated a mouse model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) by selectively overexpressing FRG1, a candidate gene for FSHD, in skeletal muscle. The muscles of the FRG-1 mice did not show any plasmamembrane defect suggesting a novel pathogenetic mechanism for FSHD. Here, we study structure and function of muscle fibres from three lines of mice overexpressing FRG1 at different levels: FRG1-low, FRG1-med, FRG1-high. Cross-sectional area (CSA), specific force (Po/CSA) and maximum shortening velocity (V(o)) of identified types of muscle fibres from FRG1-low and FRG1-med mice were analysed and found to be lower than in WT mice. Fast fibres and especially type 2B fibres (the fastest type) were preferentially involved in the dystrophic process showing a much larger force deficit than type 1 (slow) fibres. Consistent with the latter observation, the MHC isoform distribution of several muscles of the three FRG1 lines showed a shift towards slower MHC isoforms in comparison to WT muscle. Moreover, fast muscles showed a more evident histological deterioration, a larger atrophy and a higher percentage of centrally nucleated fibres than the soleus, the slowest muscle in mice. Interestingly, loss in CSA, Po/CSA and V(o) of single muscle fibres and MHC isoform shift towards a slower phenotype can be considered early signs of muscular dystrophy (MD). They were, in fact, found also in FRG1-low mice which did not show any impairment of function in vivo and of muscle size in vitro and in soleus muscles, which had a completely preserved morphology. This study provides a detailed characterization of structure and function of muscle fibres in a novel murine model of one of the main human MDs and suggests that fundamental features of the dystrophic process, common to most MDs, such as the intrinsic loss of contractile strength of muscle fibres, the preferential involvement of fast fibres and the shift towards a slow muscle phenotype can occur independently from

  17. Developmental Changes in the ECG of a Hamster Model of Muscular Dystrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Thomas G; Kale, Ajit; McCue, Scott; Bhagavan, Hemmi N; Vandongen, Case

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant autonomic signaling is being increasingly recognized as an important symptom in neuromuscular disorders. The δ-sarcoglycan-deficient BIO TO-2 hamster is recognized as a good model for studying mechanistic pathways and sequelae in muscular dystrophy and heart failure, including autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. Recent studies using the TO-2 hamster model have provided promising preclinical results demonstrating the efficacy of gene therapy to treat skeletal muscle weakness and heart failure. Methods to accelerate preclinical testing of gene therapy and new drugs for neuromuscular diseases are urgently needed. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate a rapid non-invasive screen for characterizing the ANS imbalance in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Electrocardiograms were recorded non-invasively in conscious ∼9-month old TO-2 hamsters (n = 10) and non-myopathic F1B control hamsters (n = 10). Heart rate was higher in TO-2 hamsters than controls (453 ± 12 bpm vs. 311 ± 25 bpm, P < 0.01). Time domain heart rate variability, an index of parasympathetic tone, was lower in TO-2 hamsters (12.2 ± 3.7 bpm vs. 38.2 ± 6.8, P < 0.05), as was the coefficient of variance of the RR interval (2.8 ± 0.9% vs. 16.2 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05) compared to control hamsters. Power spectral analysis demonstrated reduced high frequency and low frequency contributions, indicating autonomic imbalance with increased sympathetic tone and decreased parasympathetic tone in dystrophic TO-2 hamsters. Similar observations in newborn hamsters indicate autonomic nervous dysfunction may occur quite early in life in neuromuscular diseases. Our findings of autonomic abnormalities in newborn hamsters with a mutation in the δ-sarcoglycan gene suggest approaches to correct modulation of the heart rate as prevention or therapy for muscular dystrophies.

  18. Increased autophagy and apoptosis contribute to muscle atrophy in a myotonic dystrophy type 1 Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Ariadna; Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M; Vilchez, Juan J; Llamusi, Beatriz; Artero, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    Muscle mass wasting is one of the most debilitating symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) disease, ultimately leading to immobility, respiratory defects, dysarthria, dysphagia and death in advanced stages of the disease. In order to study the molecular mechanisms leading to the degenerative loss of adult muscle tissue in DM1, we generated an inducible Drosophila model of expanded CTG trinucleotide repeat toxicity that resembles an adult-onset form of the disease. Heat-shock induced expression of 480 CUG repeats in adult flies resulted in a reduction in the area of the indirect flight muscles. In these model flies, reduction of muscle area was concomitant with increased apoptosis and autophagy. Inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy mediated by the overexpression of DIAP1, mTOR (also known as Tor) or muscleblind, or by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of autophagy regulatory genes, achieved a rescue of the muscle-loss phenotype. In fact, mTOR overexpression rescued muscle size to a size comparable to that in control flies. These results were validated in skeletal muscle biopsies from DM1 patients in which we found downregulated autophagy and apoptosis repressor genes, and also in DM1 myoblasts where we found increased autophagy. These findings provide new insights into the signaling pathways involved in DM1 disease pathogenesis.

  19. Functional correction in mouse models of muscular dystrophy using exon-skipping tricyclo-DNA oligomers.

    PubMed

    Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Griffith, Graziella; Babbs, Arran; El Andaloussi, Samir; Ezzat, Kariem; Avril, Aurélie; Dugovic, Branislav; Chaussenot, Rémi; Ferry, Arnaud; Voit, Thomas; Amthor, Helge; Bühr, Claudia; Schürch, Stefan; Wood, Matthew J A; Davies, Kay E; Vaillend, Cyrille; Leumann, Christian; Garcia, Luis

    2015-03-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) hold promise for therapeutic correction of many genetic diseases via exon skipping, and the first AON-based drugs have entered clinical trials for neuromuscular disorders. However, despite advances in AON chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is limited because of poor tissue uptake, and recent clinical reports confirm that sufficient therapeutic efficacy has not yet been achieved. Here we present a new class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA), which displays unique pharmacological properties and unprecedented uptake by many tissues after systemic administration. We demonstrate these properties in two mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a neurogenetic disease typically caused by frame-shifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, respiratory failure and neurocognitive impairment. Although current naked AONs do not enter the heart or cross the blood-brain barrier to any substantial extent, we show that systemic delivery of tcDNA-AONs promotes a high degree of rescue of dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles, the heart and, to a lesser extent, the brain. Our results demonstrate for the first time a physiological improvement of cardio-respiratory functions and a correction of behavioral features in DMD model mice. This makes tcDNA-AON chemistry particularly attractive as a potential future therapy for patients with DMD and other neuromuscular disorders or with other diseases that are eligible for exon-skipping approaches requiring whole-body treatment.

  20. Sildenafil reverses cardiac dysfunction in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Candace M; Dai, Dao-Fu; Percival, Justin M; Minami, Elina; Willis, Monte S; Patrucco, Enrico; Froehner, Stanley C; Beavo, Joseph A

    2010-11-02

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder of muscle degeneration. Patients with DMD lack expression of the protein dystrophin as a result of mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. The loss of dystrophin leads to severe skeletal muscle pathologies as well as cardiomyopathy, which manifests as congestive heart failure and arrhythmias. Like humans, dystrophin-deficient mice (mdx mice) show cardiac dysfunction as evidenced by a decrease in diastolic function followed by systolic dysfunction later in life. We have investigated whether sildenafil citrate (Viagra), a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, can be used to ameliorate the age-related cardiac dysfunction present in the mdx mice. By using echocardiography, we show that chronic sildenafil treatment reduces functional deficits in the cardiac performance of aged mdx mice, with no effect on normal cardiac function in WT controls. More importantly, when sildenafil treatment was started after cardiomyopathy had developed, the established symptoms were rapidly reversed within a few days. It is recognized that PDE5 inhibitors can have cardioprotective effects in other models of cardiac damage, but the present study reports a prevention and reversal of pathological cardiac dysfunction as measured by functional analysis in a mouse model of DMD. Overall, the data suggest that PDE5 inhibitors may be a useful treatment for the cardiomyopathy affecting patients with DMD at early and late stages of the disease.

  1. Sustaining Cardiac Claudin-5 Levels Prevents Functional Hallmarks of Cardiomyopathy in a Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Delfín, Dawn A; Xu, Ying; Schill, Kevin E; Mays, Tessily A; Canan, Benjamin D; Zang, Kara E; Barnum, Jamie A; Janssen, Paul ML; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2012-01-01

    Identification of new molecular targets in heart failure could ultimately have a substantial positive impact on both the health and financial aspects of treating the large heart failure population. We originally identified reduced levels of the cell junction protein claudin-5 specifically in heart in the dystrophin/utrophin-deficient (Dmdmdx;Utrn−/−) mouse model of muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy, which demonstrates physiological hallmarks of heart failure. We then showed that at least 60% of cardiac explant samples from patients with heart failure resulting from diverse etiologies also have reduced claudin-5 levels. These claudin-5 reductions were independent of changes in other cell junction proteins previously linked to heart failure. The goal of this study was to determine whether sustaining claudin-5 levels is sufficient to prevent the onset of histological and functional indicators of heart failure. Here, we show the proof-of-concept rescue experiment in the Dmdmdx;Utrn−/− model, in which claudin-5 reductions were originally identified. Expression of claudin-5 4 weeks after a single administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing a claudin-5 expression cassette prevented the onset of physiological hallmarks of cardiomyopathy and improved histological signs of cardiac damage. This experiment demonstrates that claudin-5 may represent a novel treatment target for prevention of heart failure. PMID:22547149

  2. Sustaining cardiac claudin-5 levels prevents functional hallmarks of cardiomyopathy in a muscular dystrophy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Delfín, Dawn A; Xu, Ying; Schill, Kevin E; Mays, Tessily A; Canan, Benjamin D; Zang, Kara E; Barnum, Jamie A; Janssen, Paul M L; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2012-07-01

    Identification of new molecular targets in heart failure could ultimately have a substantial positive impact on both the health and financial aspects of treating the large heart failure population. We originally identified reduced levels of the cell junction protein claudin-5 specifically in heart in the dystrophin/utrophin-deficient (Dmd(mdx);Utrn(-/-)) mouse model of muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy, which demonstrates physiological hallmarks of heart failure. We then showed that at least 60% of cardiac explant samples from patients with heart failure resulting from diverse etiologies also have reduced claudin-5 levels. These claudin-5 reductions were independent of changes in other cell junction proteins previously linked to heart failure. The goal of this study was to determine whether sustaining claudin-5 levels is sufficient to prevent the onset of histological and functional indicators of heart failure. Here, we show the proof-of-concept rescue experiment in the Dmd(mdx);Utrn(-/-) model, in which claudin-5 reductions were originally identified. Expression of claudin-5 4 weeks after a single administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing a claudin-5 expression cassette prevented the onset of physiological hallmarks of cardiomyopathy and improved histological signs of cardiac damage. This experiment demonstrates that claudin-5 may represent a novel treatment target for prevention of heart failure.

  3. Dysferlin Deficiency and the Development of Cardiomyopathy in a Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Thomas H.; Cox, Gregory A.; Burzenski, Lisa; Foreman, Oded; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2009-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, and distal myopathy of anterior tibialis are severely debilitating muscular dystrophies caused by genetically determined dysferlin deficiency. In these muscular dystrophies, it is the repair, not the structure, of the plasma membrane that is impaired. Though much is known about the effects of dysferlin deficiency in skeletal muscle, little is known about the role of dysferlin in maintenance of cardiomyocytes. Recent evidence suggests that dysferlin deficiency affects cardiac muscle, leading to cardiomyopathy when stressed. However, neither the morphological location of dysferlin in the cardiomyocyte nor the progression of the disease with age are known. In this study, we examined a mouse model of dysferlinopathy using light and electron microscopy as well as echocardiography and conscious electrocardiography. We determined that dysferlin is normally localized to the intercalated disk and sarcoplasm of the cardiomyocytes. In the absence of dysferlin, cardiomyocyte membrane damage occurs and is localized to the intercalated disk and sarcoplasm. This damage results in transient functional deficits at 10 months of age, but, unlike in skeletal muscle, the cell injury is sublethal and causes only mild cardiomyopathy even at advanced ages. PMID:19875504

  4. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  5. Ventilatory Chemosensory Drive Is Blunted in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  6. Viral-mediated vision rescue of a novel AIPL1 cone-rod dystrophy model

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cristy A.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hayes, Abigail; Goldberg, Andrew F.X.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2015-01-01

    Defects in aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) are associated with blinding diseases with a wide range of severity in humans. We examined the mechanism behind autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD) caused by 12 base pair (bp) deletion at proline 351 of hAIPL1 (P351Δ12) mutation in the primate-specific region of human AIPL1. Mutant P351Δ12 human isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (hAIPL1) mice demonstrated a CORD phenotype with early defects in cone-mediated vision and subsequent photoreceptor degeneration. A dominant CORD phenotype was observed in double transgenic animals expressing both mutant P351Δ12 and normal hAIPL1, but not with co-expression of P351Δ12 hAIPL1 and the mouse isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (mAipl1). Despite a dominant effect of the mutation, we successfully rescued cone-mediated vision in P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mice following high over-expression of WT hAIPL1 by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery, which was stable up to 6 months after treatment. Our transgenic P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mouse offers a novel model of AIPL1-CORD, with distinct defects from both the Aipl1-null mouse mimicking LCA and the Aipl1-hypomorphic mice mimicking a slow progressing RP. PMID:25274777

  7. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy As a Model for Epigenetic Regulation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Jones, Takako I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Aberrant epigenetic regulation is an integral aspect of many diseases and complex disorders. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a progressive myopathy that afflicts individuals of all ages, is caused by disrupted genetic and epigenetic regulation of a macrosatellite repeat. FSHD provides a powerful model to investigate disease-relevant epigenetic modifiers and general mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that govern gene expression. Recent Advances: In the context of a genetically permissive allele, the one aspect of FSHD that is consistent across all known cases is the aberrant epigenetic state of the disease locus. In addition, certain mutations in the chromatin regulator SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge-domain protein 1) are sufficient to cause FSHD2 and enhance disease severity in FSHD1. Thus, there are multiple pathways to generate the epigenetic dysregulation required for FSHD. Critical Issues: Why do some individuals with the genetic requirements for FSHD develop disease pathology, while others remain asymptomatic? Similarly, disease progression is highly variable among individuals. What are the relative contributions of genetic background and environmental factors in determining disease manifestation, progression, and severity in FSHD? What is the interplay between epigenetic factors regulating the disease locus and which, if any, are viable therapeutic targets? Future Directions: Epigenetic regulation represents a potentially powerful therapeutic target for FSHD. Determining the epigenetic signatures that are predictive of disease severity and identifying the spectrum of disease modifiers in FSHD are vital to the development of effective therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1463–1482. PMID:25336259

  8. The anticancer drug tamoxifen counteracts the pathology in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dorchies, Olivier M; Reutenauer-Patte, Julie; Dahmane, Elyes; Ismail, Heham M; Petermann, Olivier; Patthey- Vuadens, Ophélie; Comyn, Sophie A; Gayi, Elinam; Piacenza, Tony; Handa, Robert J; Décosterd, Laurent A; Ruegg, Urs T

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting,respiratory and cardiac impairments, and premature death. No treatment exists so far, and the identification of active substances to fight DMD is urgently needed. We found that tamoxifen, a drug used to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer, caused remarkable improvements of muscle force and of diaphragm and cardiac structure in the mdx(5Cv) mouse model of DMD. Oral tamoxifen treatment from 3 weeks of age for 15 months at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day stabilized myofiber membranes, normalized whole body force, and increased force production and resistance to repeated contractions of the triceps muscle above normal values. Tamoxifen improved the structure of leg muscles and diminished cardiac fibrosis by~ 50%. Tamoxifen also reduced fibrosis in the diaphragm, while increasing its thickness,myofiber count, and myofiber diameter, thereby augmenting by 72% the amount of contractile tissue available for respiratory function. Tamoxifen conferred a markedly slower phenotype to the muscles.Tamoxifen and its metabolites were present in nanomolar concentrations in plasma and muscles,suggesting signaling through high-affinity targets. Interestingly, the estrogen receptors ERa and ERb were several times more abundant in dystrophic than in normal muscles, and tamoxifen normalized the relative abundance of ERb isoforms. Our findings suggest that tamoxifen might be a useful therapy for DMD.

  9. Isometric and eccentric force generation assessment of skeletal muscles isolated from murine models of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Moorwood, Catherine; Liu, Min; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2013-01-31

    Critical to the evaluation of potential therapeutics for muscular disease are sensitive and reproducible physiological assessments of muscle function. Because many pre-clinical trials rely on mouse models for these diseases, isolated muscle function has become one of the standards for Go/NoGo decisions in moving drug candidates forward into patients. We will demonstrate the preparation of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm muscles for functional testing, which are the predominant muscles utilized for these studies. The EDL muscle geometry is ideal for isolated muscle preparations, with two easily accessible tendons, and a small size that can be supported by superfusion in a bath. The diaphragm exhibits profound progressive pathology in dystrophic animals, and can serve as a platform for evaluating many potential therapies countering fibrosis, and promoting myofiber stability. Protocols for routine testing, including isometric and eccentric contractions, will be shown. Isometric force provides assessment of strength, and eccentric contractions help to evaluate sarcolemma stability, which is disrupted in many types of muscular dystrophies. Comparisons of the expected results between muscles from wildtype and dystrophic muscles will also be provided. These measures can complement morphological and biochemical measurements of tissue homeostasis, as well as whole animal assessments of muscle function.

  10. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats.

  11. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats. PMID:26515653

  12. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/- mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-04-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin(-/-) (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin(+/-) mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin(+/-), and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin(+/-) muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin(+/-) mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus.

  13. What has the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy contributed to our understanding of this disease?

    PubMed

    Manning, Jennifer; O'Malley, Dervla

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-chromosome linked recessive disorder caused by the truncation or deletion of the dystrophin gene. The most widely used animal model of this disease is the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse which was first discovered 30 years ago. Despite its extensive use in DMD research, no effective treatment has yet been developed for this devastating disease. This review explores what we have learned from this mouse model regarding the pathophysiology of DMD and asks if it has a future in providing a better more thorough understanding of this disease or if it will bring us any closer to improving the outlook for DMD patients.

  14. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  15. Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was first described over a century ago. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' non-coding region of DMPK, the gene encoding the DM protein kinase. More recently a second form of the disease, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. The DM2 expansion involves a CCTG repeat in the first intron of Zinc Finger 9 (ZNF9). Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. Studies suggest that the shared clinical features of DM1 and DM2 involve a novel genetic mechanism in which repetitive RNA exerts a toxic effect. The RNA toxicity stems from the expanded repeat in the transcripts from the mutant DM alleles. This chapter will review the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM, and discuss current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies. PMID:25037086

  16. The pros and cons of vertebrate animal models for functional and therapeutic research on inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Slijkerman, Ralph W N; Song, Fei; Astuti, Galuh D N; Huynen, Martijn A; van Wijk, Erwin; Stieger, Knut; Collin, Rob W J

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade, huge progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD), as well as in the development and implementation of novel therapies, especially in the field of gene therapy. The use of mutant animal models, either naturally occurring or generated by genetic modification, have contributed greatly to our knowledge on IRD. Yet, these mutant animal models do not always mimic the retinal phenotype that is observed in humans with mutations in the orthologous gene, often due to species-specific characteristics of the retina, and/or diverse functions of the gene products in different species. In this manuscript, we compare general and ocular characteristics of a series of widely used vertebrate animal models, i.e. zebrafish, chicken, rodents, cats, dogs, sheep, pigs and monkeys, in terms of genetic architecture and sequence homology, methods to modify genomes, anatomy of the eye, and structural details of the retina. Furthermore, we present an overview of mutant vertebrate animal models that have been used to study or develop treatments for the various genetic subtypes of IRD, and correlate the suitability of these models to the specific characteristics of each animal. Herewith, we provide tools that will help to select the most suitable animal model for specific research questions on IRDs in the future, and thereby assist in an optimal use of animals and resources to further increase our understanding of inherited retinal dystrophies, and develop novel treatments for these disorders.

  17. Inner Retina Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Stargardt-like Macular Dystrophy (STGD3)

    PubMed Central

    Kuny, Sharee; Gaillard, Frédéric; Mema, Silvina C.; Freund, Paul R.; Zhang, Kang; MacDonald, Ian M.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of progressive age-related photoreceptor degeneration on retinal integrity in Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STGD3). Methods. The structural design of the inner retina of the ELOVL4 transgenic mouse model of STGD3 was compared with that of age-matched littermate wild-type (WT) mice from 1 to 24 months of age by using immunohistofluorescence and confocal microscopy and by relying on antibodies against cell-type–specific markers, synapse-associated proteins, and neurotransmitters. Results. Müller cell reactivity occurred at the earliest age studied, before photoreceptor loss. This finding is perhaps not surprising, considering the cell's ubiquitous roles in retina homeostasis. Second-order neurons displayed salient morphologic changes as a function of photoreceptoral input loss. Age-related sprouting of dendritic fibers from rod bipolar and horizontal cells into the ONL did not occur. In contrast, with the loss of photoreceptor sensory input, these second-order neurons progressively bore fewer synapses. After rod loss, the few remaining cones showed abnormal opsin expression, revealing tortuous branched axons. After complete ONL loss (beyond 18 months of age), localized areas of extreme retinal disruptions were observed in the central retina. RPE cell invasion, dense networks of strongly reactive Müller cell processes, and invagination of axons and blood vessels were distinctive features of these regions. In addition, otherwise unaffected cholinergic amacrine cells displayed severe perturbation of their cell bodies and synaptic plexi in these areas. Conclusions. Remodeling in ELOVL4 transgenic mice follows a pattern similar to that reported after other types of hereditary retinopathies in animals and humans, pointing to a potentially common pathophysiologic mechanism. PMID:19933199

  18. Taurine deficiency, synthesis and transport in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Jessica R; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2015-09-01

    The amino acid taurine is essential for the function of skeletal muscle and administration is proposed as a treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Taurine homeostasis is dependent on multiple processes including absorption of taurine from food, endogenous synthesis from cysteine and reabsorption in the kidney. This study investigates the cause of reported taurine deficiency in the dystrophic mdx mouse model of DMD. Levels of metabolites (taurine, cysteine, cysteine sulfinate and hypotaurine) and proteins (taurine transporter [TauT], cysteine deoxygenase and cysteine sulfinate dehydrogenase) were quantified in juvenile control C57 and dystrophic mdx mice aged 18 days, 4 and 6 weeks. In C57 mice, taurine content was much higher in both liver and plasma at 18 days, and both cysteine and cysteine deoxygenase were increased. As taurine levels decreased in maturing C57 mice, there was increased transport (reabsorption) of taurine in the kidney and muscle. In mdx mice, taurine and cysteine levels were much lower in liver and plasma at 18 days, and in muscle cysteine was low at 18 days, whereas taurine was lower at 4: these changes were associated with perturbations in taurine transport in liver, kidney and muscle and altered metabolism in liver and kidney. These data suggest that the maintenance of adequate body taurine relies on sufficient dietary intake of taurine and cysteine availability and metabolism, as well as retention of taurine by the kidney. This research indicates dystrophin deficiency not only perturbs taurine metabolism in the muscle but also affects taurine metabolism in the liver and kidney, and supports targeting cysteine and taurine deficiency as a potential therapy for DMD.

  19. Evidence for impaired neurovascular transmission in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bagher, Pooneh; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Little is known about how blood flow control is affected in arteriolar networks supplying dystrophic muscle. We tested the hypothesis that mdx mice, a murine model for DMD, exhibit defects in arteriolar vasomotor control. The cremaster muscle was prepared for intravital microscopy in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized mdx and C57BL/10 control mice (n ≥ 5 per group). Spontaneous vasomotor tone increased similarly with arteriolar branch order in both mdx and C57BL/10 mice [pooled values: first order (1A), 6%; second order (2A), 56%; and third order (3A), 61%] with no difference in maximal diameters between groups measured during equilibration with topical 10 μM sodium nitroprusside (pooled values: 1A, 70 ± 3 μm; 2A, 31 ± 3 μm; and 3A, 19 ± 3 μm). Concentration-response curves to acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine added to the superfusion solution did not differ between mdx and C57BL/10 mice, nor did constriction to elevated (21%) oxygen. In response to local stimulation from a micropipette, conducted vasodilation to ACh and conducted vasoconstriction to KCl were also not different between groups; however, constriction decayed with distance (P < 0.05) whereas dilation did not. Remarkably, arteriolar constriction to perivascular nerve stimulation (PNS) at 2, 4, and 8 Hz was reduced by ∼25–30% in mdx mice compared with C57BL/10 mice (P < 0.05). With intact arteriolar reactivity to agonists, attenuated constriction to perivascular nerve stimulation indicates impaired neurovascular transmission in arterioles controlling blood flow in mdx mice. PMID:21109597

  20. Muscleblind, BSF and TBPH are mislocalized in the muscle sarcomere of a Drosophila myotonic dystrophy model

    PubMed Central

    Llamusi, Beatriz; Bargiela, Ariadna; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M.; Garcia-Lopez, Amparo; Klima, Raffaella; Feiguin, Fabian; Artero, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disease caused by the pathological expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. In the DMPK transcripts, the CUG expansions sequester RNA-binding proteins into nuclear foci, including transcription factors and alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL1. MBNL1 sequestration has been associated with key features of DM1. However, the basis behind a number of molecular and histological alterations in DM1 remain unclear. To help identify new pathogenic components of the disease, we carried out a genetic screen using a Drosophila model of DM1 that expresses 480 interrupted CTG repeats, i(CTG)480, and a collection of 1215 transgenic RNA interference (RNAi) fly lines. Of the 34 modifiers identified, two RNA-binding proteins, TBPH (homolog of human TAR DNA-binding protein 43 or TDP-43) and BSF (Bicoid stability factor; homolog of human LRPPRC), were of particular interest. These factors modified i(CTG)480 phenotypes in the fly eye and wing, and TBPH silencing also suppressed CTG-induced defects in the flight muscles. In Drosophila flight muscle, TBPH, BSF and the fly ortholog of MBNL1, Muscleblind (Mbl), were detected in sarcomeric bands. Expression of i(CTG)480 resulted in changes in the sarcomeric patterns of these proteins, which could be restored by coexpression with human MBNL1. Epistasis studies showed that Mbl silencing was sufficient to induce a subcellular redistribution of TBPH and BSF proteins in the muscle, which mimicked the effect of i(CTG)480 expression. These results provide the first description of TBPH and BSF as targets of Mbl-mediated CTG toxicity, and they suggest an important role of these proteins in DM1 muscle pathology. PMID:23118342

  1. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  2. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  3. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in two animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Giacomotto, Jean; Pertl, Cordula; Borrel, Caroline; Walter, Maggie C; Bulst, Stefanie; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David L; Lochmüller, Hanns; Thirion, Christian; Ségalat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is an inherited muscle degeneration disease for which there is still no efficient treatment. However, compounds active on the disease may already exist among approved drugs but are difficult to identify in the absence of cellular models. We used the Caenorhabditis elegans animal model to screen a collection of 1000 already approved compounds. Two of the most active hits obtained were methazolamide and dichlorphenamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors widely used in human therapy. In C. elegans, these drugs were shown to interact with CAH-4, a putative carbonic anhydrase. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further validated in long-term experiments on mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Mice were treated for 120 days with food containing methazolamide or dichlorphenamide at two doses each. Musculus tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles were histologically analyzed and isometric muscle force was measured in M. extensor digitorum longus. Both substances increased the tetanic muscle force in the treated M. extensor digitorum longus muscle group, dichlorphenamide increased the force significantly by 30%, but both drugs failed to increase resistance of muscle fibres to eccentric contractions. Histological analysis revealed a reduction of centrally nucleated fibers in M. tibialis anterior and diaphragm in the treated groups. These studies further demonstrated that a C. elegans-based screen coupled with a mouse model validation strategy can lead to the identification of potential pharmacological agents for rare diseases.

  4. Myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Charles A

    2014-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. DM type 1 was first described over a century ago. More recently, a second form of the disease, DM type 2 was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. This article reviews the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM and discusses current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies.

  5. Myostatin inhibition by a follistatin-derived peptide ameliorates the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy model mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, K

    2008-07-01

    Gene-targeted therapies, such as adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene therapy and cell-mediated therapy using myogenic stem cells, are hopeful molecular strategies for muscular dystrophy. In addition, drug therapies based on the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy patients are desirable. Multidisciplinary approaches to drug design would offer promising therapeutic strategies. Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, is predominantly produced by skeletal muscle and negatively regulates the growth and differentiation of cells of the skeletal muscle lineage. Myostatin inhibition would increase the skeletal muscle mass and prevent muscle degeneration, regardless of the type of muscular dystrophy. Myostatin inhibitors include myostatin antibodies, myostatin propeptide, follistatin and follistatin-related protein. Although follistatin possesses potent myostatin-inhibiting activity, it works as an efficient inhibitor of activins. Unlike myostatin, activins regulate the growth and differentiation of nearly all cell types, including cells of the gonads, pituitary gland and skeletal muscle. We have developed a myostatin-specific inhibitor derived from follistatin, designated FS I-I. Transgenic mice expressing this myostatin-inhibiting peptide under the control of a skeletal muscle-specific promoter showed increased skeletal muscle mass and strength. mdx mice were crossed with FS I-I transgenic mice and any improvement of the pathological signs was investigated. The resulting mdx/FS I-I mice exhibited increased skeletal muscle mass and reduced cell infiltration in muscles. Muscle strength was also recovered in mdx/FS I-I mice. Our data indicate that myostatin inhibition by this follistatin-derived peptide has therapeutic potential for muscular dystrophy.

  6. Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy: A Mouse Model Generated by Gene Targeting of the GCAP1/Guca1a Gene

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Prateek K.; Mihelec, Marija; Cottrill, Phillippa; Wilkie, Susan E.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Duran, Yanai; West, Emma L.; Michaelides, Michel; Ali, Robin R.; Hunt, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Cone dystrophy 3 (COD3) is a severe dominantly inherited retinal degeneration caused by missense mutations in GUCA1A, the gene encoding Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 1 (GCAP1). The role of GCAP1 in controlling cyclic nucleotide levels in photoreceptors has largely been elucidated using knock-out mice, but the disease pathology in these mice cannot be extrapolated directly to COD3 as this involves altered, rather than loss of, GCAP1 function. Therefore, in order to evaluate the pathology of this dominant disorder, we have introduced a point mutation into the murine Guca1a gene that causes an E155G amino acid substitution; this is one of the disease-causing mutations found in COD3 patients. Disease progression in this novel mouse model of cone dystrophy was determined by a variety of techniques including electroretinography (ERG), retinal histology, immunohistochemistry and measurement of cGMP levels. It was established that although retinal development was normal up to 3 months of age, there was a subsequent progressive decline in retinal function, with a far greater alteration in cone than rod responses, associated with a corresponding loss of photoreceptors. In addition, we have demonstrated that accumulation of cyclic GMP precedes the observed retinal degeneration and is likely to contribute to the disease mechanism. Importantly, this knock-in mutant mouse has many features in common with the human disease, thereby making it an excellent model to further probe disease pathogenesis and investigate therapeutic interventions. PMID:21464903

  7. AAV6-mediated systemic shRNA delivery reverses disease in a mouse model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bortolanza, Sergia; Nonis, Alessandro; Sanvito, Francesca; Maciotta, Simona; Sitia, Giovanni; Wei, Jessica; Torrente, Yvan; Di Serio, Clelia; Chamberlain, Joel R; Gabellini, Davide

    2011-11-01

    Treatment of dominantly inherited muscle disorders remains a difficult task considering the need to eliminate the pathogenic gene product in a body-wide fashion. We show here that it is possible to reverse dominant muscle disease in a mouse model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD is a common form of muscular dystrophy associated with a complex cascade of epigenetic events following reduction in copy number of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats located on chromosome 4q35. Several 4q35 genes have been examined for their role in disease, including FRG1. Overexpression of FRG1 causes features related to FSHD in transgenic mice and the FRG1 mouse is currently the only available mouse model of FSHD. Here we show that systemic delivery of RNA interference expression cassettes in the FRG1 mouse, after the onset of disease, led to a dose-dependent long-term FRG1 knockdown without signs of toxicity. Histological features including centrally nucleated fibers, fiber size reduction, fibrosis, adipocyte accumulation, and inflammation were all significantly improved. FRG1 mRNA knockdown resulted in a dramatic restoration of muscle function. Through RNA interference (RNAi) expression cassette redesign, our method is amenable to targeting any pathogenic gene offering a viable option for long-term, body-wide treatment of dominant muscle disease in humans.

  8. Uncoordinated transcription and compromised muscle function in the lmna-null mouse model of Emery- Emery-Dreyfuss muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gnocchi, Viola F; Scharner, Juergen; Huang, Zhe; Brady, Ken; Lee, Jaclyn S; White, Robert B; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sun, Yin-Biao; Ellis, Juliet A; Zammit, Peter S

    2011-02-22

    LMNA encodes both lamin A and C: major components of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in LMNA underlie a range of tissue-specific degenerative diseases, including those that affect skeletal muscle, such as autosomal-Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (A-EDMD) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1B. Here, we examine the morphology and transcriptional activity of myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction and the muscle contraction dynamics in the lmna-null mouse model of A-EDMD. We found that there were fewer myonuclei in lmna-null mice, of which ∼50% had morphological abnormalities. Assaying transcriptional activity by examining acetylated histone H3 and PABPN1 levels indicated that there was a lack of coordinated transcription between myonuclei lacking lamin A/C. Myonuclei with abnormal morphology and transcriptional activity were distributed along the length of the myofibre, but accumulated at the myotendinous junction. Indeed, in addition to the presence of abnormal myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction was perturbed, with disorganised sarcomeres and reduced interdigitation with the tendon, together with lipid and collagen deposition. Functionally, muscle contraction became severely affected within weeks of birth, with specific force generation dropping as low as ∼65% and ∼27% of control values in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles respectively. These observations illustrate the importance of lamin A/C for correct myonuclear function, which likely acts synergistically with myotendinous junction disorganisation in the development of A-EDMD, and the consequential reduction in force generation and muscle wasting.

  9. Preclinical studies in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat.

    PubMed

    Consalvi, Silvia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Bettica, Paolo; Germani, Massimiliano; Fiorentini, Francesco; Del Bene, Francesca; Rocchetti, Maurizio; Leoni, Flavio; Monzani, Valmen; Mascagni, Paolo; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Saccone, Valentina

    2013-05-20

    Previous work has established the existence of dystrophin-nitric oxide (NO) signaling to histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is deregulated in dystrophic muscles. As such, pharmacological interventions that target HDACs (that is, HDAC inhibitors) are of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this study, we explored the effectiveness of long-term treatment with different doses of the HDAC inhibitor givinostat in mdx mice--the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This study identified an efficacy for recovering functional and histological parameters within a window between 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat, with evident reduction of the beneficial effects with 1 mg/kg/d dosage. The long-term (3.5 months) exposure of 1.5-month-old mdx mice to optimal concentrations of givinostat promoted the formation of muscles with increased cross-sectional area and reduced fibrotic scars and fatty infiltration, leading to an overall improvement of endurance performance in treadmill tests and increased membrane stability. Interestingly, a reduced inflammatory infiltrate was observed in muscles of mdx mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg/kg/d of givinostat. A parallel pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis confirmed the relationship between the effective doses of givinostat and the drug distribution in muscles and blood of treated mice. These findings provide the preclinical basis for an immediate translation of givinostat into clinical studies with DMD patients.

  10. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression.

  11. ANGIOTENSIN-DEPENDENT AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION PRECEDES DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Weiss, Robert M.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Domenig, Oliver; Cicha, Michael Z.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoglycan mutations cause muscular dystrophy. Patients with muscular dystrophy develop autonomic dysregulation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but the temporal relationship and mechanism of autonomic dysregulation are not well understood. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes autonomic dysregulation prior to development of DCM in sarcoglycan-delta (Sgcd) deficient mice, and that the severity of autonomic dysfunction at a young age predicts the severity of DCM at older ages. At 10-12 weeks of age, when left ventricular function assessed by echocardiography remained normal, Sgcd−/− mice exhibited decreases in arterial pressure, locomotor activity, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovagal tone, and increased sympathetic tone compared with age-matched C57BL/6 control mice (P<0.05). Systemic and skeletal muscle RAS were activated, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, superoxide and fibrosis were increased in dystrophic skeletal muscle (P<0.05). Treatment with the AT1R blocker losartan for 7-9 weeks beginning at 3 weeks of age prevented or strongly attenuated the abnormalities in Sgcd−/− mice (P<0.05). Repeated assessment of phenotypes between 10 and 75 weeks of age demonstrated worsening of autonomic function, progressive cardiac dysfunction and DCM, and increased mortality in Sgcd−/− mice. High sympathetic tone predicted subsequent left ventricular dysfunction. We conclude that RAS activation causes severe autonomic dysregulation in young Sgcd−/− mice, which portends a worse long-term prognosis. Therapeutic targeting of RAS at a young age may improve autonomic function and slow disease progression in muscular dystrophy. PMID:25921929

  12. Trendelenburg-Like Gait, Instability and Altered Step Patterns in a Mouse Model for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2i

    PubMed Central

    Maricelli, Joseph W.; Lu, Qi L.; Lin, David C.; Rodgers, Buel D.

    2016-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2i (LGMD2i) affects thousands of lives with shortened life expectancy mainly due to cardiac and respiratory problems and difficulty with ambulation significantly compromising quality of life. Limited studies have noted impaired gait in patients and animal models of different muscular dystrophies, but not in animal models of LGMD2i. Our goal, therefore, was to quantify gait metrics in the fukutin-related protein P448L mutant (P448L) mouse, a recently developed model for LGMD2i. The Noldus CatWalk XT motion capture system was used to identify multiple gait impairments. An average galloping body speed of 35 cm/s for both P448L and C57BL/6 wild-type mice was maintained to ensure differences in gait were due only to strain physiology. Compared to wild-type mice, P448L mice reach maximum contact 10% faster and have 40% more paw surface area during stance. Additionally, force intensity at the time of maximum paw contact is roughly 2-fold higher in P448L mice. Paw swing time is reduced in P448L mice without changes in stride length as a faster swing speed compensates. Gait instability in P448L mice is indicated by 50% higher instances of 3 and 4 paw stance support and conversely, 2-fold fewer instances of single paw stance support and no instance of zero paw support. This leads to lower variation of normal step patterns used and a higher use of uncommon step patterns. Similar anomalies have also been noted in muscular dystrophy patients due to weakness in the hip abductor muscles, producing a Trendelenburg gait characterized by “waddling” and more pronounced shifts to the stance leg. Thus, gait of P448L mice replicates anomalies commonly seen in LGMD2i patients, which is not only potentially valuable for assessing drug efficacy in restoring movement biomechanics, but also for better understanding them. PMID:27627455

  13. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  14. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-06-15

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies.

  15. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful.

  16. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD.

  17. Differential expression of genes involved in the degeneration and regeneration pathways in mouse models for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Onofre-Oliveira, P C G; Santos, A L F; Martins, P M; Ayub-Guerrieri, D; Vainzof, M

    2012-03-01

    The genetically determined muscular dystrophies are caused by mutations in genes coding for muscle proteins. Differences in the phenotypes are mainly the age of onset and velocity of progression. Muscle weakness is the consequence of myofiber degeneration due to an imbalance between successive cycles of degeneration/regeneration. While muscle fibers are lost, a replacement of the degraded muscle fibers by adipose and connective tissues occurs. Major investigation points are to elicit the involved pathophysiological mechanisms to elucidate how each mutation can lead to a specific degenerative process and how the regeneration is stimulated in each case. To answer these questions, we used four mouse models with different mutations causing muscular dystrophies, Dmd (mdx), SJL/J, Large (myd) and Lama2 (dy2J) /J, and compared the histological changes of regeneration and fibrosis to the expression of genes involved in those processes. For regeneration, the MyoD, Myf5 and myogenin genes related to the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells were studied, while for degeneration, the TGF-β1 and Pro-collagen 1α2 genes, involved in the fibrotic cascade, were analyzed. The result suggests that TGF-β1 gene is activated in the dystrophic process in all the stages of degeneration, while the activation of the expression of the pro-collagen gene possibly occurs in mildest stages of this process. We also observed that each pathophysiological mechanism acted differently in the activation of regeneration, with distinctions in the induction of proliferation of satellite cells, but with no alterations in stimulation to differentiation. Dysfunction of satellite cells can, therefore, be an important additional mechanism of pathogenesis in the dystrophic muscle.

  18. Positive effects of bisphosphonates on bone and muscle in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density and bone fracture as a result of inactivity. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could improve bone quality and their effects on muscle we studied the Mdx mouse, treated with pamidronate during peak bone growth at 5 and 6 weeks of age, and examined the outcome at 13 weeks of age. Pamidronate increased cortical bone architecture and strength in femurs with increased resistance to fracture. While overall long bone growth was not affected by pamidronate, there was significant inhibition of remodeling in metaphyseal trabecular bone with evidence of residual calcified cartilage. Pamidronate treatment had positive effects on skeletal muscle in the Mdx mice with decreased serum and muscle creatine kinase and evidence of improved muscle histology and grip strength.

  19. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a model for studying the contribution of muscle to energy and protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hankard, R

    1998-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with a dramatic muscle mass loss. We hypothesized that DMD would be associated with significant changes in both energy and protein metabolism. We studied the resting energy expenditure (REE) in DMD and control children using indirect calorimetry, and their protein metabolism using an intravenous infusion of leucine and glutamine labeled with stable isotopes. In spite of a 75% muscle mass loss in the DMD children, the REE only decreased by 10%. DMD was associated with increased leucine oxidation but neither protein degradation nor protein synthesis were different from that of the controls. In contrast, whole body turnover of glutamine, an amino acid mainly synthesized in the muscle, was significantly decreased. These studies emphasized the quantitatively poor contribution of muscle to energy and protein metabolism in children. The qualitative impact of muscle mass loss on amino acid metabolism (glutamine) offers a fascinating field of research for the next few years and has therapeutic potential.

  20. Non-invasive evaluation of muscle disease in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by electrical impedance myography

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Mijailovic, Alex; Lessa, Thais B.; Coates, Joan R.; Shin, Carmen; Rutkove, Seward B.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2017-01-01

    Dystrophin-deficient dogs are by far the best available large animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal childhood muscle degenerative disease. The use of the canine DMD model in basic disease mechanism research and translational studies will be greatly enhanced with the development of reliable outcome measures. Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a non-invasive painless procedure that provides quantitative data relating to muscle composition and histology. EIM has been extensively used in neuromuscular disease research in both human patients and rodent models. Recent studies suggest that EIM may represent a highly reliable and convenient outcome measure in DMD patients and the mdx mouse model of DMD. To determine whether EIM can be used as a biomarker of disease severity in the canine model, we performed the assay in fourteen young (~6.6-m-old; 6 normal and 8 affected) and ten mature (~16.9-m-old; 4 normal and 6 affected) dogs of mixed background breeds. EIM was well tolerated with good inter-rater reliability. Affected dogs showed higher resistance, lower reactance and phase. The difference became more straightforward in mature dogs. Importantly, we observed a statistically significant correlation between the EIM data and muscle fibrosis. Our results suggest that EIM is a valuable objective measurement in the canine DMD model. PMID:28339469

  1. Non-invasive evaluation of muscle disease in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by electrical impedance myography.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Chady H; Mijailovic, Alex; Lessa, Thais B; Coates, Joan R; Shin, Carmen; Rutkove, Seward B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2017-01-01

    Dystrophin-deficient dogs are by far the best available large animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal childhood muscle degenerative disease. The use of the canine DMD model in basic disease mechanism research and translational studies will be greatly enhanced with the development of reliable outcome measures. Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a non-invasive painless procedure that provides quantitative data relating to muscle composition and histology. EIM has been extensively used in neuromuscular disease research in both human patients and rodent models. Recent studies suggest that EIM may represent a highly reliable and convenient outcome measure in DMD patients and the mdx mouse model of DMD. To determine whether EIM can be used as a biomarker of disease severity in the canine model, we performed the assay in fourteen young (~6.6-m-old; 6 normal and 8 affected) and ten mature (~16.9-m-old; 4 normal and 6 affected) dogs of mixed background breeds. EIM was well tolerated with good inter-rater reliability. Affected dogs showed higher resistance, lower reactance and phase. The difference became more straightforward in mature dogs. Importantly, we observed a statistically significant correlation between the EIM data and muscle fibrosis. Our results suggest that EIM is a valuable objective measurement in the canine DMD model.

  2. Dantrolene enhances antisense-mediated exon skipping in human and mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Genevieve C; Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Moran, Miriana; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Wang, Derek W; Silva, Oscar; Wang, Richard T; Martinez, Leonel; Lu, Qi L; Damoiseaux, Robert; Spencer, Melissa J; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie

    2012-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes profound and progressive muscle weakness and loss, resulting in early death. DMD is usually caused by frameshifting deletions in the gene DMD, which leads to absence of dystrophin protein. Dystrophin binds to F-actin and components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and protects the sarcolemma from contraction-induced injury. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach aimed at restoring the DMD reading frame and allowing expression of an intact dystrophin glycoprotein complex. To date, low levels of dystrophin protein have been produced in humans by this method. We performed a small-molecule screen to identify existing drugs that enhance antisense-directed exon skipping. We found that dantrolene, currently used to treat malignant hyperthermia, potentiates antisense oligomer-guided exon skipping to increase exon skipping to restore the mRNA reading frame, the sarcolemmal dystrophin protein, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscles of mdx mice when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously. Further, dantrolene synergized with multiple weekly injections of antisense to increase muscle strength and reduce serum creatine kinase in mdx mice. Dantrolene similarly promoted antisense-mediated exon skipping in reprogrammed myotubes from DMD patients. Ryanodine and Rycal S107, which, like dantrolene, targets the ryanodine receptor, also promoted antisense-driven exon skipping, implicating the ryanodine receptor as the critical molecular target.

  3. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  4. Dystrophin Deficiency Compromises Force Production of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Muscle in the Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Pan, Xiufang; Terjung, Ronald L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle force is a salient feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Assessment of force production from a single intact muscle has been considered as the gold standard for studying physiological consequences in murine models of DMD. Unfortunately, equivalent assays have not been established in dystrophic dogs. To fill the gap, we developed a novel in situ protocol to measure force generated by the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscle of a dog. We also determined the muscle length to fiber length ratio and the pennation angle of the ECU muscle. Muscle pathology and contractility were compared between normal and affected dogs. Absence of dystrophin resulted in marked histological damage in the ECU muscle of affected dogs. Central nucleation was significantly increased and myofiber size distribution was altered in the dystrophic ECU muscle. Muscle weight and physiological cross sectional area (PCSA) showed a trend of reduction in affected dogs although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Force measurement revealed a significant decrease of absolute force, and the PCSA or muscle weight normalized specific forces. To further characterize the physiological defect in affected dog muscle, we conducted eccentric contraction. Dystrophin-null dogs showed a significantly greater force loss following eccentric contraction damage. To our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of force deficit in a single intact muscle in the canine DMD model. The method described here will be of great value to study physiological outcomes following innovative gene and/or cell therapies. PMID:22973449

  5. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  6. Skeletal muscle fibrosis in the mdx/utrn+/- mouse validates its suitability as a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutpell, Kelly M; Hrinivich, William T; Hoffman, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Various therapeutic approaches have been studied for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but none of these approaches have led to significant long-term effects in patients. One reason for this observed inefficacy may be the use of inappropriate animal models for the testing of therapeutic agents. The mdx mouse is the most widely used murine model of DMD, yet it does not model the fibrotic progression observed in patients. Other murine models of DMD are available that lack one or both alleles of utrophin, a functional analog of dystrophin. The aim of this study was to compare fibrosis and myofiber damage in the mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and double knockout (dko) mouse models. We used Masson's trichrome stain and percentage of centrally-nucleated myofibers as indicators of fibrosis and myofiber regeneration, respectively, to assess disease progression in diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles harvested from young and aged wild-type, mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and dko mice. Our results indicated that eight week-old gastrocnemius muscles of both mdx/utrn+/- and dko hind limb developed fibrosis whereas age-matched mdx gastrocnemius muscle did not (p = 0.002). The amount of collagen found in the mdx/utrn+/- diaphragm was significantly higher than that found in the corresponding diaphragm muscles of wild-type animals, but not of mdx animals (p = 0.0003). Aged mdx/utrn+/- mice developed fibrosis in both diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles compared to wild-type controls (p = 0.003). Mdx diaphragm was fibrotic in aged mice as well (p = 0.0235), whereas the gastrocnemius muscle in these animals was not fibrotic. We did not measure a significant difference in collagen staining between wild-type and mdx gastrocnemius muscles. The results of this study support previous reports that the moderately-affected mdx/utrn+/- mouse is a better model of DMD, and we show here that this difference is apparent by 2 months of age.

  7. Nanopatterned muscle cell patches for enhanced myogenesis and dystrophin expression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee Seok; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Tsui, Jonathan H; Kim, Hong Nam; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Reyes, Morayma; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly organized tissue in which the extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed of highly-aligned cables of collagen with nanoscale feature sizes, and provides structural and functional support to muscle fibers. As such, the transplantation of disorganized tissues or the direct injection of cells into muscles for regenerative therapy often results in suboptimal functional improvement due to a failure to integrate with native tissue properly. Here, we present a simple method in which biodegradable, biomimetic substrates with precisely controlled nanotopography were fabricated using solvent-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) and were able to induce the proper development and differentiation of primary mononucleated cells to form mature muscle patches. Cells cultured on these nanopatterned substrates were highly-aligned and elongated, and formed more mature myotubes as evidenced by up-regulated expression of the myogenic regulatory factors Myf5, MyoD and myogenin (MyoG). When transplanted into mdx mice models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the proposed muscle patches led to the formation of a significantly greater number of dystrophin-positive muscle fibers, indicating that dystrophin replacement and myogenesis is achievable in vivo with this approach. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing biomimetic substrates not only as platforms for studying the influences of the ECM on skeletal muscle function and maturation, but also to create transplantable muscle cell patches for the treatment of chronic and acute muscle diseases or injuries.

  8. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1.

  9. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro.

  10. Respiratory failure in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy does not correlate with the CTG repeat length.

    PubMed

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kuntzer, Thierry; Gourdon, Geneviève; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2013-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by an expansion of CTG repeats in the region of DMPK, the gene encoding DM protein kinase. The severity of muscle disability in DM1 correlates with the size of CTG expansion. As respiratory failure is one of the main causes of death in DM1, we investigated the correlation between respiratory impairment and size of the (CTG)n repeat in DM1 animal models. Using pressure plethysmography the respiratory function was assessed in control and transgenic mice carrying either 600 (DM600) or >1300 CTG repeats (DMSXL). The statistical analysis of respiratory parameters revealed that both DM1 transgenic mice sub-lines show respiratory impairment compared to control mice. In addition, there is no significant difference in breathing functions between the DM600 and DMSXL mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that respiratory impairment is present in both transgenic mice sub-lines, but the severity of respiratory failure is not related to the size of the (CTG)n expansion.

  11. Triplet Repeat–Derived siRNAs Enhance RNA–Mediated Toxicity in a Drosophila Model for Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenming; Teng, Xiuyin; Bonini, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    More than 20 human neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by simple DNA repeat expansions; among these, non-coding CTG repeat expansions are the basis of myotonic dystrophy (DM1). Recent work, however, has also revealed that many human genes have anti-sense transcripts, raising the possibility that human trinucleotide expansion diseases may be comprised of pathogenic activities due both to a sense expanded-repeat transcript and to an anti-sense expanded-repeat transcript. We established a Drosophila model for DM1 and tested the role of interactions between expanded CTG transcripts and expanded CAG repeat transcripts. These studies revealed dramatically enhanced toxicity in flies co-expressing CTG with CAG expanded repeats. Expression of the two transcripts led to novel pathogenesis with the generation of dcr-2 and ago2-dependent 21-nt triplet repeat-derived siRNAs. These small RNAs targeted the expression of CAG-containing genes, such as Ataxin-2 and TATA binding protein (TBP), which bear long CAG repeats in both fly and man. These findings indicate that the generation of triplet repeat-derived siRNAs may dramatically enhance toxicity in human repeat expansion diseases in which anti-sense transcription occurs. PMID:21437269

  12. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Bal, Naresh C; Lowe, Jeovanna; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO) mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1) and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  13. Development of pharmacophore models for small molecules targeting RNA: Application to the RNA repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Angelbello, Alicia J; González, Àlex L; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-12-01

    RNA is an important drug target, but current approaches to identify bioactive small molecules have been engineered primarily for protein targets. Moreover, the identification of small molecules that bind a specific RNA target with sufficient potency remains a challenge. Computer-aided drug design (CADD) and, in particular, ligand-based drug design provide a myriad of tools to identify rapidly new chemical entities for modulating a target based on previous knowledge of active compounds without relying on a ligand complex. Herein we describe pharmacophore virtual screening based on previously reported active molecules that target the toxic RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1-associated defects are caused by sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1), an alternative splicing regulator, by expanded CUG repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Several small molecules have been found to disrupt the MBNL1-r(CUG)(exp) complex, ameliorating DM1 defects. Our pharmacophore model identified a number of potential lead compounds from which we selected 11 compounds to evaluate. Of the 11 compounds, several improved DM1 defects both in vitro and in cells.

  14. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/− mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-01-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin−/− (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin+/− mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin+/− mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin+/−, and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin+/− mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin+/− mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin+/− mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin+/− muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin+/− mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin+/− mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus. PMID:25921779

  15. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  16. Restoration of Vision in the pde6β-deficient Dog, a Large Animal Model of Rod-cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Lhériteau, Elsa; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Guihal, Caroline; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the β subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6β) are associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a childhood blinding disease with early retinal degeneration and vision loss. To date, there is no treatment for this pathology. The aim of this preclinical study was to test recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene addition therapy in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency that strongly resembles the human pathology. A total of eight rcd1 dogs were injected subretinally with AAV2/5RK.cpde6β (n = 4) or AAV2/8RK.cpde6β (n = 4). In vivo and post-mortem morphological analysis showed a significant preservation of the retinal structure in transduced areas of both AAV2/5RK.cpde6β- and AAV2/8RK.cpde6β-treated retinas. Moreover, substantial rod-derived electroretinography (ERG) signals were recorded as soon as 1 month postinjection (35% of normal eyes) and remained stable for at least 18 months (the duration of the study) in treated eyes. Rod-responses were undetectable in untreated contralateral eyes. Most importantly, dim-light vision was restored in all treated rcd1 dogs. These results demonstrate for the first time that gene therapy effectively restores long-term retinal function and vision in a large animal model of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy, and provide great promise for human treatment. PMID:22828504

  17. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  18. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  19. Low Intensity, High Frequency Vibration Training to Improve Musculoskeletal Function in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Susan A.; Mader, Tara L.; Greising, Angela G.; Lin, Angela S.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Warren, Gordon L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if low intensity, high frequency vibration training impacted the musculoskeletal system in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, relative to healthy mice. Three-week old wildtype (n = 26) and mdx mice (n = 22) were randomized to non-vibrated or vibrated (45 Hz and 0.6 g, 15 min/d, 5 d/wk) groups. In vivo and ex vivo contractile function of the anterior crural and extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively, were assessed following 8 wks of vibration. Mdx mice were injected 5 and 1 days prior to sacrifice with Calcein and Xylenol, respectively. Muscles were prepared for histological and triglyceride analyses and subcutaneous and visceral fat pads were excised and weighed. Tibial bones were dissected and analyzed by micro-computed tomography for trabecular morphometry at the metaphysis, and cortical geometry and density at the mid-diaphysis. Three-point bending tests were used to assess cortical bone mechanical properties and a subset of tibiae was processed for dynamic histomorphometry. Vibration training for 8 wks did not alter trabecular morphometry, dynamic histomorphometry, cortical geometry, or mechanical properties (P≥0.34). Vibration did not alter any measure of muscle contractile function (P≥0.12); however the preservation of muscle function and morphology in mdx mice indicates vibration is not deleterious to muscle lacking dystrophin. Vibrated mice had smaller subcutaneous fat pads (P = 0.03) and higher intramuscular triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.03). These data suggest that vibration training at 45 Hz and 0.6 g did not significantly impact the tibial bone and the surrounding musculature, but may influence fat distribution in mice. PMID:25121503

  20. Discovery of serum protein biomarkers in the mdx mouse model and cross-species comparison to Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Marathi, Ramya L.; Rayavarapu, Sree; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J.; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cirak, Sebahattin; Bello, Luca; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Partridge, Terry; Hoffman, Eric P.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Mah, Jean K.; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that serum protein biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will reflect disease pathogenesis, progression and aid future therapy developments. Here, we describe use of quantitative in vivo stable isotope labeling in mammals to accurately compare serum proteomes of wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Biomarkers identified in serum from two independent dystrophin-deficient mouse models (mdx-Δ52 and mdx-23) were concordant with those identified in sera samples of DMD patients. Of the 355 mouse sera proteins, 23 were significantly elevated and 4 significantly lower in mdx relative to wild-type mice (P-value < 0.001). Elevated proteins were mostly of muscle origin: including myofibrillar proteins (titin, myosin light chain 1/3, myomesin 3 and filamin-C), glycolytic enzymes (aldolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 2, beta enolase and glycogen phosphorylase), transport proteins (fatty acid-binding protein, myoglobin and somatic cytochrome-C) and others (creatine kinase M, malate dehydrogenase cytosolic, fibrinogen and parvalbumin). Decreased proteins, mostly of extracellular origin, included adiponectin, lumican, plasminogen and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor. Analysis of sera from 1 week to 7 months old mdx mice revealed age-dependent changes in the level of these biomarkers with most biomarkers acutely elevated at 3 weeks of age. Serum analysis of DMD patients, with ages ranging from 4 to 15 years old, confirmed elevation of 20 of the murine biomarkers in DMD, with similar age-related changes. This study provides a panel of biomarkers that reflect muscle activity and pathogenesis and should prove valuable tool to complement natural history studies and to monitor treatment efficacy in future clinical trials. PMID:25027324

  1. Low intensity, high frequency vibration training to improve musculoskeletal function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Susan A; Mader, Tara L; Greising, Angela G; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Warren, Gordon L; Lowe, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if low intensity, high frequency vibration training impacted the musculoskeletal system in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, relative to healthy mice. Three-week old wildtype (n = 26) and mdx mice (n = 22) were randomized to non-vibrated or vibrated (45 Hz and 0.6 g, 15 min/d, 5 d/wk) groups. In vivo and ex vivo contractile function of the anterior crural and extensor digitorum longus muscles, respectively, were assessed following 8 wks of vibration. Mdx mice were injected 5 and 1 days prior to sacrifice with Calcein and Xylenol, respectively. Muscles were prepared for histological and triglyceride analyses and subcutaneous and visceral fat pads were excised and weighed. Tibial bones were dissected and analyzed by micro-computed tomography for trabecular morphometry at the metaphysis, and cortical geometry and density at the mid-diaphysis. Three-point bending tests were used to assess cortical bone mechanical properties and a subset of tibiae was processed for dynamic histomorphometry. Vibration training for 8 wks did not alter trabecular morphometry, dynamic histomorphometry, cortical geometry, or mechanical properties (P ≥ 0.34). Vibration did not alter any measure of muscle contractile function (P ≥ 0.12); however the preservation of muscle function and morphology in mdx mice indicates vibration is not deleterious to muscle lacking dystrophin. Vibrated mice had smaller subcutaneous fat pads (P = 0.03) and higher intramuscular triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.03). These data suggest that vibration training at 45 Hz and 0.6 g did not significantly impact the tibial bone and the surrounding musculature, but may influence fat distribution in mice.

  2. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  3. Melatonin improves muscle function of the dystrophic mdx5Cv mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Reutenauer-Patte, Julie; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Ruegg, Urs T; Dorchies, Olivier M

    2011-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked muscle-wasting disease caused by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In addition to abnormal calcium handling, numerous studies point to a crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Considering the impressive results provided by antioxidants on dystrophic muscle structure and function, we investigated whether melatonin can protect the mdx(5Cv) mouse, an animal model for DMD. Male mdx(5Cv) mouse pups were treated with melatonin by daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection (30 mg/kg body weight) or by subcutaneous (s.c.) implant(s) (18 or 54 mg melatonin as Melovine® implants) from 17/18 to 28/29 days of age. Isometric force of the triceps surae was recorded at the end of the treatment. The i.p. treatment increased the phasic twitch tension of mdx(5Cv) mice. The maximal tetanic tension was ameliorated by 18 mg s.c. and 30 mg/kg i.p. treatments. Melatonin caused the dystrophic muscle to contract and relax faster. The force-frequency relationship of melatonin-treated dystrophic mice was shifted to the right. In accordance with improved muscle function, melatonin decreased plasma creatine kinase activity, a marker for muscle injury. Melatonin treatment increased total glutathione content and lowered the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio, indicating a better redox status of the muscle. In light of the present investigation, the therapeutic potential of melatonin should be further considered for patients with DMD.

  4. Degenerative and regenerative features of myofibers differ among skeletal muscles in a murine model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teppei; Ichii, Osamu; Otsuka-Kanazawa, Saori; Nakamura, Teppei; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle myofibers constantly undergo degeneration and regeneration. Histopathological features of 6 skeletal muscles (cranial tibial [CT], gastrocnemius, quadriceps femoris, triceps brachii [TB], lumbar longissimus muscles, and costal part of the diaphragm [CPD]) were compared using C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd (mdx) (mdx) mice, a model for muscular dystrophy versus control, C57BL/10 mice. Body weight and skeletal muscle mass were lower in mdx mice than the control at 4 weeks of age; these results were similar at 6-30 weeks. Additionally, muscular lesions were observed in all examined skeletal muscles in mdx mice after 4 weeks, but none were noted in the controls. Immunohistochemical staining revealed numerous paired box 7-positive satellite cells surrounding the embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating myofibers, while the number of the former and staining intensity of the latter decreased as myofiber regeneration progressed. Persistent muscular lesions were observed in skeletal muscles of mdx mice between 4 and 14 weeks of age, and normal myofibers decreased with age. Number of muscular lesions was lowest in CPD at all ages examined, while the ratio of normal myofibers was lowest in TB at 6 weeks. In CT, TB, and CPD, Iba1-positive macrophages, the main inflammatory cells in skeletal muscle lesions, showed a significant positive correlation with the appearance of regenerating myofibers. Additionally, B220-positive B-cells showed positive and negative correlation with regenerating and regenerated myofibers, respectively. Our data suggest that degenerative and regenerative features of myofibers differ among skeletal muscles and that inflammatory cells are strongly associated with regenerative features of myofibers in mdx mice.

  5. Discovery of serum protein biomarkers in the mdx mouse model and cross-species comparison to Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Marathi, Ramya L; Rayavarapu, Sree; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cirak, Sebahattin; Bello, Luca; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Partridge, Terry; Hoffman, Eric P; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Mah, Jean K; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig

    2014-12-15

    It is expected that serum protein biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will reflect disease pathogenesis, progression and aid future therapy developments. Here, we describe use of quantitative in vivo stable isotope labeling in mammals to accurately compare serum proteomes of wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Biomarkers identified in serum from two independent dystrophin-deficient mouse models (mdx-Δ52 and mdx-23) were concordant with those identified in sera samples of DMD patients. Of the 355 mouse sera proteins, 23 were significantly elevated and 4 significantly lower in mdx relative to wild-type mice (P-value < 0.001). Elevated proteins were mostly of muscle origin: including myofibrillar proteins (titin, myosin light chain 1/3, myomesin 3 and filamin-C), glycolytic enzymes (aldolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 2, beta enolase and glycogen phosphorylase), transport proteins (fatty acid-binding protein, myoglobin and somatic cytochrome-C) and others (creatine kinase M, malate dehydrogenase cytosolic, fibrinogen and parvalbumin). Decreased proteins, mostly of extracellular origin, included adiponectin, lumican, plasminogen and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor. Analysis of sera from 1 week to 7 months old mdx mice revealed age-dependent changes in the level of these biomarkers with most biomarkers acutely elevated at 3 weeks of age. Serum analysis of DMD patients, with ages ranging from 4 to 15 years old, confirmed elevation of 20 of the murine biomarkers in DMD, with similar age-related changes. This study provides a panel of biomarkers that reflect muscle activity and pathogenesis and should prove valuable tool to complement natural history studies and to monitor treatment efficacy in future clinical trials.

  6. The Rag2–Il2rb–Dmd– Mouse: a Novel Dystrophic and Immunodeficient Model to Assess Innovating Therapeutic Strategies for Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Vallese, Denis; Negroni, Elisa; Duguez, Stéphanie; Ferry, Arnaud; Trollet, Capucine; Aamiri, Ahmed; Vosshenrich, Christian AJ; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Di Santo, James P; Vitiello, Libero; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The development of innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies, particularly cell-based approaches, is still a developing field. Although positive results have been obtained in animal models, they have rarely been confirmed in patients and resulted in very limited clinical improvements, suggesting some specificity in humans. These findings emphasized the need for an appropriate animal model (i.e., immunodeficient and dystrophic) to investigate in vivo the behavior of transplanted human myogenic stem cells. We report a new model, the Rag2–Il2rb–Dmd– mouse, which lacks T, B, and NK cells, and also carries a mutant Dmd allele that prevents the production of any dystrophin isoform. The dystrophic features of this new model are comparable with those of the classically used mdx mouse, but with the total absence of any revertant dystrophin positive fiber. We show that Rag2–Il2rb–Dmd– mice allow long-term xenografts of human myogenic cells. Altogether, our findings indicate that the Rag2–Il2rb–Dmd– mouse represents an ideal model to gain further insights into the behavior of human myogenic stem cells in a dystrophic context, and can be used to assess innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies. PMID:23975040

  7. The Rag2⁻Il2rb⁻Dmd⁻ mouse: a novel dystrophic and immunodeficient model to assess innovating therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Vallese, Denis; Negroni, Elisa; Duguez, Stéphanie; Ferry, Arnaud; Trollet, Capucine; Aamiri, Ahmed; Vosshenrich, Christian A J; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Di Santo, James P; Vitiello, Libero; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    The development of innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies, particularly cell-based approaches, is still a developing field. Although positive results have been obtained in animal models, they have rarely been confirmed in patients and resulted in very limited clinical improvements, suggesting some specificity in humans. These findings emphasized the need for an appropriate animal model (i.e., immunodeficient and dystrophic) to investigate in vivo the behavior of transplanted human myogenic stem cells. We report a new model, the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse, which lacks T, B, and NK cells, and also carries a mutant Dmd allele that prevents the production of any dystrophin isoform. The dystrophic features of this new model are comparable with those of the classically used mdx mouse, but with the total absence of any revertant dystrophin positive fiber. We show that Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mice allow long-term xenografts of human myogenic cells. Altogether, our findings indicate that the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse represents an ideal model to gain further insights into the behavior of human myogenic stem cells in a dystrophic context, and can be used to assess innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

  8. The Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) Mouse: a Novel Dystrophic and Immunodeficient Model to Assess Innovating Therapeutic Strategies for Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Vallese, Denis; Negroni, Elisa; Duguez, Stéphanie; Ferry, Arnaud; Trollet, Capucine; Aamiri, Ahmed; Vosshenrich, Christian Aj; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Di Santo, James P; Vitiello, Libero; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    The development of innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies, particularly cell-based approaches, is still a developing field. Although positive results have been obtained in animal models, they have rarely been confirmed in patients and resulted in very limited clinical improvements, suggesting some specificity in humans. These findings emphasized the need for an appropriate animal model (i.e., immunodeficient and dystrophic) to investigate in vivo the behavior of transplanted human myogenic stem cells. We report a new model, the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse, which lacks T, B, and NK cells, and also carries a mutant Dmd allele that prevents the production of any dystrophin isoform. The dystrophic features of this new model are comparable with those of the classically used mdx mouse, but with the total absence of any revertant dystrophin positive fiber. We show that Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mice allow long-term xenografts of human myogenic cells. Altogether, our findings indicate that the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse represents an ideal model to gain further insights into the behavior of human myogenic stem cells in a dystrophic context, and can be used to assess innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

  9. A fly model for the CCUG-repeat expansion of myotonic dystrophy type 2 reveals a novel interaction with MBNL1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenming; Goodman, Lindsey D; Shieh, Shin-Yi; Min, Michelle; Teng, Xiuyin; Zhu, Yongqing; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-02-15

    Expanded non-coding RNA repeats of CUG and CCUG are the underlying genetic causes for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), respectively. A gain-of-function of these pathogenic repeat expansions is mediated at least in part by their abnormal interactions with RNA-binding proteins such as MBNL1 and resultant loss of activity of these proteins. To study pathogenic mechanisms of CCUG-repeat expansions in an animal model, we created a fly model of DM2 that expresses pure, uninterrupted CCUG-repeat expansions ranging from 16 to 720 repeats in length. We show that this fly model for DM2 recapitulates key features of human DM2 including RNA repeat-induced toxicity, ribonuclear foci formation and changes in alternative splicing. Interestingly, expression of two isoforms of MBNL1, MBNL135 and MBNL140, leads to cleavage and concurrent upregulation of the levels of the RNA-repeat transcripts, with MBNL140 having more significant effects than MBNL135. This property is shared with a fly CUG-repeat expansion model. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for interaction between the pathogenic RNA repeat expansions of myotonic dystrophy and MBNL1.

  10. Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and wheelchairs may improve movement and self-care. Genetic counseling may be recommended. Daughters of a man with ... Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  11. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    CARBERRY, STEVEN; BRINKMEIER, HEINRICH; ZHANG, YAXIN; WINKLER, CLAUDIA K.; OHLENDIECK, KAY

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20–25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  12. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  13. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  14. Modeling and study of the mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Li, Yang; Han, Lu; Kaplan, Aaron D.; Ao, Ying; Kalra, Spandan; Bett, Glenna C. L.; Rasmusson, Randall L.; Denning, Chris; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD), and is characterized by progressive weakness in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Currently, dilated cardiomyopathy due to cardiac muscle loss is one of the major causes of lethality in late-stage DMD patients. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD heart, we generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) from DMD and healthy control induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). DMD iPSC-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) displayed dystrophin deficiency, as well as the elevated levels of resting Ca2+, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found an activated mitochondria-mediated signaling network underlying the enhanced apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, when we treated DMD iPSC-CMs with the membrane sealant Poloxamer 188, it significantly decreased the resting cytosolic Ca2+ level, repressed caspase-3 (CASP3) activation and consequently suppressed apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Taken together, using DMD patient-derived iPSC-CMs, we established an in vitro model that manifests the major phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, and uncovered a potential new disease mechanism. Our model could be used for the mechanistic study of human muscular dystrophy, as well as future preclinical testing of novel therapeutic compounds for dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients. PMID:25791035

  15. Modeling and study of the mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Yang; Han, Lu; Kaplan, Aaron D; Ao, Ying; Kalra, Spandan; Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L; Denning, Chris; Yang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD), and is characterized by progressive weakness in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Currently, dilated cardiomyopathy due to cardiac muscle loss is one of the major causes of lethality in late-stage DMD patients. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD heart, we generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) from DMD and healthy control induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). DMD iPSC-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) displayed dystrophin deficiency, as well as the elevated levels of resting Ca(2+), mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found an activated mitochondria-mediated signaling network underlying the enhanced apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, when we treated DMD iPSC-CMs with the membrane sealant Poloxamer 188, it significantly decreased the resting cytosolic Ca(2+) level, repressed caspase-3 (CASP3) activation and consequently suppressed apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Taken together, using DMD patient-derived iPSC-CMs, we established an in vitro model that manifests the major phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, and uncovered a potential new disease mechanism. Our model could be used for the mechanistic study of human muscular dystrophy, as well as future preclinical testing of novel therapeutic compounds for dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients.

  16. Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium Meeting on Disease Progression Modeling for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Larkindale, Jane; Abresch, Richard; Aviles, Enrique; Bronson, Abby; Chin, Janice; Furlong, Pat; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Habeeb-Louks, Elizabeth; Henricson, Erik; Kroger, Hans; Lynn, Charles; Lynn, Stephen; Martin, Dana; Nuckolls, Glen; Rooney, William; Romero, Klaus; Sweeney, Lee; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn; Wolff, Jodi; Wong, Brenda; McDonald, Craig M.; Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium, Imaging-DMD Consortium and the CINRG Investigators, members of the

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Duchenne Regulatory Science Consortium (D-RSC) was established to develop tools to accelerate drug development for DMD.  The resulting tools are anticipated to meet validity requirements outlined by qualification/endorsement pathways at both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Administration (EMA), and will be made available to the drug development community. The initial goals of the consortium include the development of a disease progression model, with the goal of creating a model that would be used to forecast changes in clinically meaningful endpoints, which would inform clinical trial protocol development and data analysis.  Methods: In April of 2016 the consortium and other experts met to formulate plans for the development of the model.  Conclusions: Here we report the results of the meeting, and discussion as to the form of the model that we plan to move forward to develop, after input from the regulatory authorities. PMID:28228973

  17. Hereditary Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Thomas C

    2016-12-30

    As our understanding of the genetic basis for inherited retinal disease has expanded, gene therapy has advanced into clinical development. When the gene mutations associated with inherited retinal dystrophies were identified, it became possible to create animal models in which individual gene were altered to match the human mutations. The retina of these animals were then characterized to assess whether the mutated genes produced retinal phenotypes characteristic of disease-affected patients. Following the identification of a subpopulation of patients with the affected gene and the development of techniques for the viral gene transduction of retinal cells, it has become possible to deliver a copy of the normal gene into the retinal sites of the mutated genes. When this was performed in animal models of monogenic diseases, at an early stage of retinal degeneration when the affected cells remained viable, successful gene augmentation corrected the structural and functional lesions characteristic of the specific diseases in the areas of the retina that were successfully transduced. These studies provided the essential proof-of-concept needed to advance monogenic gene therapies into clinic development; these therapies include treatments for: Leber's congenital amaurosis type 2, caused by mutations to RPE65, retinoid isomerohydrolase; choroideremia, caused by mutations to REP1, Rab escort protein 1; autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, caused by mutations to ABCA4, the photoreceptor-specific ATP-binding transporter; Usher 1B disease caused by mutations to MYO7A, myosin heavy chain 7; X-linked juvenile retinoschisis caused by mutations to RS1, retinoschisin; autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations to MERTK, the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase MER; Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by mutations to ND4, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) subunit 4 and achromatopsia, caused by

  18. Learning about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in ... to date, which encodes the muscle protein, dystrophin. Boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy do not make the ...

  19. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput – omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products. PMID:27858763

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying muscle degeneration. Moreover, these studies have revealed distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms that link genetic mutations to diverse muscle wasting phenotypes. PMID:23671309

  1. Clinical and Laboratory Features Distinguishing Juvenile Polymyositis and Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    MAMYROVA, GULNARA; KATZ, JAMES D.; JONES, ROBERT V.; TARGOFF, IRA N.; LACHENBRUCH, PETER A.; JONES, OLCAY Y.; MILLER, FREDERICK W.; RIDER, LISA G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To differentiate juvenile polymyositis (PM) and muscular dystrophy, both of which may present with chronic muscle weakness and inflammation. Methods We studied 39 patients with probable or definite juvenile PM and 9 patients with muscular dystrophies who were initially misdiagnosed as having juvenile PM. Differences in demographic, clinical, and laboratory results; outcomes; and treatment responses were evaluated by Fisher’s exact and rank sum tests. Random forests classification analysis and logistic regression were performed to examine significant differences in multivariable models. Results Clinical features and serum muscle enzyme levels were similar between juvenile PM and dystrophy patients, except 89% of dystrophy patients had muscle atrophy compared with 46% of juvenile PM patients. Dystrophy patients had a longer delay to diagnosis (median 12 versus 4 months) and were less frequently hospitalized than juvenile PM patients (22% versus 74%). No dystrophy patients, but 54% of juvenile PM patients, had a myositis autoantibody. Dystrophy patients more frequently had myopathic features on muscle biopsy, including diffuse variation of myofiber size, fiber hypertrophy, and myofiber fibrosis (44–100% versus 8–53%). Juvenile PM patients more frequently had complex repetitive discharges on electromyography and a complete response to treatment with prednisone or other immunosuppressive agents than dystrophy patients (44% versus 0%). Random forests analysis revealed that the most important features in distinguishing juvenile PM from dystrophies were myositis autoantibodies, clinical muscle atrophy, and myofiber size variation on biopsy. Logistic regression confirmed muscle atrophy, myofiber fibrosis, and hospitalization as significant predictors. Conclusion Muscular dystrophy can present similarly to juvenile PM. Selected clinical and laboratory features are helpful in combination in distinguishing these conditions. PMID:23925923

  2. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Rabi

    2008-10-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominantly inherited disorder, is the third most common dystrophy after Duchenne and myotonic muscular dystrophy. No known effective treatments exist for FSHD. The lack of an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology remains an obstacle in the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. The genetic defect is a loss of a critical number of a repetitive element (D4Z4) in the 4q subtelomeric region. The loss of the repeats results in specific changes in chromatin structure, although neither the molecular nor the cellular consequences of this change are known. Nevertheless, these epigenetic changes in chromatin structure offer a potential therapeutic target. This review discusses current management strategies in FSHD as well as potential therapeutic interventions to slow down or reverse the progressive muscle atrophy and weakness.

  3. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies.

  4. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Statland, Jeffrey; Tawil, Rabi

    2014-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a common type of adult muscular dystrophy and is divided into types 1 and 2 based on genetic mutation. Clinically, both FSHD types often show asymmetric and progressive muscle weakness affecting initially the face, shoulder, and arms followed by the distal then proximal lower extremities. Approximately 95% of patients, termed FSHD1, have a deletion of a key number of repetitive elements on chromosome 4q35. The remaining 5%, termed FSHD2, have no deletion on chromosome 4q35. Nevertheless, both types share a common downstream mechanism, making it possible for future disease-directed therapies to be effective for both FSHD types.

  5. Prospect of gene therapy for cardiomyopathy in hereditary muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Binalsheikh, Ibrahim M.; Leach, Stacey B.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac involvement is a common feature in muscular dystrophies. It presents as heart failure and/or arrhythmia. Traditionally, dystrophic cardiomyopathy is treated with symptom-relieving medications. Identification of disease-causing genes and investigation on pathogenic mechanisms have opened new opportunities to treat dystrophic cardiomyopathy with gene therapy. Replacing/repairing the mutated gene and/or targeting the pathogenic process/mechanisms using alternative genes may attenuate heart disease in muscular dystrophies. Areas covered Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy. Duchenne cardiomyopathy has been the primary focus of ongoing dystrophic cardiomyopathy gene therapy studies. Here, we use Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy to showcase recent developments and to outline the path forward. We also discuss gene therapy status for cardiomyopathy associated with limb-girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies, and myotonic dystrophy. Expert opinion Gene therapy for dystrophic cardiomyopathy has taken a slow but steady path forward. Preclinical studies over the last decades have addressed many fundamental questions. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy has significantly improved the outcomes in rodent models of Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Validation of these encouraging results in large animal models will pave the way to future human trials. PMID:27340611

  6. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists alleviate muscle pathology in the mouse model for laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe muscle-wasting disease for which no curative treatment is available. Antagonists of the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1), including the anti-hypertensive drug losartan, have been shown to block also the profibrotic action of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and thereby ameliorate disease progression in mouse models of Marfan syndrome. Because fibrosis and failure of muscle regeneration are the main reasons for the severe disease course of MDC1A, we tested whether L-158809, an analog derivative of losartan, could ameliorate the dystrophy in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized model of MDC1A. Methods L-158809 was given in food to dyW/dyW mice at the age of 3 weeks, and the mice were analyzed at the age of 6 to 7 weeks. We examined the effect of L-158809 on muscle histology and on muscle regeneration after injury as well as the locomotor activity and muscle strength of the mice. Results We found that TGF-β signaling in the muscles of the dyW/dyW mice was strongly increased, and that L-158809 treatment suppressed this signaling. Consequently, L-158809 reduced fibrosis and inflammation in skeletal muscle of dyW/dyW mice, and largely restored muscle regeneration after toxin-induced injury. Mice showed improvement in their locomotor activity and grip strength, and their body weight was significantly increased. Conclusion These data provide evidence that AT1 antagonists ameliorate several hallmarks of MDC1A in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized mouse model for this disease. Because AT1 antagonists are well tolerated in humans and widely used in clinical practice, these results suggest that losartan may offer a potential future treatment of patients with MDC1A. PMID:22943509

  7. E2F transcription factor-1 deficiency reduces pathophysiology in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through increased muscle oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Emilie; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Pradelli, Ludivine A; Hugon, Gérald; Matecki, Stéfan; Mornet, Dominique; Rivier, François; Fajas, Lluis

    2012-09-01

    E2F1 deletion leads to increased mitochondrial number and function, increased body temperature in response to cold and increased resistance to fatigue with exercise. Since E2f1-/- mice show increased muscle performance, we examined the effect of E2f1 genetic inactivation in the mdx background, a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). E2f1-/-;mdx mice demonstrated a strong reduction of physiopathological signs of DMD, including preservation of muscle structure, decreased inflammatory profile, increased utrophin expression, resulting in better endurance and muscle contractile parameters, comparable to normal mdx mice. E2f1 deficiency in the mdx genetic background increased the oxidative metabolic gene program, mitochondrial activity and improved muscle functions. Interestingly, we observed increased E2F1 protein levels in DMD patients, suggesting that E2F1 might represent a promising target for the treatment of DMD.

  8. Laminin-111 Protein Therapy Reduces Muscle Pathology and Improves Viability of a Mouse Model of Merosin-Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Jachinta E.; Knapp, Jolie R.; Hodges, Bradley L.; Wuebbles, Ryan D.; Burkin, Dean J.

    2012-01-01

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a lethal muscle-wasting disease that is caused by mutations in the LAMA2 gene, resulting in the loss of laminin-α2 protein. MDC1A patients exhibit severe muscle weakness from birth, are confined to a wheelchair, require ventilator assistance, and have reduced life expectancy. There are currently no effective treatments or cures for MDC1A. Laminin-α2 is required for the formation of heterotrimeric laminin-211 (ie, α2, β1, and γ1) and laminin-221 (ie, α2, β2, and γ1), which are major constituents of skeletal muscle basal lamina. Laminin-111 (ie, α1, β1, and γ1) is the predominant laminin isoform in embryonic skeletal muscle and supports normal skeletal muscle development in laminin-α2–deficient muscle but is absent from adult skeletal muscle. In this study, we determined whether treatment with Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm–derived mouse laminin-111 protein could rescue MDC1A in the dyW−/− mouse model. We demonstrate that laminin-111 protein systemically delivered to the muscles of laminin-α2–deficient mice prevents muscle pathology, improves muscle strength, and dramatically increases life expectancy. Laminin-111 also prevented apoptosis in laminin-α2–deficient mouse muscle and primary human MDC1A myogenic cells, which indicates a conserved mechanism of action and cross-reactivity between species. Our results demonstrate that laminin-111 can serve as an effective protein substitution therapy for the treatment of muscular dystrophy in the dyW−/− mouse model and establish the potential for its use in the treatment of MDC1A. PMID:22322301

  9. Laminin-111 protein therapy reduces muscle pathology and improves viability of a mouse model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Jachinta E; Knapp, Jolie R; Hodges, Bradley L; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Burkin, Dean J

    2012-04-01

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a lethal muscle-wasting disease that is caused by mutations in the LAMA2 gene, resulting in the loss of laminin-α2 protein. MDC1A patients exhibit severe muscle weakness from birth, are confined to a wheelchair, require ventilator assistance, and have reduced life expectancy. There are currently no effective treatments or cures for MDC1A. Laminin-α2 is required for the formation of heterotrimeric laminin-211 (ie, α2, β1, and γ1) and laminin-221 (ie, α2, β2, and γ1), which are major constituents of skeletal muscle basal lamina. Laminin-111 (ie, α1, β1, and γ1) is the predominant laminin isoform in embryonic skeletal muscle and supports normal skeletal muscle development in laminin-α2-deficient muscle but is absent from adult skeletal muscle. In this study, we determined whether treatment with Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm-derived mouse laminin-111 protein could rescue MDC1A in the dy(W-/-) mouse model. We demonstrate that laminin-111 protein systemically delivered to the muscles of laminin-α2-deficient mice prevents muscle pathology, improves muscle strength, and dramatically increases life expectancy. Laminin-111 also prevented apoptosis in laminin-α2-deficient mouse muscle and primary human MDC1A myogenic cells, which indicates a conserved mechanism of action and cross-reactivity between species. Our results demonstrate that laminin-111 can serve as an effective protein substitution therapy for the treatment of muscular dystrophy in the dy(W-/-) mouse model and establish the potential for its use in the treatment of MDC1A.

  10. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and myotonic dystrophy. Each of these disorders represents a different class of genetic disease (monogenic, epigenetic, and repeat expansion disorders), and the approach to therapy addresses the diverse and complex molecular mechanisms involved in these diseases. The large number of novel pharmacologic agents in development with good biologic rationale and strong proof of concept suggests there will be an improved quality of life for individuals with muscular dystrophy. PMID:23939629

  11. Rbfox1 Downregulation and Altered Calpain 3 Splicing by FRG1 in a Mouse Model of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Shiue, Lily; Cline, Melissa S.; Bortolanza, Sergia; Neguembor, Maria Victoria; Xynos, Alexandros; Ares, Manuel; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a common muscle disease whose molecular pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Over-expression of FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1) in mice, frogs, and worms perturbs muscle development and causes FSHD–like phenotypes. FRG1 has been implicated in splicing, and we asked how splicing might be involved in FSHD by conducting a genome-wide analysis in FRG1 mice. We find that splicing perturbations parallel the responses of different muscles to FRG1 over-expression and disease progression. Interestingly, binding sites for the Rbfox family of splicing factors are over-represented in a subset of FRG1-affected splicing events. Rbfox1 knockdown, over-expression, and RNA-IP confirm that these are direct Rbfox1 targets. We find that FRG1 is associated to the Rbfox1 RNA and decreases its stability. Consistent with this, Rbfox1 expression is down-regulated in mice and cells over-expressing FRG1 as well as in FSHD patients. Among the genes affected is Calpain 3, which is mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy, a disease phenotypically similar to FSHD. In FRG1 mice and FSHD patients, the Calpain 3 isoform lacking exon 6 (Capn3 E6–) is increased. Finally, Rbfox1 knockdown and over-expression of Capn3 E6- inhibit muscle differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that a component of FSHD pathogenesis may arise by over-expression of FRG1, reducing Rbfox1 levels and leading to aberrant expression of an altered Calpain 3 protein through dysregulated splicing. PMID:23300487

  12. Rbfox1 downregulation and altered calpain 3 splicing by FRG1 in a mouse model of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Shiue, Lily; Cline, Melissa S; Bortolanza, Sergia; Neguembor, Maria Victoria; Xynos, Alexandros; Ares, Manuel; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a common muscle disease whose molecular pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Over-expression of FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1) in mice, frogs, and worms perturbs muscle development and causes FSHD-like phenotypes. FRG1 has been implicated in splicing, and we asked how splicing might be involved in FSHD by conducting a genome-wide analysis in FRG1 mice. We find that splicing perturbations parallel the responses of different muscles to FRG1 over-expression and disease progression. Interestingly, binding sites for the Rbfox family of splicing factors are over-represented in a subset of FRG1-affected splicing events. Rbfox1 knockdown, over-expression, and RNA-IP confirm that these are direct Rbfox1 targets. We find that FRG1 is associated to the Rbfox1 RNA and decreases its stability. Consistent with this, Rbfox1 expression is down-regulated in mice and cells over-expressing FRG1 as well as in FSHD patients. Among the genes affected is Calpain 3, which is mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy, a disease phenotypically similar to FSHD. In FRG1 mice and FSHD patients, the Calpain 3 isoform lacking exon 6 (Capn3 E6-) is increased. Finally, Rbfox1 knockdown and over-expression of Capn3 E6- inhibit muscle differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that a component of FSHD pathogenesis may arise by over-expression of FRG1, reducing Rbfox1 levels and leading to aberrant expression of an altered Calpain 3 protein through dysregulated splicing.

  13. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Lim, HoTae; Estrellas, Kenneth; Mula, Jyothi; Cohen, Tatiana V; Zhang, Yuanfan; Donnelly, Christopher J; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Kim, Yong Jun; Kim, Hyesoo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Hongmei Lisa; Hotta, Akitsu; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Maragakis, Nicholas; Wagner, Kathryn R; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-06-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our "chemical-compound-based" strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological "dual-SMAD" inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form "rescued" multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human "DMD-in-a-dish" model using hiPSC-based disease modeling.

  14. Dystrophin Threshold Level Necessary for Normalization of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase, Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, and Ryanodine Receptor-Calcium Release Channel Type 1 Nitrosylation in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy Dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Gentil, Christel; Le Guiner, Caroline; Falcone, Sestina; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Guigand, Lydie; Montus, Marie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Piétri-Rouxel, France

    2016-09-01

    At present, the clinically most advanced strategy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the exon-skipping strategy. Whereas antisense oligonucleotide-based clinical trials are underway for DMD, it is essential to determine the dystrophin restoration threshold needed to ensure improvement of muscle physiology at the molecular level. A preclinical trial has been conducted in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs treated in a forelimb by locoregional delivery of rAAV8-U7snRNA to promote exon skipping on the canine dystrophin messenger. Here, we exploited rAAV8-U7snRNA-transduced GRMD muscle samples, well characterized for their percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers, with the aim of defining the threshold of dystrophin rescue necessary for normalization of the status of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel type 1 (RyR1), crucial actors for efficient contractile function. Results showed that restoration of dystrophin in 40% of muscle fibers is needed to decrease abnormal cytosolic nNOSμ expression and to reduce overexpression of iNOS, these two parameters leading to a reduction in the NO level in the muscle fibers. Furthermore, the same percentage of dystrophin-positive fibers of 40% was associated with the normalization of RyR1 nitrosylation status and with stabilization of the RyR1-calstabin1 complex that is required to facilitate coupled gating. We concluded that a minimal threshold of 40% of dystrophin-positive fibers is necessary for the reinstatement of central proteins needed for proper muscle contractile function, and thus identified a rate of dystrophin expression significantly improving, at the molecular level, the dystrophic muscle physiology.

  15. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Niclas E.; Hall, John K.; Odom, Guy L.; Phelps, Michael P.; Andrus, Colin R.; Hawkins, R. David; Hauschka, Stephen D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx4cv mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:28195574

  16. Prophylactic pamidronate partially protects from glucocorticoid-induced bone loss in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Chen, Jinghan; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-09-01

    Glucocorticoids are extensively used to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy because of their ability to delay muscle damage, prolong ambulation and extend life. However, use of glucocorticoids significantly increases bone loss, fragility and fractures. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could prevent the effects of glucocorticoids on bone quality, we used dystrophic mdx mice treated with the glucocorticoid prednisone during 8weeks of rapid bone growth from 5 to 13weeks of age and treated some mice with the bisphosphonate pamidronate during the first two weeks of prednisone administration. Prednisone reduced long bone growth, decreased cortical bone thickness and area and decreased the strength of the femurs. Pamidronate treatment protected mice from cortical bone loss but did not increase bone strength. The combination of prednisone and pamidronate inhibited remodeling of metaphyseal trabecular bone with large numbers of trabeculae containing remnants of calcified cartilage. Prednisone improved muscle strength in the mdx mice and decreased serum creatine kinase with evidence of improved muscle histology and these effects were maintained in mice treated with pamidronate.

  17. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Hall, John K; Odom, Guy L; Phelps, Michael P; Andrus, Colin R; Hawkins, R David; Hauschka, Stephen D; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-14

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx(4cv) mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders.

  18. Cognitive dysfunction in the dystrophin-deficient mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A reappraisal from sensory to executive processes.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, Rémi; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Le Bec, Benoit; El Massioui, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Vaillend, Cyrille

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with language disabilities and deficits in learning and memory, leading to intellectual disability in a patient subpopulation. Recent studies suggest the presence of broader deficits affecting information processing, short-term memory and executive functions. While the absence of the full-length dystrophin (Dp427) is a common feature in all patients, variable mutation profiles may additionally alter distinct dystrophin-gene products encoded by separate promoters. However, the nature of the cognitive dysfunctions specifically associated with the loss of distinct brain dystrophins is unclear. Here we show that the loss of the full-length brain dystrophin in mdx mice does not modify the perception and sensorimotor gating of auditory inputs, as assessed using auditory brainstem recordings and prepulse inhibition of startle reflex. In contrast, both acquisition and long-term retention of cued and trace fear memories were impaired in mdx mice, suggesting alteration in a functional circuit including the amygdala. Spatial learning in the water maze revealed reduced path efficiency, suggesting qualitative alteration in mdx mice learning strategy. However, spatial working memory performance and cognitive flexibility challenged in various behavioral paradigms in water and radial-arm mazes were unimpaired. The full-length brain dystrophin therefore appears to play a role during acquisition of associative learning as well as in general processes involved in memory consolidation, but no overt involvement in working memory and/or executive functions could be demonstrated in spatial learning tasks.

  19. Implications for Cardiac Function Following Rescue of the Dystrophic Diaphragm in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Muses, Sofia; Wells, Kim E; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Woffindale, Caroline; Clarke, Kieran; Wells, Dominic J; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-06-26

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by absence of the integral structural protein, dystrophin, which renders muscle fibres susceptible to injury and degeneration. This ultimately results in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, which is the predominant cause of death in DMD patients, and highlights the importance of therapeutic targeting of the cardiorespiratory system. While there is some evidence to suggest that restoring dystrophin in the diaphragm improves both respiratory and cardiac function, the role of the diaphragm is not well understood. Here using exon skipping oligonucleotides we predominantly restored dystrophin in the diaphragm and assessed cardiac function by MRI. This approach reduced diaphragmatic pathophysiology and markedly improved diaphragm function but did not improve cardiac function or pathophysiology, with or without exercise. Interestingly, exercise resulted in a reduction of dystrophin protein and exon skipping in the diaphragm. This suggests that treatment regimens may require modification in more active patients. In conclusion, whilst the diaphragm is an important respiratory muscle, it is likely that dystrophin needs to be restored in other tissues, including multiple accessory respiratory muscles, and of course the heart itself for appropriate therapeutic outcomes. This supports the requirement of a body-wide therapy to treat DMD.

  20. Phenylbutazone induces expression of MBNL1 and suppresses formation of MBNL1-CUG RNA foci in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guiying; Masuda, Akio; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Tohru; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by abnormal expansion of CTG repeats in the 3′ untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Expanded CTG repeats are transcribed into RNA and make an aggregate with a splicing regulator, MBNL1, in the nucleus, which is called the nuclear foci. The nuclear foci sequestrates and downregulates availability of MBNL1. Symptomatic treatments are available for DM1, but no rational therapy is available. In this study, we found that a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), phenylbutazone (PBZ), upregulated the expression of MBNL1 in C2C12 myoblasts as well as in the HSALR mouse model for DM1. In the DM1 mice model, PBZ ameliorated aberrant splicing of Clcn1, Nfix, and Rpn2. PBZ increased expression of skeletal muscle chloride channel, decreased abnormal central nuclei of muscle fibers, and improved wheel-running activity in HSALR mice. We found that the effect of PBZ was conferred by two distinct mechanisms. First, PBZ suppressed methylation of an enhancer region in Mbnl1 intron 1, and enhanced transcription of Mbnl1 mRNA. Second, PBZ attenuated binding of MBNL1 to abnormally expanded CUG repeats in cellulo and in vitro. Our studies suggest that PBZ is a potent therapeutic agent for DM1 that upregulates availability of MBNL1. PMID:27126921

  1. Read-through compound 13 restores dystrophin expression and improves muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Refik; Ku, Jin-Mo; Khitrov, Gregory; Jung, Michael E.; Prikhodko, Olga; Bertoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Molecules that induce ribosomal read-through of nonsense mutations in mRNA and allow production of a full-length functional protein hold great therapeutic potential for the treatment of many genetic disorders. Two such read-through compounds, RTC13 and RTC14, were recently identified by a luciferase-independent high-throughput screening assay and were shown to have potential therapeutic functions in the treatment of nonsense mutations in the ATM and the dystrophin genes. We have now tested the ability of RTC13 and RTC14 to restore dystrophin expression into skeletal muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Direct intramuscular injection of compound RTC14 did not result in significant read-through activity in vivo and demonstrated the levels of dystrophin protein similar to those detected using gentamicin. In contrast, significant higher amounts of dystrophin were detected after intramuscular injection of RTC13. When administered systemically, RTC13 was shown to partially restore dystrophin protein in different muscle groups, including diaphragm and heart, and improved muscle function. An increase in muscle strength was detected in all treated animals and was accompanied by a significant decrease in creatine kinase levels. These studies establish the therapeutic potential of RTC13 in vivo and advance this newly identified compound into preclinical application for DMD. PMID:22692682

  2. Muscle and heart function restoration in a limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) mouse model by systemic FKRP gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276I(KI)) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276I(KI) mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective.

  3. Safety and efficacy of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Marc; Roudaut, Carinne; Martin, Samia; Fougerousse, Françoise; Suel, Laurence; Poupiot, Jérôme; Gicquel, Evelyne; Noulet, Fanny; Danos, Olivier; Richard, Isabelle

    2006-02-01

    Calpainopathy (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, LGMD2A) is a recessive muscular disorder caused by deficiency in the calcium-dependent cysteine protease calpain 3. To date, no treatment exists for this disease. We evaluated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for gene therapy in a murine model for LGMD2A. To drive the expression of calpain 3, we used rAAV2/1 pseudotyped vectors and muscle-specific promoters to avoid calpain 3 cell toxicity. We report efficient and stable transgene expression in muscle with restoration of the proteolytic activity and without evident toxicity. In addition, calpain 3 was correctly targeted to the sarcomere. Moreover, its presence resulted in improvement of the histological features and in therapeutic efficacy at the physiological levels, including correction of atrophy and full rescue of the contractile force deficits. Our results establish the feasibility of AAV-mediated calpain 3 gene transfer as a therapeutic approach.

  4. Increased sarcolipin expression and decreased sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake in skeletal muscles of mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joel S; Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Gonzalez, James Patrick; Lopez, Henderson; Gordan, Richard; Fraidenraich, Diego; Babu, Gopal J

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling is an important factor in the progressive functional decline of dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we investigated the function of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) in various dystrophic muscles of mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our studies show that the protein expression of sarcolipin, a key regulator of the SERCA pump is abnormally high and correlates with decreased maximum velocity of SR Ca(2+) uptake in the soleus, diaphragm and quadriceps of mild (mdx) and severe (mdx:utr-/-) dystrophic mice. These changes are more pronounced in the muscles of mdx:utr-/- mice. We also found increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin specifically in the dystrophic quadriceps. Immunostaining analysis further showed that SERCA2a expression is associated both with fibers expressing slow-type myosin and regenerating fibers expressing embryonic myosin. Together, our data suggest that sarcolipin upregulation is a common secondary alteration in all dystrophic muscles and contributes to the abnormal elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via SERCA inhibition.

  5. Increased calcium in neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum is not associated with cell loss in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Emma; Gosetti, Troy; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma; Verghese, Elizabeth

    2015-09-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease resulting from mutation of the X-linked dystrophin gene. In addition to skeletal muscle pathology, cognitive deficits have been identified in patients with DMD. There is a lack of research investigating the pathological mechanisms underlying the neurological deficits apparent in DMD. The current study assessed whether increases in calcium contributed towards neuronal cell loss or histopathological changes in the genetically homologous mdx mouse model of DMD in sections from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months of age. Alizarin S staining showed a significant increase in calcium-positive neurons in the mdx cerebral cortex at 24 days and 9 months and the cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months compared with age-matched controls. However, neuronal cell counts of haemotoxylin and eosin-stained sections showed that altered calcium levels did not lead to neuronal cell loss. A better understanding of how the disruption of calcium regulation affects the function of neurons may explain the neurological deficits apparent in mdx mice and patients with DMD.

  6. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets.

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis of muscular dystrophy models Large(myd), Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd) and Dmd(mdx): what makes them different?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila F; Martins, Poliana Cm; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-08-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of Mendelian diseases. The underlying pathophysiology and phenotypic variability in each form are much more complex, suggesting the involvement of many other genes. Thus, here we studied the whole genome expression profile in muscles from three mice models for MD, at different time points: Dmd(mdx) (mutation in dystrophin gene), Large(myd-/-) (mutation in Large) and Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd-/-) (both mutations). The identification of altered biological functions can contribute to understand diseases and to find prognostic biomarkers and points for therapeutic intervention. We identified a substantial number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in each model, reflecting diseases' complexity. The main biological process affected in the three strains was immune system, accounting for the majority of enriched functional categories, followed by degeneration/regeneration and extracellular matrix remodeling processes. The most notable differences were in 21-day-old Dmd(mdx), with a high proportion of DEGs related to its regenerative capacity. A higher number of positive embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMyHC) fibers confirmed this. The new Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd-/-) model did not show a highly different transcriptome from the parental lineages, with a profile closer to Large(myd-/-), but not bearing the same regenerative potential as Dmd(mdx). This is the first report about transcriptome profile of a mouse model for congenital MD and Dmd(mdx)/Large(myd). By comparing the studied profiles, we conclude that alterations in biological functions due to the dystrophic process are very similar, and that the intense regeneration in Dmd(mdx) involves a large number of activated genes, not differentially expressed in the other two strains.

  8. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  9. COUP-TFII regulates satellite cell function and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Tsai, Sophia Y.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and progressive muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Although dystrophin deficiency in myofiber triggers the disease’s pathological changes, the degree of satellite cell (SC) dysfunction defines disease progression. Here, we have identified chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter–transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) hyperactivity as a contributing factor underlying muscular dystrophy in a dystrophin-deficient murine model of DMD. Ectopic expression of COUP-TFII in murine SCs led to Duchenne-like dystrophy in the muscles of control animals and exacerbated degenerative myopathies in dystrophin-deficient mice. COUP-TFII–overexpressing mice exhibited regenerative failure that was attributed to deficient SC proliferation and myoblast fusion. Mechanistically, we determined that COUP-TFII coordinated a regenerative program through combined regulation of multiple promyogenic factors. Furthermore, inhibition of COUP-TFII preserved SC function and counteracted the muscle weakness associated with Duchenne-like dystrophy in the murine model, suggesting that targeting COUP-TFII is a potential treatment for DMD. Together, our findings reveal a regulatory role of COUP-TFII in the development of muscular dystrophy and open up a potential therapeutic opportunity for managing disease progression in patients with DMD. PMID:27617862

  10. Prednisolone attenuates improvement of cardiac and skeletal contractile function and histopathology by lisinopril and spironolactone in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Paul M L; Murray, Jason D; Schill, Kevin E; Rastogi, Neha; Schultz, Eric J; Tran, Tam; Raman, Subha V; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited disease that causes striated muscle weakness. Recently, we showed therapeutic effects of the combination of lisinopril (L), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, and spironolactone (S), an aldosterone antagonist, in mice lacking dystrophin and haploinsufficient for utrophin (utrn(+/-);mdx, het mice); both cardiac and skeletal muscle function and histology were improved when these mice were treated early with LS. It was unknown to what extent LS treatment is effective in the most commonly used DMD murine model, the mdx mouse. In addition, current standard-of-care treatment for DMD is limited to corticosteroids. Therefore, potentially useful alternative or additive drugs need to be both compared directly to corticosteroids and tested in presence of corticosteroids. We evaluated the effectiveness of this LS combination in the mdx mouse model both compared with corticosteroid treatment (prednisolone, P) or in combination (LSP). We tested the additional combinatorial treatment containing the angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan (T), which is widely used to halt and treat the developing cardiac dysfunction in DMD patients as an alternative to an ACE inhibitor. Peak myocardial strain rate, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, showed a negative impact of P, whereas in both diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle contractile function was not significantly impaired by P. Histologically, P generally increased cardiac damage, estimated by percentage area infiltrated by IgG as well as by collagen staining. In general, groups that only differed in the presence or absence of P (i.e. mdx vs. P, LS vs. LSP, and TS vs. TSP) demonstrated a significant detrimental impact of P on many assessed parameters, with the most profound impact on cardiac pathology.

  11. Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Elhalis, Hussain; Azizi, Behrooz; Jurkunas, Ula V.

    2011-01-01

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is characterized by progressive loss of corneal endothelial cells, thickening of Descement’s membrane and deposition of extracellular matrix in the form of guttae. When the number of endothelial cells becomes critically low, the cornea swells and causes loss of vision. The clinical course of FECD usually spans 10–20 years. Corneal transplantation is currently the only modality used to restore vision. Over the last several decades genetic studies have detected several genes, as well as areas of chromosomal loci associated with the disease. Proteomic studies have given rise to several hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of FECD. This review expands upon the recent findings from proteomic and genetic studies and builds upon recent advances in understanding the causes of this common corneal disorder. PMID:20964980

  12. TRIM proteins in therapeutic membrane repair of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alloush, Jenna; Weisleder, Noah

    2013-07-01

    Muscular dystrophy represents a major unmet medical need; only palliative treatments exist for this group of debilitating diseases. Because multiple forms of muscular dystrophy arise from compromised sarcolemmal membrane integrity, a therapeutic approach that can target this loss of membrane function could be applicable to a number of these distinct diseases.One promising therapeutic approach involves the process the cell uses to repair injuries to the plasma membrane. Recent discoveries of genes associated with the membrane repair process provide an opportunity to promote this process as a way to treat muscular dystrophy. One such gene is mitsugumin 53 (MG53), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins (TRIM72), which is an essential component of the membrane repair pathway in muscle. Recent results indicate that MG53/TRIM72 protein can be directly applied as a therapeutic agent to increase membrane repair capacity of many cell types and treat some aspects of the disease in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. There is great potential for the use of recombinant human MG53 in treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases in which compromised membrane integrity contributes to the disease. Other TRIM family proteins may provide additional targets for therapeutic intervention in similar disease states.

  13. Dysregulation of calcium homeostasis in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Toral-Ojeda, Ivan; Aldanondo, Garazi; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2014-10-08

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of diseases characterised by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle, which compromises patient mobility and in the most severe cases originate a complete paralysis and premature death. Existing evidence implicates calcium dysregulation as an underlying crucial event in the pathophysiology of several muscular dystrophies, such as dystrophinopathies, calpainopathies or myotonic dystrophy among others. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most frequent myopathy in childhood, and calpainopathy or LGMD2A is the most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, whereas myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent inherited muscle disease worldwide. In this review, we summarise recent advances in our understanding of calcium ion cycling through the sarcolemma, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and its involvement in the pathogenesis of these dystrophies. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of recent findings regarding Ca2+ handling as well as novel approaches to treat muscular dystrophies targeting Ca2+ regulatory proteins.

  14. Functional and Molecular Effects of Arginine Butyrate and Prednisone on Muscle and Heart in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guerron, Alfredo D.; Rawat, Rashmi; Sali, Arpana; Spurney, Christopher F.; Pistilli, Emidio; Cha, Hee-Jae; Pandey, Gouri S.; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Francia, Dwight; Farajian, Viken; Escolar, Diana M.; Bossi, Laura; Becker, Magali; Zerr, Patricia; de la Porte, Sabine; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Partridge, Terence; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated) mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo

  15. Impaired fetal muscle development and JAK-STAT activation mark disease onset and progression in a mouse model for merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Andreia M; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Sarathy, Apurva; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Deries, Marianne; Burkin, Dean J; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig

    2017-03-07

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a dramatic neuromuscular disease in which crippling muscle weakness is evident from birth. Here we use the dyW mouse model for human MDC1A to trace the onset of the disease during development in utero. We find that myotomal and primary myogenesis proceed normally in homozygous dyW-/-embryos. Fetal dyW-/-muscles display the same number of myofibers as wildtype muscles, but by E18.5 dyW-/-muscles are significantly smaller and muscle size is not recovered post-natally. These results suggest that fetal dyW-/-myofibers fail to grow at the same rate as wildtype myofibers. Consistent with this hypothesis between E17.5 and E18.5 dyW-/-muscles display a dramatic drop in the number of Pax7- and Myogenin-positive cells relative to wildtype muscles, suggesting that dyW-/-muscles fail to generate enough muscle cells to sustain fetal myofiber growth. Gene expression analysis of dyW-/-E17.5 muscles identified a significant increase in the expression of the JAK-STAT target gene Pim1 and muscles from 2-day and 3-week old dyW-/-mice demonstrate a dramatic increase in pSTAT3 relative to wildtype muscles. Interestingly, myotubes lacking integrin α7β1, a laminin-receptor, also show a significant increase in pSTAT3 levels compared to wildtype myotubes, indicating that α7β1 can act as a negative regulator of STAT3 activity. Our data reveal for the first time that dyW-/-mice exhibit a myogenesis defect already in utero. We propose that overactivation of JAK-STAT signaling is part of the mechanism underlying disease onset and progression in dyW-/-mice.

  16. Distinct roles of TRAF6 at early and late stages of muscle pathology in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Sato, Shuichi; Choi, Yongwon; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-03-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disorder caused by loss of functional dystrophin protein. Accumulating evidence suggests that the deficiency of dystrophin leads to aberrant activation of many signaling pathways which contribute to disease progression. However, the proximal signaling events leading to the activation of various pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle remain less clear. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein which acts as a signaling intermediate for several receptor-mediated signaling events leading to the context-dependent activation of a number of signaling pathways. TRAF6 is also an E3 ubiquitin ligase and an important regulator of autophagy. However, the role of TRAF6 in pathogenesis of DMD remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the levels and activity of TRAF6 are increased in skeletal muscle of mdx (a mouse model of DMD) mice. Targeted deletion of TRAF6 improves muscle strength and reduces fiber necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and the activation of proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in 7-week-old mdx mice. Ablation of TRAF6 also increases satellite cells proliferation and myofiber regeneration in young mdx mice. Intriguingly, ablation of TRAF6 exacerbates muscle injury and increases fibrosis in 9-month-old mdx mice. TRAF6 inhibition reduces the markers of autophagy and Akt signaling in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice. Collectively, our study suggests that while the inhibition of TRAF6 improves muscle structure and function in young mdx mice, its continued inhibition causes more severe myopathy at later stages of disease progression potentially through repressing autophagy.

  17. Genome-wide Mechanosensitive MicroRNA (MechanomiR) Screen Uncovers Dysregulation of Their Regulatory Networks in the mdm Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Junaith S.; Hajira, Ameena; Lopez, Michael A.; Boriek, Aladin M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic and neuromuscular disorders, which result in severe loss of motor ability and skeletal muscle mass and function. Aberrant mechanotransduction and dysregulated-microRNA pathways are often associated with the progression of MD. Here, we hypothesized that dysregulation of mechanosensitive microRNAs (mechanomiRs) in dystrophic skeletal muscle plays a major role in the progression of MD. To test our hypothesis, we performed a genome-wide expression profile of anisotropically regulated mechanomiRs and bioinformatically analyzed their target gene networks. We assessed their functional roles in the advancement of MD using diaphragm muscles from mdm (MD with myositis) mice, an animal model of human tibial MD (titinopathy), and their wild-type littermates. We were able to show that ex vivo anisotropic mechanical stretch significantly alters the miRNA expression profile in diaphragm muscles from WT and mdm mice; as a result, some of the genes associated with MDs are dysregulated in mdm mice due to differential regulation of a distinct set of mechanomiRs. Interestingly, we found a contrasting expression pattern of the highly expressed let-7 family mechanomiRs, let-7e-5p and miR-98–5p, and their target genes associated with the extracellular matrix and TGF-β pathways, respectively, between WT and mdm mice. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis of let-7e-5p in myocytes isolated from the diaphragms of WT and mdm mice confirmed Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Col24a1, Col27a1, Itga1, Itga4, Scd1, and Thbs1 as target genes of let-7e-5p. Furthermore, we found that miR-98 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation. Our study therefore introduces additional biological players in the regulation of skeletal muscle structure and myogenesis that may contribute to unexplained disorders of MD. PMID:26272747

  18. The paradox of muscle hypertrophy in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, Joe N; Childers, Martin K; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Nghiem, Peter; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Howard, James F; Schatzberg, Scott J; Dow, Jennifer L; Grange, Robert W; Styner, Martin A; Hoffman, Eric P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in humans and syndromes in mice, dogs, and cats. Affected humans and dogs have progressive disease that leads primarily to muscle atrophy. Mdx mice progress through an initial phase of muscle hypertrophy followed by atrophy. Cats have persistent muscle hypertrophy. Hypertrophy in humans has been attributed to deposition of fat and connective tissue (pseudohypertrophy). Increased muscle mass (true hypertrophy) has been documented in animal models. Muscle hypertrophy can exaggerate postural instability and joint contractures. Deleterious consequences of muscle hypertrophy should be considered when developing treatments for muscular dystrophy.

  19. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man.

  20. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg), a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease. PMID:23216833

  1. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  2. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-15

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  3. A model to estimate the expression of the dystrophin gene in muscle from female Becker muscular dystrophy carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Vainzof, M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Pavanello, R C; Schreiber, R; Zatz, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the possibility of building a model to estimate, through dystrophin western blotting analysis, the expression of the DMD/BMD gene in muscle from heterozygotes. Dystrophin was analysed by mixing in increasing proportions (from 0% to 100%) aliquots of solubilised muscle from BMD patients with a qualitatively abnormal dystrophin and a normal male control. The intensity of the abnormal bands, which could be detected starting with 20% of muscle from the BMD patient, increased progressively according to the affected muscle concentration. In five obligate BMD carriers, two dystrophin bands were observed (corresponding to the products from the X bearing the normal and the BMD alleles), even among those with normal serum enzyme activities. Surprisingly, in the four obligate BMD carriers related to patients in whom an additional dystrophin fragment of 250 kd was present (two of them with raised serum enzymes), this band could not be seen, suggesting that the stability or the mechanism responsible for the synthesis of abnormal dystrophin products differs in heterozygotes compared to affected patients. Images PMID:1640426

  4. Elevated Expression of Moesin in Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Pines, Mark; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Olga; Lavy, Adi; Angelini, Corrado; Allamand, Valérie; Halevy, Orna

    2017-03-01

    Fibrosis is the main complication of muscular dystrophies. We identified moesin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family, in dystrophic muscles of mice representing Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophies (DMD and CMD, respectively) and dysferlinopathy, but not in the wild type. High levels of moesin were also observed in muscle biopsy specimens from DMD, Ullrich CMD, and merosin-deficient CMD patients, all of which present high levels of fibrosis. The myofibroblasts, responsible for extracellular matrix protein synthesis, and the macrophages infiltrating the dystrophic muscles were the source of moesin. Moesin-positive cells were embedded within the fibrotic areas between the myofibers adjacent to the collagen type I fibers. Radixin was also synthesized by the myofibroblasts, whereas ezrin colocalized with the myofiber membranes. In animal models and patients' muscles, part of the moesin was in its active phosphorylated form. Inhibition of fibrosis by halofuginone, an antifibrotic agent, resulted in a major decrease in moesin levels in the muscles of DMD and CMD mice. In summary, the results of this study may pave the way for exploiting moesin as a novel target for intervention in MDs, and as part of a battery of biomarkers to evaluate treatment success in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  5. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life.

  6. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2.

  7. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  8. Mutations in IMPG1 cause vitelliform macular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P M; Hollyfield, Joe G; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P

    2013-09-05

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507(∗)). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD.

  9. Bietti crystalline dystrophy and choroidal neovascularisation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B; Parvizi, S; Mohamed, M D

    2011-02-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by the presence of crystals in the retina and is followed by retinal and choroidal degeneration. We present a novel finding of juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularisation in Bietti crystalline dystrophy and demonstrate a spectral domain optical coherence tomography image of this disorder.

  10. The genetics of inherited macular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, M; Hunt, D; Moore, A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge relating to the monogenic macular dystrophies, with discussion of currently mapped genes, chromosomal loci and genotype-phenotype relationships. Inherited systemic disorders with a macular dystrophy component will not be discussed. PMID:12960208

  11. Injection of vessel-derived stem cells prevents dilated cardiomyopathy and promotes angiogenesis and endogenous cardiac stem cell proliferation in mdx/utrn-/- but not aged mdx mouse models for duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chun, Ju Lan; O'Brien, Robert; Song, Min Ho; Wondrasch, Blake F; Berry, Suzanne E

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. DMD patients lack dystrophin protein and develop skeletal muscle pathology and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Approximately 20% succumb to cardiac involvement. We hypothesized that mesoangioblast stem cells (aorta-derived mesoangioblasts [ADMs]) would restore dystrophin and alleviate or prevent DCM in animal models of DMD. ADMs can be induced to express cardiac markers, including Nkx2.5, cardiac tropomyosin, cardiac troponin I, and α-actinin, and adopt cardiomyocyte morphology. Transplantation of ADMs into the heart of mdx/utrn(-/-) mice prior to development of DCM prevented onset of cardiomyopathy, as measured by echocardiography, and resulted in significantly higher CD31 expression, consistent with new vessel formation. Dystrophin-positive cardiomyocytes and increased proliferation of endogenous Nestin(+) cardiac stem cells were detected in ADM-injected heart. Nestin(+) striated cells were also detected in four of five mdx/utrn(-/-) hearts injected with ADMs. In contrast, when ADMs were injected into the heart of aged mdx mice with advanced fibrosis, no functional improvement was detected by echocardiography. Instead, ADMs exacerbated some features of DCM. No dystrophin protein, increase in CD31 expression, or increase in Nestin(+) cell proliferation was detected following ADM injection in aged mdx heart. Dystrophin was observed following transplantation of ADMs into the hearts of young mdx mice, however, suggesting that pathology in aged mdx heart may alter the fate of donor stem cells. In summary, ADMs delay or prevent development of DCM in dystrophin-deficient heart, but timing of stem cell transplantation may be critical for achieving benefit with cell therapy in DMD cardiac muscle.

  12. [Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caballero, Marta E; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Escobar-Cedillo, Rosa E; Villegas-Castrejon, Hilda

    2010-10-16

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases characterized by loss of muscle and weakness of non neurogenic origin. They are caused by mutations in one or more genes involved in the formation of muscle cells. The discovery of several proteins in the muscle began with the discovery of dystrophin, 130 years after the clinical description of muscular dystrophy. Currently, due to a better understanding of the biology of normal and diseased muscle, has achieved a classification at the molecular level of different types of muscular dystrophies, according to the protein that is affected. This has been particularly important for limb girdle muscular dystrophies, which present clinical features that can lead to confusion with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Moreover, in recent years has encouraged the development of therapies in the near future could provide a solution for restoring the function of the muscle fiber.

  13. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Donghoon

    2010-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are groups of inherited progressive diseases of the muscle caused by mutations of diverse genes related to normal muscle function. Although there is no current effective treatment for these devastating diseases, various molecular strategies have been developed to restore the expressions of the associated defective proteins. In preclinical animal models, both viral and nonviral vectors have been shown to deliver recombinant versions of defective genes. Antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to modify the splicing mechanism of mesenger ribonucleic acid to produce an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin in an experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In addition, chemicals can induce readthrough of the premature stop codon in nonsense mutations of the dystrophin gene. On the basis of these preclinical data, several experimental clinical trials are underway that aim to demonstrate efficacy in treating these devastating diseases. PMID:20944811

  14. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lo Mauro, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e. when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles and an increase in the load against which they must contract. In fact, both the resistive and elastic components of the work of breathing increase due to airway obstruction and chest wall and lung stiffening, respectively. The respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophy are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and sleep disordered breathing. They can be present at different rates according to the type of muscular dystrophy and its progression, leading to different onset of each symptom, prognosis and degree of respiratory involvement. Key points A common feature of muscular dystrophy is respiratory failure, i.e. the inability of the respiratory system to provide proper oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. In the lung, respiratory failure is caused by recurrent aspiration, and leads to hypoxaemia and hypercarbia. Ventilatory failure in muscular dystrophy is caused by increased respiratory load and respiratory muscles weakness. Respiratory load increases in muscular dystrophy because scoliosis makes chest wall compliance decrease, atelectasis and fibrosis make lung compliance decrease, and airway obstruction makes airway resistance increase. The consequences of respiratory pump failure are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and

  15. [Current studies in myotonic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yimeng; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a genetic, progressive, multisystemic disease with muscular disorder as its primary symptom. There are two types of DM (DM1 and DM2) caused by mutations in different genes, and in Japan, DM occurs with an incidence of approximately 1 in 20,000. The pathogenic mechanism underlying the disease is RNA toxicity caused by transcripts of aberrantly elongated CTG or CCTG repeats located in the 3' untranslated region or in the intron. The current treatments for DM is limited to symptomatic care. In this review, we will discuss several new therapeutic strategies based on recent studies of RNA toxicity.

  16. Misfolded Proteins and Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jonathan H.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Many mutations associated with retinal degeneration lead to the production of misfolded proteins by cells of the retina. Emerging evidence suggests that these abnormal proteins cause cell death by activating the Unfolded Protein Response, a set of conserved intracellular signaling pathways that detect protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum and control protective and proapoptotic signal transduction pathways. Here, we review the misfolded proteins associated with select types of retinitis pigmentosa, Stargadt-like macular degeneration, and Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy and discuss the role that endoplasmic reticulum stress and UPR signaling play in their pathogenesis. Last, we review new therapies for these diseases based on preventing protein misfolding in the retina. PMID:20238009

  17. Muscular dystrophy meets protein biochemistry, the mother of invention.

    PubMed

    Funk, Steven D; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies result from a defect in the linkage between the muscle fiber cytoskeleton and the basement membrane (BM). Congenital muscular dystrophy type MDC1A is caused by mutations in laminin α2 that either reduce its expression or impair its ability to polymerize within the muscle fiber BM. Defects in this BM lead to muscle fiber damage from the force of contraction. In this issue of the JCI, McKee and colleagues use a laminin polymerization-competent, designer chimeric BM protein in vivo to restore function of a polymerization-defective laminin, leading to normalized muscle structure and strength in a mouse model of MDC1A. Delivery of such a protein to patients could ameliorate many aspects of their disease.

  18. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD.

  19. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  20. Halofuginone promotes satellite cell activation and survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Bodanovsky, Anna; Maimon, Hadar; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Halofuginone is a leading agent in preventing fibrosis and inflammation in various muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that in addition to these actions, halofuginone directly promotes the cell-cycle events of satellite cells in the mdx and dysf(-/-) mouse models of early-onset Duchenne muscular dystrophy and late-onset dysferlinopathy, respectively. In both models, addition of halofuginone to freshly prepared single gastrocnemius myofibers derived from 6-week-old mice increased BrdU incorporation at as early as 18h of incubation, as well as phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) and MyoD protein expression in the attached satellite cells, while having no apparent effect on myofibers derived from wild-type mice. BrdU incorporation was abolished by an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, suggesting involvement of this pathway in mediating halofuginone's effects on cell-cycle events. In cultures of myofibers and myoblasts isolated from dysf(-/-) mice, halofuginone reduced Bax and induced Bcl2 expression levels and induced Akt phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Addition of an inhibitor of the phosphinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway reversed the halofuginone-induced cell survival, suggesting this pathway's involvement in mediating halofuginone's effects on survival. Thus, in addition to its known role in inhibiting fibrosis and inflammation, halofuginone plays a direct role in satellite cell activity and survival in muscular dystrophies, regardless of the mutation. These actions are of the utmost importance for improving muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  2. DUX4-induced dsRNA and MYC mRNA stabilization activate apoptotic pathways in human cell models of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shadle, Sean C; Zhong, Jun Wen; Campbell, Amy E; Conerly, Melissa L; Jagannathan, Sujatha; Wong, Chao-Jen; Morello, Timothy D; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the mis-expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle cells. DUX4 is a transcription factor that activates genes normally associated with stem cell biology and its mis-expression in FSHD cells results in apoptosis. To identify genes and pathways necessary for DUX4-mediated apoptosis, we performed an siRNA screen in an RD rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with an inducible DUX4 transgene. Our screen identified components of the MYC-mediated apoptotic pathway and the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) innate immune response pathway as mediators of DUX4-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that DUX4 expression led to increased MYC mRNA, accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci, and activation of the dsRNA response pathway in both RD cells and human myoblasts. Nuclear dsRNA foci were associated with aggregation of the exon junction complex component EIF4A3. The elevation of MYC mRNA, dsRNA accumulation, and EIF4A3 nuclear aggregates in FSHD muscle cells suggest that these processes might contribute to FSHD pathophysiology.

  3. DUX4-induced dsRNA and MYC mRNA stabilization activate apoptotic pathways in human cell models of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shadle, Sean C.; Jagannathan, Sujatha; Wong, Chao-Jen; Morello, Timothy D.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2017-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the mis-expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle cells. DUX4 is a transcription factor that activates genes normally associated with stem cell biology and its mis-expression in FSHD cells results in apoptosis. To identify genes and pathways necessary for DUX4-mediated apoptosis, we performed an siRNA screen in an RD rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with an inducible DUX4 transgene. Our screen identified components of the MYC-mediated apoptotic pathway and the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) innate immune response pathway as mediators of DUX4-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that DUX4 expression led to increased MYC mRNA, accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci, and activation of the dsRNA response pathway in both RD cells and human myoblasts. Nuclear dsRNA foci were associated with aggregation of the exon junction complex component EIF4A3. The elevation of MYC mRNA, dsRNA accumulation, and EIF4A3 nuclear aggregates in FSHD muscle cells suggest that these processes might contribute to FSHD pathophysiology. PMID:28273136

  4. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  5. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics.

    PubMed

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F; Gait, Michael J; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J A; Roberts, Thomas C

    2015-11-23

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients.

  6. Generation of skeletal muscle cells from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as an in vitro model and for therapy of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Salani, Sabrina; Donadoni, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness likely associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. At present, no cures or efficacious treatments are available for these diseases, but cell transplantation could be a potential therapeutic strategy. Transplantation of myoblasts using satellite cells or other myogenic cell populations has been attempted to promote muscle regeneration, based on the hypothesis that the donor cells repopulate the muscle and contribute to its regeneration. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could generate an unlimited source of differentiated cell types, including myogenic cells. Here we review the literature regarding the generation of myogenic cells considering the main techniques employed to date to elicit efficient differentiation of human and murine ESCs or iPSCs into skeletal muscle. We also critically analyse the possibility of using these cellular populations as an alternative source of myogenic cells for cell therapy of MDs. PMID:22129481

  7. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    PubMed

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C M; Almeida, Camila F; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research.

  8. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  9. The molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies--current status.

    PubMed

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2003-05-01

    The pertinent literature on inherited corneal diseases is reviewed in terms of the chromosomal localization and identification of the responsible genes. Disorders affecting the cornea have been mapped to human chromosome 1 (central crystalline corneal dystrophy, familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, early onset Fuchs dystrophy, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 4 (Bietti marginal crystalline dystrophy), chromosome 5 (lattice dystrophy types 1 and IIIA, granular corneal dystrophy types 1, 2 and 3, Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 9 (lattice dystrophy type II), chromosome 10 (Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy), chromosome 12 (Meesmann dystrophy), chromosome 16 (macular corneal dystrophy, fish eye disease, LCAT disease, tyrosinemia type II), chromosome 17 (Meesmann dystrophy, Stocker-Holt dystrophy), chromosome 20 (congenital hereditary endothelial corneal dystrophy types I and II, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy), chromosome 21 (autosomal dominant keratoconus) and the X chromosome (cornea verticillata, cornea farinata, deep filiform corneal dystrophy, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, Lisch corneal dystrophy). Mutations in nine genes (ARSC1, CHST6, COL8A2, GLA, GSN, KRT3, KRT12, M1S1and TGFBI [BIGH3]) account for some of the corneal diseases and three of them are associated with amyloid deposition in the cornea (GSN, M1S1, TGFBI) including most of the lattice corneal dystrophies (LCDs) [LCD types I, IA, II, IIIA, IIIB, IV, V, VI and VII] recognized by their lattice pattern of linear opacities. Genetic studies on inherited diseases affecting the cornea have provided insight into some of these disorders at a basic molecular level and it has become recognized that distinct clinicopathologic phenotypes can result from specific mutations in a particular gene, as well as some different mutations in the same gene. A molecular genetic understanding of inherited corneal diseases is leading to a better appreciation of the

  10. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies. PMID:28289716

  11. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  12. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: current progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2009-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies refer to a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle weakness, wasting and degeneration. So far, there is no effective treatment but new gene-based therapies are currently being developed with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies, RNA-based approaches, or cell-based gene therapy with a main focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and current treatments are far from adequate. However, genetic and cell-based therapies, in particular exon skipping induced by antisense strategies, and corrective gene therapy via functionally engineered dystrophin genes hold great promise, with several clinical trials ongoing. Proof-of-concept of exon skipping has been obtained in animal models, and most recently in clinical trials; this approach represents a promising therapy for a subset of patients. In addition, gene-delivery-based strategies exist both for antisense-induced reading frame restoration, and for highly efficient delivery of functional dystrophin mini- and micro-genes to muscle fibres in vivo and muscle stem cells ex-vivo. In particular, AAV-based vectors show efficient systemic gene delivery to skeletal muscle directly in vivo, and lentivirus-based vectors show promise of combining ex vivo gene modification strategies with cell-mediated therapies.

  13. Gene Therapy and Gene Editing for the Corneal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Keryn A; Irani, Yazad D

    2016-01-01

    Despite ever-increasing understanding of the genetic underpinnings of many corneal dystrophies, gene therapy designed to ameliorate disease has not yet been reported in any human patient. In this review, we explore the likely reasons for this apparent failure of translation. We identify the requirements for success: the genetic defect involved must have been identified and mapped, vision in the affected patient must be significantly impaired or likely to be impaired, no better or equivalently effective treatment must be available, the treatment must be capable of modulating corneal pathology, and delivery of the construct to the appropriate cell must be practicable. We consider which of the corneal dystrophies might be amenable to treatment by genetic manipulations, summarize existing therapeutic options for treatment, and explore gene editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas and other similar transformative technologies as the way of the future. We then summarize recent laboratory-based advances in gene delivery and the development of in vitro and in vivo models of the corneal dystrophies. Finally, we review recent experimental work that has increased our knowledge of the pathobiology of these conditions.

  14. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Immunoproteasome Inhibition in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassani, Barbara; Cassinelli, Letizia; Rigoni, Rosita; Colleoni, Federica; Fusco, Nicola; Gatti, Stefano; Bella, Pamela; Villa, Chiara; Napolitano, Filomena; Maiavacca, Rita; Bosari, Silvano; Villa, Anna; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited fatal genetic disease characterized by mutations in dystrophin gene, causing membrane fragility leading to myofiber necrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment in dystrophic muscles. The resulting environment enriched in proinflammatory cytokines, like IFN-γ and TNF-α, determines the transformation of myofiber constitutive proteasome into the immunoproteasome, a multisubunit complex involved in the activation of cell-mediate immunity. This event has a fundamental role in producing peptides for antigen presentation by MHC class I, for the immune response and also for cytokine production and T-cell differentiation. Here, we characterized for the first time the presence of T-lymphocytes activated against revertant dystrophin epitopes, in the animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the mdx mice. Moreover, we specifically blocked i-proteasome subunit LMP7, which was up-regulated in dystrophic skeletal muscles, and we demonstrated the rescue of the dystrophin expression and the amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype. The i-proteasome blocking lowered myofiber MHC class I expression and self-antigen presentation to T cells, thus reducing the specific antidystrophin T cell response, the muscular cell infiltrate, and proinflammatory cytokine production, together with muscle force recovery. We suggest that i-proteasome inhibition should be considered as new promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathology.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fujii T, Aiba H, Toda T. Seizure-genotype relationship in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy. Brain Dev. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... family. Ann Neurol. 2003 Aug;54(2):248-51. Citation on PubMed de Seze J, Udd B, ... dystrophy outside the Finnish population. Neurology. 1998 Dec;51(6):1746-8. Citation on PubMed Reviewed : February ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually droopy eyelids ( ptosis ), followed by difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). The swallowing difficulties begin with food, but as ... Encyclopedia: Ptosis Health Topic: Muscular Dystrophy Health Topic: Swallowing Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  19. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many different aspects of daily life, those with MD enjoy full lives. Advances in drug therapies, physical ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  1. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal.

  2. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group. PMID:27757431

  3. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  4. Age-related thoracic radiographic changes in golden and labrador retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Labruyère, Julien J; Thibaud, Jean Laurent; Barthélémy, Inès; Leperlier, Dimitri; Saunders, Jimmy H; Blot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Golden retriever and Labrador retriever muscular dystrophy are inherited progressive degenerative myopathies that are used as models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in man. Thoracic lesions were reported to be the most consistent radiographic finding in golden retriever dogs in a study where radiographs were performed at a single-time point. Muscular dystrophy worsens clinically over time and longitudinal studies in dogs are lacking. Thus our goal was to describe the thoracic abnormalities of golden retriever and Labrador retriever dogs, to determine the timing of first expression and their evolution with time. To this purpose, we retrospectively reviewed 390 monthly radiographic studies of 38 golden retrievers and six Labrador retrievers with muscular dystrophy. The same thoracic lesions were found in both golden and Labrador retrievers. They included, in decreasing frequency, flattened and/or scalloped diaphragmatic shape (43/44), pulmonary hyperinflation (34/44), hiatal hernia (34/44), cranial pectus excavatum (23/44), bronchopneumonia (22/44), and megaesophagus (14/44). The last three lesions were not reported in a previous radiographic study in golden retriever dogs. In all but two dogs the thoracic changes were detected between 4 and 10 months and were persistent or worsened over time. Clinically, muscular dystrophy should be included in the differential diagnosis of dogs with a combination of these thoracic radiographic findings.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... girdle muscular dystrophy is classified based on its inheritance pattern and genetic cause. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type ... includes forms of the disorder that have an inheritance pattern called autosomal dominant . Mutations in the LMNA gene ...

  6. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Eduard; Saenz, Amets; Illa, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is caused by mutations in the gene CAPN3 located in the chromosome region 15q15.1-q21.1. To date more than 300 mutations have been described. This gene encodes for a 94-kDa nonlysosomal calcium-dependent cysteine protease and its function in skeletal muscle is not fully understood. It seems that calpain-3 has an unusual zymogenic activation that involves, among other substrates, cytoskeletal proteins. Calpain-3 is thought to interact with titin and dysferlin. Calpain-3 deficiency produces abnormal sarcomeres that lead eventually to muscle fiber death. Hip adductors and gluteus maximus are the earliest clinically affected muscles. No clinical differences have been reported depending on the type of mutation in the CAPN3 gene. The muscle biopsy shows variability of fiber size, interstitial fibrosis, internal nuclei, lobulated fibers, and, in some cases, presence of eosinophils. Recent gene expression profiling studies have shown upregulation of interleukin-32 and immunoglobulin genes, which may explain the eosinophilic infiltration. Two mouse knockout models of CAPN3 have been characterized. There are no curative treatments for this disease. However, experimental therapeutics using mouse models conclude that adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors seem to be one of the best approaches because of their efficiency and persistency of gene transfer.

  7. Dystrophin insufficiency causes a Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a dystrophin deficiency while Becker MD is caused by a dystrophin insufficiency or expression of a partially functional dystrophin protein. Deficiencies in existing mouse and dog models necessitate the development of a novel large animal model. Our pu...

  8. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy.

  9. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    De Bleecker, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:24302815

  10. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Gao, Quan Q.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H.; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  11. Elevated plasma levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and their overexpression in muscle in human and mouse muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guilian; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Chiba, Yoko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Tanaka, Soichiro; Onuma, Akira; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2010-10-15

    To investigate the role of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in muscular dystrophy, we examined the expression of TIMP-1 using plasma and biopsied muscle from patients with various muscular dystrophies by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. TIMP-1 immunolocalization was also studied in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Plasma TIMP-1 was elevated and correlated with TGF-β1 in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), but not in Becker muscular dystrophy. In dystrophic human muscles, TIMP-1 was immunopositive in the regenerating and non-regenerating muscle fibers, and interstitial cells that consist of activated fibroblasts and macrophages. TIMP-1 immunoreactivity was also closely associated with TGF-β1. Western blot analysis showed elevated TIMP-1 protein in muscles in DMD. The semiquantitative analysis of TIMP-1 staining intensity and tissue fibrosis showed that TIMP-1 immunoreactivity is closely associated with the extent of tissue fibrosis in human and mouse dystrophic muscles. In conclusion, the present study implied that the TGF-β1-TIMP-1 pathway is activated in dystrophic muscles and the overexpression of TIMP-1 may result in increased deposition of extracellular matrix leading to tissue fibrosis.

  12. Cellular Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies: Frustrations and Clinical Successes.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Bigot, Anne; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Trollet, Capucine; Mouly, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    Cell-based therapy for muscular dystrophies was initiated in humans after promising results obtained in murine models. Early trials failed to show substantial clinical benefit, sending researchers back to the bench, which led to the discovery of many hurdles as well as many new venues to optimize this therapeutic strategy. In this review we summarize progress in preclinical cell therapy approaches, with a special emphasis on human cells potentially attractive for human clinical trials. Future perspectives for cell therapy in skeletal muscle are discussed, including the perspective of combined therapeutic approaches.

  13. Therapeutics in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Strober, Jonathan B

    2006-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 live born males, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Several different strategies are being investigated in developing a cure for this disorder. Until a cure is found, therapeutic and supportive care is essential in preventing complications and improving the afflicted child's quality of life. Currently, corticosteroids are the only class of drug that has been extensively studied in this condition, with controversy existing over the use of these drugs, especially in light of the multiple side effects that may occur. The use of nutritional supplements has expanded in recent years as researchers improve our abilities to use gene and stem cell therapies, which will hopefully lead to a cure soon. This article discusses the importance of therapeutic interventions in children with DMD, the current debate over the use of corticosteroids to treat this disease, the growing use of natural supplements as a new means of treating these boys and provides an update on the current state of gene and stem cell therapies.

  14. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy.

  15. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    PubMed

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-06

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  16. Ultra-structural time-course study in the C. elegans model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy highlights a crucial role for sarcomere-anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity in the earliest steps of the muscle degeneration process.

    PubMed

    Brouilly, Nicolas; Lecroisey, Claire; Martin, Edwige; Pierson, Laura; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Qadota, Hiroshi; Labouesse, Michel; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicole; Gieseler, Kathrin

    2015-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. In spite of great advances in the design of curative treatments, most patients currently receive palliative therapies with steroid molecules such as prednisone or deflazacort thought to act through their immunosuppressive properties. These molecules only slightly slow down the progression of the disease and lead to severe side effects. Fundamental research is still needed to reveal the mechanisms involved in the disease that could be exploited as therapeutic targets. By studying a Caenorhabditis elegans model for DMD, we show here that dystrophin-dependent muscle degeneration is likely to be cell autonomous and affects the muscle cells the most involved in locomotion. We demonstrate that muscle degeneration is dependent on exercise and force production. Exhaustive studies by electron microscopy allowed establishing for the first time the chronology of subcellular events occurring during the entire process of muscle degeneration. This chronology highlighted the crucial role for dystrophin in stabilizing sarcomeric anchoring structures and the sarcolemma. Our results suggest that the disruption of sarcomeric anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity, observed at the onset of the muscle degeneration process, triggers subcellular consequences that lead to muscle cell death. An ultra-structural analysis of muscle biopsies from DMD patients suggested that the chronology of subcellular events established in C. elegans models the pathogenesis in human. Finally, we found that the loss of sarcolemma integrity was greatly reduced after prednisone treatment suggesting a role for this molecule in plasma membrane stabilization.

  17. [Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in Chile].

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Reyes, J; Colombo, M; Blanco, M A

    1992-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the best known forms of muscular dystrophy. The incidence in different countries varies from 130 to 390 per million male live births. Becker variety may be considered a mild form of Duchenne dystrophy, with an incidence 10 times lower. A sex linked recessive inheritance is involved in both forms, the affected gene is placed at locus X21. The incidence of both forms in Chile is similar to that reported worldwide, and has been increasing since 1950. Increased CK and LDH levels are confirmed in patients, and overall, they are also higher in female carriers. However only 26% of carriers have increased CK levels and 21% increased LDH levels, compared to normal subjects. Electromyograms show myopathic characteristics in all carrier women. The scope of a prospective clinical, genetic and epidemiologic study currently underway is discussed.

  18. Feline Muscular Dystrophy with Dystrophin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, James L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Romanul, Flaviu C. A.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Rosales, Remedios K.; Ma, Nancy S. F.; Dasbach, James J.; Rae, John F.; Moore, Frances M.; McAfee, Mary B.; Pearce, Laurie K.

    1989-01-01

    This is the first description of a dystrophin-Deficient muscular dystrophy in domestic cats. The disorder appears to be of X-linked inheritance because it affected both males of a litter of four kittens. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent detection of dystrophin showed dystrophin present in control cat muscle but no detectable dystrophin in either affected cat. The feline muscular dystrophy was progressive and histopathologically resembled human Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy except for the lack of fat infiltration and the presence of prominent hypertrophy of both muscle fibers and muscles groups in the feline disorder. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:2683799

  19. Myotonic dystrophy associated with 47 XYY syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asano, A; Motomura, N; Yokota, S; Yoneda, H; Sakai, T; Tsutsumi, S

    2000-02-01

    A case of myotonic dystrophy with 47 XYY presented with tall stature and mental retardation. The patient was a 37-year-old male. In addition to grip myotonia and percussion myotonia, severe weakness and atrophy were noted in the face and the neck muscles and in the distal muscles of the four limbs. He also had diabetes mellitus, cataracts and sexual behavior abnormalities. He was found to be 47 XYY from chromosomal examinations. The combination of 47 XYY syndrome and myotonic dystrophy has not been reported previously.

  20. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  1. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  2. Halofuginone improves muscle-cell survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bodanovsky, Anna; Guttman, Noga; Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Genin, Ola; Levy, Oshrat; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2014-07-01

    Halofuginone has been shown to prevent fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 pathway in muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that halofuginone would reduce apoptosis--the presumed cause of satellite-cell depletion during muscle degradation-in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Six-week-old mdx mouse diaphragm exhibited fourfold higher numbers of apoptotic nuclei compared with wild-type mice as determined by a TUNEL assay. Apoptotic nuclei were found in macrophages and in Pax7-expressing cells; some were located in centrally-nucleated regenerating myofibers. Halofuginone treatment of mdx mice reduced the apoptotic nuclei number in the diaphragm, together with reduction in Bax and induction in Bcl2 levels in myofibers isolated from these mice. A similar effect was observed when halofuginone was added to cultured myofibers. No apparent effect of halofuginone was observed in wild-type mice. Inhibition of apoptosis or staurosporine-induced apoptosis by halofuginone in mdx primary myoblasts and C2 myogenic cell line, respectively, was reflected by less pyknotic/apoptotic cells and reduced Bax expression. This reduction was reversed by a phosphinositide-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in mediating halofuginone's effects on apoptosis. Halofuginone increased apoptosis in α smooth muscle actin- and prolyl 4-hydroxylase β-expressing cells in mdx diaphragm and in myofibroblasts, the major source of extracellular matrix. The data suggest an additional mechanism by which halofuginone improves muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  3. Complete atrioventricular block in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Orlikowski, D; Nardi, O; Annane, D

    2008-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. It is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness of variable distribution and severity. Heart is involved leading to heart failure. Conduction abnormalities are unusual. We report a case of complete atrio-ventricular block in a DMD patient.

  4. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    Page 18 of 21 Concomitant Medication Form Instructions: Please list each medication or herbal supplement in a separate row. Collection Date...DD-Mmm-YYYY): __ __ -- __ __ __ -- __ __ __ __ Is the participant currently taking any medications or herbal supplements ? Yes No * Medication Name...sites devoted to the study of pharmaceutical treatments for muscular dystrophy. This study is funded through a CTSA supplement through the University

  5. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD.

  6. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  7. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  8. Na+ Dysregulation Coupled with Ca2+ Entry through NCX1 Promotes Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Adam R.; Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A.; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Allen, Paul D.; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated Ca2+ entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd−/−), Dysf−/−, and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd−/− mice. Measured increases in baseline Na+ and Ca2+ in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca2+ influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca2+ levels. Indeed, Atp1a2+/− (encoding Na+-K+ ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na+ clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd−/− mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na+ channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  9. Second international workshop for glycosylation defects in muscular dystrophies, 11-12 November, 2010, Charlotte, USA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yiumo M; Brown, Susan C; Lu, Qi

    2011-11-01

    The second International Workshop for Glycosylation Defects in Muscular Dystrophies took place on November 11 and 12, 2010 in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Carolinas Medical Center with financial support from the Carolinas Muscular Dystrophy Research Endowment at the Carolinas HealthCare Foundation, the Muscular Dystrophy Association and funds raised by the "Jeans, Genes & Geniuses" event organized by Jane and Luther Lockwood. Since conducting the first workshop in May 2008, significant progress has been made in a subset of muscular dystrophies associated with defects in alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG) glycosylation. New findings on α-DG glycosylation and creation of novel animal models have expanded our understanding of the disease mechanism. The 2010 workshop focused on the following topics; (i) functional glycosylation of α-DG; (ii) animal models; and (iii) novel experimental therapies. The workshop brought together a total of 22 internationally renowned scientists and clinicians from US, UK, Denmark and Japan with active research and expertise in these areas. Overall, the workshop provided a unique opportunity to discuss the significance of recent progress, facilitate international collaboration, and identify new approaches to treat the disease.

  10. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies.

  11. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Scotton, Chiara; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-10-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs) are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options.

  12. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  13. SIRT1: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Atsushi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The treatment for DMD is limited to glucocorticoids, which are associated with multiple side effects. Thus, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently needed. SIRT1 is an NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase that plays roles in diverse cellular processes, including stress resistance and cell survival. Studies have shown that SIRT1 activation provides beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, a model of DMD. SIRT1 activation leads to the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, a shift from the fast to slow myofiber phenotype, and the suppression of tissue fibrosis. Although further research is needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of SIRT1 in mdx mice, we propose SIRT1 as a novel therapeutic target for patients with muscular dystrophies. PMID:27073590

  14. Cathepsin S Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Schips, Tobias G; Sargent, Michelle A; Vanhoutte, Davy; Kanisicak, Onur; Prasad, Vikram; Lin, Suh-Chin J; Maillet, Marjorie; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-06

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin protein compromises the stability of the sarcolemma membrane surrounding each muscle cell fiber, leading to membrane ruptures and leakiness that induces myofiber necrosis, a subsequent inflammatory response, and progressive tissue fibrosis with loss of functional capacity. Cathepsin S (Ctss) is a cysteine protease that is actively secreted in areas of tissue injury and ongoing inflammation, where it participates in extracellular matrix remodeling and healing. Here we show significant induction of Ctss expression and proteolytic activity following acute muscle injury or in muscle from mdx mice, a model of DMD. To examine the functional ramifications associated with greater Ctss expression, the Ctss gene was deleted in the mdx genetic background, resulting in protection from muscular dystrophy pathogenesis that included reduced myofiber turnover and histopathology, reduced fibrosis, and improved running capacity. Mechanistically, deletion of the Ctss gene in the mdx background significantly increased myofiber sarcolemmal membrane stability with greater expression and membrane localization of utrophin, integrins, and β-dystroglycan, which anchor the membrane to the basal lamina and underlying cytoskeletal proteins. Consistent with these results, skeletal muscle-specific transgenic mice overexpressing Ctss showed increased myofiber necrosis, muscle histopathology, and a functional deficit reminiscent of muscular dystrophy. Hence, Ctss induction during muscular dystrophy is a pathologic event that partially underlies disease pathogenesis, and its inhibition might serve as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD.

  15. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2007-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are characterized by insufficient restoration and gradual replacement of the skeletal muscle by fat and connective tissue. ADAM12 has previously been shown to alleviate the pathology of young dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The observed effect of ADAM12 was suggested to be mediated via a membrane-stabilizing up-regulation of utrophin, alpha7B integrin, and dystroglycans. Ectopic ADAM12 expression in normal mouse skeletal muscle also improved regeneration after freeze injury, presumably by the same mechanism. Hence, it was suggested that ADAM12 could be a candidate for nonreplacement gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We therefore evaluated the long-term effect of ADAM12 overexpression in muscle. Surprisingly, we observed loss of skeletal muscle and accelerated fibrosis and adipogenesis in 1-year-old mdx mice transgenically overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic mice (ADAM12(+)) after a knife cut lesion and observed that the regeneration process was significantly impaired. ADAM12 seemed to inhibit the satellite cell response and delay myoblast differentiation. These results discourage long-term therapeutic use of ADAM12. They also point to impaired regeneration as a possible factor in development of muscular dystrophy.

  16. [Ventricular Tachycardia as a First Manifestation of Myotonic Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Mironov, N Yu; Mironova, N A; Sokolov, S F; Mareev, Yu V; Shlevkov, N B; Saidova, M A; Stukalova, O V; Golitsyn, S P

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of bundle-branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia as a first and severe manifestation of myotonic dystrophy. Progressive cardiac conduction disturbances and cardiac arrhythmias are well-known features of myotonic dystrophy, although they are commonly found in late stage of disease in patients with established diagnosis. We review clinical manifestations, diagnostics, management, and prognostic value of cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy.

  17. Coincidence of neurofibromatosis and myotonic dystrophy in a kindred.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, K; Crosley, C J; Culebras, A; Weitkamp, L

    1981-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis and myotonic dystrophy have occurred in ten members of a nonconsanguineous family with a high degree of concordance. The expression of neurofibromatosis is peripheral, and the expression of myotonic dystrophy has produced at least moderately severe disability. Neither disease has appeared to alter the phenotypic expression of the other when both have occurred simultaneously. Secretor typing supports the assumption that the myotonic dystrophy in this family is the commonly recognised secretor-linked entity. The segregation pattern of the two disorders in this family suggest the possibility of close linkage between the loci for neurofibromatosis and myotonic dystrophy. PMID:6787200

  18. Assessment of resveratrol, apocynin and taurine on mechanical-metabolic uncoupling and oxidative stress in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy: A comparison with the gold standard, α-methyl prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; Mantuano, Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; De Bellis, Michela; Tamma, Roberto; Giustino, Arcangela; Nico, Beatrice; Montagnani, Monica; De Luca, Annamaria

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidants have a great potential as adjuvant therapeutics in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, although systematic comparisons at pre-clinical level are limited. The present study is a head-to-head assessment, in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD, of natural compounds, resveratrol and apocynin, and of the amino acid taurine, in comparison with the gold standard α-methyl prednisolone (PDN). The rationale was to target the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via disease-related pathways that are worsened by mechanical-metabolic impairment such as inflammation and over-activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX) (taurine and apocynin, respectively) or the failing ROS detoxification mechanisms via sirtuin-1 (SIRT1)-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) (resveratrol). Resveratrol (100mg/kg i.p. 5days/week), apocynin (38mg/kg/day per os), taurine (1g/kg/day per os), and PDN (1mg/kg i.p., 5days/week) were administered for 4-5 weeks to mdx mice in parallel with a standard protocol of treadmill exercise and the outcome was evaluated with a multidisciplinary approach in vivo and ex vivo on pathology-related end-points and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol≥taurine>apocynin enhanced in vivo mouse force similarly to PDN. All the compounds reduced the production of superoxide anion, assessed by dihydroethidium staining, with apocynin being as effective as PDN, and ameliorated electrophysiological biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol also significantly reduced plasma levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Force of isolated muscles was little ameliorated. However, the three compounds improved histopathology of gastrocnemius muscle more than PDN. Taurine>apocynin>PDN significantly decreased activated NF-kB positive myofibers. Thus, compounds targeting NOX-ROS or SIRT1/PGC-1α pathways differently modulate clinically relevant DMD-related endpoints according to their mechanism of action. With the

  19. Altered aquaporin-4 expression in human muscular dystrophies: a common feature?

    PubMed

    Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Repetto, Silvia; Bado, Massimo; Minetti, Carlo; Svelto, Maria

    2002-07-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive lethal muscle disease that affects young boys. Dystrophin, absent in DMD and reduced in the milder form Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), binds to several membrane-associated proteins known as dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs). Once this critical structural link is disrupted, muscle fibers become more vulnerable to mechanical and osmotic stress. Recently, we have reported that the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water-selective channel expressed in the sarcolemma of fast-twitch fibers and astrocyte end-feet, is drastically reduced in the muscle and brain of the mdx mouse, the animal model of DMD. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of AQP4 in several DMD/BMD patients of different ages with different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Immunofluorescence results indicate that, compared with healthy control children, AQP4 is reduced severely in all the DMD muscular biopsies analyzed and in 50% of the analyzed BMD. Western blot analysis revealed that the deficiency in sarcolemma AQP4 staining is due to a reduction in total AQP4 muscle protein content rather than to changes in immunoreactivity. Double-immunostaining experiments indicate that AQP4 reduction is independent of changes in the fiber myosin heavy chain composition. AQP4 and a-syntrophin analysis of BMD muscular biopsies revealed that the expression and stability of AQP4 in the sarcolemma does not always decrease when a-syntrophin is strongly reduced. Finally, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy biopsies and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy revealed that AQP4 expression was not altered in these forms of muscular dystrophy. These experiments provide the first evidence of AQP4 reduction in a human pathology and show that this deficiency is an important feature of DMD/BMD.

  20. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  1. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-10-04

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

  2. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Vincenzo; Feinberg, Joseph; Michaels, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is often cited as the third most common form of muscular dystrophy. Therefore, it should be considered in patients with complaints of progressive weakness. We present the case of a man with facial, truncal, and leg weakness that initially sought medical attention for lower back pain. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings in the trapezius, serratus anterior, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles consistent with a myopathic disorder. Subsequent genetic testing identified a FSHD allele size consistent with a FSHD deletion mutation. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis of FSHD. Unfortunately, no effective treatments currently exist for FSHD. However, supportive measures involving physical therapy and the use of orthotics may aid in improving function and mobility.

  3. Therapeutics Development in Myotonic Dystrophy Type I

    PubMed Central

    Foff, Erin Pennock; Mahadevan, Mani S.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1), the most common adult muscular dystrophy, is a multi-system, autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that leads to nuclear retention of a mutant RNA and subsequent RNA toxicity. Significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of RNA toxicity have led to the surprising possibility that treating DM1 is a viable prospect. In this review, we briefly present the clinical picture in DM1, and describe how the research in understanding the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity in DM1 has led to targeted approaches to therapeutic development at various steps in the pathogenesis of the disease. We discuss the promise and current limitations of each with an emphasis on RNA-based therapeutics and small molecules. We conclude with a discussion of the unmet need for clinical tools and outcome measures that are essential prerequisites to proceed in evaluating these potential therapies in clinical trials. PMID:21607985

  4. Progress in therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Rebecca J; Bareja, Akshay; Davies, Kay E

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a devastating muscular dystrophy of childhood. Mutations in the dystrophin gene destroy the link between the internal muscle filaments and the extracellular matrix, resulting in severe muscle weakness and progressive muscle wasting. There is currently no cure and, whilst palliative treatment has improved, affected boys are normally confined to a wheelchair by 12 years of age and die from respiratory or cardiac complications in their twenties or thirties. Therapies currently being developed include mutation-specific treatments, DNA- and cell-based therapies, and drugs which aim to modulate cellular pathways or gene expression. This review aims to provide an overview of the different therapeutic approaches aimed at reconstructing the dystrophin-associated protein complex, including restoration of dystrophin expression and upregulation of the functional homologue, utrophin.

  5. [Ceruloplasmin in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Reyes, J; Holmgren, J; Colombo, M

    1991-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a well defined form of sex linked inherited muscular disease. Approximately 1/3 of cases are the product of a new mutation. We studied 20 patients with this disease and 19 heterozygous females. Ceruloplasmin levels were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. A possible protective role of this enzyme against oxydating agents may help prevent peroxydation of lipids from the smooth muscle cell membrane.

  6. Severe dystrophy in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rózsai, Barnabás; Kiss, Akos; Csábi, Györgyi; Czakó, Márta; Decsi, Tamás

    2009-03-21

    We present the case history of a 3-year-old girl who was examined because of severe dystrophy. In the background, cow's milk allergy was found, but her body weight was unchanged after eliminating milk from her diet. Other types of malabsorption were excluded. Based on nasal regurgitation and facial dysmorphisms, the possibility of DiGeorge syndrome was suspected and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The authors suggest a new feature associated with DiGeorge syndrome.

  7. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (RhoS334) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of RhoS334, which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  8. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  9. Diaphragmatic function in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jennifer; Weinberg, Jan; Hamnegård, Carl-Hugo; Spahija, Jadranka; Olofson, Jan; Grimby, Gunnar; Sinderby, Christer

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diaphragm electrical activation and diaphragm strength in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy during resting conditions. Eight patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age of 25 +/- 2 years) were studied during tidal breathing, maximal inspiratory capacity, maximal sniff inhalations, and magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Six patients were prescribed home mechanical ventilation (five non-invasive and one tracheotomy). Transdiaphragmatic pressure and diaphragm electrical activation were measured using an esophageal catheter. During tidal breathing (tidal volume 198 +/- 83 ml, breathing frequency 25 +/- 7), inspiratory diaphragm electrical activation was clearly detectable in seven out of eight patients and was 12 +/- 7 times above the noise level, and represented 45 +/- 19% of the maximum diaphragm electrical activation. Mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure during tidal breathing was 1.5 +/- 1.2 cmH2O, and during maximal sniff was 7.6 +/- 3.6 cmH2O. Twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure deflections could not be detected. This study shows that despite near complete loss of diaphragm strength in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy, diaphragm electrical activation measured with an esophageal electrode array remains clearly detectable in all but one patient.

  10. Diagnostic approach to the congenital muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Wang, Ching H.; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Deconinck, Nicolas; Bertini, Enrico; Ferreiro, Ana; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Béroud, Christophe; Mathews, Katherine D.; Moore, Steven A.; Bellini, Jonathan; Rutkowski, Anne; North, Kathryn N.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are early onset disorders of muscle with histological features suggesting a dystrophic process. The congenital muscular dystrophies as a group encompass great clinical and genetic heterogeneity so that achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis has become increasingly challenging, even in the age of next generation sequencing. In this document we review the diagnostic features, differential diagnostic considerations and available diagnostic tools for the various CMD subtypes and provide a systematic guide to the use of these resources for achieving an accurate molecular diagnosis. An International Committee on the Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies composed of experts on various aspects relevant to the CMDs performed a review of the available literature as well as of the unpublished expertise represented by the members of the committee and their contacts. This process was refined by two rounds of online surveys and followed by a three-day meeting at which the conclusions were presented and further refined. The combined consensus summarized in this document allows the physician to recognize the presence of a CMD in a child with weakness based on history, clinical examination, muscle biopsy results, and imaging. It will be helpful in suspecting a specific CMD subtype in order to prioritize testing to arrive at a final genetic diagnosis. PMID:24581957

  11. A Small Molecule p75NTR Ligand, LM11A-31, Reverses Cholinergic Neurite Dystrophy in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models with Mid- to Late-Stage Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Danielle A.; Knowles, Juliet K.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Banerjee, Gargi; Finkle, Carly; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contributes significantly to the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been attributed to aberrant signaling through the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR). Thus, modulating p75NTR signaling is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Accordingly, our laboratory has developed small molecule p75NTR ligands that increase survival signaling and inhibit amyloid-β-induced degenerative signaling in in vitro studies. Previous work found that a lead p75NTR ligand, LM11A-31, prevents degeneration of cholinergic neurites when given to an AD mouse model in the early stages of disease pathology. To extend its potential clinical applications, we sought to determine whether LM11A-31 could reverse cholinergic neurite atrophy when treatment begins in AD mouse models having mid- to late stages of pathology. Reversing pathology may have particular clinical relevance as most AD studies involve patients that are at an advanced pathological stage. In this study, LM11A-31 (50 or 75 mg/kg) was administered orally to two AD mouse models, Thy-1 hAPPLond/Swe (APPL/S) and Tg2576, at age ranges during which marked AD-like pathology manifests. In mid-stage male APPL/S mice, LM11A-31 administered for 3 months starting at 6–8 months of age prevented and/or reversed atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurites and cortical dystrophic neurites. Importantly, a 1 month LM11A-31 treatment given to male APPL/S mice (12–13 months old) with late-stage pathology reversed the degeneration of cholinergic neurites in basal forebrain, ameliorated cortical dystrophic neurites, and normalized increased basal forebrain levels of p75NTR. Similar results were seen in female Tg2576 mice. These findings suggest that LM11A-31 can reduce and/or reverse fundamental AD pathologies in late-stage AD mice. Thus, targeting p75NTR is a promising approach to reducing AD-related degenerative processes that have progressed

  12. Targeting the Activin Type IIB Receptor to Improve Muscle Mass and Function in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistilli, Emidio E.; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Ahima, Rexford S.; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-01-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg−1 body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg−1 dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg−1), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies. PMID:21356379

  13. Targeting the activin type IIB receptor to improve muscle mass and function in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Goncalves, Marcus D; Ahima, Rexford S; Lachey, Jennifer; Seehra, Jasbir; Khurana, Tejvir

    2011-03-01

    The activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) is a transmembrane receptor for transforming growth factor-β superfamily members, including myostatin, that are involved in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle mass. We tested the translational hypothesis that blocking ligand binding to ActRIIB for 12 weeks would stimulate skeletal muscle growth and improve muscle function in the mdx mouse. ActRIIB was targeted using a novel inhibitor comprised of the extracellular portion of the ActRIIB fused to the Fc portion of murine IgG (sActRIIB), at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg(-1) body weight. After 12 weeks of treatment, the 10.0 mg/kg(-1) dose caused a 27% increase in body weight with a concomitant 33% increase in lean muscle mass. Absolute force production of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo was higher in mice after treatment with either dose of sActRIIB, and the specific force was significantly higher after the lower dose (1.0 mg/kg(-1)), indicating functional improvement in the muscle. Circulating creatine kinase levels were significantly lower in mice treated with sActRIIB, compared with control mice. These data show that targeting the ActRIIB improves skeletal muscle mass and functional strength in the mdx mouse model of DMD, providing a therapeutic rationale for use of this molecule in treating skeletal myopathies.

  14. Simultaneous Pathoproteomic Evaluation of the Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex and Secondary Changes in the mdx-4cv Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sandra; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Zweyer, Margit; Mundegar, Rustam R.; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex forms a membrane-associated assembly of relatively low abundance, making its detailed proteomic characterization in normal versus dystrophic tissues technically challenging. To overcome this analytical problem, we have enriched the muscle membrane fraction by a minimal differential centrifugation step followed by the comprehensive label-free mass spectrometric analysis of microsomal membrane preparations. This organelle proteomic approach successfully identified dystrophin and its binding partners in normal versus dystrophic hind limb muscles. The introduction of a simple pre-fractionation step enabled the simultaneous proteomic comparison of the reduction in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and secondary changes in the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy in a single analytical run. The proteomic screening of the microsomal fraction from dystrophic hind limb muscle identified the full-length dystrophin isoform Dp427 as the most drastically reduced protein in dystrophinopathy, demonstrating the remarkable analytical power of comparative muscle proteomics. Secondary pathoproteomic expression patterns were established for 281 proteins, including dystrophin-associated proteins and components involved in metabolism, signalling, contraction, ion-regulation, protein folding, the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Key findings were verified by immunoblotting. Increased levels of the sarcolemmal Na+/K+-ATPase in dystrophic leg muscles were also confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, the reduction of sample complexity in organelle-focused proteomics can be advantageous for the profiling of supramolecular protein complexes in highly intricate systems, such as skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:26067837

  15. A Novel Hybrid Feature Selection Model for Classification of Neuromuscular Dystrophies Using Bhattacharyya Coefficient, Genetic Algorithm and Radial Basis Function Based Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Anand, Divya; Pandey, Babita; Pandey, Devendra K

    2016-09-17

    An accurate classification of neuromuscular disorders is important in providing proper treatment facilities to the patients. Recently, the microarray technology is employed to monitor the level of activity or expression of large number of genes simultaneously. The gene expression data derived from the microarray experiment usually involve a large number of genes but a very few number of samples. There is a need to reduce the dimension of gene expression data which intends to find a small set of discriminative genes that accurately classifies the samples of various kinds of diseases. So, our goal is to find a small subset of genes which ensures the accurate classification of neuromuscular disorders. In the present paper, we propose a novel hybrid feature selection model for classification of neuromuscular disorders. The process of feature selection is done in two phases by integrating Bhattacharyya coefficient and genetic algorithm (GA). In the first phase, we find Bhattacharyya coefficient to choose a candidate gene subset by removing the most redundant genes. In the second phase, the target gene subset is created by selecting the most discriminative gene subset by applying GA wherein the fitness function is calculated using radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM). The proposed hybrid algorithm is applied on two publicly available microarray neuromuscular disorders datasets. The results are compared with two individual techniques of feature selection, namely Bhattacharyya coefficient and GA, and one integrated technique, i.e., Bhattacharyya-GA wherein the fitness function of GA is calculated using four other classifiers, which shows that the proposed integrated method is capable of giving the better classification accuracy.

  16. Lengthening-contractions in isolated myocardium impact force development and worsen cardiac contractile function in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-02-01

    Lengthening-contractions exert eccentric stress on myofibers in normal myocardium. In congestive heart failure caused by a variety of diseases, the impact of lengthening-contractions of myocardium likely becomes more prevalent and severe. The present study introduces a method to investigate the role of stretching imposed by repetitive lengthening-contractions in myocardium under near-physiological conditions. By exerting various stretch-release ramps while the muscle is contracting, consecutive lengthening-contractions and their potential detrimental effect on cardiac function can be studied. We tested our model and hypothesis in age-matched (young and adult) mdx and wild-type mouse right ventricular trabeculae. These linear and ultrathin muscles possess all major cardiac cell types, and their contractile behavior very closely mimics that of the whole myocardium. In the first group of experiments, 10 lengthening-contractions at various magnitudes of stretch were performed in trabeculae from 10-wk-old mdx and wild-type mice. In the second group, 100 lengthening-contractions at various magnitudes were conducted in trabeculae from 10- and 20-wk-old mice. The peak isometric active developed tension (F(dev), in mN/mm(2)) and kinetic parameters time to peak tension (TTP, in ms) and time from peak tension to half-relaxation (RT50, in ms) were measured. Our results indicate lengthening-contractions significantly impact contractile behavior, and that dystrophin-deficient myocardium in mdx mice is significantly more susceptible to these damaging lengthening-contractions. The results indicate that lengthening-contractions in intact myocardium can be used in vitro to study this emerging contributor to cardiomyopathy.

  17. Early onset myotonic dystrophy in association with polyneuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Paramesh, K; Smith, B H; Kalyanaraman, K

    1975-01-01

    A patient with early onset of myotonic dystrophy, with associated neuropathy and epilepsy, is presented. It is postulated that his disorder was inherited through a recessive, pleomorphic gene. His differential diagnosis is discussed and the literature reviewed. The clinical variability of myotonic dystrophy is stressed and the diagnostic difficulties encountered in the younger age group. Images PMID:173806

  18. Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Hrishikesh; Barik, Manas R; Reddy, Mamatha M; Mittal, Ruchi; Das, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD) is a rare autosomal recessive form of corneal dystrophy characterised by subepithelial and stromal amyloid deposits. It is relatively common in Japan. It usually presents in the first two decades of life with subepithelial nodular lesions that later coalesce to form mulberry-like opacities. Although various surgical modalities have been attempted, recurrence remains a major challenge.

  19. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Chávez García, Ana Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset. PMID:22701119

  20. Changes in pain-related beliefs, coping, and catastrophizing predict changes in pain intensity, pain interference, and psychological functioning in individuals with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Rubén; Raichle, Katherine A.; Jensen, Mark P.; Miró, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this study was to test hypothesized associations between changes in psychological variables (i.e., pain beliefs, catastrophizing and coping strategies) and changes in pain intensity and related adjustment (i.e., pain interference and psychological functioning) in individuals with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD). Methods A sample of 107 adults with a diagnosis of MMD or FSHD, reporting pain in the past three months, completed assessments at two time-points, separated by about 24 months. Results Results showed that changes in pain-related psychological variables were significantly associated with changes in psychological functioning, pain intensity and pain interference. Specifically, increases in the belief that emotion influences pain, and catastrophizing were associated with decreases in psychological functioning. Increases in the coping strategies of asking for assistance and resting, and the increases of catastrophizing were associated with increases in pain intensity. Finally, increases in pain intensity and asking for assistance were associated with increases in pain interference. Discussion The results support the utility of the biopsychosocial model of pain for understanding pain and its impact in individuals with MMD or FSHD. These findings may inform the design and implementation of psychosocial pain treatments for people with muscular dystrophy and chronic pain. PMID:21642844

  1. Drug Discovery of Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Blat, Yuval; Blat, Shachar

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic, lethal, muscle disorder caused by the loss of the muscle protein, dystrophin, leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and muscle weakness. Drug discovery efforts targeting DMD have used two main approaches: (1) the restoration of dystrophin expression or the expression of a compensatory protein, and (2) the mitigation of downstream pathological mechanisms, including dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and muscle ischemia. The aim of this review is to introduce the disease, its pathophysiology, and the available research tools to a drug discovery audience. This review will also detail the most promising therapies that are currently being tested in clinical trials or in advanced preclinical models.

  2. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee.

  3. Consensus Statement on Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching H.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M.; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M.; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O.; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D.; Connolly, Anne M.; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L.; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  4. Can Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Advance Understanding of Muscular Dystrophies?

    PubMed

    Kalra, Spandan; Montanaro, Federica; Denning, Chris

    2016-08-30

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are clinically and molecularly a highly heterogeneous group of single-gene disorders that primarily affect striated muscles. Cardiac disease is present in several MDs where it is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. Careful monitoring of cardiac issues is necessary but current management of cardiac involvement does not effectively protect from disease progression and cardiac failure. There is a critical need to gain new knowledge on the diverse molecular underpinnings of cardiac disease in MDs in order to guide cardiac treatment development and assist in reaching a clearer consensus on cardiac disease management in the clinic. Animal models are available for the majority of MDs and have been invaluable tools in probing disease mechanisms and in pre-clinical screens. However, there are recognized genetic, physiological, and structural differences between human and animal hearts that impact disease progression, manifestation, and response to pharmacological interventions. Therefore, there is a need to develop parallel human systems to model cardiac disease in MDs. This review discusses the current status of cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) to model cardiac disease, with a focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and myotonic dystrophy (DM1). We seek to provide a balanced view of opportunities and limitations offered by this system in elucidating disease mechanisms pertinent to human cardiac physiology and as a platform for treatment development or refinement.

  5. Can Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Advance Understanding of Muscular Dystrophies?

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Spandan; Montanaro, Federica; Denning, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are clinically and molecularly a highly heterogeneous group of single-gene disorders that primarily affect striated muscles. Cardiac disease is present in several MDs where it is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. Careful monitoring of cardiac issues is necessary but current management of cardiac involvement does not effectively protect from disease progression and cardiac failure. There is a critical need to gain new knowledge on the diverse molecular underpinnings of cardiac disease in MDs in order to guide cardiac treatment development and assist in reaching a clearer consensus on cardiac disease management in the clinic. Animal models are available for the majority of MDs and have been invaluable tools in probing disease mechanisms and in pre-clinical screens. However, there are recognized genetic, physiological, and structural differences between human and animal hearts that impact disease progression, manifestation, and response to pharmacological interventions. Therefore, there is a need to develop parallel human systems to model cardiac disease in MDs. This review discusses the current status of cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) to model cardiac disease, with a focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and myotonic dystrophy (DM1). We seek to provide a balanced view of opportunities and limitations offered by this system in elucidating disease mechanisms pertinent to human cardiac physiology and as a platform for treatment development or refinement. PMID:27854224

  6. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... print info for the public, providers, educators, researchers Data Sharing and Other Resources Scientific databases, models, datasets & repositories Research Research networks, center programs, career ...

  7. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  8. A molecular protocol for diagnosing myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Guida, M; Marger, R S; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Kissel, J T; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. The CTG repeat is present 5-30 times in the normal population, whereas DM patients have CTG expansions of 50 to several thousand repeats. The age of onset of the disorder and the severity of the phenotype is roughly correlated with the size of the CTG expansion. We developed a molecular protocol for the diagnosis of DM based on an initial polymerase chain reaction screen to detect normal-sized alleles and small expansions, followed by an improved Southern protocol to detect larger expansions.

  9. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials.

  10. Manumycin A corrects aberrant splicing of Clcn1 in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) mice.

    PubMed

    Oana, Kosuke; Oma, Yoko; Suo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Masanori P; Nishino, Ichizo; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults and as yet no cure for DM1. Here, we report the potential of manumycin A for a novel DM1 therapeutic reagent. DM1 is caused by expansion of CTG repeat. Mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats lead to aberrant regulation of alternative splicing. Myotonia (delayed muscle relaxation) is the most commonly observed symptom in DM1 patients and is caused by aberrant splicing of the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLCN1) gene. Identification of small-molecule compounds that correct aberrant splicing in DM1 is attracting much attention as a way of improving understanding of the mechanism of DM1 pathology and improving treatment of DM1 patients. In this study, we generated a reporter screening system and searched for small-molecule compounds. We found that manumycin A corrects aberrant splicing of Clcn1 in cell and mouse models of DM1.

  11. Dystrophin gene replacement and gene repair therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in 2016.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-04

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repair the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD.

  12. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD.

  13. Progress and prospects of next-generation sequencing testing for inherited retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John (Pei-Wen); Lamey, Tina; McLaren, Terri; Thompson, Jennifer A; Montgomery, Hannah; De Roach, John

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing, also known as massively paralleled sequencing, offers an unprecedented opportunity to study disease mechanisms of inherited retinal dystrophies: a dramatic change from a few years ago. The specific involvement of the retina and the manageable number of genes to sequence make inherited retinal dystrophies an attractive model to study genotype–phenotype correlations. Costs are reducing rapidly and the current overall mutation detection rate of approximately 60% offers real potential for personalized medicine and treatments. This report addresses the challenges ahead, which include: better understanding of the mutation mechanisms of syndromic genes in apparent non-syndromic patients; finding mutations in patients who have tested negative or inconclusive; better variant calling, especially for intronic and synonymous variants; more precise genotype–phenotype correlations and making genetic testing more broadly accessible. PMID:26394700

  14. Mutations in the proteolytic enzyme calpain 3 cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Broux, O; Allamand, V; Fougerousse, F; Chiannilkulchai, N; Bourg, N; Brenguier, L; Devaud, C; Pasturaud, P; Roudaut, C

    1995-04-07

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of inherited diseases whose genetic etiology has yet to be elucidated. The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) constitute a genetically heterogeneous group with LGMD2A mapping to chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1. The gene encoding the muscle-specific calcium-activated neutral protease 3 (CANP3) large subunit is located in this region. This cysteine protease belongs to the family of intracellular calpains. Fifteen nonsense, splice site, frameshift, or missense calpain mutations cosegregate with the disease in LGMD2A families, six of which were found within La Réunion island patients. A digenic inheritance model is proposed to account for the unexpected presence of multiple independent mutations in this small inbred population. Finally, these results demonstrate an enzymatic rather than a structural protein defect causing a muscular dystrophy, a defect that may have regulatory consequences, perhaps in signal transduction.

  15. Lighting a candle in the dark: advances in genetics and gene therapy of recessive retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Anneke I; Black, Aaron; Bennett, Jean; Cremers, Frans P M

    2010-09-01

    Nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophies cause severe visual impairment due to the death of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium cells. These diseases until recently have been considered to be incurable. Molecular genetic studies in the last two decades have revealed the underlying molecular causes in approximately two-thirds of patients. The mammalian eye has been at the forefront of therapeutic trials based on gene augmentation in humans with an early-onset nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophy due to mutations in the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65kDa (RPE65) gene. Tremendous challenges still lie ahead to extrapolate these studies to other retinal disease-causing genes, as human gene augmentation studies require testing in animal models for each individual gene and sufficiently large patient cohorts for clinical trials remain to be identified through cost-effective mutation screening protocols.

  16. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  17. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively.

  18. Memory or amnesia: the dilemma of stem cell therapy in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are monogenetic diseases that are often characterized by the degeneration of both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Gene therapy to correct the mutated gene has shown promise in both animal models and clinical trials; however, current gene delivery strategies are limited to the introduction of the corrected gene into only one tissue. Strategies to target multiple striated muscle types would provide a much-needed improvement for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this issue of the JCI, Quattrocelli and colleagues demonstrate that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with a myogenic propensity are able to engraft into both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The authors also identified a novel pool of mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitors (MiPs). Moreover, the authors show that these MiPs are amenable to gene correction and can restore function in murine dystrophic models. Together, the results of this study provide an important advance in improving gene delivery to treat patients with muscular dystrophy. PMID:26571391

  19. Concise review: mesoangioblast and mesenchymal stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophy: progress, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Berry, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and mesoangioblasts (MABs) are multipotent cells that differentiate into specialized cells of mesodermal origin, including skeletal muscle cells. Because of their potential to differentiate into the skeletal muscle lineage, these multipotent cells have been tested for their capacity to participate in regeneration of damaged skeletal muscle in animal models of muscular dystrophy. MSCs and MABs infiltrate dystrophic muscle from the circulation, engraft into host fibers, and bring with them proteins that replace the functions of those missing or truncated. The potential for systemic delivery of these cells increases the feasibility of stem cell therapy for the large numbers of affected skeletal muscles in patients with muscular dystrophy. The present review focused on the results of preclinical studies with MSCs and MABs in animal models of muscular dystrophy. The goals of the present report were to (a) summarize recent results, (b) compare the efficacy of MSCs and MABs derived from different tissues in restoration of protein expression and/or improvement in muscle function, and (c) discuss future directions for translating these discoveries to the clinic. In addition, although systemic delivery of MABs and MSCs is of great importance for reaching dystrophic muscles, the potential concerns related to this method of stem cell transplantation are discussed.

  20. Genetics and emerging treatments for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wein, Nicolas; Alfano, Lindsay; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene result in Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy due to absent or altered expression of the dystrophin protein. The more severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy typically presents around ages 2 to 5 with gait disturbance, and historically has led to the loss of ambulation by age 12. It is important for the practicing pediatrician, however, to be aware of other presenting signs, such as delayed motor or cognitive milestones, or elevated serum transaminases. Becker muscular dystrophy is milder, often presenting after age 5, with ambulation frequently preserved past 20 years and sometimes into late decades.

  1. Myasthenia gravis and thymoma coexisting with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, Ozgul; Karasoy, Hatice; Bademkiran, Fikret; Akkus, Dilek Evyapan; Yuceyar, Nur

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 34-year old man presenting with subacute generalized myasthenic symptoms. His clinical features and laboratory investigations demonstrated both myasthenia gravis and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The computerized tomography of chest revealed anterior mediastinal mass. The lymphocyte-rich thymoma was removed surgically and he received radiotherapy. Recent observations suggested that the patients with myotonic dystrophy may have an increased risk of benign and malignant tumours but its coexistence with thymoma is very rare. The risk of thymoma associated with myotonic dystrophy is unknown.

  2. Meretoja's Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, C.; Neves, M.; Oliveira, L.; Beirão, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja's syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients. PMID:28250773

  3. Diagnostic Odyssey of Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Day, John W.; Luebbe, Elizabeth A.; Martens, William B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Tawil, Rabi; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    The onset and symptoms of the myotonic dystrophies are diverse, complicating their diagnoses and limiting a comprehensive approach to their clinical care. This report analyzes the diagnostic delay (time from onset of first symptom to diagnosis) in a large sample of myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients enrolled in the US National Registry [679 DM type 1 (DM1) and 135 DM type 2 (DM2) patients]. Age of onset averaged 34.0 ± 14.1 years in DM2 patients compared to 26.1 ± 13.2 years in DM1 (p<0.0001). The most common initial symptom in DM2 patients was leg weakness (32.6%) compared to grip myotonia in DM1 (38.3%). Pain was reported as the first symptom in 11.1% of DM2 and 3.0% of DM1 patients (p<0.0001). Reaching the correct diagnosis in DM2 took 14 years on average (double the time compared to DM1) and a significantly higher percentage of patients underwent extended workup including electromyography, muscle biopsies, and finally genetic testing. DM patients who were index cases experienced similar diagnostic delays to non-index cases of DM. Further evaluation of how to shorten these diagnostic delays and limit their impact on burdens of disease, family planning, and symptom management is needed. PMID:23807151

  4. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic.

  5. [Pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1].

    PubMed

    Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults, affecting 1/8000 individuals. DM1 is a dominant disorder characterized by multisystemic clinical features affecting skeletal muscle, heart and the nervous and endocrine systems. DM1 is caused by an expansion of CTG trinucleotide repeats within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the DMPK gene. This repeat is polymorphic in normal individuals with alleles ranging from 5 to 37 in length. Repeats exceeding a threshold of approximately 50 and reaching up to a number of 4,000 result in disease. This review offers a detailed description of the scientific findings that have allowed the establishment of the molecular basis of the DM1 in the muscle and nervous systems. Currently, it is known that mutant DM1 transcript accumulates in the nucleus of muscle and neuronal cells sequestering nuclear proteins, such as splicing regulators and transcription factors to form nuclear foci that are observed under inmunofluorescence techniques. This event disturbs the expression of several muscular and neuronal genes impairing cell differentiation, which may explain the multiple symptoms of the disease. Finally, the main findings towards the development of a gene therapy for DM1 are discussed.

  6. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  7. Sleep disordered breathing in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Buccarella, Cristina; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Rossi, Monica; Scarano, Emanuele; Pirronti, Tommaso; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Mazza, Salvatore; Tonali, Pietro A; Ricci, Enzo

    2009-10-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most frequent forms of muscular dystrophy. The aims of this study were: 1) to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with FSHD; 2) to define the sleep-related respiratory patterns in FSHD patients with SDB; and 3) to find the clinical predictors of SDB. Fifty-one consecutive FSHD patients were enrolled, 23 women, mean age 45.7+/-12.3 years (range: 26-72). The diagnosis of FSHD was confirmed by genetic tests. All patients underwent medical and neurological evaluations, subjective evaluation of sleep and full-night laboratory-based polysomnography. Twenty patients presented SDB: 13 presented obstructive apneas, four presented REM related oxygen desaturations and three showed a mixed pattern. Three patients needed positive airways pressure. SDB was not related to the severity of the disease. Body mass index, neck circumference and daytime sleepiness did not allow prediction of SDB. In conclusion, the results suggest a high prevalence of SDB in patients with FSHD. The presence of SDB does not depend on the clinical severity of the disease. SDB is often asymptomatic, and no clinical or physical measure can reliably predict its occurrence. A screening of SDB should be included in the clinical assessment of FSHD.

  8. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Hao; Zhao, Heng; Qing, Yu-Bo; Pan, Wei-Rong; Jia, Bao-Yu; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Huang, Xing-Xu; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig. PMID:27735844

  9. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Hao; Zhao, Heng; Qing, Yu-Bo; Pan, Wei-Rong; Jia, Bao-Yu; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Huang, Xing-Xu; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2016-10-09

    Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD) is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig.

  10. Muscular Dystrophy associated with alpha-dystroglycan deficiency in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul T; Diane Shelton, G.; Dickinson, Peter J; Sturges, Beverly K; Xu, Rui; LeCouteur, Richard A; Guo, Ling T; Grahn, Robert A; Lo, Harriet P; North, Kathryn N; Malik, Richard; Engvall, Eva; Lyons, Leslie A

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of forms of muscular dystrophy, termed dystroglycanopathies, which are associated with loss of natively glycosylated α–dystroglycan. Here we identify a new animal model for this class of disorders in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats. Affected cats displayed a slowly progressive myopathy with clinical and histologic hallmarks of muscular dystrophy including skeletal muscle weakness with no involvement of peripheral nerves or CNS. Skeletal muscles had myopathic features and reduced expression of α–dystroglycan, while β–dystroglycan, sarcoglycans, and dystrophin were expressed at normal levels. In the Sphynx cat, analysis of laminin and lectin binding capacity demonstrated no loss in overall glycosylation or ligand binding for the α-dystroglycan protein, only a loss of protein expression. A reduction in laminin-α2 expression in the basal lamina surrounding skeletal myofibers was also observed. Sequence analysis of translated regions of the feline dystroglycan gene (DAG1) in affected cats did not identify a causative mutation, and levels of DAG1 mRNA determined by real-time QRT-PCR did not differ significantly from normal controls. Reduction in the levels of glycosylated α–dystroglycan by immunoblot was also identified in an affected Devon Rex cat. These data suggest that muscular dystrophy in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats results from a deficiency in α-dystroglycan protein expression, and as such may represent a new type of dystroglycanopathy where expression, but not glycosylation, is affected. PMID:18990577

  11. TWEAK/Fn14, a pathway and novel therapeutic target in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Ramesh S; Foff, Erin P; Yu, Qing; Gladman, Jordan T; Kim, Yun K; Bhatt, Kirti S; Thornton, Charles A; Zheng, Timothy S; Mahadevan, Mani S

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), the most prevalent muscular dystrophy in adults, is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and multi-systemic complications. DM1 is the prototype for disorders caused by RNA toxicity. Currently, no therapies exist. Here, we identify that fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family, is induced in skeletal muscles and hearts of mouse models of RNA toxicity and in tissues from DM1 patients, and that its expression correlates with severity of muscle pathology. This is associated with downstream signaling through the NF-κB pathways. In mice with RNA toxicity, genetic deletion of Fn14 results in reduced muscle pathology and better function. Importantly, blocking TWEAK/Fn14 signaling with an anti-TWEAK antibody likewise improves muscle histopathology and functional outcomes in affected mice. These results reveal new avenues for therapeutic development and provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic target for which clinically available therapy exists to potentially treat muscular dystrophy in DM1.

  12. The 'PDA nail': traumatic nail dystrophy in habitual users of personal digital assistants.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Malgorzata; Wu, John Z; Slowinska, Monika; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2009-01-01

    All-in-one devices with mobile phone, web browser, and organizer are now owned by over 6 million people and their popularity is increasing. These devices are often called personal digital assistants (PDAs) or 'BlackBerry(R)' devices, after a popular brand name of these appliances. The use of PDAs is associated with exposure of distal thumbs and nails to repeated pressure with a frequency of up to a few thousand times per hour and several tens of thousands of times per day. We describe two cases of traumatic thumb nail dystrophy associated with using a PDA keyboard for several hours per day. Both patients developed median nail plate dystrophy after 4-8 months of habitual PDA use. One patient also developed thumb nail psoriasis and paronychia. All symptoms resolved a few months after discontinuing PDA use. Analysis of nail biomechanics, performed by using a finite element fingertip model, showed that maximal stress reaches approximately 3 MPa and appears near the root on the internal surface of the nail, while it reaches approximately 2 MPa and appears around one-third from the root on the outside surface. In conclusion, biomechanical stress resulting from overuse of PDAs may result in various types of nail dystrophy. We suggest the general term 'PDA nails' for these nail abnormalities.

  13. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan induces severe muscular dystrophy. Implications for the regulation of Sarcoglycan assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Hadhazy, M; Groh, M E; Wheeler, M T; Wollmann, R; McNally, E M

    2001-06-15

    The sarcoglycan complex is found normally at the plasma membrane of muscle. Disruption of the sarcoglycan complex, through primary gene mutations in dystrophin or sarcoglycan subunits, produces membrane instability and muscular dystrophy. Restoration of the sarcoglycan complex at the plasma membrane requires reintroduction of the mutant sarcoglycan subunit in a manner that will permit normal assembly of the entire sarcoglycan complex. To study sarcoglycan gene replacement, we introduced transgenes expressing murine gamma-sarcoglycan into muscle of normal mice. Mice expressing high levels of gamma-sarcoglycan, under the control of the muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter, developed a severe muscular dystrophy with greatly reduced muscle mass and early lethality. Marked gamma-sarcoglycan overexpression produced cytoplasmic aggregates that interfered with normal membrane targeting of gamma-sarcoglycan. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan lead to the up-regulation of alpha- and beta-sarcoglycan. These data suggest that increased gamma-sarcoglycan and/or mislocalization of gamma-sarcoglycan to the cytoplasm is sufficient to induce muscle damage and provides a new model of muscular dystrophy that highlights the importance of this protein in the assembly, function, and downstream signaling of the sarcoglycan complex. Most importantly, gene dosage and promoter strength should be given serious consideration in replacement gene therapy to ensure safety in human clinical trials.

  14. TNF-α-Induced microRNAs Control Dystrophin Expression in Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Alyson A; Heier, Christopher R; Novak, James S; Tully, Christopher B; Brown, Kristy J; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Vila, Maria C; Ngheim, Peter P; Bello, Luca; Kornegay, Joe N; Angelini, Corrado; Partridge, Terence A; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P

    2015-09-08

    The amount and distribution of dystrophin protein in myofibers and muscle is highly variable in Becker muscular dystrophy and in exon-skipping trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we investigate a molecular basis for this variability. In muscle from Becker patients sharing the same exon 45-47 in-frame deletion, dystrophin levels negatively correlate with microRNAs predicted to target dystrophin. Seven microRNAs inhibit dystrophin expression in vitro, and three are validated in vivo (miR-146b/miR-374a/miR-31). microRNAs are expressed in dystrophic myofibers and increase with age and disease severity. In exon-skipping-treated mdx mice, microRNAs are significantly higher in muscles with low dystrophin rescue. TNF-α increases microRNA levels in vitro whereas NFκB inhibition blocks this in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data show that microRNAs contribute to variable dystrophin levels in muscular dystrophy. Our findings suggest a model where chronic inflammation in distinct microenvironments induces pathological microRNAs, initiating a self-sustaining feedback loop that exacerbates disease progression.

  15. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-15

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wild-type mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype, and showed increased expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD.

  16. How Physicians Support Mothers of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Shinno, Susumu; Imura, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Communicating about Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its prognosis can be difficult for affected children and their family. We focused on how physicians provide support to the mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have difficulty communicating about the condition with their child. The eligible participants were certified child neurologists of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Participants responded to questionnaires consisting of free descriptions of a vignette of a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a mother. We analyzed 263 responses of the participants. We found 4 themes on advising mothers, involving encouraging communication, family autonomy, supporting family, and considering the child's concerns. These results provide a better understanding of the communication between physicians and family members who need help sharing information with a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These findings will assist clinical practitioners in supporting families and the affected children throughout the course of their illness.

  17. Acetazolamide for cystoid macular oedema in Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Broadhead, Geoffrey K; Chang, Andrew A

    2014-04-01

    Bietti crystalline retinal dystrophy is a rare, inherited disorder whose hallmark is the presence of retinal crystal deposits associated with later chorioretinal degeneration. This condition may rarely be complicated by the development of cystoid macular oedema leading to rapid visual decline. Currently, treatment options for this complication of Bietti dystrophy are limited and the visual prognosis is poor. Here, we present a case of cystoid macular oedema associated with Bietti dystrophy that was successfully diagnosed using multimodal imaging techniques including optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography. These modalities confirmed the diagnosis of macular oedema and excluded other possible causes of oedema such as choroidal neovascularisation. In this patient, cystoid macular oedema was resolved with oral acetazolamide therapy, a treatment that has not been previously reported in this context. Acetazolamide treatment resulted in oedema resolution and improvement in visual function, and can be considered a therapeutic option for other patients with Bietti dystrophy who develop cystoid macular oedema.

  18. Pharmacologic and genetic therapy for childhood muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Escolar, D M; Scacheri, C G

    2001-03-01

    The outstanding advances in the molecular characterization of muscle diseases, including muscular dystrophies, inflammatory myopathies, and ion channel disorders, have resulted in the identification of potential targets for pharmacologic and genetic therapy in the best characterized of these diseases. The most common myopathy in children, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), is the focus of active pharmacologic clinical trials. Genetic transfer therapy research for this and other dystrophies is rapidly moving forward. However, as new approaches for treatment are being actively investigated, the current modality of treatment for all myopathies is still in the realm of physical medicine and rehabilitation. The focus of this review is on the advances in pharmacologic and genetic therapy research in DMD and limb girdle muscular dystrophies.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystrophy are two related conditions that primarily affect skeletal muscles , which are used for movement, and heart (cardiac) ... linked dilated cardiomyopathy typically do not have any skeletal muscle weakness or wasting, although they may have subtle ...

  20. Disease-modifying effects of orally bioavailable NF-κB inhibitors in dystrophin-deficient muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hammers, David W.; Sleeper, Margaret M.; Forbes, Sean C.; Coker, Cora C.; Jirousek, Michael R.; Zimmer, Michael; Walter, Glenn A.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating muscle disease characterized by progressive muscle deterioration and replacement with an aberrant fatty, fibrous matrix. Chronic upregulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is implicated as a driver of the dystrophic pathogenesis. Herein, 2 members of a novel class of NF-κB inhibitors, edasalonexent (formerly CAT-1004) and CAT-1041, were evaluated in both mdx mouse and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog models of DMD. These orally bioavailable compounds consist of a polyunsaturated fatty acid conjugated to salicylic acid and potently suppress the pathogenic NF-κB subunit p65/RelA in vitro. In vivo, CAT-1041 effectively improved the phenotype of mdx mice undergoing voluntary wheel running, in terms of activity, muscle mass and function, damage, inflammation, fibrosis, and cardiac pathology. We identified significant increases in dysferlin as a possible contributor to the protective effect of CAT-1041 to sarcolemmal damage. Furthermore, CAT-1041 improved the more severe GRMD phenotype in a canine case study, where muscle mass and diaphragm function were maintained in a treated GRMD dog. These results demonstrate that NF-κB modulation by edasalonexent and CAT-1041 is effective in ameliorating the dystrophic process and these compounds are candidates for new treatments for DMD patients. PMID:28018975

  1. Electrophysiological evaluation of oropharyngeal swallowing in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, C; Yuceyar, N; Aydogdu, I; Karasoy, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common feature of patients with myotonic dystrophy and is not usually perceived due to their emotional deficits and lack of interest. The aim was to show the existence and frequency of subclinical electrophysiological abnormalities in oropharyngeal swallowing and to clarify the mechanisms of dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy.
METHODS—Eighteen patients with myotonic dystrophy were examined for oropharyngeal phase of swallowing by clinical and electrophysiological methods. Ten patients had dysphagia whereas 11 patients had signs and symptoms reflecting CNS involvement. Four patients with myotonia congenita and 30 healthy volunteers served as controls. Laryngeal movements were detected by means of a piezoelectric sensor. EMG activities of the submental muscle (SM-EMG) and needle EMG of the cricopharyngeal muscle of the upper eosophageal sphincter (CP-EMG) were also recorded during swallowing.
RESULTS—In about 70% of the patients with myotonic dystrophy, the existence of oropharyngeal dysphagia was indicated objectively by means of the technique of "dysphagia limit" and by clinical evaluation. Duration of the swallowing reflex as defined by the laryngeal relocation time (0-2 time interval) and submental muscle excitation as a part of the swallowing reflex (A-C interval) were significantly prolonged in patients with myotonic dystrophy, especially in dysphagic patients. Triggering time of the swallowing reflex (A-0 interval) also showed significant prolongation, especially in the patients having both dysphagia and CNS involvement. During swallowing, CP muscle activity was abnormal in 40% of the patients with myotonic dystrophy.
CONCLUSION—Both myopathic weakness and myotonia encountered in oropharyngeal muscles play an important part in the oral and the pharyngeal phases of swallowing dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy. It was also suggested that CNS involvement might contribute to the delay of the triggering of the

  2. Dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian steers.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N

    1996-01-01

    Diaphragmatic muscles in two slaughtered Holstein-Friesian revealed slightly pale color, swelling, and stiffness on palpation. Histologically the muscle fibers showed internal nuclei, fiber-splitting, variation in diameter, central core-like structures, sarcoplasmic masses, and vacuolar degeneration. These lesions were the same as those in dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cows. It was demonstrated that muscular dystrophy of the diaphragm in Holstein-Friesian cattle occurred also in males, probably by inheriting an autosomal recessive trait.

  3. Posterior polymorphous dystrophy and keratoglobus in a child.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sangita P; Sajnani, Manoj M; Pineda, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with gradually progressive deterioration of vision in both eyes, bilateral photophobia, and regular headaches. Clinical examination, anterior segment findings, and specular microscopy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of posterior polymorphous dystrophy and keratoglobus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first pediatric case and the second case overall of the simultaneous occurrence of posterior polymorphous dystrophy and keratoglobus.

  4. Outside in: The matrix as a modifier of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetic conditions leading to muscle degeneration and often, impaired regeneration. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a prototypical form of muscular dystrophy, and like other forms of genetically inherited muscle diseases, pathological progression is variable. Variability in muscular dystrophy can arise from differences in the manner in which the primary mutation impacts the affected protein's function; however, clinical heterogeneity also derives from secondary mutations in other genes that can enhance or reduce pathogenic features of disease. These genes, called genetic modifiers, regulate the pathophysiological context of dystrophic degeneration and regeneration. Understanding the mechanistic links between genetic modifiers and dystrophic progression sheds light on pathologic remodeling, and provides novel avenues to therapeutically intervene to reduce muscle degeneration. Based on targeted genetic approaches and unbiased genomewide screens, several modifiers have been identified for muscular dystrophy, including extracellular agonists of signaling cascades. This review will focus on identification and possible mechanisms of recently identified modifiers for muscular dystrophy, including osteopontin, latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4) and Jagged1. Moreover, we will review the investigational approaches that aim to target modifier pathways and thereby counteract dystrophic muscle wasting.

  5. The genetics of Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, Benjamin W; Riazuddin, S Amer; Gottsch, John D

    2013-01-01

    Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a common late-onset genetic disorder of the corneal endothelium. It causes loss of endothelial cell density and excrescences in the Descemet membrane, eventually progressing to corneal edema, necessitating corneal transplantation. The genetic basis of FCD is complex and heterogeneous, demonstrating variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. To date, three causal genes, ZEB1, SLC4A11 and LOXHD1, have been identified, representing a small proportion of the total genetic load of FCD. An additional four loci have been localized, including a region on chromosome 18 that is potentially responsible for a large proportion of all FCD cases. The elucidation of the causal genes underlying these loci will begin to clarify the pathogenesis of FCD and pave the way for the emergence of nonsurgical treatments. PMID:23585771

  6. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: the path to consensus on pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) has been controversial over the last decades, progress in recent years has led to a model that incorporates these decades of findings and is gaining general acceptance in the FSHD research community. Here we review how the contributions from many labs over many years led to an understanding of a fundamentally new mechanism of human disease. FSHD is caused by inefficient repeat-mediated epigenetic repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array on chromosome 4, resulting in the variegated expression of the DUX4 retrogene, encoding a double-homeobox transcription factor, in skeletal muscle. Normally expressed in the testis and epigenetically repressed in somatic tissues, DUX4 expression in skeletal muscle induces expression of many germline, stem cell, and other genes that might account for the pathophysiology of FSHD. Although some disagreements regarding the details of mechanisms remain in the field, the coalescing agreement on a central model of pathophysiology represents a pivot-point in FSHD research, transitioning the field from discovery-oriented studies to translational studies aimed at developing therapies based on a sound model of disease pathophysiology.

  7. Therapeutic potential of matrix metalloproteinases in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yuji; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are secreted proteinases that have physiologic roles in degradation and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) in almost all tissues. However, their excessive production in disease conditions leads to many pathological features including tissue breakdown, inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic muscle disorder caused by partial or complete loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Progressive muscle wasting in DMD is accompanied by myofiber necrosis followed by cycles of regeneration and degeneration and inflammation that eventually result in replacement of myofiber by connective and adipose tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that gene expression and the activity of various MMPs are aberrantly regulated in muscle biopsies from DMD patients and in skeletal muscle of animal models of DMD. Moreover, a few studies employing genetic mouse models have revealed that different MMPs play distinct roles in disease progression in DMD. Modulation of the activity of MMPs improves myofiber regeneration and enhances the efficacy of transplantation and engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle in mouse models of DMD. Furthermore, recent reports also suggest that some MMPs especially MMP-9 can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of DMD. In this article, we provide a succinct overview of the regulation of various MMPs and their therapeutic importance in DMD. PMID:25364719

  8. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: the path to consensus on pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) has been controversial over the last decades, progress in recent years has led to a model that incorporates these decades of findings and is gaining general acceptance in the FSHD research community. Here we review how the contributions from many labs over many years led to an understanding of a fundamentally new mechanism of human disease. FSHD is caused by inefficient repeat-mediated epigenetic repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array on chromosome 4, resulting in the variegated expression of the DUX4 retrogene, encoding a double-homeobox transcription factor, in skeletal muscle. Normally expressed in the testis and epigenetically repressed in somatic tissues, DUX4 expression in skeletal muscle induces expression of many germline, stem cell, and other genes that might account for the pathophysiology of FSHD. Although some disagreements regarding the details of mechanisms remain in the field, the coalescing agreement on a central model of pathophysiology represents a pivot-point in FSHD research, transitioning the field from discovery-oriented studies to translational studies aimed at developing therapies based on a sound model of disease pathophysiology. PMID:24940479

  9. Therapeutic potential of matrix metalloproteinases in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Sato, Shuichi; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are secreted proteinases that have physiologic roles in degradation and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) in almost all tissues. However, their excessive production in disease conditions leads to many pathological features including tissue breakdown, inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic muscle disorder caused by partial or complete loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Progressive muscle wasting in DMD is accompanied by myofiber necrosis followed by cycles of regeneration and degeneration and inflammation that eventually result in replacement of myofiber by connective and adipose tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that gene expression and the activity of various MMPs are aberrantly regulated in muscle biopsies from DMD patients and in skeletal muscle of animal models of DMD. Moreover, a few studies employing genetic mouse models have revealed that different MMPs play distinct roles in disease progression in DMD. Modulation of the activity of MMPs improves myofiber regeneration and enhances the efficacy of transplantation and engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle in mouse models of DMD. Furthermore, recent reports also suggest that some MMPs especially MMP-9 can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of DMD. In this article, we provide a succinct overview of the regulation of various MMPs and their therapeutic importance in DMD.

  10. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Boussaid, Ghilas; Stojkovic, Tanya; Orlikowski, David; Letilly, Nadege; Behin, Anthony; Butel, Sandrine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Prigent, Hélène

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory insufficiency in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy has rarely been studied. We compared two age- and sex-matched groups of 29 patients, with and without respiratory dysfunction. Tests in the 29 patients with respiratory dysfunction suggested predominant expiratory muscle dysfunction, leading to ineffective cough in 17 patients. Supine and upright vital capacities were not different (P = 0.76), suggesting absence of diaphragmatic dysfunction. By stepwise regression, only expiratory reserve volume correlated with the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (R(2) = 0.503; P = 0.001). Compared to controls, patients with respiratory dysfunction had higher values for the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (6.1 ± 1.9 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2; P <0.0001) and body mass index (26.9 ± 6.0 vs. 22.9 ± 4.0 kg/m(2); P = 0.003) and a smaller number of D4Z4 allele repeats (4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 5.7 ± 1.8; P = 0.05). Mechanical ventilation was required eventually in 20 patients, including 14 who were wheelchair bound. Three patients had acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; 16 patients had poor airway clearance, including 10 with sleep apnea syndrome, responsible in 7 for chronic hypercapnia. Two patients presented isolated severe sleep apnea syndrome. Respiratory dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is predominantly related to expiratory muscle weakness. Respiratory function and cough effectiveness should especially be monitored in patients with severe motor impairment and high body mass index.

  11. Codon optimization of the microdystrophin gene for Duchene muscular dystrophy gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Takis; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith; Dickson, George

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting X-linked genetic disease caused by dystrophin gene mutations. Gene replacement therapy aims to transfer a functional full-length dystrophin cDNA or a quasi micro/mini-gene into the muscle. A number of AAV vectors carrying microdystrophin genes have been tested in the mdx model of DMD. Further modification/optimization of these microgene vectors may improve the therapeutic potency. In this chapter, we describe a species-specific, codon optimization protocol to improve microdystrophin gene therapy in the mdx model.

  12. Apathy and hypersomnia are common features of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsztein, J; Rubinsztein, D; Goodburn, S; Holland, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Myotonic dystrophy is a disease characterised by myotonia and muscle weakness. Psychiatric disorder and sleep problems have also been considered important features of the illness. This study investigated the extent to which apathy, major depression, and hypersomnolence were present. The objective was to clarify if the apathy reported anecdotally was a feature of CNS involvement or if this was attributable to major depression, hypersomnolence, or a consequence of chronic muscle weakness.
METHODS—These features were studied in 36 adults with non-congenital myotonic dystrophy and 13 patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. By using patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as a comparison group the aim was to control for the disabling effects of having an inherited chronic neurological disease causing muscle weakness. Standardised assessment instruments were used wherever possible to facilitate comparison with other groups reported in the medical literature.
RESULTS—There was no excess of major depression on cross sectional analysis in these patients with mild myotonic dystrophy. However, apathy was a prominent feature of myotonic dystrophy in comparison with a similarly disabled group of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (clinician rated score; Mann Whitney U test, p=0.0005). Rates of hypersomnolence were greater in the myotonic dystrophy group, occurring in 39% of myotonic dystrophy patients, but there was no correlation with apathy.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest that apathy and hypersomnia are independent and common features of myotonic dystrophy. Apathy cannot be accounted for by clinical depression or peripheral muscle weakness and is therefore likely to reflect CNS involvement. These features of the disease impair quality of life and may be treatable.

 PMID:9576545

  13. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients.

  14. Fuchs endothelial cornea dystrophy: a review of the genetics behind disease development

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Cecily E.; Schmedt, Thore; Jurkunas, Ula

    2014-01-01

    Fuchs dystrophy represents the most common form of endothelial dystrophy and is a significant cause of visual impairment. The cause of Fuchs dystrophy is a complicated combination of both genetic and environmental factors. Understanding the underlying causes of the disease can potentially lead to new medical treatments preventing loss of vision. PMID:24138036

  15. Medication adherence in patients with myotonic dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Bryan P; Conn, Kelly M; Smith, Joanne; Walker, Andrew; Parkhill, Amy L; Hilbert, James E; Luebbe, Elizabeth A; Moxley III, Richard T

    2016-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) are the two most common adult muscular dystrophies and have progressive and often disabling manifestations. Higher levels of medication adherence lead to better health outcomes, especially important to patients with DM and FSHD because of their multisystem manifestations and complexity of care. However, medication adherence has not previously been studied in a large cohort of DM type 1 (DM1), DM type 2 (DM2), and FSHD patients. The purpose of our study was to survey medication adherence and disease manifestations in patients enrolled in the NIH-supported National DM and FSHD Registry. The study was completed by 110 DM1, 49 DM2, and 193 FSHD patients. Notable comorbidities were hypertension in FSHD (44 %) and DM2 (37 %), gastroesophageal reflux disease in DM1 (24 %) and DM2 (31 %) and arrhythmias (29 %) and thyroid disease (20 %) in DM1. Each group reported high levels of adherence based on regimen complexity, medication costs, health literacy, side effect profile, and their beliefs about treatment. Only dysphagia in DM1 was reported to significantly impact medication adherence. Approximately 35 % of study patients reported polypharmacy (taking 6 or more medications). Of the patients with polypharmacy, the DM1 cohort was significantly younger (mean 55.0 years) compared to DM2 (59.0 years) and FSHD (63.2 years), and had shorter disease duration (mean 26 years) compared to FSHD (26.8 years) and DM2 (34.8 years). Future research is needed to assess techniques to ease pill swallowing in DM1 and to monitor polypharmacy and potential drug interactions in DM and FSHD.

  16. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Feeney, Sandra J; McGrath, Meagan J; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lynch, Gordon S; D'Arcy, Colleen E; Price, John T; McLean, Catriona A; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  17. FHL1 Reduces Dystrophy in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing FSHD Muscular Dystrophy Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Sandra J.; McGrath, Meagan J.; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Lynch, Gordon S.; D’Arcy, Colleen E.; Price, John T.; McLean, Catriona A.; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1. PMID:25695429

  18. Sympathetic neuroaxonal dystrophy in the aged rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Parvin, Curtis A; Beaudet, Lucie N

    2006-10-01

    Dysfunction of circadian melatonin production by the pineal gland in aged humans and rats is thought to reflect the functional loss of its sympathetic innervation. Our ultrastructural neuropathologic studies of the sympathetic innervation of the pineal gland of aged (24 months old) Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats showed loss of nerve terminals as well as the development of neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD), an ultrastructurally distinctive distal axonopathy, far in excess of that in young control rats. Immunolocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase confirmed the age-related loss of normal noradrenergic innervation and development of NAD. NAD was more frequent in aged female rats compared to males and was particularly severe in aged female Sprague-Dawley rats compared to Fischer-344 rats. Pineal NGF content was significantly increased or unchanged in female and male aged Fischer-344 rats, respectively, compared to young controls. The rat pineal is a sensitive experimental model for the quantitative ultrastructural examination of age-related neuropathological changes in nerve terminals of postganglionic noradrenergic sympathetic axons, changes which may reflect similar changes in the diffusely distributed sympathetic innervation of other targeted endorgans.

  19. Compound loss of muscleblind-like function in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuang-Yung; Li, Moyi; Manchanda, Mini; Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Mohan, Apoorva; Warren, Sonisha A; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Finn, Dustin; Hong, Hannah; Ashraf, Hassan; Kasahara, Hideko; Ranum, Laura P W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2013-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-systemic disease that impacts cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as the central nervous system (CNS). DM is unusual because it is an RNA-mediated disorder due to the expression of toxic microsatellite expansion RNAs that alter the activities of RNA processing factors, including the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. While these mutant RNAs inhibit MBNL1 splicing activity in heart and skeletal muscles, Mbnl1 knockout mice fail to recapitulate the full-range of DM symptoms in these tissues. Here, we generate mouse Mbnl compound knockouts to test the hypothesis that Mbnl2 functionally compensates for Mbnl1 loss. Although Mbnl1(-/-) ; Mbnl2(-/-) double knockouts (DKOs) are embryonic lethal, Mbnl1(-/-) ; Mbnl2(+/-) mice are viable but develop cardinal features of DM muscle disease including reduced lifespan, heart conduction block, severe myotonia and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. Mbnl2 protein levels are elevated in Mbnl1(-/-) knockouts where Mbnl2 targets Mbnl1-regulated exons. These findings support the hypothesis that compound loss of MBNL function is a critical event in DM pathogenesis and provide novel mouse models to investigate additional pathways disrupted in this RNA-mediated disease.

  20. Synaptic protein dysregulation in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Sicot, Géraldine; Dinca, Diana M.; Huguet, Aline; Nicole, Annie; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève; Gomes-Pereira, Mário

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of expanded transcripts in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is mainly mediated by the disruption of alternative splicing. However, the detailed disease mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) have not been fully elucidated. In our recent study, we demonstrated that the accumulation of mutant transcripts in the CNS of a mouse model of DM1 disturbs splicing in a region-specific manner. We now discuss that the spatial- and temporal-regulated expression of splicing factors may contribute to the region-specific spliceopathy in DM1 brains. In the search for disease mechanisms operating in the CNS, we found that the expression of expanded CUG-containing RNA affects the expression and phosphorylation of synaptic vesicle proteins, possibly contributing to DM1 neurological phenotypes. Although mediated by splicing regulators with a described role in DM1, the misregulation of synaptic proteins was not associated with missplicing of their coding transcripts, supporting the view that DM1 mechanisms in the CNS have also far-reaching implications beyond the disruption of a splicing program. PMID:25003003

  1. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  2. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p < 0.0001), follicular hyperkeratosis (p = 0.0003), early androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1.

  3. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  4. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  5. AAV micro-dystrophin gene therapy alleviates stress-induced cardiac death but not myocardial fibrosis in >21-m-old mdx mice, an end-stage model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Brian; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Lai, Yi; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal genetic disease caused by the absence of the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin. Dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in DMD. We recently demonstrated amelioration of DMD heart disease in 16 to 20-m-old dystrophin-null mdx mice using adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated micro-dystrophin gene therapy. DMD patients show severe heart disease near the end of their life expectancy. Similarly, mdx mice exhibit profoundly worsening heart disease when they reach beyond 21 months of age. To more rigorously test micro-dystrophin therapy, we treated mdx mice that were between 21.2 and 22.7-m-old (average, 22.1 ± 0.2 months; N=8). The ∆R4-23/∆C micro-dystrophin gene was packaged in the cardiotropic AAV-9 virus. 5×10(12) viral genome particles/mouse were delivered to mdx mice via the tail vein. AAV transduction, myocardial fibrosis and heart function were examined 1.7 ± 0.2 months after gene therapy. Efficient micro-dystrophin expression was observed in the myocardium of treated mice. Despite the robust dystrophin expression, myocardial fibrosis was not mitigated. Most hemodynamic parameters were not improved either. However, ECG abnormalities were partially corrected. Importantly, treated mice became more resistant to dobutamine-induced cardiac death. In summary, we have revealed for the first time the potential benefits and limitations of AAV micro-dystrophin therapy in end-stage Duchenne dilated cardiomyopathy. Our findings have important implications for the use of AAV gene therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

  6. [Cardiac involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Orlikowski, David; Nardi, Olivier; Annane, Djillali

    2008-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked hereditary dystrophinopathy due to the absence of dystrophin, a cytoskeleton protein; it is the most frequent of the dystrophinopathies. DMD affects one newborn boy in 3500. The disease locus is found on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21). Dystrophin plays an important role in the maintenance of the cellular architecture and permits signal transduction between the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. Its absence is expressed by peripheral muscular damage, most often at the pelvic girdle, and sometimes associated with pseudohypertrophy of the calf. The disease is very often complicated by cardiac damage that develops towards the end of adolescence, together with restrictive lung disease that will usually end up requiring respiratory support. The prognosis is severe. Doppler examination of the myocardial tissue helps to screen for subclinical myocardial damage. Therapeutic management is multidisciplinary. Medical treatment of cardiac involvement relies on the drugs already proved effective in chronic heart failure. Ongoing research is currently studying gene therapy.

  7. Cardiac asynchrony in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Nardi, Olivier; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. Heart failure is a classical complication in this disease. Little data are available about systolic dyssynchrony in DMD. We sought to assess the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction and systolic asynchrony in DMD patients using echocardiographic parameters. We performed electrocardiography and echocardiography for adult's patients with DMD. For systolic dyssynchrony assessment, echocardiography-Doppler was performed and completed by tissular Doppler imaging. 48 DMD were included in our study. Age ranged from 20 to 37 years. QRS duration >120 ms was present in 10 patients/48 and 1 patient disclosed a QRS duration >150 ms. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) ranged from 10 to 62 % with a median of 43 %. Inter-ventricular asynchrony was found in 11.9 % of patients with EF < 35 % and in 2.6 % of patients with EF > 35 %. Intra-ventricular asynchrony was present in 6 % of patients with EF < 35 %. We found a high prevalence of LV dysfunction in DMD. Systolic ventricular asynchrony seems frequent particularly in patients with EF < 35 %.

  8. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  9. Molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Ankala, Arunkanth; Hegde, Madhuri

    2014-10-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD; locus Xp21.2). The mutation spectrum of DMD is unique in that 65% of causative mutations are intragenic deletions, with intragenic duplications and point mutations (along with other sequence variants) accounting for 6% to 10% and 30% to 35%, respectively. The strategy for molecular diagnostic testing for DMD involves initial screening for deletions/duplications using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) followed by full-sequence analysis of DMD for sequence variants. Recently, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted gene analysis has become clinically available for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants (small insertions, deletions, and indels). This unit initially discusses the strategic algorithm for establishing a molecular diagnosis of DMD and later provides detailed protocols of current molecular diagnostic methods for DMD, including array-CGH, PCR-based Sanger sequencing, and NGS-based sequencing assay.

  10. Lipomatous muscular 'dystrophy' of Piedmontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, E; Amedeo, S; Brugiapaglia, A; Destefanis, G; Di Stasio, L; Valenza, F; Capucchio, M T

    2012-11-01

    Lipomatous myopathy is a degenerative muscle pathology characterized by the substitution of muscle cells with adipose tissue, sporadically reported in cattle, pigs, and rarely in sheep, horses and dogs. This study investigated the pathology of this myopathy in 40 muscle samples collected from regularly slaughtered Piedmontese cattle living in Piedmont region (Italy). None of the animals showed clinical signs of muscular disease. Muscle specimens were submitted to histological and enzymatic investigations. Gross pathology revealed a different grade of infiltration of adipose tissue, involving multiple or single muscles. The most affected regions were the ventral abdomen and the shoulders, especially the cutaneous muscles and the muscles of the thoracic group. Morphological staining revealed an infiltration of adipose tissue varying in distribution and severity, changes in muscle fibre size and increased number of fibres with centrally located nuclei, suggesting muscle degeneration-regeneration. Necrosis and non-suppurative inflammatory cells were also seen. Furthermore, proliferation of connective tissue and non-specific myopathic changes were present. Chemical and physical characteristics of the affected tissue were also evaluated. The authors discuss about the aetiopathogenesis and classification of this muscle disorder whose histological lesions were similar to those reported in human dystrophies.

  11. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  12. Necropsy findings in neonatal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Turkel, S B; Diehl, E J; Richmond, J A

    1985-01-01

    Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by an abnormally small thorax, variable shortening of the extremities, and pelvic anomalies. Renal and pancreatic symptoms are found in longer survivors, although most cases die in infancy of respiratory failure. Seven neonatal cases were studied at necropsy. These cases ranged in gestational age from 32 to 40 weeks. One was stillborn and the other six survived from 1 hour to 10 days. Two were sibs born to consanguineous parents. Dwarfing was not pronounced and the extremities were shortened in only one infant who also had polydactyly. All seven showed visceral changes in addition to abnormalities of bone. Endochondral ossification was irregular in sections of femur, vertebra, and rib. Pulmonary hypoplasia was associated with the small thorax typical of this disorder. Periportal fibrosis and bile duct proliferation were seen in sections of liver, and in one case cirrhosis was found. Pancreatic fibrosis was variable. These necropsy findings correlate with later clinical manifestations of the disease and emphasise the multisystem nature of this disorder. Images PMID:3989824

  13. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Respiratory surveillance of patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Spehrs-Ciaffi, Virginia; Fitting, Jean William; Cotting, Jacques; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is is the most common form of the childhood muscular dystrophies. It follows a predictable clinical course marked by progressive skeletal muscle weakness, lost of ambulation before teen-age and death in early adulthood secondary to respiratory or cardiac failure. Becker muscular dystrophy is less common and has a milder clinical course but also results in respiratory and cardiac failure.Altough recent advances in respiratory care and new technologies have improved the outlook many patients already received only a traditional non-interventional approach. The aims of this work are: to analyse the pathophysiology and natural history of respiratory function in these diseases, to descript their clinical manifestations, to present the diagnostics tools and to provide recommendations for an adequated respiratory care in this particular population based on the updated literature referenced.

  15. Congenital myotonic dystrophy in Britain. II. Genetic basis.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, P S

    1975-01-01

    Genetic analysis of 54 sibships containing 70 patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy has shown paternal transmission in only one case, the disorder being maternally transmitted in 51 sibships. No instance of new mutation was found. At least half the sibs were unaffected; 9 sibs were affected without definite congenital involvement. No evidence for genetic heterogeneity was found, most affected mothers having few or no symptoms. There was no disturbance of sex ratio for the affected grandparents, nor in the sibships of the affected parents. The genetic data from this study and from previous published reports support the clinic evidence that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy results from a maternal intrauterine factor affecting those individuals carrying the myotonic dystrophy gene. PMID:1167063

  16. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: moving the field forward.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. Although corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain the standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, loss of ambulation, respiratory failure, and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes based on disease pathomechanism and phenotype. In this review, we highlight the therapeutic progress with emphasis on evolving preclinical data and our own experience in completed clinical trials and others currently underway. We also discuss the lessons we have learned along the way and the strategies developed to overcome limitations and obstacles in this field.

  17. Preclinical studies for gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Odom, Guy L; Banks, Glen B; Schultz, Brian R; Gregorevic, Paul; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2010-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of genetic disorders without an effective treatment. Because they are caused by mutations in various genes, the most direct way to treat them involves correcting the underlying gene defect (ie, gene therapy). Such a gene therapy approach involves delivering a therapeutic gene cassette to essentially all the muscles of the body in a safe and efficacious manner. The authors describe gene delivery methods using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus that are showing great promise in preclinical studies for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. It is hoped that variations on these methods might be applicable for most, if not all, of the different types of muscular dystrophy.

  18. Perspectives of stem cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Belicchi, Marzia; Parolini, Daniele; Cassinelli, Letizia; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heritable and heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle, usually caused by mutations in the proteins forming the link between the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. As a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene, Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients suffer from progressive muscle atrophy and an exhaustion of muscular regenerative capacity. No efficient therapies are available. The evidence that adult stem cells were capable of participating in the regeneration of more than their resident organ led to the development of potential stem cell treatments for degenerative disorder. In the present review, we describe the different types of myogenic stem cells and their possible use for the progression of cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weig, Spencer G; Zinn, Matthias M; Howard, James F

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked, recessively inherited disorder characterized by progressive weakness attributable to the absence of dystrophin expression in muscle. In multiple studies, the chronic administration of corticosteroids slowed the loss of ambulation that develops in mid to late childhood. Corticosteroids, however, frequently produce unacceptable side effects, including Cushingoid appearance and weight gain. Deflazacort, an oxazoline analogue of prednisolone, produces equivalent benefits on muscle with fewer reported Cushingoid side effects. We present a 9-year-old boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who developed morbid obesity and subsequent idiopathic intracranial hypertension after 2 years of receiving deflazacort. Although deflazacort is typically thought to produce less obesity than prednisone, severe Cushingoid side effects may occur in some individuals. To our knowledge, this description is the first of idiopathic intracranial hypertension complicating chronic corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  20. Myotonic dystrophy in two European grey wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Pákozdy, A; Leschnik, M; Nell, B; Kolm, U S; Virányi, Z; Belényi, B; Molnár, M J; Bilzer, T

    2007-03-01

    Two related European Grey wolves (Canis lupus) with the history of muscle stiffness beginning at 2 weeks of age were examined in this study. Muscle tone and muscle mass were increased in both animals. Muscle stiffness was worsened by stress so that the animals fell into lateral recumbency. Blood chemistry revealed mildly increased serum creatine kinase activity. Abnormal potentials typical of myotonic discharges were recorded by electromyography. Cataract, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and inhomogeneous myocardial texture by ultrasound suggested extramuscular involvement. Myopathology demonstrated dystrophic signs in the muscle biopsy specimen. The presumptive diagnosis based on the in vivo findings was myotonic dystrophy. Immunochemistry of the striated muscles revealed focal absence of dystrophin 1 and beta-dystroglycan in both cases. Cardiac and ophthalmologic involvement suggested a disorder very similar to a human form of myotonic dystrophy. This is the first description of myotonic dystrophy in wolves.

  1. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Wilson, Francis X.; Davies, Kay E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ –sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  2. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  3. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  4. Structural deterioration of tendon collagen in genetic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Stinson, R H

    1975-08-19

    The structure of gastrocnemius tendons from chickens with genetically induced muscular dystrophy has been studied by low-angle X-ray diffraction. Compared with normal samples there is poor alignment of collagen within the tendons. This difference is quite pronounced at eight weeks when the affected birds are still in comparatively good physical condition. Similar changes have been reported for birds with nutritionally induced muscular dystrophy (Bartlett, M. W., Egelstaff, P. A., Holden, T. M., Stinson, R. H. and Sweeny, P. R. (1973) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 328, 213-220).

  5. Nifedipine in the treatment of myotonia in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R; Sutton, D L; Behan, P O; Ballantyne, J P

    1987-01-01

    Abnormal calcium transport may be implicated in the membrane defect in myotonic dystrophy. A single blind crossover trial of placebo (t.i.d.), nifedipine 10 mg (t.i.d.) and nifedipine 20 mg (t.i.d.), was performed in 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy. The severity of myotonia was assessed by measuring finger extension time after maximum voluntary finger flexion. A significant improvement in myotonia, after nifedipine, was recorded by this technique and supported by a subjective improvement in 50% of patients and clinical improvement of greater than 20% in five patients. Initial grip strength and muscle fatiguability measured by grip strength ergometry were not significantly altered. Images PMID:3553433

  6. [Myotonic dystrophy as a contraindication for electroconvulsive therapy?].

    PubMed

    Wynhoven, L M L; Scherders, M J W T; van Suijlekom, J A

    2009-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with medication-resistant major depression was referred to our clinic for electroconvulsive therapy. After an extensive evaluation of our patient's condition we concluded that in this case the comorbid myotonic dystrophy was a contraindication for the performance of electroconvulsive therapy. However, in the current Dutch Psychiatric Association guidelines this illness is not mentioned as a possible contraindication for electroconvulsive therapy. This raises the question of whether myotonic dystrophy should now be incorporated in these guidelines and makes us wonder to what extent our conclusion could have consequences for the treatment of other neuromuscular illnesses.

  7. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Nicholas L; Banks, Glen B; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Hockenbery, David M; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M

    2015-01-13

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I "red" slow twitch and type II "white" fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases.

  8. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced.

  9. The burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F.; Schmitt, Claude; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the total cost of illness and economic burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: Patients with DMD from Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and United States were identified through Translational Research in Europe–Assessment & Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases registries and invited to complete a questionnaire online together with a caregiver. Data on health care use, quality of life, work status, informal care, and household expenses were collected to estimate costs of DMD from the perspective of society and caregiver households. Results: A total of 770 patients (173 German, 122 Italian, 191 from the United Kingdom, and 284 from the United States) completed the questionnaire. Mean per-patient annual direct cost of illness was estimated at between $23,920 and $54,270 (2012 international dollars), 7 to 16 times higher than the mean per-capita health expenditure in these countries. Indirect and informal care costs were substantial, each constituting between 18% and 43% of total costs. The total societal burden was estimated at between $80,120 and $120,910 per patient and annum, and increased markedly with disease progression. The corresponding household burden was estimated at between $58,440 and $71,900. Conclusions: We show that DMD is associated with a substantial economic burden. Our results underscore the many different costs accompanying a rare condition such as DMD and the considerable economic burden carried by affected families. Our description of the previously unknown economic context of a rare disease serves as important intelligence input to health policy evaluations of intervention programs and novel therapies, financial support schemes for patients and their families, and the design of future cost studies. PMID:24991029

  10. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit.

  11. Phototherapeutic keratectomy for epithelial basement membrane dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Lam, Carson K; Manche, Edward E

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) in treating epithelial basement membrane dystrophy (EBMD). Methods Preoperative and postoperative records were reviewed for 58 eyes of 51 patients with >3 months follow-up (range 3–170 months) treated for EBMD with PTK after failure of conservative medical treatment at Byers Eye Institute of Stanford University. Symptoms, clinical findings, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) were assessed. The primary outcome measure was symptomatic recurrence as measured by erosions or visual complaints >3 months after successful PTK. Results For eyes with visual disturbances (n=30), preoperative CDVA waŝ20/32 (0.24 Log-MAR, SD 0.21) and postoperative CDVA was ~20/25 (0.07 LogMAR, SD 0.12; P<0.0001). Twenty-six eyes (86.7%) responded to treatment, with symptomatic recurrence in 6 eyes (23.1%) at an average of 37.7 months (SD 42.8). For eyes with painful erosions (n=29), preoperative CDVA was ~20/25 (0.12, SD 0.19) and postoperative CDVA was ~20/20 (0.05. SD 0.16; P=0.0785). Twenty-three eyes (79.3%) responded to treatment, with symptomatic recurrence in 3 eyes (13.0%) at an average of 9.7 months (SD 1.5). The probability of being recurrence free after a successful treatment for visual disturbances and erosions at 5 years postoperatively was estimated at 83.0% (95% confidence interval 68.7%–97.0%) and 88.0% (95% confidence interval 65.3%–96.6%), respectively. Conclusion The majority of visual disturbances and painful erosions associated with EBMD respond to PTK. For those with a treatment response, symptomatic relief is maintained over long-term follow-up. PMID:28031698

  12. Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Nardi, Olivier; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin, a sarcolemmal protein which links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix by interacting with a large number of proteins. Heart failure is a classic complication of this disease. The authors review the pathogenesis and therapeutics of cardiac involvement in DMD.

  13. Psychiatric and Cognitive Phenotype of Childhood Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douniol, Marie; Jacquette, Aurelia; Cohen, David; Bodeau, Nicolas; Rachidi, Linda; Angeard, Nathalie; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Vallee, Louis; Eymard, Bruno; Plaza, Monique; Heron, Delphine; Guile, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the psychiatric and cognitive phenotype in young individuals with the childhood form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Method: Twenty-eight individuals (15 females, 13 males) with childhood DM1 (mean age 17y, SD 4.6, range 7-24y) were assessed using standardized instruments and cognitive testing of general intelligence,…

  14. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  15. Gene therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy: expectations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Chicoine, Louis G; Kaspar, Brian K; Mendell, Jerry R

    2007-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a debilitating X-linked disease with limited treatment options. We examined the possibility of moving forward with gene therapy, an approach that demonstrates promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Gene therapy is not limited to replacement of defective genes but also includes strategies using surrogate genes with alternative but effective means of improving cellular function or repairing gene mutations. The first viral-mediated gene transfer for any muscle disease was carried out at Columbus Children's Research Institute and Ohio State University for limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D, and the first viral-mediated trial of gene transfer for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is under way at the same institutions. These studies, consisting of intramuscular injection of virus into a single muscle, are limited in scope and represent phase 1 clinical trials with safety as the primary end point. These initial clinical studies lay the foundation for future studies, providing important information about dosing, immunogenicity, and viral serotype in humans. This article highlights the challenges and potential pitfalls as the field advances this treatment modality to clinical reality.

  16. Recovery of nail dystrophy potential new therapeutic indication of tofacitinib.

    PubMed

    Jaller, Jose A; Jaller, Juan J; Jaller, Antonio M; Jaller-Char, Juan J; Ferreira, Sineida Berbert; Ferreira, Rachel; Scheinberg, Morton

    2017-04-01

    Nail dystrophy is a heterogeneous skin condition and in some subtypes, is associated with autoimmune diseases in particular psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In this report, we show that tofacitinib, a novel therapy for rheumatoid arthritis, appears to be beneficial in patients with nail disease refractory to other conventional modes of therapy.

  17. Beneficial effects of penicillamine treatment on hereditary avian muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chou, T; Hill, E J; Bartle, E; Woolley, K; LeQuire, V; Olson, W; Roelofs, R; Park, J H

    1975-10-01

    Hereditary muscular dystrophy in chickens of the New Hampshire strain was treated with penicillamine from the 9th day after hatching to the 425th day. The adult maintenance dose for males was 50 mg/kg per day and for females, 13-65 mg/kg per day. In avian dystrophy, deterioration of the muscle fibers is evidenced in the 2nd mo by an inability of the birds to rise after falling on their backs and by a progressive rigidity of the wings. The drug delayed the onset of symptoms and partially alleviated the debilitating aspects of the disease. Penicillamine produced three major improvements: (a) better righting ability when birds were placed on their backs; (b) greater wing flexibility; (c) and suppression of plasma creatine phosphokinase activity. The results are statistically analyzed and discussed in relationship to Duchenne dystrophy. Normal birds were not affected by penicillamine as judged by these parameters. The rationale for using penicillamine, a sulfhydryl compound with reducing properties, was (a) to attempt to protect essential thiol enzymes in the anabolic and glycolytic pathways against inactivation and (b) to prevent collagen cross-linking and deposition in muscle. Although the precise mechanism of drug action has not been determined. the possible role of penicillamine in mitigating the symptoms of genetic dystrophy in man is under consideration. Further, penicillamine may have a more generalized application i the prevention of contractures in a variety of neuromuscular disorders.

  18. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  19. Congenital nutritional muscular dystrophy in a beef calf.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Radostits, Otto M

    2003-09-01

    A 13-hour-old Aberdeen-Angus was involuntarily recumbent since birth. Congenital nutritional muscular dystrophy was suspected based on clinical findings, increased serum creatine kinase, and decreased serum vitamin E and selenium levels. Recovery followed after supportive therapy and parenteral vitamin E and selenium. Reports of this disease in newborn calves are unusual.

  20. CINRG: Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Berglund, Ann-Berit Ekstrom, Anna-Karin Kroksmark, Ulrika Sterky; Children’s National Medical Center: Marissa Birkme- ier, Sarah Kaminski, Katie Parker ...dren with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. J Child Neurol 2010;25:1130–1144. 55. Daltroy LH, Liang MH, Fossel AH, Goldberg MJ. The POSNA pediat- ric

  1. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  2. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  3. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  4. The Assessment of Intelligence in Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1979-01-01

    Challenges assumptions and research procedures leading to the position that below-average intellectual potential is an integral part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A study of 58 boys (ages 5 to 18) from urban, suburban, and rural settings indicated IQ range of 59 to 131 and no evidence of significant verbal deficit (reported in earlier studies).…

  5. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  6. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  7. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  8. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report 14 new cases of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and three new cases of cone-rod dystrophy and to compare the similarities and dissimilarities to those found in the bilateral forms of these disorders. Methods: A total of 272 cases of retinitis pigmentosa and 167 cases of cone-rod dystrophy were studied by corneal full field electroretinograms and electrooculograms. The student t-test was used to compare categories. Results: The percentage of familial and nonfamilial cases was the same for the bilateral and unilateral forms of the disease. In our series, unilateral retinitis pigmentosa makes up approximately 5% of the total population of retinitis pigmentosa, while unilateral cone-rod dystrophy makes up only about 2% of the total. In the familial forms of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa the most common inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant and all affected relatives had bilateral disease. Conclusion: Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy appear to be directly related to the more common bilateral forms of these disorders. The genetic mechanisms which account for asymmetric disorders are not currently understood. It may be a different unidentified mutation at a single loci or it is possible that nonlinked mutations in multiple loci account for this unusual disorder. PMID:19668577

  9. Modifying muscular dystrophy through transforming growth factor-β.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle, with replacement by scar or fibrotic tissue, resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through both candidate gene approaches and genome-wide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or an altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGF-β pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGF-β pathway and approaches to modulate TGF-β activity to ameliorate muscle disease.

  10. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  11. The role of stem cells in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Colleoni, Federica; Cassinelli, Letizia; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders of inherited origin, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Cell-based therapies were used to promote muscle regeneration with the hope that the host cells repopulated the muscle and improved muscle function and pathology. Stem cells were preferable for therapeutic applications, due to their capacity of self-renewal and differentiative potential. In the last years, encouraging results were obtained with adult stem cells to treat muscular dystrophies. Adult stem cells were found into various tissues of the body and they were able to maintain, generate, and replace terminally differentiated cells within their own specific tissue because of cell turnover or tissue injury. Moreover, it became clear that these cells could participate into regeneration of more than just their resident organ. Here, we described multiple types of muscle and non muscle-derived myogenic stem cells, their characterization and their possible use to treat muscular dystrophies. We also underlined that most promising possibility for the management and therapy of DMD is a combination of different approaches, such as gene and stem cell therapy.

  12. [Myotonic dystrophy with marked megacolon: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kawai, T; Kobari, M; Ohkubo, K; Itoh, H; Kikuchi, M

    1997-11-01

    A 45-year-old woman was incidentally suspected to have megacolon. Chest X-rays showed elevated left diaphragm due to colonic gas, and the heart was deviated to the midline. Barium enema revealed marked dilation of the sigmoid colon, confirming the diagnosis of megacolon. Maximal diameter of the sigmoid colon was 23 cm, but she had no gastrointestinal symptoms. During the work up for megacolon, the presence of myotonic dystrophy was suspected. She had hatchet face, but was not bald. Muscles of the neck and extremities were slightly atrophic. There was percussion myotonia of the tongue and both hands, and grip myotonia of the hands. Laboratory examinations showed impaired glucose tolerance and low level of serum IgG. EMG showed myotonic discharges and myopathic units in the limbs. Brain CT imaging revealed a thick skull. Cases of myotonic dystrophy associated with marked megacolon are rare in Japan. Megacolon presents a high risk for ileus, volvulus, and rupture, and myotonic dystrophy is associated with a high operative and anesthesic risk. Megacolon, therefore, is an important complication to look for in the management of myotonic dystrophy.

  13. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-02

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations.

  14. Asynchronous remodeling is a driver of failed regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dadgar, Sherry; Wang, Zuyi; Johnston, Helen; Kesari, Akanchha; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hill, D. Ashley; Partridge, Terence A.; Giri, Mamta; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nazarian, Javad; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the mechanisms underlying failure of muscle regeneration that is observed in dystrophic muscle through hypothesis generation using muscle profiling data (human dystrophy and murine regeneration). We found that transforming growth factor β–centered networks strongly associated with pathological fibrosis and failed regeneration were also induced during normal regeneration but at distinct time points. We hypothesized that asynchronously regenerating microenvironments are an underlying driver of fibrosis and failed regeneration. We validated this hypothesis using an experimental model of focal asynchronous bouts of muscle regeneration in wild-type (WT) mice. A chronic inflammatory state and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity are observed in bouts separated by 4 d, whereas a chronic profibrotic state was seen in bouts separated by 10 d. Treatment of asynchronously remodeling WT muscle with either prednisone or VBP15 mitigated the molecular phenotype. Our asynchronous regeneration model for pathological fibrosis and muscle wasting in the muscular dystrophies is likely generalizable to tissue failure in chronic inflammatory states in other regenerative tissues. PMID:25313409

  15. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  16. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Quan Q.; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A.; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M.; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  17. Corneal Hydration Control in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Katrin; McLaren, Jay W.; Kane, Katrina M.; Baratz, Keith H.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess corneal hydration control across a range of severity of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) by measuring the percent recovery per hour (PRPH) of central corneal thickness after swelling the cornea and to determine its association with corneal morphologic parameters. Methods Twenty-three corneas of 23 phakic FECD patients and 8 corneas of 8 healthy control participants devoid of guttae were graded (modified Krachmer scale). Effective endothelial cell density (ECDe) was determined from the area of guttae and local cell density in confocal microscopy images. Steady-state corneal thickness (CTss) and standardized central corneal backscatter were derived from Scheimpflug images. Corneal swelling was induced by wearing a low-oxygen transmissible contact lens for 2 hours in the morning. De-swelling was measured over 5 hours after lens removal or until corneal thickness returned to CTss. Percent recovery per hour was 100 × (1 – e−k), where k was determined from CT(t) = (de−kt) + CTss, and where d was the initial change from CTss. Results After contact lens wear, corneas swelled by 9% (95% CI 9–10). Percent recovery per hour was 49%/h (95% CI 41–57) in controls and 37%/h in advanced FECD (95% CI 29–43, P = 0.028). Low PRPH was associated with disease severity, low ECDe, and increased anterior and posterior corneal backscatter. Anterior backscatter was associated with PRPH in a multivariable model (R2 = 0.44). Conclusions Corneal hydration control is impaired in advanced FECD and is inversely related to anterior corneal backscatter. Anterior corneal backscatter might serve as an indicator of impaired endothelium in FECD. PMID:27661858

  18. Eccentric contractions lead to myofibrillar dysfunction in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Agatea, Lisa; Toniolo, Luana; Canato, Marta; Quarta, Marco; Dyar, Kenneth A; Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Betto, Romeo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Reggiani, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that skeletal muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx mice are more susceptible than those from wild-type mice to damage from eccentric contractions. However, the downstream mechanisms involved in this enhanced force drop remain controversial. We studied the reduction of contractile force induced by eccentric contractions elicited in vivo in the gastrocnemius muscle of wild-type mice and three distinct models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, alpha-sarcoglycan (Sgca)-null, and collagen 6A1 (Col6a1)-null mice. In mdx and Sgca-null mice, force decreased 35% compared with 14% in wild-type mice. Drop of force in Col6a1-null mice was comparable to that in wild-type mice. To identify the determinants of the force drop, we measured force generation in permeabilized fibers dissected from gastrocnemius muscle that had been exposed in vivo to eccentric contractions and from the contralateral unstimulated muscle. A force loss in skinned fibers after in vivo eccentric contractions was detectable in fibers from mdx and Sgca-null, but not wild-type and Col6a1-null, mice. The enhanced force reduction in mdx and Sgca-null mice was observed only when eccentric contractions were elicited in vivo, since eccentric contractions elicited in vitro had identical effects in wild-type and dystrophic skinned fibers. These results suggest that 1) the enhanced force loss is due to a myofibrillar impairment that is present in all fibers, and not to individual fiber degeneration, and 2) the mechanism causing the enhanced force reduction is active in vivo and is lost after fiber permeabilization.

  19. Myoclonus dystonia and muscular dystrophy: ɛ‐sarcoglycan is part of the dystrophin‐associated protein complex in brain

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Adrian J.; Carlisle, Francesca A.; Chan, Yiumo Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Myoclonus‐dystonia is a neurogenic movement disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding ɛ‐sarcoglycan. By contrast, mutations in the α‐, β‐, γ‐, and δ‐sarcoglycan genes cause limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The sarcoglycans are part of the dystrophin‐associated protein complex in muscle that is disrupted in several types of muscular dystrophy. Intriguingly, patients with myoclonus‐dystonia have no muscle pathology; conversely, limb‐girdle muscular dystrophy patients have not been reported to have dystonia‐associated features. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, we searched for evidence of a sarcoglycan complex in the brain. Methods Immunoaffinity chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to purify ubiquitous and brain‐specific ɛ‐sarcoglycan directly from tissue. Cell models were used to determine the effect of mutations on the trafficking and assembly of the brain sarcoglycan complex. Results Ubiquitous and brain‐specific ɛ‐sarcoglycan isoforms copurify with β‐, δ‐, and ζ‐sarcoglycan, β‐dystroglycan, and dystrophin Dp71 from brain. Incorporation of a muscular dystrophy‐associated β‐sarcoglycan mutant into the brain sarcoglycan complex impairs the formation of the βδ‐sarcoglycan core but fails to abrogate the association and membrane trafficking of ɛ‐ and ζ‐sarcoglycan. Conclusions ɛ‐Sarcoglycan is part of the dystrophin‐associated protein complex in brain. Partial preservation of ɛ‐ and ζ‐sarcoglycan in brain may explain the absence of myoclonus dystonia‐like features in muscular dystrophy patients. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27535350

  20. Shifts in macrophage phenotypes and macrophage competition for arginine metabolism affect the severity of muscle pathology in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Nguyen, Hal X; Deng, Bo; Gotoh, Tomomi; Tidball, James G

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal, muscle-wasting disease of childhood. Previous investigations have shown that muscle macrophages may play an important role in promoting the pathology in the mdx mouse model of DMD. In the present study, we investigate the mechanism through which macrophages promote mdx dystrophy and assess whether the phenotype of the macrophages changes between the stage of peak muscle necrosis (4 weeks of age) and muscle regeneration (12 weeks). We find that 4-week-old mdx muscles contain a population of pro-inflammatory, classically activated M1 macrophages that lyse muscle in vitro by NO-mediated mechanisms. Genetic ablation of the iNOS gene in mdx mice also significantly reduces muscle membrane lysis in 4-week-old mdx mice in vivo. However, 4-week mdx muscles also contain a population of alternatively activated, M2a macrophages that express arginase. In vitro assays show that M2a macrophages reduce lysis of muscle cells by M1 macrophages through the competition of arginase in M2a cells with iNOS in M1 cells for their common, enzymatic substrate, arginine. During the transition from the acute peak of mdx pathology to the regenerative stage, expression of IL-4 and IL-10 increases, either of which can deactivate the M1 phenotype and promote activation of a CD163+, M2c phenotype that can increase tissue repair. Our findings further show that IL-10 stimulation of macrophages activates their ability to promote satellite cell proliferation. Deactivation of the M1 phenotype is also associated with a reduced expression of iNOS, IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10. Thus, these results show that distinct subpopulations of macrophages can promote muscle injury or repair in muscular dystrophy, and that therapeutic interventions that affect the balance between M1 and M2 macrophage populations may influence the course of muscular dystrophy.

  1. Nanolipodendrosome-loaded glatiramer acetate and myogenic differentiation 1 as augmentation therapeutic strategy approaches in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ehsan; Zakeri, Saba; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Bagheri, Meisam; Mahjoubi, Parvin; Asadian, Mahtab; Omoomi, Nogol; Dehqanian, Mohammad; Ghalandarlaki, Negar; Darvishmohammadi, Tahmineh; Farjadian, Fatemeh; Golvajoee, Mohammad Sadegh; Afzal, Shadi; Ghaffari, Maryam; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Gravand, Amin; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-01-01

    Backgrond Muscular dystrophies consist of a number of juvenile and adult forms of complex disorders which generally cause weakness or efficiency defects affecting skeletal muscles or, in some kinds, other types of tissues in all parts of the body are vastly affected. In previous studies, it was observed that along with muscular dystrophy, immune inflammation was caused by inflammatory cells invasion – like T lymphocyte markers (CD8+/CD4+). Inflammatory processes play a major part in muscular fibrosis in muscular dystrophy patients. Additionally, a significant decrease in amounts of two myogenic recovery factors (myogenic differentation 1 [MyoD] and myogenin) in animal models was observed. The drug glatiramer acetate causes anti-inflammatory cytokines to increase and T helper (Th) cells to induce, in an as yet unknown mechanism. MyoD recovery activity in muscular cells justifies using it alongside this drug. Methods In this study, a nanolipodendrosome carrier as a drug delivery system was designed. The purpose of the system was to maximize the delivery and efficiency of the two drug factors, MyoD and myogenin, and introduce them as novel therapeutic agents in muscular dystrophy phenotypic mice. The generation of new muscular cells was analyzed in SW1 mice. Then, immune system changes and probable side effects after injecting the nanodrug formulations were investigated. Results The loaded lipodendrimer nanocarrier with the candidate drug, in comparison with the nandrolone control drug, caused a significant increase in muscular mass, a reduction in CD4+/CD8+ inflammation markers, and no significant toxicity was observed. The results support the hypothesis that the nanolipodendrimer containing the two candidate drugs will probably be an efficient means to ameliorate muscular degeneration, and warrants further investigation. PMID:23966782

  2. SPP1 genotype is a determinant of disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Piva, L.; Gavassini, B.F.; Cagnin, S.; Ermani, M.; Bello, L.; Soraru, G.; Pacchioni, B.; Bonifati, M.D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Angelini, C.; Kesari, A.; Lee, I.; Gordish-Dressman, H.; Devaney, J.M.; McDonald, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common single-gene lethal disorder. Substantial patient–patient variability in disease onset and progression and response to glucocorticoids is seen, suggesting genetic or environmental modifiers. Methods: Two DMD cohorts were used as test and validation groups to define genetic modifiers: a Padova longitudinal cohort (n = 106) and the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG) cross-sectional natural history cohort (n = 156). Single nucleotide polymorphisms to be genotyped were selected from mRNA profiling in patients with severe vs mild DMD, and genome-wide association studies in metabolism and polymorphisms influencing muscle phenotypes in normal volunteers were studied. Results: Effects on both disease progression and response to glucocorticoids were observed with polymorphism rs28357094 in the gene promoter of SPP1 (osteopontin). The G allele (dominant model; 35% of subjects) was associated with more rapid progression (Padova cohort log rank p = 0.003), and 12%–19% less grip strength (CINRG cohort p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Osteopontin genotype is a genetic modifier of disease severity in Duchenne dystrophy. Inclusion of genotype data as a covariate or in inclusion criteria in DMD clinical trials would reduce intersubject variance, and increase sensitivity of the trials, particularly in older subjects. PMID:21178099

  3. Ageing and muscular dystrophy differentially affect murine pharyngeal muscles in a region-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E; Luo, Qingwei; Ho, Justin; Vest, Katherine E; Sokoloff, Alan J; Pavlath, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    The inability to swallow, or dysphagia, is a debilitating and life-threatening condition that arises with ageing or disease. Dysphagia results from neurological or muscular impairment of one or more pharyngeal muscles, which function together to ensure proper swallowing and prevent the aspiration of food or liquid into the lungs. Little is known about the effects of age or disease on pharyngeal muscles as a group. Here we show ageing affected pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy in wild-type mice depending on the particular muscle analysed. Furthermore, wild-type mice also developed dysphagia with ageing. Additionally, we studied pharyngeal muscles in a mouse model for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, a dysphagic disease caused by a polyalanine expansion in the RNA binding protein, PABPN1. We examined pharyngeal muscles of mice overexpressing either wild-type A10 or mutant A17 PABPN1. Overexpression of mutant A17 PABPN1 differentially affected growth of the palatopharyngeus muscle dependent on its location within the pharynx. Interestingly, overexpression of wild-type A10 PABPN1 was protective against age-related muscle atrophy in the laryngopharynx and prevented the development of age-related dysphagia. These results demonstrate that pharyngeal muscles are differentially affected by both ageing and muscular dystrophy in a region-dependent manner. These studies lay important groundwork for understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy, which may lead to novel therapies for individuals with dysphagia. PMID:25326455

  4. Reducing CTGF/CCN2 slows down mdx muscle dystrophy and improves cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Morales, Maria Gabriela; Gutierrez, Jaime; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Cabrera, Daniel; Lipson, Kenneth E; Goldschmeding, Roel; Brandan, Enrique

    2013-12-15

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the mdx mouse model, the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin causes defective anchoring of myofibres to the basal lamina. The resultant myofibre degeneration and necrosis lead to a progressive loss of muscle mass, increased fibrosis and ultimately fatal weakness. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN-2) is critically involved in several chronic fibro-degenerative diseases. In DMD, the role of CTGF might extend well beyond replacement fibrosis secondary to loss of muscle fibres, since its overexpression in skeletal muscle could by itself induce a dystrophic phenotype. Using two independent approaches, we here show that mdx mice with reduced CTGF availability do indeed have less severe muscular dystrophy. Mdx mice with hemizygous CTGF deletion (mdx-Ctgf+/-), and mdx mice treated with a neutralizing anti-CTGF monoclonal antibody (FG-3019), performed better in an exercise endurance test, had better muscle strength in isolated muscles and reduced skeletal muscle impairment, apoptotic damage and fibrosis. Transforming growth factor type-β (TGF-β), pERK1/2 and p38 signalling remained unaffected during CTGF suppression. Moreover, both mdx-Ctgf+/- and FG-3019 treated mdx mice had improved grafting upon intramuscular injection of dystrophin-positive satellite cells. These findings reveal the potential of targeting CTGF to reduce disease progression and to improve cell therapy in DMD.

  5. Mitochondria mediate cell membrane repair and contribute to Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Maria C; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hogarth, Marshall W; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Horn, Adam; Defour, Aurelia; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2017-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency is the genetic basis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but the cellular basis of progressive myofiber death in DMD is not fully understood. Using two dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse models, we find that the mitochondrial dysfunction is among the earliest cellular deficits of mdx muscles. Mitochondria in dystrophic myofibers also respond poorly to sarcolemmal injury. These mitochondrial deficits reduce the ability of dystrophic muscle cell membranes to repair and are associated with a compensatory increase in dysferlin-mediated membrane repair proteins. Dysferlin deficit in mdx mice further compromises myofiber cell membrane repair and enhances the muscle pathology at an asymptomatic age for dysferlin-deficient mice. Restoring partial dystrophin expression by exon skipping improves mitochondrial function and offers potential to improve myofiber repair. These findings identify that mitochondrial deficit in muscular dystrophy compromises the repair of injured myofibers and show that this repair mechanism is distinct from and complimentary to the dysferlin-mediated repair of injured myofibers. PMID:27834955

  6. Dystrophy of the diaphragmatic muscles in adult Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cattle: electromyographical and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Goedegebuure, S A; Hartman, W; Hoebe, H P

    1983-01-01

    Electromyographic investigation of diaphragmatic muscles of Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cattle revealed a significant decreased duration of action potentials, while the number of polyphasic potentials was increased in four of seven cows. Histologically, the diaphragmatic muscles in all cows were affected severely, as characterized by variation in size of individual fibers, abundant vacuolar and hyaline degeneration with occasional fragmentation and phagocytosis, fiber splitting, apparent increase in internal nuclei, vesicular nuclei, chains of central nuclei, absence of regeneration, and proliferation of endomysial and perimysial connective tissue. Core-like structures seemed to be a hallmark of the disease. The intercostal muscles in all cows had core-like structures and some variation in fiber size; degenerative lesions did occur, but were less severe than in diaphragmatic muscles. In other skeletal muscles and cardiac muscles, core-like structures were present predominantly, indicating a generalized muscle disorder. No lesions were detected in the peripheral or central nervous systems. The muscular alterations were classified as a progressive muscular dystrophy, with a suspicion of hereditary transmission. This dystrophy may be an important animal model.

  7. Where do we stand in trial readiness for autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies?

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Bertoli, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases that are typically characterised by progressive weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. Many of the more than 20 different conditions show overlapping clinical features with other forms of muscular dystrophy, congenital, myofibrillar or even distal myopathies and also with acquired muscle diseases. Although individually extremely rare, all types of LGMD2 together form an important differential diagnostic group among neuromuscular diseases. Despite improved diagnostics and pathomechanistic insight, a curative therapy is currently lacking for any of these diseases. Medical care consists of the symptomatic treatment of complications, aiming to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Besides well characterised pre-clinical tools like animal models and cell culture assays, the determinants of successful drug development programmes for rare diseases include a good understanding of the phenotype and natural history of the disease, the existence of clinically relevant outcome measures, guidance on care standards, up to date patient registries, and, ideally, biomarkers that can help assess disease severity or drug response. Strong patient organisations driving research and successful partnerships between academia, advocacy, industry and regulatory authorities can also help accelerate the elaboration of clinical trials. All these determinants constitute aspects of translational research efforts and influence patient access to therapies. Here we review the current status of determinants of successful drug development programmes for LGMD2, and the challenges of translating promising therapeutic strategies into effective and accessible treatments for patients.

  8. Osteoprotegerin and β2-Agonists Mitigate Muscular Dystrophy in Slow- and Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Frenette, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Our recent work showed that daily injections of osteoprotegerin (OPG)-immunoglobulin fragment complex (OPG-Fc) completely restore the function of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles in dystrophic mdx mice, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, despite marked improvements, OPG-Fc was not as effective in preventing the loss of function of slow-twitch soleus and diaphragm muscles. Because β2-agonists enhance the function of slow- and fast-twitch dystrophic muscles and because their use is limited by their adverse effects on bone and cardiac tissues, we hypothesized that OPG-Fc, a bone and skeletal muscle protector, acts synergistically with β2-agonists and potentiates their positive effects on skeletal muscles. We observed that the content of β2-adrenergic receptors, which are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, is significantly reduced in dystrophic muscles but is rescued by the injection of OPG-Fc. Most important, OPG-Fc combined with a low dose of formoterol, a member of a new generation of β2-agonists, histologically and functionally rescued slow-twitch dystrophic muscles. This combination of therapeutic agents, which have already been tested and approved for human use, may open up new therapeutic avenues for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and possibly other neuromuscular diseases.

  9. Deficiency of merosin in dystrophic dy mouse homologue of congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Y.; Campbell, K.P.; Bernier, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Merosin (laminin M chain) is the predominant laminin isoform in the basal lamina of striated muscle and peripheral nerve and is a native ligand for {alpha}-dystroglycan, a novel laminin receptor. Merosin is linked to the subsarcolemmal actin cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which plays an important role for maintenance of normal muscle function. We have mapped the mouse merosin gene, Lamm, to the region containing the dystrophia muscularis (dy) locus on chromosome 10. This suggested the possibility that a mutation in the merosin gene could be responsible for the dy mouse, an animal model for autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, and prompted us to test this hypothesis. We analyzed the status of merosin expression in dy mouse by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In dy mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle and peripheral nerve, merosin was reduced greater than 90% as compared to control mice. However, the expression of laminin B1/B2 chains and collagen type IV was smaller to that in control mice. These findings strongly suggest that merosin deficiency may be the primary defect in the dy mouse. Furthermore, we have identified two patients afflicted with congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency, providing the basis for future studies of molecular pathogenesis and gene therapy.

  10. The involvement of collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Spector, Itai; Zilberstein, Yael; Lavy, Adi; Genin, Olga; Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Bodanovsky, Ana; Halevy, Orna; Pines, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Fibrosis is the main complication of muscular dystrophies. We identified collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (Cthrc1) in skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice, representing Duchenne and congenital muscle dystrophies (DMD and CMD, respectively), and dysferlinopathy. In all of the mice, Cthrc1 was associated with high collagen type I levels; no Cthrc1 or collagen was observed in muscles of control mice. High levels of Cthrc1 were also observed in biopsy specimens from patients with DMD, in whom they were reversibly correlated with that of β-dystroglycan, whereas collagen type I levels were elevated in all patients with DMD. At the muscle sites where collagen and Cthrc1 were adjacent, collagen fibers appeared smaller, suggesting involvement of Cthrc1 in collagen turnover. Halofuginone, an inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation downstream of the transforming growth factor-β signaling, reduced Cthrc1 levels in skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice, representing DMD, CMD, and dysferlinopathy. The myofibroblasts infiltrating the dystrophic muscles of the murine models of DMD, CMD, and dysferlinopathy were the source of Cthrc1. Transforming growth factor-β did not affect Cthrc1 levels in the mdx fibroblasts but decreased them in the control fibroblasts, in association with increased migration of mdx fibroblasts and dystrophic muscle invasion by myofibroblasts. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of Cthrc1 as a marker of the severity of the disease progression in the dystrophic muscles, and as a possible target for therapy.

  11. An Intracellular Ca2+ Channel is Required For Sarcolemma Repair to Prevent Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiping; Zhang, Xiaoli; Gao, Qiong; Samie, Mohammad Ali; Azar, Marlene; Tsang, Wai Lok; Dong, Libing; Sahoo, Nirakar; Li, Xinran; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G.; Wang, Xiang; Ferrer, Marc; Dowling, James; Xu, Li; Han, Renzhi; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-01-01

    The integrity of the plasma membrane is maintained through an active repair process, especially for skeletal and cardiac muscle cells, in which contraction-induced mechanical damage frequently occurs in vivo1,2. Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of muscle diseases characterized by skeletal muscle wasting and weakness3,4. An important cause of MD is defective repair of sarcolemmal injuries, and sarcolemma repair requires Ca2+ sensor proteins5–8 and Ca2+-dependent delivery of intracellular vesicles to injury sites5,8,9. TRPML1 (ML1) is an endosomal and lysosomal Ca2+ channel and its human mutations cause Mucolipidosis IV, a neurodegenerative disease with motor disabilities10,11. Here, we report that ML1-null mice develop a primary, early-onset muscular dystrophy independent of neural degeneration. Although the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and the known membrane repair proteins are normally expressed, membrane resealing was defective in ML1-null muscle fibers or upon acute and pharmacological inhibition of ML1 channel activity or vesicular Ca2+ release. Injury facilitated the trafficking and exocytosis of vesicles by upmodulating ML1 channel activity. In the dystrophic mdx mouse model, overexpression of ML1 decreased muscle pathology. Collectively, we have identified an intracellular Ca2+ channel that regulates membrane repair in skeletal muscle via Ca2+-dependent vesicle exocytosis. PMID:25216637

  12. Development and psychometric analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy Functional Ability Self-Assessment Tool (DMDSAT).

    PubMed

    Landfeldt, Erik; Mayhew, Anna; Eagle, Michelle; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Katharine

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the development and initial psychometric analysis of the UK English version of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy Functional Ability Self-Assessment Tool (DMDSAT), a patient-reported outcome (PRO) scale designed to measure functional ability in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Item selection was made by neuromuscular specialists and a Rasch analysis was performed to understand the psychometric properties of the DMDSAT. Instrument scores were also linked to cost of illness and health-related quality of life data. The administered version, completed by 186 UK patient-caregivers pairs, included eight items in four domains: Arm function, Mobility, Transfers, and Ventilation status. These items together successfully operationalized functional ability in DMD, with excellent targeting and reliability (Person Separation Index: 0.95; Cronbach's α: 0.93), stable item locations, and good fit to the Rasch model (mean person/item fit residual: -0.21/-0.44, SD: 0.32/1.28). Estimated item difficulty was in excellent agreement with clinical opinion (Spearman's ρ: 0.95) and instrument scores mapped well onto health economic outcomes. We show that the DMDSAT is a PRO instrument fit for purpose to measure functional ability in ambulant and non-ambulant patients with DMD. Rasch analysis augments clinical expertise in the development of robust rating scales.

  13. Dose-Dependent Regulation of Alternative Splicing by MBNL Proteins Reveals Biomarkers for Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Adam J.; Gupta, Riti; Farnsworth, Dylan R.; Mahady, Amy E.; Eichinger, Katy; Thornton, Charles A.; Wang, Eric T.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a regulated process that results in expression of specific mRNA and protein isoforms. Alternative splicing factors determine the relative abundance of each isoform. Here we focus on MBNL1, a splicing factor misregulated in the disease myotonic dystrophy. By altering the concentration of MBNL1 in cells across a broad dynamic range, we show that different splicing events require different amounts of MBNL1 for half-maximal response, and respond more or less steeply to MBNL1. Motifs around MBNL1 exon 5 were studied to assess how cis-elements mediate the MBNL1 dose-dependent splicing response. A framework was developed to estimate MBNL concentration using splicing responses alone, validated in the cell-based model, and applied to myotonic dystrophy patient muscle. Using this framework, we evaluated the ability of individual and combinations of splicing events to predict functional MBNL concentration in human biopsies, as well as their performance as biomarkers to assay mild, moderate, and severe cases of DM. PMID:27681373

  14. Potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules, osteopontin and galectin-3, are not major disease modulators of laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gawlik, Kinga I.; Holmberg, Johan; Svensson, Martina; Einerborg, Mikaela; Oliveira, Bernardo M. S.; Deierborg, Tomas; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    A large number of human diseases are caused by chronic tissue injury with fibrosis potentially leading to organ failure. There is a need for more effective anti-fibrotic therapies. Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a devastating form of muscular dystrophy caused by laminin α2 chain-deficiency. It is characterized with early inflammation and build-up of fibrotic lesions, both in patients and MDC1A mouse models (e.g. dy3K/dy3K). Despite the enormous impact of inflammation on tissue remodelling in disease, the inflammatory response in MDC1A has been poorly described. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of secondary mechanisms (impaired regeneration, enhanced fibrosis) leading to deterioration of muscle phenotype in MDC1A is missing. We have monitored inflammatory processes in dy3K/dy3K muscle and created mice deficient in laminin α2 chain and osteopontin or galectin-3, two pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules drastically increased in dystrophic muscle. Surprisingly, deletion of osteopontin worsened the phenotype of dy3K/dy3K mice and loss of galectin-3 did not reduce muscle pathology. Our results indicate that osteopontin could even be a beneficial immunomodulator in MDC1A. This knowledge is essential for the design of future therapeutic interventions for muscular dystrophies that aim at targeting inflammation, especially that osteopontin inhibition has been suggested for Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy. PMID:28281577

  15. Potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules, osteopontin and galectin-3, are not major disease modulators of laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Kinga I; Holmberg, Johan; Svensson, Martina; Einerborg, Mikaela; Oliveira, Bernardo M S; Deierborg, Tomas; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2017-03-10

    A large number of human diseases are caused by chronic tissue injury with fibrosis potentially leading to organ failure. There is a need for more effective anti-fibrotic therapies. Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a devastating form of muscular dystrophy caused by laminin α2 chain-deficiency. It is characterized with early inflammation and build-up of fibrotic lesions, both in patients and MDC1A mouse models (e.g. dy(3K)/dy(3K)). Despite the enormous impact of inflammation on tissue remodelling in disease, the inflammatory response in MDC1A has been poorly described. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of secondary mechanisms (impaired regeneration, enhanced fibrosis) leading to deterioration of muscle phenotype in MDC1A is missing. We have monitored inflammatory processes in dy(3K)/dy(3K) muscle and created mice deficient in laminin α2 chain and osteopontin or galectin-3, two pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules drastically increased in dystrophic muscle. Surprisingly, deletion of osteopontin worsened the phenotype of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and loss of galectin-3 did not reduce muscle pathology. Our results indicate that osteopontin could even be a beneficial immunomodulator in MDC1A. This knowledge is essential for the design of future therapeutic interventions for muscular dystrophies that aim at targeting inflammation, especially that osteopontin inhibition has been suggested for Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy.

  16. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. ); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya )

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  17. Mutations in CNNM4 cause recessive cone-rod dystrophy with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Polok, Bozena; Escher, Pascal; Ambresin, Aude; Chouery, Eliane; Bolay, Sylvain; Meunier, Isabelle; Nan, Francis; Hamel, Christian; Munier, Francis L; Thilo, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2009-02-01

    Cone-rod dystrophies are inherited dystrophies of the retina characterized by the accumulation of deposits mainly localized to the cone-rich macular region of the eye. Dystrophy can be limited to the retina or be part of a syndrome. Unlike nonsyndromic cone-rod dystrophies, syndromic cone-rod dystrophies are genetically heterogeneous with mutations in genes encoding structural, cell-adhesion, and transporter proteins. Using a genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype analysis to fine map the locus and a gene-candidate approach, we identified homozygous mutations in the ancient conserved domain protein 4 gene (CNNM4) that either generate a truncated protein or occur in highly conserved regions of the protein. Given that CNNM4 is implicated in metal ion transport, cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta may originate from abnormal ion homeostasis.

  18. The link between stress disorders and autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time—(i) outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii) propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy. PMID:24523698

  19. Translational Studies of GALGT2 Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Martin, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Research Institute...for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0416 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul T. Martin...translational studies in support of developing GALGT2 gene therapy for use in Duchenne Muscular dystrophy patients. In year 2, we have completed

  20. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1): a triplet repeat expansion disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita; Agarwal, Divya; Phadke, Shubha R

    2013-06-15

    Myotonic dystrophy is a progressive multisystem genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 8000 people worldwide. The unstable repeat expansions of (CTG)n or (CCTG)n in the DMPK and ZNF9 genes cause the two known subtypes of myotonic dystrophy: (i) myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and (ii) myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) respectively. There is currently no cure but supportive management helps equally to reduce the morbidity and mortality and patients need close follow up to pay attention to their clinical problems. This review will focus on the clinical features, molecular view and genetics, diagnosis and management of DM1.

  1. The brain in myotonic dystrophy 1 and 2: evidence for a predominant white matter disease.

    PubMed

    Minnerop, Martina; Weber, Bernd; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Roeske, Sandra; Mirbach, Sandra; Anspach, Christian; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Betz, Regina C; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Klockgether, Thomas; Kornblum, Cornelia

    2011-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2 are progressive multisystemic disorders with potential brain involvement. We compared 22 myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 22 myotonic dystrophy type 2 clinically and neuropsychologically well-characterized patients and a corresponding healthy control group using structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T (T(1)/T(2)/diffusion-weighted). Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics were applied for voxel-wise analysis of cerebral grey and white matter affection (P(corrected) < 0.05). We further examined the association of structural brain changes with clinical and neuropsychological data. White matter lesions rated visually were more prevalent and severe in myotonic dystrophy type 1 compared with controls, with frontal white matter most prominently affected in both disorders, and temporal lesions restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Voxel-based morphometry analyses demonstrated extensive white matter involvement in all cerebral lobes, brainstem and corpus callosum in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2, while grey matter decrease (cortical areas, thalamus, putamen) was restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Accordingly, we found more prominent white matter affection in myotonic dystrophy type 1 than myotonic dystrophy type 2 by diffusion tensor imaging. Association fibres throughout the whole brain, limbic system fibre tracts, the callosal body and projection fibres (e.g. internal/external capsules) were affected in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2. Central motor pathways were exclusively impaired in myotonic dystrophy type 1. We found mild executive and attentional deficits in our patients when neuropsychological tests were corrected for manual motor dysfunctioning. Regression analyses revealed associations of white matter affection with several clinical parameters in both disease entities, but not with neuropsychological performance. We showed that depressed mood and fatigue were

  2. Molecular genetics of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Upadhyaya, M

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD; MIM 158900), is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder. The disease is characterized by the weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm and shoulder girdle. The gene for FSHD has been mapped to 4q35 (FSHD1A) and is closely linked to D4F1O4S1, which detects two highly polymorphic loci (located at 4q35 and 10q26), with restriction enzyme EcoRI. The polymorphic EcoRI fragment detected with D4F1O4S1 is composed almost entirely of D4Z4 (3.3 kb) tandem repeats. In FSHD patients a deletion of the integral number of D4Z4 repeats generates a fragment which is usually smaller than 35 kb, whereas in normal controls, the size usually ranges from 50 to 300 kb. These 'small' EcoRI fragments segregate with FSHD in families but appear as de novo deletions in the majority of sporadic cases. Each 3.3 kb repeat contains two homeobox domains neither of which has yet been proven to encode a protein. D4Z4 is located adjacent to the 4q telomere and cross hybridizes to several different regions of the genome. Although D4Z4 probably does not encode a protein with any direct association to FSHD, a clear correlation has been shown between the deletion size at this locus and the age at onset of the disease in FSHD patients. In approximately 5-10% of FSHD families the disease locus is unlinked to 4q35 (locus designated FSHD1B), however, none of the non 4q35 loci for FSHD have yet been chromosomally located. Thus so far, only one gene, FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) has been identified from the FSHD candidate region on 4q35. The apparent low level of expressed sequences from within this region, the integral deletions of D4Z4 repeats observed in FSHD patients and the close proximity of these repeats to the 4q telomere, all suggest that the disease may be the result of position effect variegation. To date, the molecular diagnosis of FSHD with D4F104S1 has been most secure in those families which are linked to other 4q35 markers. Recent studies

  3. Bilateral choroidal excavation in best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-02-14

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) has recently been described as one or more localized areas of choroidal excavation on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of bilateral FCE in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). SD-OCT revealed FCE in both eyes characterized by interruption of the internal segment-outer segment junction and the presence of subretinal hyporeflective space. This is the first report describing bilateral FCE in a distinct macular disorder and specifically with VMD. Future investigations are warranted to ascertain the involvement of other macular dystrophies with atrophic evolution and the impact of FCE on the clinical course. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:e8-e10.].

  4. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  5. Early visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Prokofyeva, Elena; Troeger, Eric; Wilke, Robert; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2011-01-01

    The present retrospective study compared initial visual symptom patterns in inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) on the basis of records of 544 patients diagnosed with a wide variety of IRD at the Tuebingen University Eye Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Age at first onset of symptoms was noted, and the following clinical data were analyzed: visual acuity (VA), night vision disturbances, photophobia, onset of visual field defects, best corrected VA, and types of visual field defects. Median age at visual symptom onset was defined with 25th and 75th percentiles and compared in 15 IRD types. The main trends in VA changes in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophies were identified. This study was the first to combine disease history and clinical data analysis in such a wide variety of IRD. It showed that patterns of initial symptoms in IRD can provide extra clues for early differential diagnosis and inclusion of IRD patients in clinical trials.

  6. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: lessons learned and path forward.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K; Walker, Christopher M; Clark, K Reed

    2012-10-11

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2'O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleoside-phosphorothioate (2'OMe) and a phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO). Both have demonstrated early evidence of efficacy. A second molecular approach involves suppression of stop codons to promote readthrough of the DMD gene. We have been able to establish proof of principle for mutation suppression using the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. A safer, orally administered, alternative agent referred to as Ataluren (PTC124) has been used in clinical trials and is currently under consideration for approval by the FDA. Using a gene therapy approach, we have completed two trials and have initiated a third. For DMD, we used a mini-dystrophin transferred in adeno-associated virus (AAV). In this trial an immune response was seen directed against transgene product, a quite unexpected outcome that will help guide further studies. For limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency), the transgene was again transferred using AAV but in this study, a muscle specific creatine kinase promoter controlled gene expression that persisted for six months. A third gene therapy trial has been initiated with transfer of the follistatin gene in AAV directly to the quadriceps muscle. Two diseases with selective quadriceps muscle weakness are undergoing gene transfer including sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Increasing the size and strength of the muscle is the goal of this study. Most importantly, no adverse events have been encountered in any of

  7. Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: renewed optimism from genetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Rebecca J; Wood, Matthew J; Davies, Kay E

    2013-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating progressive disease for which there is currently no effective treatment except palliative therapy. There are several promising genetic approaches, including viral delivery of the missing dystrophin gene, read-through of translation stop codons, exon skipping to restore the reading frame and increased expression of the compensatory utrophin gene. The lessons learned from these approaches will be applicable to many other disorders.

  8. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Uney, James B.; Mahadevan, Mani S.; Phylactou, Leonidas A.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts on muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.

  9. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  10. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Edwin H.A.; Courtney, David G.; Atkinson, Sarah D.; Moore, Johnny E.; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P.; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J.D.; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Moore, C.B. Tara

    2016-01-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  11. Scalpel or Straitjacket: CRISPR/Cas9 Approaches for Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Versatility of CRISPR/Cas9-based platforms makes them promising tools for the correction of diverse genetic/epigenetic disorders. Here we contrast the use of these genome editing tools in two myopathies with very different molecular origins: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a monogenetic disease, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, an epigenetic disorder with unique therapeutic challenges.

  12. Be careful about abdominal discomfort in adult patients with muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Ritzenthaler, T; Luis, D; Hullin, T; Clair, B; Annane, D; Orlikowski, D

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetic muscular disease with disability. Heart failure is a classical complication mainly in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We report 2 cases of severe acute heart failure revealed by abdominal discomfort in a patient with DMD and in a patient with gamma-sarcoglycanopathy.

  13. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  14. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study of School Experiences of Boys with Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soim, Aida; Lamb, Molly; Campbell, Kimberly; Pandya, Shree; Peay, Holly; Howard, James F., Jr.; Fox, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate types of supportive school services received and factors related to provision of these services. We conducted a cross-sectional study to describe the school experience of males with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. Study subjects were identified through the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance,…

  16. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Rising Stars in Eliminating RNA Toxicity in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited, multisystemic disease caused by expanded CTG (type 1, DM1) or CCTG (type 2, DM2) repeats in untranslated regions of the mutated genes. Pathogenesis results from expression of RNAs from the mutated alleles that are toxic because of the expanded CUG or CCUG repeats. Increased understanding of the repeat-containing RNA (C/CUGexp RNA)-induced toxicity has led to the development of multiple strategies targeting the toxic RNA. Among these approaches, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have demonstrated high potency in reversing the RNA toxicity in both cultured DM1 cells and DM1 animal models, thus offering great promise for the potential treatment of DM1. ASO targeting approaches will also provide avenues for the treatment of other repeat RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:23252746

  17. Rapid DNA haplotyping using a multiplex heteroduplex approach: application to Duchenne muscular dystrophy carrier testing.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Wenger, G D; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Bartolo, C; Moore, J W; Highsmith, W E

    1995-01-01

    A new strategy has been developed for rapid haplotype analysis based on an initial multiplex amplification of several polymorphic sites, followed by heteroduplex detection. Heteroduplexes formed between two different alleles are detected because they migrate differently than the corresponding homoduplexes in Hydrolink-MDE gel. This simple, rapid method does not depend on specific sequences such as restriction enzyme sites or CA boxes and does not require the use of isotope. This approach has been tested using commonly occurring polymorphisms spanning the dystrophin gene as a model. We describe the use of the method to assign the carrier status of females in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) pedigrees. The method may be used for other genetic diseases when mutations are unknown or there are few dinucleotide markers in the gene proximity, and for the identification of haplotype backgrounds of mutant alleles.

  18. Regenerative pharmacology in the treatment of genetic diseases: The paradigm of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Minetti, Giulia; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Current evidence supports the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions that counter the progression of genetic disorders by promoting regeneration of the affected organs or tissues. The rationale behind this concept lies on the evidence that targeting key events downstream of the genetic defect can compensate, at least partially, the pathological consequence of the related disease. In this regard, the beneficial effect exerted on animal models of muscular dystrophy by pharmacological strategies that enhance muscle regeneration provides an interesting paradigm. In this review, we describe and discuss the potential targets of pharmacological strategies that promote regeneration of dystrophic muscles and alleviate the consequence of the primary genetic defect. Regenerative pharmacology provides an immediate and suitable therapeutic opportunity to slow down the decline of muscles in the present generation of dystrophic patients, with the perspective to hold them in conditions such that they could benefit of future, more definitive, therapies. PMID:18804548

  19. Progress on gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological strategies toward the treatment of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Harish, Pradeep; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Bachtarzi, Houria

    2015-05-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle-specific, late-onset degenerative disorder whereby muscles of the eyes (causing ptosis), throat (leading to dysphagia), and limbs (causing proximal limb weakness) are mostly affected. The disease is characterized by a mutation in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, resulting in a short GCG expansion in the polyalanine tract of PABPN1 protein. Accumulation of filamentous intranuclear inclusions in affected skeletal muscle cells constitutes the pathological hallmark of OPMD. This review highlights the current translational research advances in the treatment of OPMD. In vitro and in vivo disease models are described. Conventional and experimental therapeutic approaches are discussed with emphasis on novel molecular therapies including the use of intrabodies, gene therapy, and myoblast transfer therapy.

  20. Initial Pulmonary Respiration Causes Massive Diaphragm Damage and Hyper-CKemia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dog

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinori; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Yugeta, Naoko; Okada, Takashi; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle degeneration in a lethal muscle disorder Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) has not been fully elucidated. The dystrophic dog, a model of DMD, shows a high mortality rate with a marked increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) levels in the neonatal period. By measuring serum CK levels in cord and venous blood, we found initial pulmonary respiration resulted in massive diaphragm damage in the neonates and thereby lead to the high serum CK levels. Furthermore, molecular biological techniques revealed that osteopontin was prominently upregulated in the dystrophic diaphragm prior to the respiration, and that immediate-early genes (c-fos and egr-1) and inflammation/immune response genes (IL-6, IL-8, COX-2, and selectin E) were distinctly overexpressed after the damage by the respiration. Hence, we segregated dystrophic phases at the molecular level before and after mechanical damage. These molecules could be biomarkers of muscle damage and potential targets in pharmaceutical therapies. PMID:23851606

  1. Endpoint measures in the mdx mouse relevant for muscular dystrophy pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yvonne M.; Rader, Erik P.; Crawford, Robert W.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of mobility influences the quality of life for patients with neuromuscular diseases. Common measures of mobility and chronic muscle damage are the six-minute walk test and serum creatine kinase. Despite extensive pre-clinical studies of therapeutic approaches, characterization of these measures is incomplete. To address this, a six-minute ambulation assay, serum creatine kinase, and myoglobinuria were investigated for the mdx mouse, a dystrophinopathy mouse model commonly used in pre-clinical studies. Mdx mice ambulated shorter distances than normal controls, a disparity accentuated after mild exercise. An asymmetric pathophysiology in mdx mice was unmasked with exercise, and peak measurements of serum creatine kinase and myoglobinuria were identified. Our data highlights the necessity to consider asymmetric pathology and timing of biomarkers when testing potential therapies for muscular dystrophy. PMID:22154712

  2. Muscular dystrophy candidate gene FRG1 is critical for muscle development.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Meredith L; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Jones, Peter L

    2009-06-01

    The leading candidate gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1). However, the correlation of altered FRG1 expression levels with disease pathology has remained controversial and the precise function of FRG1 is unknown. Here, we carried out a detailed analysis of the normal expression patterns and effects of FRG1 misexpression during vertebrate embryonic development using Xenopus laevis. We show that frg1 is expressed in and essential for the development of the tadpole musculature. FRG1 morpholino injection disrupted myotome organization and led to inhibited myotome growth, while elevated FRG1 led to abnormal epaxial and hypaxial muscle formation. Thus, maintenance of normal FRG1 levels is critical for proper muscle development, supportive of FSHD disease models whereby misregulation of FRG1 plays a causal role underlying the pathology exhibited in FSHD patients. Developmental Dynamics 238:1502-1512, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Musculoskeletal simulation can help explain selective muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Blemker, Silvia S

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease that occurs due to the deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Although dystrophin is deficient in all muscles, it is unclear why degeneration progresses differently across muscles in DMD. We hypothesized that each muscle undergoes a different degree of eccentric contraction during gait, which could contribute to the selective degeneration in lower limb muscle, as indicated by various amounts of fatty infiltration. By comparing eccentric contractions quantified from a previous multibody dynamic musculoskeletal gait simulation and fat fractions quantified in a recent imaging study, our preliminary analyses show a strong correlation between eccentric contractions during gait and lower limb muscle fat fractions, supporting our hypothesis. This knowledge is critical for developing safe exercise regimens for the DMD population. This study also provides supportive evidence for using multiscale modeling and simulation of the musculoskeletal system in future DMD research.

  4. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  5. Trends with corticosteroid use in males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy born 1982-2001.

    PubMed

    Fox, Deborah J; Kumar, Anil; West, Nancy A; DiRienzo, A Gregory; James, Katherine A; Oleszek, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines trends in corticosteroid use for males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy by birth year, race/ethnicity, and knowledge of Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history. Firstborn males (n = 521) selected from a population-based surveillance system of Duchenne muscular dystrophy were analyzed using Kaplan Meier and regression methods. Comparing males born 1982 to 1986 with males born 1997 to 2001, steroid use increased from 54% to 72% and mean age at steroid initiation decreased from 8.2 to 7.1 years. Hispanics and non-Hispanic Black males used steroids less frequently and delayed initiation compared to white males. Compared to males without a Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history, males with known family history were half as likely to use steroids. Duration of steroid use increased over time and age at initiation decreased. Racial/ethnic disparities exist for steroid use and should be addressed to improve outcome and quality of life for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  6. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: a myogenic precursor cell hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kallestad, Kristen M; Hebert, Sadie L; McDonald, Abby A; Daniel, Mark L; Cu, Sharon R; McLoon, Linda K

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin(-/-) (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a subpopulation

  7. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  8. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  9. D