Science.gov

Sample records for e centers

  1. E-Learning and Virtual Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hin, Leo Tan Wee, Ed.; Subramaniam, R., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "E-Learning and Virtual Science Centers" addresses an aspect of Web-based education that has not attracted sufficient attention in the international research literature--that of virtual science centers, the cyberspace annex of traditional science centers. It is the first book to be published on the rapidly advancing field of science education.…

  2. Global Challenges in People-Centered E-Health.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Safran, Charles

    2015-01-01

    People-centered health care seeks an active role for the patient while empowering all other members of the health care team. By promoting greater patient responsibility and optimal usage, patient-centered health care leads to improved health outcomes, quality of life and optimal value for health care investment. This paper reviews some definitions of people-centered health care and various e-health approaches around the world used to implement this vision. The barriers and enablers to implementation this type of approach are explored. This paper provides a proposed research agenda for future implementations of people-centered e-health.

  3. 16. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. CENTER MILL (RIGHTHANDED) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. William E. Barrett, Photographer, August 1975. CENTER MILL (RIGHT-HANDED) WITH CARRIAGE TRACKS AND BANDSAW HOUSING INTACT. LOG CLAMPS ON THIS CARRIAGE WERE PNEUMATICALLY OPERATED. - Meadow River Lumber Company, Highway 60, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV

  4. Many trained at E1 Salvador center.

    PubMed

    1970-02-01

    The Family Planning Association of E1 Salvador is conducting regular week-long courses in family planning for doctors, nurses, social workers and other interested people in El Salvador and the surrounding countries of Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Twelve regional courses on population dynamics, the physiology of reproduction and family planning were held in the academic year 1968-69 at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of El Salvador. Because the demand for places far exceeds the capacity of the Association's training unit, careful selection of candidates is made through consultation with the national family planning associations. Most of those trained are doctors who are being specially equipped to carry out family planning work either as part of government maternal and child health centres or in Association clinics. Many places are also found for nurses and some social workers also attend in order to build up teams for effective clinic management. A few journalists and teachers have been among the trainees as well as groups of religious leaders including Roman Catholics. Lecturers are mainly university personnel drawn from a wide range of disciplines in order to relate family planning not only to health and medicine but also to socio-economic aspects and community welfare. The El Salvador Association, an IPPF member, gets financial support from the Population Council for the training programme but hopes eventually that responsibility for continuing the courses will be taken over by the Government, probably through the Ministry of Education. Another pace-setting activity of the Association has been its close contacts with industry, particulary through the efforts of its President, Mr. Lucio Burgos, General Manager of the El Salvador Power Company, who has gained the interest and support of business and union leaders. Not only do these groups help the work of the Association through fund-raising and public relations activities, but

  5. Usability Evaluation of the Student Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junus, Inas Sofiyah; Santoso, Harry Budi; Isal, R. Yugo K.; Utomo, Andika Yudha

    2015-01-01

    Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCeLE) has substantial roles to support learning activities at Faculty of Computer Science, Universitas Indonesia (Fasilkom UI). Although it has been utilized for about 10 years, the usability aspect of SCeLE as an e-Learning system has not been evaluated. Therefore, the usability aspects of SCeLE Fasilkom…

  6. The E1-E2 center in gallium arsenide is the divacancy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter A

    2015-02-25

    Based on defect energy levels computed from first-principles calculations, it is shown the E1-E2 center in irradiated GaAs cannot be due to an isolated arsenic vacancy. The only simple intrinsic defect with levels compatible with E1 and E2 is the divacancy. The arsenic monovacancy is reassigned to the E3 center in irradiated GaAs. These new assignments are shown to reconcile a number of seemingly contradictory experimental observations.

  7. A Cognitive Approach to Student-Centered e-Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2002-09-30

    Like traditional classroom instruction, distance/electronic learning (e-Learning) derives from largely behaviorist computer-based instruction paradigms that tend to reflect passive training philosophies. Over the past thirty years, more flexible, student-centered classroom teaching methods have been advocated based on the concepts of ''discovery'' learning and ''active'' learning; student-centered approaches are likewise encouraged in the development of e-Learning applications. Nevertheless, many e-Learning applications that employ state-of-the art multimedia technology in which students interact with simulations, animations, video, and sounds still fail to meet their expected training potential. Implementation of multimedia-based training features may give the impression of engaging the student in more active forms of learning, but sophisticated use of multimedia features does not necessarily produce the desired effect. This paper briefly reviews some general guidelines for applying cognitive science principles to development of student-centered e-Learning applications and describes a cognitive approach to e-Learning development that is being undertaken for the US Army.

  8. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smoller, Jordan W; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Green, Robert C; Kathiresan, Sekar; MacArthur, Daniel G; Talkowski, Michael E; Murphy, Shawn N; Weiss, Scott T

    2016-01-20

    The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs) and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians.

  9. 330 NORTH & CENTER STREET (990 EAST) (8E1684E, SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    330 NORTH & CENTER STREET (990 EAST) (8-E-16-8-4E, SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST OVER THE CEMETERY. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  10. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 45 Degrees N., Center Longitude 11 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of the lowland plains in Sedna Planitia. Circular depressions with associated fracture patterns called 'coronae' are apparently unique to the lowlands of Venus, and tend to occur in linear clusters along the planet's major tectonic belts. Coronae differ greatly in size and detailed morphology: the central depression may or may not lie below the surrounding plains, and may or may not be surrounded by a raised rim or a moat outside the rim. The corona shown here is relatively small (100 km in diameter and 1 km deep) and is of the subtype known as an 'arachnoid' because of the spider-like configuration of concentric (body) and radial (legs) fractures. Coronae are thought to be caused by localized 'hot spot' magmatic activity in Venus' subsurface. Intrusion of magma into the crust first pushes up the surface, after which cooling and contraction create the central depression and generate a pattern of concentric fractures. In some cases, lava may be extruded onto the surface. The fractured ridge at the left is classified as a 'nova' or 'stellate fracture center' and is believed to represent an early phase of corona formation, in which subsidence due to cooling has not yet created the central depression, and the fracture pattern is still entirely radial. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-45N011. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 439 x 474. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.82 -- 0.88. Vertical exaggeration: 100. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 150. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 600. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  11. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 0 Degree N., Center Longitude 77 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the boundary between the lowland plains and characteristic Venusian highland terrain in Ovda Regio, the western part of the great equatorial highland called Aphrodite Terra. For a view of the highlands just to the east, see PIA00310. The view is parallel to the northern boundary of Ovda. The black stripe in the foreground is not a data gap; the front part of the terrain has been 'dropped down' to show a topographic cross-section through the region. The conical 'hill' in the extreme upper right of the image is not a real feature, but an artifact resulting from a single erroneous altimeter measurement. Its size gives an idea of the horizontal resolution of the altimeter. Whereas the lowlands at left are made up of overlapping, relatively dark and unfractured lava flows, the highlands consist mainly of 'tessera terrain'. The tesserae in the center of the image consist mainly of ridges running nearly parallel to the highland boundary, whereas further south (to the right) the pattern is complicated by north-south trending fractures. Local depressions in the highlands, which have been partially filled in by smooth material, are visible in several places. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1- 00N077. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 824 x 520. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.67 -- 0.87. Vertical exaggeration: 40. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 165. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 520. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  12. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 0 Degree N., Center Longitude 163 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the impact crater Markham, named after the English aviator Beryl Markham (The crater was briefly known unofficially as Franklin; the earlier name was not approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Astronomical Union). Markham, with a diameter of 71 km, is one of more than 400 Venusian craters whose formation triggered the outflow of highly fluid materials. Such outflows are thought to consist of mixtures of melted and fractured rock, and studies of their lobate margins and surface roughnesses suggest that they behave like a cross between lava flows and debris flows on Earth. The flow from this crater's ejecta traversed a slope of extremely low gradient (less than 0.1 degree) for 450 km, leaving an extremely rough, radar-bright surface. The ground-hugging nature of the flow is indicated by its being diverted by the foreground hill, which is less than 200 m high. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1- 00N163. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 473 x 360. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.80 -- 0.95. Vertical exaggeration: 200. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 300. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 500. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  13. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 45 Degrees N., Center Longitude 350 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of Sedna Planitia and illustrates a common phenomenon of the lowland plains of Venus: one of many overlapping lava flows that make up the plains has been deflected by low-relief hills. Differing radar brightness among the flows reflects mostly differences in roughness. In this area, the most recent lava flows characteristically have somewhat lower emissivities (indicated here by the green color) and higher SAR brightness than the ridges they embay. Fracture patterns typical of 'tessera terrain' (a major component of Venusian highlands) can be seen on the ridge at the right. A 15-km impact crater at the right is surrounded by a dark splotch thought to have been formed by the transmission of shock energy to the surface by the atmosphere during the impact. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-45N350. Resolution of SAR image (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 540 x 540. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.80 -- 0.88. Vertical exaggeration: 200. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 140. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 275. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  14. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville,...

  15. The Robert E. Hopkins Center for Optical Design and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavislan, James M.; Brown, Thomas G.

    2008-08-01

    preparation for these students. While this extracurricular experience is truly world-class, an integrated design experience defined within our academic program is increasingly necessary for those going on to professional careers in engineering. This paper describes the philosophy behind a revision to our undergraduate curriculum that integrates a design experience and describes the engineering laboratory that has been established to make it a reality. The laboratory and design center has been named in honor of Robert E. Hopkins, former director and professor, co-founder of Tropel corporation, and a lifelong devotee to engineering innovation.

  16. 78 FR 16471 - National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure Exchange of Electronic Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure... Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) invited... 64314), inviting U.S. companies to enter into ``National Cybersecurity Excellence Partnerships''...

  17. 77 FR 26511 - Announcing a National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcing a National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence.... ACTION: Notice of initial public workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces a National Cybersecurity Center of... integrated cybersecurity tools and technologies. The NCCoE will bring together experts from...

  18. 77 FR 64314 - National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... approaches that support automated and trustworthy e- government and e-commerce. Each NCEP will be between... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE)...

  19. Studies on the Magnetic Center of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Khalatian, V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of the magnetic center in the Mu2e solenoid system is not trivial given the S-shaped nature of the transport solenoid. Moreover, due to the fringe field of the larger bore adjacent magnets-production solenoid and the detector solenoid-the magnetic center does not coincide with the geometric center of the system. The reference magnetic center can be obtained by tracking a low-momentum charged particle through the whole system. This paper will discuss this method and will evaluate the deviations from the nominal magnetic center given the tolerances in the manufacturing and the alignment of the coils. Methods for the correction of the magnetic center will also be presented.

  20. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  1. 78 FR 20924 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing an invitation to sponsors of investigational new drug (IND... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research eSubmitter Pilot Evaluation Program for Investigational New Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  2. Students´ Perspectives on eLearning Activities in Person-Centered, Blended Learning Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselberger, David; Motsching, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Blended or hybrid learning has become a frequent practice in higher education. In this article our primary research interest was to find out how students perceived eLearning activities in blended learning courses based on the person-centered paradigm. Through analyzing the content of a series of semi-structured interviews we found out that…

  3. 78 FR 2953 - National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure Exchange of Electronic Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... variety of client devices (desktops, laptops, and mobile devices) and the range of healthcare data... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure... Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Institute of Standards...

  4. Two-center interference effects in (e, 2e) ionization of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Nakajima, Isao; Satoh, Hironori; Watanabe, Noboru; Jones, Darryl; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in understanding quantum mechanical interference effects in molecular ionization. Since this interference appears as a consequence of coherent electron emission from the different molecular centers, it should depend strongly on the nature of the ionized molecular orbital. Such molecular orbital patterns can be investigated by means of binary (e, 2e) spectroscopy, which is a kinematically-complete electron-impact ionization experiment performed under the high-energy Bethe ridge conditions. In this study, two-center interference effects in the (e, 2e) cross sections of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer are demonstrated with a high-statistics experiment, in order to elucidate the relationship between molecular orbital patterns and the interference structure. It is shown that the two-center interference is highly sensitive to the phase, spatial pattern, symmetry of constituent atomic orbital, and chemical bonding nature of the molecular orbital. This work was partially supported by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (S) (No. 20225001) and for Young Scientists (B) (No. 21750005) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  5. Asymptotic properties of the three-Coulomb-center problem eZ{sub 1}ZZ

    SciTech Connect

    Lazur, V. Yu.; Khoma, M. V.; Janev, R. K.

    2006-03-15

    An analytic study is presented of the asymptotic properties of the three-Coulomb-center problem eZ{sub 1}ZZ. The electron energies and wave functions of this system, where e designates an electron and Z, Z{sub 1} are bare nuclei, are calculated asymptotically exactly for large distances L between the fragments of a quasimolecular system. The electron exchange interaction between eZZ and Z{sub 1} fragments is also calculated asymptotically exactly and used to estimate the electron-capture cross section in slow collisions of Z=1 and Z{sub 1}=2,3,4 systems.

  6. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    PubMed

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  7. Highlighting High Performance: Michael E. Capuano Early Childhood Center; Somerville, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-03-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Michael E. Capuano Early Childhood Center. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  8. Genome-related datasets within the E. coli Genetic Stock Center database.

    PubMed Central

    Berlyn, M B; Letovsky, S

    1992-01-01

    The contents of the E. coli Genetic Stock Center database and the availability in electronic form of the subset of information most relevant to sequence databases are described. The database uses the long-standing Stock Center records (developed and curated by Dr B.J.Bachmann) in describing genotypes of mutant derivatives of E.coli K-12 in terms of alleles, structural mutations, mating type, and plasmids as well as the derivation, names and originators of the strain, and references. The database includes descriptions of mutations, mutation properties, genes, gene properties, and gene products, with EC number identifiers for enzymes. Sequence information is not included, but entries refer to sequence database accession numbers for sequenced regions. A gene is described as a subtype of a more general category of chromosome interval called Site. Since sites are used to describe any chromosomal interval, mapping information is associated with sites. Alleles are described as mutations of those sites and they are not primary map objects, but inherit map position information from the corresponding site description. The database design is intended to preserve richness of detail where it is known and uncertainty of measurements or information as it occurs in order to represent the stock center records as accurately as possible. PMID:1475178

  9. (29)Si hyperfine structure of the E(')(alpha) center in amorphous silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Buscarino, G; Agnello, S; Gelardi, F M

    2006-09-29

    We report a study by electron paramagnetic resonance on the E'(alpha) point defect in amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO(2)). Our experiments were performed on gamma-ray irradiated oxygen-deficient materials and pointed out that the (29)Si hyperfine structure of the E'(alpha) consists of a pair of lines split by approximately 49 mT. On the basis of the experimental results, a microscopic model is proposed for the E'(alpha) center, consisting of a hole trapped in an oxygen vacancy with the unpaired electron sp(3) orbital pointing away from the vacancy in a back-projected configuration and interacting with an extra oxygen atom of the a-SiO(2) matrix.

  10. Building a regional medical center. Interview by Donald E.L. Johnson.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, A P

    1990-04-01

    Allen P. Fletcher is president of a 372-bed community hospital that is between Atlanta and Birmingham and loses patients to hospitals in those cities more frequently than he likes. Northeast Alabama Regional Medical Center, Anniston, Alabama, runs an average daily census of about 165 patients and many of its 100 active physicians are so busy that they have waiting lists. Fletcher has been president of Northeast for six years. He holds an MHA from Georgia State University. In an interview with Donald E.L. Johnson, editor and publisher of Health Care Strategic Management, Fletcher talks about the small window of opportunity he sees for secondary hospitals.

  11. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  12. Expanding Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple at small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization- improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accommodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  13. Alkalic Basalt in Ridge Axis of 53˚E Amagmatic Segment Center, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is key tracer of composition and process in the mantle. It is interesting to notice that some alkalic basalts occur in amagmatic spreading center of ultraslow spreading ridges, for examples, 9-16˚E of the Southwest Indian ridge (Standish et al., 2008) and Lena Trough of Arctic Ocean (Snow et al., 2011). The latter is interpreted as the result of the pre-existence of continental transform fault or the especially cold thermal structure of ancient continental lithosphere. 53˚E segment, east of the Gallieni transform fault, was discovered as an amagmatic segment (Zhou and Dick, 2013). On both sides of the ridge axis, peridotites with a little gabbro are exposed in an area more than 3200 km2. Basalts exist in the southern portion of 53˚E segment, indicating the transformation from magmatic to amagmatic spreading about 9.4 million years ago. In April of 2014, Leg 4 of the RV Dayang Yihao cruise 30, basaltic glasses was dredged at one location (3500 m water depth) in the ridge axis of 53˚E segment center. It is shown by electric probe analysis that the samples have extremely high sodium content (4.0-4.49 wt% Na­2O ), relative higher potassium content (0.27-0.32 wt% K2O) and silica (50.67-51.87 wt% SiO2), and lower MgO content (5.9-6.4 wt% MgO). Mg-number is 0.55-0.59. It is distinctly different from the N-MORB (2.42-2.68 wt% Na2O, 0.03-0.06 wt% K2O, 48.6-49.6 wt% Si2O, 8.8-9.0 wt% MgO, Mg-numbers 0.63) distributed in the 560-km-long supersegment, west of the Gallieni transform fault, where the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field was discovered at 49.6˚E in 2007. The reasons for the alkalic basalt in the ridge axis of 53˚E amagmatic segment center, either by low melting degree of garnet stability field, by melting from an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, or by sodium-metasomatism or even other mantle processes or their combination in the deep mantle, are under further studies.

  14. E-Learning education program for registered nurses: the experience of a teaching medical center.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Shu-Tai Hsiao; Chang, Wen-Yin; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chao, Hui-Lin; Tseng, Ching Ping

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses' experiences with an e-learning education program (ELEP) conducted at a 776-bed teaching medical center in Taipei. The study was completed in three stages: planning, implementation, and evaluation. Nurses who were registered were randomly assigned either to the ELEP or traditional in-classroom program (TICP). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Forty-two nurses participated (22 in the ELEP and 20 in the TICP). Scores for participants were all > 70 points (out of 100) for both programs. Of the five courses, only teaching and learning and communication showed significant statistical difference between the two groups (p = .001). Nearly all participants (97.6%) felt satisfied with their program (both ELEP and TICP). All nurses passed the nursing care skill tests. Findings should help guide efforts to popularize e-learning education in Taiwan and help create alternative learning methods for future continuing nursing education programs.

  15. The distinctive germinal center phase of IgE+ B lymphocytes limits their contribution to the classical memory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms involved in the maintenance of memory IgE responses are poorly understood, and the role played by germinal center (GC) IgE+ cells in memory responses is particularly unclear. IgE B cell differentiation is characterized by a transient GC phase, a bias towards the plasma cell (PC) fate,...

  16. Positron-electron autocorrelation function study of E-center in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Ching, H. M.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Ng, K. P.; Biasini, M.; Ferro, G.; Gong, M.

    2003-11-01

    Two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) spectra have been taken for 1019cm-3 phosphorus-doped Si in the as-grown state after having been subjected to 1.8 MeV electron fluences of 1×1018 and 2×1018 cm-2. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy confirms, in accordance with previous works, that positrons are saturation trapping into (VSi:P) pair defect (E-center) monovacancy sites in the electron irradiated samples. In the as-grown case, the positron-electron autocorrelation functions along the [111] and [1-10] directions, obtained through Fourier transformation of the 2D-ACAR data, reveal zero-crossings that deviate only slightly from the lattice points, in a manner consistent with positron-electron correlation effects. Conversely, in the spectra of the irradiated samples, the zero-crossing points are observed to move outward further by between 0.15 and 0.50 Å. This displacement is associated with positron annihilation with electrons in localized orbitals at the defect site. An attempt is made to extract just the component of the defect's positron-electron autocorrelation function that relates to the localized defect orbitals. In doing this features are found that correspond to the expected atomic positions at the vacancy defect site suggesting that this real-space function may provide a convenient means for obtaining a mapping of localized orbitals. The observed approximate separability of positron and electron wave-function autocorrelates leads to an estimate of 0.22 eV for the positron binding energy to the E-center.

  17. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Validation Data Management at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, M. C.; Paserba, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is supporting the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) validation activity. NSIDC has designed and developed a web portal to data and information collected during NASA's AMSR-E Validation Program: (http://nsidc.org/data/amsr_validation/.) The AMSR-E validation experiments address three disciplines: soil moisture, rainfall and cryospheric validation campaigns. This poster describes all these experiments (past, present and future). NSIDC provides documentation, e.g., user guides, as well as metadata documents (DIFS) submitted to the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), for all the AMSR-E validation experiments. NSIDC further supports the validation activities by collaborating with the AMSR-E Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) to provide scientists in the field (e.g., Arctic and Antarctic ship and flight campaigns) with quick, easy access to AMSR-E data for their validation experiments. NSIDC provides subsets of reformatted data in a manner most convenient to the validation scientists while they conduct their experiments. The AMSR-E is a mission instrument launched aboard NASA's Aqua Satellite on 4 May 2002. The Aqua mission provides a multi-disciplinary study of the Earth's atmospheric, oceanic, cryospheric, and land processes and their relationship to global change. With six instruments aboard, the Aqua Satellite will travel in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit. NSIDC will archive and distribute all AMSR-E products, including Levels 1A, 2, and 3 data. Users can order Level-1A AMSR-E data beginning 19 June 2003 and Level-2A data beginning 01 September 2003. Other products will be available in March 2004.

  18. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC-E2) Performance Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore; Wilson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG Project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). For this purpose, four pairs of ASCs capable of operating to 850 C and designated with the model number ASC-E2, were delivered by Sunpower of Athens, Ohio, to GRC in 2010. The ASC-E2s underwent a series of tests that included workmanship vibration testing, performance mapping, and extended operation. Workmanship vibration testing was performed following fabrication of each convertor to verify proper hardware build. Performance mapping consisted of operating each convertor at various conditions representing the range expected during a mission. Included were conditions representing beginning-of-mission (BOM), end-of-mission (EOM), and fueling. This same series of tests was performed by Sunpower prior to ASC-E2 delivery. The data generated during the GRC test were compared to performance before delivery. Extended operation consisted of a 500-hr period of operation with conditions maintained at the BOM point. This was performed to demonstrate steady convertor performance following performance mapping. Following this initial 500-hr period, the ASC-E2s will continue extended operation, controller development and special durability testing, during which the goal is to accumulate tens of thousands of hours of operation. Data collected during extended operation will support reliability analysis. Performance data from these tests is summarized in this paper.

  19. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC-E2) Performance Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore; Wilson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG Project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). For this purpose, four pairs of ASCs capable of operating to 850 C and designated with the model number ASC-E2, were delivered by Sunpower of Athens, OH, to GRC in 2010. The ASC-E2s underwent a series of tests that included workmanship vibration testing, performance mapping, and extended operation. Workmanship vibration testing was performed following fabrication of each convertor to verify proper hardware build. Performance mapping consisted of operating each convertor at various conditions representing the range expected during a mission. Included were conditions representing beginning-of-mission (BOM), end-of-mission (EOM), and fueling. This same series of tests was performed by Sunpower prior to ASC-E2 delivery. The data generated during the GRC test were compared to performance before delivery. Extended operation consisted of a 500-hour period of operation with conditions maintained at the BOM point. This was performed to demonstrate steady convertor performance following performance mapping. Following this initial 500-hour period, the ASC-E2s will continue extended operation, controller development and special durability testing, during which the goal is to accumulate tens of thousands of hours of operation. Data collected during extended operation will support reliability analysis. Performance data from these tests is summarized in this paper.

  20. Measuring the Usability of Augmented Reality e-Learning Systems: A User-Centered Evaluation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribeanu, Costin; Balog, Alexandru; Iordache, Dragoş Daniel

    The development of Augmented Reality (AR) systems is creating new challenges and opportunities for the designers of e-learning systems. The mix of real and virtual requires appropriate interaction techniques that have to be evaluated with users in order to avoid usability problems. Formative usability aims at finding usability problems as early as possible in the development life cycle and is suitable to support the development of such novel interactive systems. This work presents an approach to the user-centered usability evaluation of an e-learning scenario for Biology developed on an Augmented Reality educational platform. The evaluation has been carried on during and after a summer school held within the ARiSE research project. The basic idea was to perform usability evaluation twice. In this respect, we conducted user testing with a small number of students during the summer school in order to get a fast feedback from users having good knowledge in Biology. Then, we repeated the user testing in different conditions and with a relatively larger number of representative users. In this paper we describe both experiments and compare the usability evaluation results.

  1. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER MICROQUASAR 1E 1740.7-2942

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.

    2010-06-20

    We present two Suzaku observations of the Galactic center microquasar 1E 1740.7-2942 separated by approximately 700 days. The source was observed on both occasions after a transition to the spectrally hard state. Significant emission from 1E 1740.7-2942 is detected out to an energy of 300 keV, with no spectral break or turnover evident in the data. We tentatively measure a lower limit to the cutoff energy of {approx}380 keV. The spectra are found to be consistent with a Comptonized corona on both occasions, where the high energy emission is consistent with a hard power-law ({Gamma} {approx} 1.8) with a significant contribution from an accretion disk with a temperature of {approx}0.4 keV at soft X-ray energies. The measured value for the inner radius of the accretion disk is found to be inconsistent with the picture whereby the disk is truncated at large radii in the low-hard state and instead favors a radius close to the ISCO (R{sub in} {approx} 10 - 20 R{sub g}).

  2. Secure Cloud-Based Solutions for Different eHealth Services in Spanish Rural Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The combination of eHealth applications and/or services with cloud technology provides health care staff—with sufficient mobility and accessibility for them—to be able to transparently check any data they may need without having to worry about its physical location. Objective The main aim of this paper is to put forward secure cloud-based solutions for a range of eHealth services such as electronic health records (EHRs), telecardiology, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis. Methods The scenario chosen for introducing the services is a set of four rural health centers located within the same Spanish region. iCanCloud software was used to perform simulations in the proposed scenario. We chose online traffic and the cost per unit in terms of time as the parameters for choosing the secure solution on the most optimum cloud for each service. Results We suggest that load balancers always be fitted for all solutions in communication together with several Internet service providers and that smartcards be used to maintain identity to an appropriate extent. The solutions offered via private cloud for EHRs, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis services require a volume of online traffic calculated at being able to reach 2 Gbps per consultation. This may entail an average cost of €500/month. Conclusions The security solutions put forward for each eHealth service constitute an attempt to centralize all information on the cloud, thus offering greater accessibility to medical information in the case of EHRs alongside more reliable diagnoses and treatment for telecardiology, telediagnosis, and teleconsultation services. Therefore, better health care for the rural patient can be obtained at a reasonable cost. PMID:26215155

  3. Learning Centers: A T.O.A.S.T.E. to Good Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Million, Steven K.

    This paper develops a rationale for individualization of instruction and after a brief discussion of two alternative approaches--diagnostic-prescriptive teaching and modularized instruction--promotes learning centers as a practical approach to such individualization. Learning centers are defined as compact, highly-structured sets of didactic…

  4. Effects of Fading Support on Hypertext Navigation and Performance in Student-Centered E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Whether fading support for problems affects accuracy of hypertext navigation and problem performance is investigated in this study. In a student-centered e-learning environment conceptual support is added to help domain novices get an overview of the problem domain, while strategic support is provided to help domain novices get insight into the…

  5. Solar-B E/PO Program at Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burress, B. S.

    2005-05-01

    Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, California, conducts the Education/Public Outreach program for the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab Solar-B Focal Plane Package project. Since opening its doors in August 2000, Chabot has carried out this program in activities and educational products in the public outreach, informal education, and formal education spheres. We propose a poster presentation that illustrates the spectrum of our Solar-B E/PO program. Solar-B, scheduled to launch in September 2006, is another step in an increasingly sophisticated investigation and understanding of our Sun, its behavior, and its effects on the Earth and our technological civilization. A mission of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Solar-B is an international collaboration between Japan, the US/NASA, and the UK/PPARC. Solar-B's main optical telescope, extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer, and x-ray telescope will collect data on the Sun's magnetic dynamics from the photosphere through the corona at higher spatial and time resolution than on current and previous solar satellite missions, furthering our understanding of the Sun's behavior and, ultimately, its effects on the Earth. Chabot's E/PO program for the Lockheed-Martin Solar-B Focal Plane Package is multi-faceted, including elements focused on technology/engineering, solar physics, and Sun-Earth Connection themes. In the Public Outreach arena, we conduct events surrounding NASA Sun-Earth Day themes and programs other live and/or interactive events, facilitate live solar viewing, and present a series of exhibits focused on the Solar-B and other space-based missions, the dynamic Sun, and light and optics. In the Informal Education sector we run a solar day camp for kids and produce educational products, including a poster on the Solar-B mission and CDROM multimedia packages. In Formal Education, we develop classroom curriculum guides and conduct workshops training teachers in their implementation

  6. Experimental demonstration of elastic optical networks based on enhanced software defined networking (eSDN) for data center application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Lin, Yi; Li, Gang; Han, Jianrui; Lee, Young; Ma, Teng

    2013-11-04

    Due to the high burstiness and high-bandwidth characteristics of the applications, data center interconnection by elastic optical networks have attracted much attention of network operators and service providers. Many data center applications require lower delay and higher availability with the end-to-end guaranteed quality of service. In this paper, we propose and implement a novel elastic optical network based on enhanced software defined networking (eSDN) architecture for data center application, by introducing a transport-aware cross stratum optimization (TA-CSO) strategy. eSDN can enable cross stratum optimization of application and elastic optical network stratum resources and provide the elastic physical layer parameter adjustment, e.g., modulation format and bandwidth. We have designed and verified experimentally software defined path provisioning on our testbed with four real OpenFlow-enabled elastic optical nodes for data center application. The overall feasibility and efficiency of the proposed architecture is also experimentally demonstrated and compared with individual CSO and physical layer adjustment strategies in terms of path setup/release/adjustment latency, blocking probability and resource occupation rate.

  7. Study of the process e+e- → KS0 KL0 in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, E. A.; Solodov, E. P.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. S.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Korobov, A. A.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Koop, I. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Otboev, A. V.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The e+e- →KS0 KLl0l cross section has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1004-1060 MeV at 25 energy points using 6.1 ×105 events with KS0 →π+π- decay. The analysis is based on 5.9 pb-1 of an integrated luminosity collected with the CMD-3 detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. To obtain ϕ (1020) meson parameters the measured cross section is approximated according to the Vector Meson Dominance model as a sum of the ρ , ω , ϕ-like amplitudes and their excitations. This is the most precise measurement of the e+e- →KS0 KL0 cross section with a 1.8% systematic uncertainty.

  8. Usability of patient-centered health IT: mixed-methods usability study of ePill.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Kraepelin, Manuel; Dehling, Tobias; Sunyaev, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate use of patient-centered health IT applications in everyday life, a high degree of usability is required. Based on the example of a patient-centered web application, we propose a usability study design enabling developers and researchers to assess usability of patient-centered health IT applications and derive implications for their improvement. Our study design integrates tasks that subjects have to process, an associated questionnaire based on Perceived Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Attitude Toward Using, and Behavioral Intention to Use, a System Usability Scale questionnaire, and focus groups. Application of the usability study design demonstrates its feasibility and provides insights for assessment of usability in related projects in research and practice.

  9. Exploring the creation of learner-centered e-training environments among retail workers: a model development perspective.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sookeun; Mills, Juline E

    2011-01-01

    Current business leaders continue to adopt e-learning technology despite concerns regarding its value. Positing that the effectiveness of e-training depends on how its environment is managed, we argue that a learner-centric approach is necessary in order to achieve workplace training goals. We subsequently develop a theoretical model that is aimed at identifying the key components of learner-centered e-training environments, which serve the function of providing a benchmarked approach for evaluating e-training success. The model was empirically tested using data from an Internet survey of retail industry employees and partial least squares techniques were used for analysis. Based on the findings, this study clarifies what is needed for successful e-training in terms of instructional design, system design, and organizational support.

  10. E-Reserves Permissions and the Copyright Clearance Center: Process, Efficiency, and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holobar, J. Christopher; Marshall, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the process of requesting copyright permissions through the Copyright Clearance Center's (CCC) pay-per-use service for electronic course reserves at the Penn State University Libraries in 2008. The authors investigate the efficiency of this process as a function of the percentage of permission requests successfully mediated by…

  11. Basic Skills Center, E.C.I.A. Chapter 2. Final Evaluation Report, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Div. of Quality Assurance.

    Basic Skills Centers in the District of Columbia's public schools are intended to provide supplementary, individualized reading and math instruction for 7th and 8th graders who are two or more years below grade level in those areas. This Chapter 2 program superseded an earlier Title II program and was implemented in 1983. According to this report,…

  12. 75 FR 27493 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Center, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... with the FAA's National Aerospace Charting Office. Controlled airspace is needed for the safety and... 6.5-mile radius of Center Municipal Airport and within 2.5 miles each side of the 341 bearing from....3 miles each side of the 171 bearing from the airport extending from the 6.5-mile radius to...

  13. Triplet states of oxygen vacancy defects in α-quartz: Center \\bf{\\text{E}^{\\prime\\prime}_{9}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, R. I.; Pan, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The paramagnetic E^{\\prime\\prime}_{9} center in triplet state occurring in electron-irradiated, synthetic α-quartz has been investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The primary spin Hamiltonian parameter matrices g, D and A (hyperfine interactions for five 29Si nuclei) have now been determined. The principal values and principal directions of D and A matrices allow us to suggest the structural model for this stable triplet defect. The E^{\\prime\\prime}_{9} center involves the two unpaired electrons located in the orbitals of two silicon atoms next to one oxygen vacancy each. Firm correlations between the spin Hamiltonian matrix principal axes and crystallographic directions have been attained.

  14. Neutrinos and γ -rays from the Galactic Center Region after H.E.S.S. multi-TeV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Silvia; Palladino, Andrea; Vissani, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The hypothesis of a PeVatron in the Galactic Center, emerged with the recent γ -ray measurements of H.E.S.S. [1], motivates the search for neutrinos from this source. The effect of γ -ray absorption is studied: at the energies currently probed, the known background radiation fields lead to small effects, whereas it is not possible to exclude large effects due to new IR radiation fields near the very center. Precise upper limits on neutrino fluxes are derived and the underlying hypotheses are discussed. The expected number of events for ANTARES, IceCube and KM3NeT, based on the H.E.S.S. measurements, are calculated. It is shown that km^3-class telescopes in the Northern hemisphere have the potential of observing high-energy neutrinos from this important astronomical object and can check the existence of a hadronic PeV galactic accelerator.

  15. Molecular functions of the transcription factors E2A and E2-2 in controlling germinal center B cell and plasma cell development

    PubMed Central

    Wöhner, Miriam; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bilic, Ivan; Jaritz, Markus; Poliakova, Daniela Kostanova; Fischer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    E2A is an essential regulator of early B cell development. Here, we have demonstrated that E2A together with E2-2 controlled germinal center (GC) B cell and plasma cell development. As shown by the identification of regulated E2A,E2-2 target genes in activated B cells, these E-proteins directly activated genes with important functions in GC B cells and plasma cells by inducing and maintaining DNase I hypersensitive sites. Through binding to multiple enhancers in the Igh 3′ regulatory region and Aicda locus, E-proteins regulated class switch recombination by inducing both Igh germline transcription and AID expression. By regulating 3′ Igk and Igh enhancers and a distal element at the Prdm1 (Blimp1) locus, E-proteins contributed to Igk, Igh, and Prdm1 activation in plasmablasts. Together, these data identified E2A and E2-2 as central regulators of B cell immunity. PMID:27261530

  16. J/ψ production via initial state radiation in e+e-→μ+μ-γ at an e+e- center-of-mass energy near 10.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Shen, B. C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biasini, M.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Pioppi, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the process e+e-→μ+μ-γ at a center-of-mass energy near the Υ(4S) resonance for a μ+μ- invariant mass range near the J/ψ mass and measured the cross section σ(e+e-→J/ψ γ→μ+μ-γ). The data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 88.4 fb-1, was collected using the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II collider. From the measured cross section we extract the product Γ(J/ψ→e+e-)B(J/ψ→μ+μ-)=0.330±0.008±0.007 keV. Using the world averages for B(J/ψ→μ+μ-) and B(J/ψ→e+e-), we derive the J/ψ electronic and total widths: Γ(J/ψ→e+e-)=5.61±0.20 keV and Γ=94.7±4.4 keV.

  17. Scaffolding the design of accessible eLearning content: a user-centered approach and cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Catarci, Tiziana; De Giovanni, Loredana; Gabrielli, Silvia; Kimani, Stephen; Mirabella, Valeria

    2008-08-01

    There exist various guidelines for facilitating the design, preparation, and deployment of accessible eLearning applications and contents. However, such guidelines prevalently address accessibility in a rather technical sense, without giving sufficient consideration to the cognitive aspects and issues related to the use of eLearning materials by learners with disabilities. In this paper we describe how a user-centered design process was applied to develop a method and set of guidelines for didactical experts to scaffold their creation of accessible eLearning content, based on a more sound approach to accessibility. The paper also discusses possible design solutions for tools supporting eLearning content authors in the adoption and application of the proposed approach.

  18. Precision measurement of the total cross section for e+e--->hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Gottschalk, B.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Michalowski, S. J.; Muller, F.; Moss, L. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Rich, K.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, Hoyun; Loh, E. C.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-04-01

    We report a high-precision measurement of the ratio R of the total cross section for e+e--->hadrons to that for e+e--->μ+μ-, at a center-of-mass energy of 29.0 GeV using the MAC detector. The result is R=3.96+/-0.09. This value of R is used to determine a value of the strong coupling constant αs of 0.23+/-0.06, nearly independent of fragmentation models. Two different analysis methods having quite different event-selection criteria have been used and the results are in agreement. Particular attention has been given to the study of systematic errors. New higher-order QED calculations are used for the luminosity determination and the acceptance for hadrons.

  19. Towards a Citizen-Centered E-Government: Exploring Citizens' Satisfaction with E-Government in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    E-government research has been practical and utilitarian, lacking theoretical concerns. Based on the literature of customer satisfaction with private-sector services, citizen/user satisfaction with public services, and information systems management, this study systematically investigates the following factors and their effects on citizen…

  20. Study of e+e-→ω χc J at Center of Mass Energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, Cheng; Li, C. H.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Based on data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider at nine center of mass energies from 4.21 to 4.42 GeV, we search for the production of e+e-→ω χc J (J =0 , 1, 2). The process e+e-→ω χc 0 is observed for the first time, and the Born cross sections at √{s }=4.23 and 4.26 GeV are measured to be (55.4 ±6.0 ±5.9 ) and (23.7 ±5.3 ±3.5 ) pb , respectively, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. The ω χc 0 signals at the other seven energies and the e+e-→ω χc 1 and ω χc 2 signals are not significant, and the upper limits on the cross sections are determined. By examining the ω χc 0 cross section as a function of center of mass energy, we find that it is inconsistent with the line shape of the Y (4260 ) observed in e+e-→π+π-J /ψ . Assuming the ω χc 0 signals come from a single resonance, we extract the mass and width of the resonance to be (4230 ±8 ±6 ) MeV /c2 and (38 ±12 ±2 ) MeV , respectively, and the statistical significance is more than 9 σ .

  1. eIF3j is located in the decoding center of the human 40S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Berry, Katherine E; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-06-22

    Protein synthesis in all cells begins with the ordered binding of the small ribosomal subunit to messenger RNA (mRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA). In eukaryotes, translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is thought to play an essential role in this process by influencing mRNA and tRNA binding through indirect interactions on the backside of the 40S subunit. Here we show by directed hydroxyl radical probing that the human eIF3 subunit eIF3j binds to the aminoacyl (A) site and mRNA entry channel of the 40S subunit, placing eIF3j directly in the ribosomal decoding center. eIF3j also interacts with eIF1A and reduces 40S subunit affinity for mRNA. A high affinity for mRNA is restored upon recruitment of initiator tRNA, even though eIF3j remains in the mRNA-binding cleft in the presence of tRNA. These results suggest that eIF3j functions in part by regulating access of the mRNA-binding cleft in response to initiation factor binding.

  2. Dynamic changes in Id3 and E-protein activity orchestrate germinal center and plasma cell development

    PubMed Central

    Gloury, Renee; Zotos, Dimitra; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Masson, Frederick; Liao, Yang; Hasbold, Jhaguaral; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Hodgkin, Phil D.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Shi, Wei; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of high-affinity antibodies requires germinal center (GC) development and differentiation of long-lived plasma cells in a multilayered process that is tightly controlled by the activity of multiple transcription factors. Here, we reveal a new layer of complexity by demonstrating that dynamic changes in Id3 and E-protein activity govern both GC and plasma cell differentiation. We show that down-regulation of Id3 in B cells is essential for releasing E2A and E2-2, which in a redundant manner are required for antigen-induced B cell differentiation. We demonstrate that this pathway controls the expression of multiple key factors, including Blimp1, Xbp1, and CXCR4, and is therefore critical for establishing the transcriptional network that controls GC B cell and plasma cell differentiation. PMID:27217539

  3. Evidence for e+e - to gammaetac(1S) at center-of-mass energies between 4.01 and 4.60 GeV at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Manuel

    This dissertation shows the first evidence of the process e +e- → gammaeta c(1S) using data collected by the BESIII experiment operating at BEPCII. This process can be used as a probe to study the nature of recently discovered charmonium-like Y states between 4.0 and 4.6 GeV, including the Y(4260) and Y(4360). Data collected at six center-of-mass energies are analyzed, namely: 4.01, 4.23, 4.26, 4.36, 4.42, and 4.60 GeV, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1. We measure the Born cross section, sigma E(e+e - → gammaetac(1 S)), at each energy using a combination of twelve eta c(1S) decay channels. Because the significance of the signal is marginal at each energy (≤ 3.0sigma), we also combine all six energies under various assumptions for the energy-dependence of the cross section. If a Y(4260) is assumed, we measure sigma4 .26(e+e- → gammaetac(1S)) = 2.11 +/- 0.49 (stat.) +/- 0.33 (syst.) pb with a significance of 4.2sigma. With our current statistics we are unable to distinguish the Y(4260) process from others.

  4. SU-E-P-02: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (RPC) Credentialing

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, C; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: IROC Houston issues credentials for NCI sponsored study groups. Requirements for credentialing might include any combination of questionnaires, knowledge assessment forms, benchmarks, or phantom irradiations. Credentialing requirements for specific protocols can be found on IROC Houston's website (irochouston.mdanderson.org). The website also houses the credentialing status inquiry (CSI) form. Once an institution has reviewed the protocol's credentialing requirements, a CSI form should be completed and submitted to IROC Houston. This form is used both to request whether requirements have been met as well as to notify IROC Houston that the institution requests credentialing for a specific protocol. IROC Houston will contact the institution to discuss any delinquent requirements. Once the institution has met all requirements IROC Houston issues a credentialing letter to the institution and will inform study groups and other IROC offices of the credentials. Institutions can all phone the IROC Houston office to initiate credentialing or ask any credentialing related questions. Results: Since 2010 IROC has received 1313 credentialing status inquiry forms. We received 317 in 2010, 266 in 2011, 324 in 2012, and 406 in 2013. On average we receive 35 phone calls per week with multiple types of credentialing questions. Decisions regarding credentialing status are based on the protocol specifications and previous completed credentialing by the institution. In some cases, such as for general IMRT credentialing, up to 5 sites may be credentialed based on the credentialing of one main center. Each of these situations is handled individually. Conclusion: IROC Houston will issue radiation therapy credentials for the NCI trials in the National Clinical Trials Network. Credentialing requirements and the CSI form

  5. Two-electron/24-center (2e/24c) bonding in novel diradical π-dimers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Wei; Zhong, Rong-Lin; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-10-26

    A series of diradical π-dimers 2 with interesting pancake-shaped 2e/24c π-π bonding character were designed and investigated based on the famous phenalenyl (PLY) π-dimer with 2e/12c π-π bonding character. The position of stronger interaction between two layers of radicals was found by the Wiberg bond index (WBI) maximum component. Further, the different contributions of the interaction energy were analyzed quantitatively by energy decomposition analysis (EDA). Among these new diradical π-dimers, 2180 has the smallest layer distance and the largest interaction between two layers of radicals. The unusual PLY analogues can provide new insights into the unique features of two-electron/multicenter (2e/mc) π-π bonding.

  6. User-Centered Design Practices to Redesign a Nursing e-Chart in Line with the Nursing Process.

    PubMed

    Schachner, María B; Recondo, Francisco J; González, Zulma A; Sommer, Janine A; Stanziola, Enrique; Gassino, Fernando D; Simón, Mariana; López, Gastón E; Benítez, Sonia E

    2016-01-01

    Regarding the user-centered design (UCD) practices carried out at Hospital Italiano of Buenos Aires, nursing e-chart user interface was redesigned in order to improve records' quality of nursing process based on an adapted Virginia Henderson theoretical model and patient safety standards to fulfil Joint Commission accreditation requirements. UCD practices were applied as standardized and recommended for electronic medical records usability evaluation. Implementation of these practices yielded a series of prototypes in 5 iterative cycles of incremental improvements to achieve goals of usability which were used and perceived as satisfactory by general care nurses. Nurses' involvement allowed balance between their needs and institution requirements.

  7. Measuring User Experience of the Student-Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoso, Harry B.; Schrepp, Martin; Isal, R. Yugo Kartono; Utomo, Andika Yudha; Priyogi, Bilih

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ) and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires) available to measure user experience of any products, especially…

  8. Changes in Enterococcal and E coli populations and related antibiotic resistance from medical center to receiving environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, F.; Berthe, T.; Oberle, K.; Denamur, E.; Clermont, O.; Leclercq, R.; Cattoir, V.; Budzinski, H.

    2013-12-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant faecal bacteria and their corresponding genes in water environment, as a result of the overuse of antibiotics, have become an ecological and a public problem. The aim of this multidisciplinary research program (FLASH) -associating chemists, hydrologists, clinical and environmental microbiologists- was to determine to what extent the hospital effluent have an ecological impact on the downstream aquatic environment. For this purpose, fate of Escherichia coli (distribution of phylogenetic groups, antibiotic resistance, integrons- 342 strains) and Enterococci (diversity, antibiotic resistance, genes ermB, mefA, clonal complex 17- 235 strains ) was analyzed in water and sediments along a medical center - WWTP - river - estuary continuum, during a high epidemiologic period in the North west of France. A multi-residue chemical methodology was developed in order to detect low levels of 34 antibiotics in water. To link occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in water and antibiotic prescription, we use the data collection from the hospital and the antibiotics sales information. In the medical center, the main prescribed antibiotic (amoxicillin) was weakly found in effluents. Along the continuum, contamination of water by antibiotics decreased from 160μg.L-1 (cefotaxim) in hospital effluents to 1ng.L-1 (ofloxacin) in the river. These concentrations were too low to exert a selective pressure (mg.L-1) on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In same samples, occurrences of antibiotic-resistant E. coli and those harboring a class 1 integrons decreased significantly (p-value < 0.001) along the continuum and a lower survival of most of the E. coli isolates, multiresistant to antibiotic, was observed in water microcosm experiment (< 2days). Once in the estuary, E. coli and the corresponding antibiotic-resistance genes are submitted to the particle dynamics and are deposited on mudflats. Among Enterococcus populations, E. faecium was mainly isolated

  9. Space and Missile Systems Center Tailoring: Tailoring Instructions for MIL-STD-882E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-30

    December 2008. d. AFI 63-101, Acquisition and Sustainment Life Cycle Management. e. AFI 63- 1201 , Assurance of Operational Safety, Suitability...Common Risk Criteria For National Test Ranges. p. SMCI 63- 1205 , The SMC System Safety Program. q. SMCI 63-1207 (Draft), Programmatic...Instructions (AFI), AFI 63-101, Acquisition And Sustainment Life Cycle Management; AFI 63- 1201 , Life Cycle Systems Engineering; and AFI 91-202

  10. The E-3 Test Facility at Stennis Space Center: Research and Development Testing for Cryogenic and Storable Propellant Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pazos, John T.; Chandler, Craig A.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader a broad overview of the current upgraded capabilities of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center E-3 Test Facility to perform testing for rocket engine combustion systems and components using liquid and gaseous oxygen, gaseous and liquid methane, gaseous hydrogen, hydrocarbon based fuels, hydrogen peroxide, high pressure water and various inert fluids. Details of propellant system capabilities will be highlighted as well as their application to recent test programs and accomplishments. Data acquisition and control, test monitoring, systems engineering and test processes will be discussed as part of the total capability of E-3 to provide affordable alternatives for subscale to full scale testing for many different requirements in the propulsion community.

  11. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

  12. Observation of e+e-→η'J /ψ at center-of-mass energies between 4.189 and 4.600 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The process e+e-→η'J /ψ is observed for the first time with a statistical significance of 8.6 σ at center-of-mass energy √{s }=4.226 GeV and 7.3 σ at √{s }=4.258 GeV using data samples collected with the BESIII detector. The Born cross sections are measured to be (3.7 ±0.7 ±0.3 ) and (3.9 ±0.8 ±0.3 ) pb at √{s }=4.226 and 4.258 GeV, respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. Upper limits at the 90% confidence level of the Born cross sections are also reported at other 12 energy points.

  13. Measurements of the reaction e/+/e/-/ yielding gamma-gamma at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilger, E.; Beron, B. L.; Carrington, R. L.; Ford, R. L.; Hill, W. T.; Hofstadter, R.; Hughes, E. B.; Liberman, A. D.; Martin, T. W.; Oneill, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    The cross section for the pair-annihilation reaction e(+)e(-) yields gamma-gamma were measured at center-of-mass energies in the range 6.2-7.4 GeV and at production angles close to 90 deg. The experimental apparatus consisted of two identical spectrometers which were set to view the luminous region at SPEAR-II from opposite directions at an azimuthal angle of 45 deg. In each spectrometer there was a NaI(TI) crystal 20 radiation lengths thick and 30 in. in diameter to measure the gamma-ray energies. Annihilation events were detected by an electronic trigger which required only the observation in coincidence of more than 0.2 GeV in each NaI(TI) crystal within + or - 15 nsec of the crossing beams. The observed rates of pair-annihilation events were found to be in agreement with those expected from quantum electrodynamics (QED) at all the center-of-mass energies used.

  14. The musical centers of the brain: Vladimir E. Larionov (1857-1929) and the functional neuroanatomy of auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; Verina, Tatyana

    2016-11-01

    In 1899 a landmark paper entitled "On the musical centers of the brain" was published in Pflügers Archiv, based on work carried out in the Anatomo-Physiological Laboratory of the Neuropsychiatric Clinic of Vladimir M. Bekhterev (1857-1927) in St. Petersburg, Imperial Russia. The author of that paper was Vladimir E. Larionov (1857-1929), a military doctor and devoted brain scientist, who pursued the problem of the localization of function in the canine and human auditory cortex. His data detailed the existence of tonotopy in the temporal lobe and further demonstrated centrifugal auditory pathways emanating from the auditory cortex and directed to the opposite hemisphere and lower brain centers. Larionov's discoveries have been largely considered as findings of the Bekhterev school. Perhaps this is why there are limited resources on Larionov, especially keeping in mind his military medical career and the fact that after 1917 he just seems to have practiced otorhinolaryngology in Odessa. Larionov died two years after Bekhterev's mysterious death of 1927. The present study highlights the pioneering contributions of Larionov to auditory neuroscience, trusting that the life and work of Vladimir Efimovich will finally, and deservedly, emerge from the shadow of his celebrated master, Vladimir Mikhailovich.

  15. FAS Inactivation Releases Unconventional Germinal Center B Cells that Escape Antigen Control and Drive IgE and Autoantibody Production.

    PubMed

    Butt, Danyal; Chan, Tyani D; Bourne, Katherine; Hermes, Jana R; Nguyen, Akira; Statham, Aaron; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Strasser, Andreas; Price, Susan; Schofield, Peter; Christ, Daniel; Basten, Antony; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Phan, Tri Giang; Rao, V Koneti; Brink, Robert

    2015-05-19

    The mechanistic links between genetic variation and autoantibody production in autoimmune disease remain obscure. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by inactivating mutations in FAS or FASL, with autoantibodies thought to arise through failure of FAS-mediated removal of self-reactive germinal center (GC) B cells. Here we show that FAS is in fact not required for this process. Instead, FAS inactivation led to accumulation of a population of unconventional GC B cells that underwent somatic hypermutation, survived despite losing antigen reactivity, and differentiated into a large population of plasma cells that included autoantibody-secreting clones. IgE(+) plasma cell numbers, in particular, increased after FAS inactivation and a major cohort of ALPS-affected patients were found to have hyper-IgE. We propose that these previously unidentified cells, designated "rogue GC B cells," are a major driver of autoantibody production and provide a mechanistic explanation for the linked production of IgE and autoantibodies in autoimmune disease.

  16. A Summary of NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Work in the E.O. Office and in the Educator Resources Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, H. Wendell, Sr.

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Equal Opportunity supports a number of summer programs which are designed to: 1.) Increase the number of elementary and secondary students and teachers who are involved in NASA-related education opportunities; and 2.) Support higher education research capability and opportunities that attract and prepare increasing numbers of students and faculty for NASA-related careers. A part of my work in the E.O. office involved the evaluation of several of the programs in order to determine their level of success and to make recommendations for the improvement of those programs where necessary. As a part of the involvement with one of the programs, the PSTI, I had the great opportunity to interact with the students in a number of their sessions which involved problem-based learning in science, mathematics and technology. A summary of the evaluation of those programs is included in this report. The second part of my work involved assisting the coordinator of the Educator Resource Center at the Space and Rocket Center. I participated in space science workshops for in-service and pre-service teachers. There educational resources were made available to the participants including many hands-on activities that hey could take back to their classes. I participated in the three hour workshops that were offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each week, although there were workshops on other days. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, I worked in the E.O. office. As a result of my work in the ERC, I developed a Directed Reading PowerPoint Lesson Plan Guide involving remote sensing entitled, Echo the Bat. This was based on a NASA published children's book entitled Echo The Bat, written by Ginger Butcher. I have included a description of the lesson in this report. A summary of the evaluations of several of the summer programs supported by the Equal Opportunity office are included in this report.

  17. Bose-Einstein correlations of pions in e/sup +/e/sup minus/ annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.

    1989-01-13

    Measurements of two- and three-particle correlations between like-sign pions produced in e/sup +/e/sup minus/ annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy are presented. The analysis is based on data taken during the period 1982--1986 using the TPC/2..gamma.. detector at PEP. Two-particle correlations are studied as a function of Q, the momentum difference as measured in the rest frame of the pion pair, and as a function of q/sub 0/, the energy difference as measured in the lab frame. The Bose-Einstein enhancement is observed when Q is small even when the energy difference, q/sub 0/, is substantial. This observation provides evidence that the Bose-Einstein correlations are best described by a model that correctly accounts for the relativistic motion of the particle sources. Three-pion correlations are measured both by using a standard three-pion correlation function, and also by using a correlation function for which the correlations between the pairs of pions within the triplet have been subtracted. The observation of three-pion correlations after pair correlations have been subtracted supports the interpretation that the observed correlations are due to Bose-Einstein interference. 56 refs.

  18. Pseudo-Jahn-Teller and relaxation-rate analyses of a model for the hydride ion at the E' 4 center in alpha quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, M.; Manov, A.

    1988-02-01

    Calculated cluster data on the energy vs hydride-ion displacement for the E' 4 center, as reported by Isoya, Weil, and Halliburton, are re-analyzed in terms of the Pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. Realistic values are obtained of the vibronic-mixing parameters giving credibility to our interpretation. Relaxation rates are computed of hydrogen transfer between two opposite off-center sites.

  19. Spin-Relaxation Dynamics of E' Centers at High Density in SiO2 Thin Films for Single-Spin Tunneling Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambal, K.; Payne, A.; Waters, D. P.; Williams, C. C.; Boehme, C.

    2015-08-01

    The suitability of the spin dynamics of paramagnetic silicon dangling bonds (E' centers) in high-E'-density amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) as probe spins for single-spin tunneling force microscopy (SSTFM) is studied. SSTFM is a spin-selection-rule-based scanning-probe single-spin readout concept. Following the synthesis of SiO2 thin films on (111)-oriented crystalline-silicon substrates with room-temperature stable densities of [E'] >5 ×1018 cm-3 throughout the 60-nm thin film, pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is conducted on the E' centers at temperatures between T =5 K and T =70 K . The measurements reveal that the spin coherence (the transverse spin-relaxation time T2) of these centers is significantly shortened compared to low-E'-density SiO2 films and within error margins not dependent on temperature. In contrast, the spin-flip times (the longitudinal relaxation times T1) are dependent on the temperature but with much weaker dependence than low-density SiO2 , with the greatest deviations from low-density SiO2 seen for T =5 K . These results, discussed in the context of the spin-relaxation dynamics of dangling-bond states of other silicon-based disordered solids, indicate the suitability of E' centers in high-density SiO2 as probe spins for SSTFM.

  20. The Teacher Center Program. Final Evaluation Report, E.C.I.A. Chapter 2, 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    The Teacher Center Program (Washington, D.C.) provides an environment where teachers may come to work on materials or projects for their classrooms, take courses for recertification credit, college credit, or enrichment, and take graduate level courses. Chapter one of this evaluation report on the Teacher Center Program describes the background of…

  1. Patient-Centered Communication: Exploring the Dentist's Role in the Era of e-Patients and Health 2.0.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Brittany; Yang, Helen; Getman, Rebekah; Barrow, Jane; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    In today's digital era, people are increasingly relying on the Internet-including social media-to access health information and inform their health decisions. This article describes an exploratory initiative to better understand and define the role of dentists in patient education in the context of e-patients and Health 2.0. This initiative consisted of four phases. In Phase I, an interdisciplinary expert advisory committee was assembled for a roundtable discussion about patients' health information-seeking behaviors online. In Phase II, a pilot case study was conducted, with methods and analysis informed by Phase I recommendations. Phase III consisted of a debriefing conference to outline future areas of research on modernizing health communication strategies. In Phase IV, the findings and working theories were presented to 75 dental students, who then took a survey regarding their perspectives with the objective of guiding potential curriculum design for predoctoral courses. The results of the survey showed that the validity of online content was often secondary to the strength of the network sharing it and that advocacy online could be more effective if it allowed for emotional connections with peers rather than preserving accuracy of the information. Students expressed high interest in learning how to harness modern health communications in their clinical care since the role of the dentist is evolving from giving information to giving personalized guidance against the backdrop of an often contradictory modern information environment. The authors recommend that the dental profession develop patient-centered health communication training for predoctoral students and professional development and continuing education for practicing professionals.

  2. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-09

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  3. Introduction to Evidence Centered Design and Lessons Learned from Its Application in a Global E-Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, John T.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Bauer, Malcolm; Williamson, David M.; Levy, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the assessment and deployment contexts of the Networking Performance Skill System (NetPASS) project and the articles in this section that report on findings from this endeavor. First, the educational context of the Cisco Networking Academy Program is described. Second, the basic outline of Evidence Centered Design is…

  4. Measurement of the e + e - → ηπ+π- cross section in the center-of-mass energy range 1.22-2.00 GeV with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtol, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the experiment with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 e + e - collider the cross section for the process e + e - → ηπ+π- has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range from 1.22 to 2.00 GeV. Obtained results are in agreement with previous measurements and have better accuracy. The energy dependence of the e + e - → ηπ+π- cross section has been fitted with the vector-meson dominance model. From this fit the product of the branching fractions B(ρ(1450) → ηπ+π-) B(ρ(1450) → π+π-) has been extracted and compared with the same products for (ρ(1450) → ωP0 and (ρ(1450) → π+π- decays. The obtained cross section data have been also used to test the conservation of vector current hypothesis.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Property Transfer to Cheyenne Regional Medical Center, F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei) and Colorado butterfly plant (Gaura neomexicana coloradensis) (F.E. Warren AFB 2006). Populations of these...comata) (F.E. Warren AFB 2011). Some areas are dominated by planted crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) and are typically found in previously...species and their habitat are provided in the F.E. Warren AFB INRMP (2006). Noxious Weeds. Noxious weeds are undesirable plant species that are not

  6. Evidence for e+e- →γχc1,2 at center-of-mass energies from 4.009 to 4.360 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; N. Achasov, M.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; J. Ambrose, D.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; R. Baldini, Ferroli; Ban, Y.; W. Bennett, D.; V. Bennett, J.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; A. Briere, R.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; A. Cetin, S.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; F. De, Mori; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; P. Guo, Y.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; A. Harris, F.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; C. Ke, B.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; B. Kolcu, O.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; S. Lange, J.; M., Lara; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; X. Lin(Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; L. Liu, C.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhiqing, Liu; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; E. Maas, F.; Maggiora, M.; A. Malik, Q.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; G. Messchendorp, J.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; E. Mitchell, R.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; C. Morales, Morales; Moriya, K.; Yu. Muchnoi, N.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; B. Nikolaev, I.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; H. Rashid, K.; F. Redmer, C.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; R. Shepherd, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; H. Thorndike, E.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; S. Varner, G.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; D. Wang(Yadi, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; A. Zafar, A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Using data samples collected at center-of-mass energies of √s = 4.009, 4.230, 4.260, and 4.360 GeV with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider, we perform a search for the process e+e- → γχcJ (J=0, 1, 2) and find evidence for e+e- → γχc1 and e+e- → γχc2 with statistical significances of 3.0σ and 3.4σ, respectively. The Born cross sections σB(e+e- → γχcJ), as well as their upper limits at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) are determined at each center-of-mass energy. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079008, 11179007, U1232201, U1332201, U1232107), National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (10935007, 11121092, 11125525, 11235011, 11322544, 11335008), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Large-Scale Scientific Facility Program, CAS (KJCX2-YW-N29, KJCX2-YW-N45), 100 Talents Program of CAS, INPAC and Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology; German Research Foundation DFG (Collaborative Research Center CRC-1044), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy, Ministry of Development of Turkey (DPT2006K-120470), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (14-07-91152), U. S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, University of Groningen (RuG) and Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt, WCU Program of National Research Foundation of Korea (R32-2008-000-10155-0)

  7. Study of quark flow in exclusive reactions at 90 degrees in the center of mass (AGS E838)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, R.; White, C.; Courant, H.; Fang, G.; Heller, K. J.; Johns, K.; Marshak, M. L.; Shupe, M.; Barton, D. S.; Bunce, G.; Carroll, A. S.; Gushue, S.; Kmit, M.; Lowenstein, D. I.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Heppelmann, S.; Ma, X.; Russell, J. J.

    1995-07-01

    We report a study of quark flow in 20 exclusive reactions measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS with a beam momentum of 5.9 GeV/c at 90° in the center of mass. This experiment confirms the strong quark flow reaction mechanism dependence of two-body hadron scattering at large angles seen at 9.9 GeV/c. Large differences in cross sections for different reactions are consistent with the dominance of quark interchange in these 90° reactions, and indicate that pure gluon exchange and quark/antiquark annihilation diagrams are less important.

  8. Developing a Conceptual Framework for Evaluation of E-Content of Virtual Courses: E-Learning Center of an Iranian University Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akhavan, Peyman; Arefi, Majid Feyz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain suitable quality criteria for evaluation of electronic content for virtual courses. We attempt to find the aspects which are important in developing e-content for virtual courses and to determine the criteria we need to judge for the quality and efficiency of learning objects and e-content. So we can classify…

  9. Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2011-08-15

    An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

  10. Reduction of the tyrosyl radical and the iron center in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse, herpes simplex virus and E. coli by p-alkoxyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pötsch, S; Sahlin, M; Langelier, Y; Gräslund, A; Lassmann, G

    1995-10-23

    The rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical in the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (protein R2) from E. coli, mouse, and herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) by a series of p-alkoxyphenols with different alkyl chains, have been studied by stopped-flow UV-vis and stopped-flow EPR spectroscopy. The reduction and release of iron in R2 by the inhibitors was followed using bathophenanthroline as chelator of Fe2+. p-Alkoxyphenols reduce the mouse R2 tyrosyl radical 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than the HSV-2 and E. coli radical. In contrast to E. coli, the iron center in R2 from mouse and HSV-2 is reduced by the inhibitors. For mouse R2, the rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical increases in parallel with increasing alkyl chain length of the inhibitor, an observation which may be important for the design of new antiproliferative drugs.

  11. SU-E-T-387: Achieving Optimal Patient Setup Imaging and Treatment Workflow Configurations in Multi-Room Proton Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Prado, K; Langen, K; Yi, B; Mehta, M; Regine, W; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate patient flow in proton treatment center under uncertainty and to explore the feasibility of treatment preparation rooms to improve patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Methods: Three center layout scenarios were modeled: (S1: In-Tx room imaging) patient setup and imaging (planar/volumetric) performed in treatment room, (S2: Patient setup in preparation room) each treatment room was assigned with preparation room(s) that was equipped with lasers only for patient setup and gross patient alignment, and (S3: Patient setup and imaging in preparation room) preparation room(s) was equipped with laser and volumetric imaging for patient setup, gross and fine patient alignment. A 'snap' imaging was performed in treatment room. For each scenario, the number of treatment rooms and the number of preparation rooms serving each treatment room were varied. We examined our results (average of 100 16-hour (two shifts) working days) by evaluating patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Results: When the number of treatment rooms increased ([from, to]) [1, 5], daily patient throughput increased [32, 161], [29, 184] and [27, 184] and cyclotron utilization increased [13%, 85%], [12%, 98%], and [11%, 98%] for scenarios S1, S2 and S3 respectively. However, both measures plateaued after 4 rooms. With the preparation rooms, the throughput and the cyclotron utilization increased by 14% and 15%, respectively. Three preparation rooms were optimal to serve 1-3 treatment rooms and two preparation rooms were optimal to serve 4 or 5 treatment rooms. Conclusion: Patient preparation rooms for patient setup may increase throughput and decrease the need for additional treatment rooms (cost effective). Optimal number of preparation rooms serving each gantry room varies as a function of treatment rooms and patient setup scenarios. A 5th treatment room may not be justified by throughput or utilization.

  12. W. E. B. Du Bois at the center: from science, civil rights movement, to Black Lives Matter.

    PubMed

    Morris, Aldon

    2017-03-01

    I am honoured to present the 2016 British Journal of Sociology Annual Lecture at the London School of Economics. My lecture is based on ideas derived from my new book, The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology. In this essay I make three arguments. First, W.E.B. Du Bois and his Atlanta School of Sociology pioneered scientific sociology in the United States. Second, Du Bois pioneered a public sociology that creatively combined sociology and activism. Finally, Du Bois pioneered a politically engaged social science relevant for contemporary political struggles including the contemporary Black Lives Matter movement.

  13. The Data Acquisition and Controls Systems (DACS) of the E-Complex at the John C. Stennis Space Center, MS: A General Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Mark S.; Hebert, Phillip W.; Davis, Dawn M.

    2003-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) provides test operations services to a variety of customers including NASA, DoD, commercial enterprises, and others for the development of current next-generation rocket propulsion systems. Many of these test operations services are provided in the E-Complex series of test facilities. The E-Complex is composed of three active test stands (E1, E2, & E3), each with two or more test positions. Each test position is comprised of unique sets of data acquisition and controls hardware and software that record both facility and test article data and safely operate the test facility. The E-Complex data acquisition system (DAS) is actually composed of two separate systems, one for static data and the other for dynamic. The static DAS, otherwise known as the Low-Speed DAS (LSDAS), samples 16 bit data at 250 samples-per-second (SPS), although an aggregate sample rate of 200,000 SPS is possible. The dynamic data acquisition system, otherwise known as the high-speed DAS (HSDAS), samples 16 bit data at 100K SPS with a 45 KHz bandwidth.

  14. Motor activity of centromere-associated protein-E contributes to its localization at the center of the midbody to regulate cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Ohori, Momoko; Iwai, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Accurate control of cytokinesis is critical for genomic stability to complete high-fidelity transmission of genetic material to the next generation. A number of proteins accumulate in the intercellular bridge (midbody) during cytokinesis, and the dynamics of these proteins are temporally and spatially orchestrated to complete the process. In this study, we demonstrated that localization of centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) at the midbody is involved in cytokinetic abscission. The motor activity of CENP-E and the C-terminal midbody localization domain, which includes amino acids 2659–2666 (RYFDNSSL), are involved in the anchoring of CENP-E to the center of the midbody. Furthermore, CENP-E motor activity contributes to the accumulation of protein regulator of cytokinesis 1 (PRC1) in the midbody during cytokinesis. Midbody localization of PRC1 is critical to the antiparallel microtubule structure and recruitment of other midbody-associated proteins. Therefore, CENP-E motor activity appears to play important roles in the organization of these proteins to complete cytokinetic abscission. Our findings will be helpful for understanding how each step of cytokinesis is regulated to complete cytokinetic abscission. PMID:27835888

  15. Constraints on an annihilation signal from a core of constant dark matter density around the milky way center with H.E.S.S.

    PubMed

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Ait Benkhali, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M-H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C-C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Paz Arribas, M; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; de Los Reyes, R; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J-P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H-S

    2015-02-27

    An annihilation signal of dark matter is searched for from the central region of the Milky Way. Data acquired in dedicated on-off observations of the Galactic center region with H.E.S.S. are analyzed for this purpose. No significant signal is found in a total of ∼9  h of on-off observations. Upper limits on the velocity averaged cross section, ⟨σv⟩, for the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses in the range of ∼300  GeV to ∼10  TeV are derived. In contrast to previous constraints derived from observations of the Galactic center region, the constraints that are derived here apply also under the assumption of a central core of constant dark matter density around the center of the Galaxy. Values of ⟨σv⟩ that are larger than 3×10^{-24}  cm^{3}/s are excluded for dark matter particles with masses between ∼1 and ∼4  TeV at 95% C.L. if the radius of the central dark matter density core does not exceed 500 pc. This is the strongest constraint that is derived on ⟨σv⟩ for annihilating TeV mass dark matter without the assumption of a centrally cusped dark matter density distribution in the search region.

  16. Constraints on an Annihilation Signal from a Core of Constant Dark Matter Density around the Milky Way Center with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    An annihilation signal of dark matter is searched for from the central region of the Milky Way. Data acquired in dedicated on-off observations of the Galactic center region with H.E.S.S. are analyzed for this purpose. No significant signal is found in a total of ˜9 h of on-off observations. Upper limits on the velocity averaged cross section, ⟨σ v ⟩, for the annihilation of dark matter particles with masses in the range of ˜300 GeV to ˜10 TeV are derived. In contrast to previous constraints derived from observations of the Galactic center region, the constraints that are derived here apply also under the assumption of a central core of constant dark matter density around the center of the Galaxy. Values of ⟨σ v ⟩ that are larger than 3 ×10-24 cm3/s are excluded for dark matter particles with masses between ˜1 and ˜4 TeV at 95% C.L. if the radius of the central dark matter density core does not exceed 500 pc. This is the strongest constraint that is derived on ⟨σ v ⟩ for annihilating TeV mass dark matter without the assumption of a centrally cusped dark matter density distribution in the search region.

  17. Accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in breast milk of women from an e-waste recycling center in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinghong; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Yun; Ben, Yujie; Lv, Quanxia

    2017-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) can be transferred to infants through the ingestion of breast milk, resulting in potential health risk. In this study, PBDEs, hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) in human milk from women living adjacent to e-waste recycling sites of Wenling, China, were investigated. The median level of PBDEs in samples from residents living in the e-waste recycling environment >20years (R20 group, 19.5ng/g lipid weight (lw)) was significantly higher than that for residents living in Wenling <3years (R3 group, 3.88ng/g lw) (p<0.05), likely ascribable to specific exposure to PBDEs from e-waste recycling activities. In the R20 group, most congeners (except for BDE-209) were correlated with each other (p<0.05). Moreover, CB-153 showed significant association with most PBDE congeners, rather than BDE-209. The relationship indicated that most BDE congeners other than BDE-209 shared common sources and/or pathways with CB-153, e.g., dietary ingestion. The correlations between BDE-209 and other congeners were different in the two groups, likely suggesting their different exposure sources and/or pathways for PBDEs. Although estimated dietary intake of PBDEs for infants via breast milk was lower than the minimum value affecting human health, the PBDE exposure of infants should be of great concern because of their potential effect on the development of neonates over long-term exposure. OH-PBDEs were not detected in the collected samples, which is in accordance with reports in published literature, likely indicating that they were not apt to be accumulated in human milk.

  18. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  19. DoE Plasma Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Self-Organization in Plasmas: Non-linear Emergent Structure Formation in magnetized Plasmas and Rotating Magnetofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2016-11-10

    This report covers the UW-Madison activities that took place within a larger DoE Center Administered and directed by Professor George Tynan at the University of California, San Diego. The work at Wisconsin will also be covered in the final reporting for the entire center, which will be submitted by UCSD. There were two main activities, one experimental and one that was theoretical in nature, as part of the Center activities at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. First, the Center supported an experimentally focused postdoc (Chris Cooper) to carry out fundamental studies of momentum transport in rotating and weakly magnetized plasma. His experimental work was done on the Plasma Couette Experiment, a cylindrical plasma confinement device, with a plasma flow created through electromagnetically stirring plasma at the plasma edge facilitated by arrays of permanent magnets. Cooper's work involved developing optical techniques to measure the ion temperature and plasma flow through Doppler-shifted line radiation from the plasma argon ions. This included passive emission measurements and development of a novel ring summing Fabry-Perot spectroscopy system, and the active system involved using a diode laser to induce fluorescence. On the theoretical side, CMTFO supported a postdoc (Johannes Pueschel) to carry out a gyrokinetic extension of residual zonal flow theory to the case with magnetic fluctuations, showing that magnetic stochasticity disrupts zonal flows. The work included a successful comparison with gyrokinetic simulations. This work and its connection to the broader CMTFO will be covered more thoroughly in the final CMTFO report from Professor Tynan.

  20. Assessing the impact of user-centered research on a clinical trial eHealth tool via counterbalanced research design

    PubMed Central

    Massett, Holly A; Mylks, Christy; McCormack, Lauren A; Kish-Doto, Julia; Hesse, Bradford W; Wang, Min Qi

    2010-01-01

    Objective Informatics applications have the potential to improve participation in clinical trials, but their design must be based on user-centered research. This research used a fully counterbalanced experimental design to investigate the effect of changes made to the original version of a website, http://BreastCancerTrials.org/, and confirm that the revised version addressed and reinforced patients' needs and expectations. Design Participants included women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis within the last 5 years (N=77). They were randomized into two groups: one group used and reviewed the original version first followed by the redesigned version, and the other group used and reviewed them in reverse order. Measurements The study used both quantitative and qualitative measures. During use, participants' click paths and general reactions were observed. After use, participants were asked to answer survey items and open-ended questions to indicate their reactions and which version they preferred and met their needs and expectations better. Results Overall, the revised version of the site was preferred and perceived to be clearer, easier to navigate, more trustworthy and credible, and more private and safe overall. However, users who viewed the original version last had similar attitudes toward both versions. Conclusion By applying research findings to the redesign of a website for clinical trial searching, it was possible to re-engineer the interface to better support patients' decisions to participate in clinical trials. The mechanisms of action in this case appeared to revolve around creating an environment that supported a sense of personal control and decisional autonomy. PMID:21169619

  1. E-health in low- and middle-income countries: findings from the Center for Health Market Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Synowiec, Christina; Lagomarsino, Gina; Schweitzer, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe how information communication technology (ICT) is being used by programmes that seek to improve private sector health financing and delivery in low- and middle-income countries, including the main uses of the technology and the types of technologies being used. Methods In-country partners in 16 countries directly searched systematically for innovative health programmes and compiled profiles in the Center for Health Market Innovations’ database. These data were supplemented through literature reviews and with self-reported data supplied by the programmes themselves. Findings In many low- and middle-income countries, ICT is being increasingly employed for different purposes in various health-related areas. Of ICT-enabled health programmes, 42% use it to extend geographic access to health care, 38% to improve data management and 31% to facilitate communication between patients and physicians outside the physician’s office. Other purposes include improving diagnosis and treatment (17%), mitigating fraud and abuse (8%) and streamlining financial transactions (4%). The most common devices used in technology-enabled programmes are phones and computers; 71% and 39% of programmes use them, respectively, and the most common applications are voice (34%), software (32%) and text messages (31%). Donors are the primary funders of 47% of ICT-based health programmes. Conclusion Various types of ICT are being employed by private organizations to address key health system challenges. For successful implementation, however, more sustainable sources of funding, greater support for the adoption of new technologies and better ways of evaluating impact are required. PMID:22589566

  2. SU-E-J-137: Image Registration Tool for Patient Setup in Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Suh, T; Cho, W; Jung, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A potential validation tool for compensating patient positioning error was developed using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. Methods: For 2D/3D registration, digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR. We adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-Knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and head and neck cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT image were applied. After registration, the translation and rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Results: Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23° ± 0.40° for rotations were acquired by 2D/3D registration using an anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00° ± 0.2° for rotations were acquired using CT image sets. Conclusion: We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning error. In addition, this research could be the fundamental step for compensating patient positioning error at the first Korea heavy-ion medical accelerator treatment center.

  3. Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 H30 Is the Main Driver of Emerging Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing E. coli at a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Launer, Bryn; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Miller, Loren G

    2016-01-01

    The H30 strain of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) is a recently emerged, globally disseminated lineage associated with fluoroquinolone resistance and, via its H30Rx subclone, the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we studied the clonal background and resistance characteristics of 109 consecutive recent E. coli clinical isolates (2015) and 41 historical ESBL-producing E. coli blood isolates (2004 to 2011) from a public tertiary care center in California with a rising prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Among the 2015 isolates, ST131, which was represented mainly by ST131-H30, was the most common clonal lineage (23% overall). ST131-H30 accounted for 47% (8/17) of ESBL-producing, 47% (14/30) of fluoroquinolone-resistant, and 33% (11/33) of multidrug-resistant isolates. ST131-H30 also accounted for 53% (8/14) of dually fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing isolates, with the remaining 47% comprised of diverse clonal groups that contributed a single isolate each. ST131-H30Rx, with CTX-M-15, was the major ESBL producer (6/8) among ST131-H30 isolates. ST131-H30 and H30Rx also dominated (46% and 37%, respectively) among the historical ESBL-producing isolates (2004 to 2011), without significant temporal shifts in relative prevalence. Thus, this medical center's recently emerging ESBL-producing E. coli strains, although multiclonal, are dominated by ST131-H30 and H30Rx, which are the only clonally expanded fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing lineages. Measures to rapidly and effectively detect, treat, and control these highly successful lineages are needed. IMPORTANCE The ever-rising prevalence of resistance to first-line antibiotics among clinical Escherichia coli isolates leads to worse clinical outcomes and higher health care costs, thereby creating a need to discover its basis so that effective interventions can be developed. We found that the H30 subset within E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) is

  4. Multimedia Information eXchange for I-NET, Inc. at the Kennedy Space Center: A continuing study of the application of worldwideweb technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, David

    1995-01-01

    Multimedia Information eXchange (MIX) is a multimedia information system that accommodates multiple data types and provides consistency across platforms. Information from all over the world can be accessed quickly and efficiently with the Internet-based system. I-NET's MIX uses the World Wide Web and Mosaic graphical user interface. Mosaic is available on all platforms used at I-NET's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facilities. Key information system design concepts and benefits are reviewed. The MIX system also defines specific configuration and helper application parameters to ensure consistent operations across the entire organization. Guidelines and procedures for other areas of importance in information systems design are also addressed. Areas include: code of ethics, content, copyright, security, system administration, and support.

  5. Measurement of angular coefficients of drell-yan e(+) e(-) pairs in pp(anti-proton) collisions at square root of center of mass energy of 1.96 tev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Sudeep S.

    In this paper we present the status of the measurement of angular distributions of final state electrons in ppbar → gamma*/Z → e+ e- + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at square root of center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. For this analysis, we have used the Run IIb2 dataset collected with the Dphi detector. The angular distributions as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair are studied, and the Lam-Tung relation, valid only for a spin-1 description of the gluon is investigated. The final result will also describe the details of the production mechanism of Z bosons via quark anti-quark annihilation or quark-gluon Compton scattering.

  6. School Library Media Centers: Selected Results from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002). E.D. TAB. NCES 2005-302

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the current state of school library media centers that serve U.S. 10th-graders. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) provides comprehensive data from multiple sources on school library media centers that served 10th-graders in 2002. ELS:2002 is a…

  7. SU-E-P-01: An Informative Review On the Role of Diagnostic Medical Physicist in the Academic and Private Medical Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The role of physicist in the academic and private hospital environment continues to evolve and expand. This becomes more obvious with the newly revised requirements of the Joint Commission (JC) on imaging modalities and the continued updated requirements of ACR accreditation for medical physics (i.e., starting in June 2014, a physicists test will be needed before US accreditation). We provide an informative review on the role of diagnostic medical physicist and hope that our experience will expedite junior physicists in understanding their role in medical centers, and be ready to more opportunities. Methods: Based on our experience, diagnostic medical physicists in both academic and private medical centers perform several clinical functions. These include providing clinical service and physics support, ensuring that all ionizing radiation devices are tested and operated in compliance with the State and Federal laws, regulations and guidelines. We also discuss the training and education required to ensure that the radiation exposure to patients and staff is as low as reasonably achievable. We review the overlapping roles of medical and health physicist in some institutions. Results: A detailed scheme on the new requirements (effective 7/1/2014) of the JC is provided. In 2015, new standards for fluoroscopy, cone beam CT and the qualifications of staff will be phased in. A summary of new ACR requirements for different modalities is presented. Medical physicist have other duties such as sitting on CT and fluoroscopy committees for protocols design, training of non-radiologists to meet the new fluoroscopy rules, as well as helping with special therapies such as Yittrium 90 cases. Conclusion: Medical physicists in both academic and private hospitals are positioned to be more involved and prominent. Diagnostic physicists need to be more proactive to involve themselves in the day to day activities of the radiology department.

  8. Measurement of sin2θefflept using e+e- pairs from γ*/Z bosons produced in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; ...

    2016-06-28

    Here, at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton (pmore » $$\\bar{p}$$) collider, Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process p$$\\bar{p}$$→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the e- as a function of the e+e--pair mass is used to obtain sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$, the effective leptonic determination of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2θW. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from p$$\\bar{p}$$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$ is found to be 0.23248±0.00053. The combination with the previous CDF measurement based on μ+μ- pairs yields sin2θ$$lept\\atop{eff}$$=0.23221±0.00046. This result, when interpreted within the specified context of the standard model assuming sin2θW=1-M$$2\\atop{W}$$/M$$2\\atop{Z}$$ and that the W- and Z-boson masses are on-shell, yields sin2θW=0.22400±0.00045, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.328±0.024 GeV/c2.« less

  9. Interim Measures Report for the Headquarters Building Area Location of Concern (LOC) 2E East SWMU 104 John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment portion of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit issued by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), requires identification and evaluation of all known Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Locations of Concern (LOCs) located on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) property. The KSC Headquarters Building Area (KHQA) has been identified as SWMU 104 under KSC's RCRA Program. This report summarizes the Interim Measure (IM) conducted by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract NNK12CA13B at the KHQA to mitigate potential exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-affected media at the eastern side of LOC 2E. The IM activities were conducted in June and July 2015 to remediate PCBs above the FDEP Residential Direct-Exposure (R-) Soil Cleanup Target Level (SCTL) of 0.5 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) established by Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code. The IM was performed in accordance with the IM Work Plan (IMWP) approved by the FDEP, dated August 2012. IM activities were conducted in accordance with the KSC Generic PCB Work Plan (NASA 2007).

  10. Precise Measurement of the e^{+}e^{-}→π^{+}π^{-}J/ψ Cross Section at Center-of-Mass Energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ahmed, S; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Bakina, O; Baldini Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chai, J; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Holtmann, T; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ikegami Andersson, W; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Lavezzi, L; Leithoff, H; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Mezzadri, G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales Morales, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Musiol, P; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schnier, C; Schoenning, K; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xie, Yuehong; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; You, Z Y; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2017-03-03

    The cross section for the process e^{+}e^{-}→π^{+}π^{-}J/ψ is measured precisely at center-of-mass energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV using 9  fb^{-1} of data collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Two resonant structures are observed in a fit to the cross section. The first resonance has a mass of (4222.0±3.1±1.4)  MeV/c^{2} and a width of (44.1±4.3±2.0)  MeV, while the second one has a mass of (4320.0±10.4±7.0)  MeV/c^{2} and a width of (101.4_{-19.7}^{+25.3}±10.2)  MeV, where the first errors are statistical and second ones are systematic. The first resonance agrees with the Y(4260) resonance reported by previous experiments. The precision of its resonant parameters is improved significantly. The second resonance is observed in e^{+}e^{-}→π^{+}π^{-}J/ψ for the first time. The statistical significance of this resonance is estimated to be larger than 7.6σ. The mass and width of the second resonance agree with the Y(4360) resonance reported by the BABAR and Belle experiments within errors. Finally, the Y(4008) resonance previously observed by the Belle experiment is not confirmed in the description of the BESIII data.

  11. Precise Measurement of the e+e-→π+π-J /ψ Cross Section at Center-of-Mass Energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Yuehong; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The cross section for the process e+e-→π+π-J /ψ is measured precisely at center-of-mass energies from 3.77 to 4.60 GeV using 9 fb-1 of data collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring. Two resonant structures are observed in a fit to the cross section. The first resonance has a mass of (4222.0 ±3.1 ±1.4 ) MeV /c2 and a width of (44.1 ±4.3 ±2.0 ) MeV , while the second one has a mass of (4320.0 ±10.4 ±7.0 ) MeV /c2 and a width of (101. 4-19.7+25.3±10.2 ) MeV , where the first errors are statistical and second ones are systematic. The first resonance agrees with the Y (4260 ) resonance reported by previous experiments. The precision of its resonant parameters is improved significantly. The second resonance is observed in e+e-→π+π-J /ψ for the first time. The statistical significance of this resonance is estimated to be larger than 7.6 σ . The mass and width of the second resonance agree with the Y (4360 ) resonance reported by the BABAR and Belle experiments within errors. Finally, the Y (4008 ) resonance previously observed by the Belle experiment is not confirmed in the description of the BESIII data.

  12. DoD Center of Excellence to Support Theory and Experiments on Filamentation Topics for DDR&E’s Recent MURI Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    electrons (center) in its wake P. Preuss, BELLA: The Next Stage in Laser Wakefield Acceleration, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory News Center...April 15, 2008. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2008/04/15/bella-the-next-stage-in-laser- wakefield -acceleration/ 4 Approved for public

  13. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers EVIDENCE FOR A DIRECT PATHWAY BETWEEN THE 4′-AMINOPYRIMIDINE N1′ ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-11-03

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4{prime}-aminopyrimidine N1{prime} atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu{sup 571}, Glu{sup 235}, and Glu{sup 237}) and Arg{sup 606} resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. (1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. (2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. (3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. (4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu{sup 235} makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu{sup 571} residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  14. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin Hsin; Chang, Ching Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. Methods This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54) to analyze and evaluate the data. Results The findings are as follows: (1) Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2) After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3) Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. Conclusion It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service) on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems) in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and credibility are the most

  15. H.E.S.S. Limits on Linelike Dark Matter Signatures in the 100 GeV to 2 TeV Energy Range Close to the Galactic Center.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, H; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Ait Benkhali, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Andersson, T; Angüner, E O; Arrieta, M; Aubert, P; Backes, M; Balzer, A; Barnard, M; Becherini, Y; Becker Tjus, J; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Blackwell, R; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Capasso, M; Carr, J; Casanova, S; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chen, A; Chevalier, J; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Condon, B; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Devin, J; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J-P; Eschbach, S; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Funk, S; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Goyal, A; Grondin, M-H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Hahn, J; Hawkes, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, D; Jankowsky, F; Jingo, M; Jogler, T; Jouvin, L; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kerszberg, D; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; King, J; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Kraus, M; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lees, J-P; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Leser, E; Liu, R; Lohse, T; Lorentz, M; Lypova, I; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Mariaud, C; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; Meintjes, P J; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niederwanger, F; Niemiec, J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Ostrowski, M; Öttl, S; Oya, I; Padovani, M; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Paz Arribas, M; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perennes, C; Petrucci, P-O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Prokhorov, D; Prokoph, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; de Los Reyes, R; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Sasaki, M; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwemmer, S; Settimo, M; Seyffert, A S; Shafi, N; Shilon, I; Simoni, R; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J-P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tibaldo, L; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Tuffs, R; van der Walt, J; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Voisin, F; Völk, H J; Vuillaume, T; Wadiasingh, Z; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zefi, F; Ziegler, A; Żywucka, N

    2016-10-07

    A search for dark matter linelike signals iss performed in the vicinity of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. experiment on observational data taken in 2014. An unbinned likelihood analysis iss developed to improve the sensitivity to linelike signals. The upgraded analysis along with newer data extend the energy coverage of the previous measurement down to 100 GeV. The 18 h of data collected with the H.E.S.S. array allow one to rule out at 95% C.L. the presence of a 130 GeV line (at l=-1.5°, b=0° and for a dark matter profile centered at this location) previously reported in Fermi-LAT data. This new analysis overlaps significantly in energy with previous Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S.

  16. SU-E-J-109: Testing the KV Imaging Center Congruence with Radiation Isocenter of Small MLC and SRS Cone Field On Two Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fu,; Chen, Y; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Orthogonal kV image pairs are used for target localization when fiducial markers are implanted. CBCT is used to verify cone SRS setup. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the isocenter congruence between radiation fields and kV imaging center. This study used a simple method to evaluate the isocenter congruence, and compared the results for MLC and cone fields on two different Linacs. Methods: Varian OBI block was attached on the couch. It has a central 1mm BB with markers on three surfaces to align with laser. KV and MV images were taken at four cardinal angles. A 3x3cm2 MLC field and a 20mm cone field were irradiated respectively. On each kV image, the distance from BB center to the kV graticule center were measured. On the MV image of MLC field, the center of radiation field was determined manually, while for cone field, the Varian AM maintenance software was used to analyze the distance between BB and radiation field. The subtraction of the two distances gives the discrepancy between kV and radiation centers. Each procedure was repeated on five days at Trilogy and TrueBeam respectively. Results: The maximum discrepancy was found in the longitudinal direction at 180° gantry angel. It was 1.5±0.1mm for Trilogy and 0.6±0.1mm for TrueBeam. For Trilogy, although radiation center wobbled only 0.7mm and image center wobbled 0.8mm, they wobbled to the opposite direction. KV Pair using gantry 180° should be avoided in this case. Cone vs. kV isocenter has less discrepancy than MLC for Trilogy. Conclusion: Radiation isocenter of MLC and cone field is different, so is between Trilogy and TrueBeam. The method is simple and reproducible to check kV and radiation isocenter congruence.

  17. Dealing with missing data in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression self-report scale: a study based on the French E3N cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Center for Epidemiologic Studies - Depression scale (CES-D) is a validated tool commonly used to screen depressive symptoms. As with any self-administered questionnaire, missing data are frequently observed and can strongly bias any inference. The objective of this study was to investigate the best approach for handling missing data in the CES-D scale. Methods Among the 71,412 women from the French E3N prospective cohort (Etude Epidémiologique auprès des femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale) who returned the questionnaire comprising the CES-D scale in 2005, 45% had missing values in the scale. The reasons for failure to complete certain items were investigated by semi-directive interviews on a random sample of 204 participants. The prevalence of high depressive symptoms (score ≥16, hDS) was estimated after applying various methods for ignorable missing data including multiple imputation using imputation models with CES-D items with or without covariates. The accuracy of imputation models was investigated. Various scenarios of nonignorable missing data mechanisms were investigated by a sensitivity analysis based on the mixture modelling approach. Results The interviews showed that participants were not reluctant to answer the CES-D scale. Possible reasons for nonresponse were identified. The prevalence of hDS among complete responders was 26.1%. After multiple imputation, the prevalence was 28.6%, 29.8% and 31.7% for women presenting up to 4, 10 and 20 missing values, respectively. The estimates were robust to the various imputation models investigated and to the scenarios of nonignorable missing data. Conclusions The CES-D scale can easily be used in large cohorts even in the presence of missing data. Based on the results from both a qualitative study and a sensitivity analysis under various scenarios of missing data mechanism in a population of women, missing data mechanism does not appear to be nonignorable and estimates

  18. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.

  19. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... on, and advocacy for, wiser health care and science policy. In addition to her leadership role at The Hastings Center, she is a professor at Harvard Medical School, where she directs the school’s Fellowship in Bioethics, a program that ...

  20. Mexico: Centro de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa. Seminario de Documentacion e Informacion Pedagogica en America Latina (The Mexican Center for Educational Documentation and Information. Working Paper for the Seminar on Educational Documentation and Information in Latin America).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secretaria de Educacion Publica, Mexico City (Mexico). Centro de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa.

    This document describes the Center for Documentation and Educational Information in Mexico City. Background information on similar services in Mexico is provided and a detailed description of the Center is presented, covering organization, objectives, administration, users, activities, services, and publications. (VM)

  1. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  2. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  3. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  4. An Evaluation of a Voluntary Academic Medical Center Website Designed to Improve Access to Health Education among Consumers: Implications for E-Health and M-Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris-Hollingsworth, Nicole Rosella

    2012-01-01

    Academic Medical Centers across the United States provide health libraries on their web portals to disseminate health promotion and disease prevention information, in order to assist patients in the management of their own care. However, there is a need to obtain consumer input, consumer satisfaction, and to conduct formal evaluations. The purpose…

  5. Illinois Department of Children and Family Services Text of Adopted Rules. Subchapter e: Requirements for Licensure. Part 407: Licensing Standards for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Children and Family Services, Springfield.

    Reprinted in this document are day care center licensing standards adopted and codified, effective August 1983, by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services and amended June 1984 and January 1985. Sections of the report concern purpose, definitions, effective date of standards, application for license and license renewal, provisions…

  6. Environmental Assessment for the Army Aviation Support Facility and Administrative Support Facility and the Joint Forces Headquarters, Readiness Center, and Field Maintenance Shop at Francis E. Warren Air Force Base, Cheyenne, Wyoming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Centers, Union Pacific Railroad, Sierra Trading Post, Wal-Mart, Echo Star Communications, Great Lakes Aviation, Qwest Corporation , and Blue Cross/Blue...meet the requirements and is subject to continuous power outage. Natural Gas System. Blackhills Corporation supplies natural gas to F. E. Warren AFB...Buildings/Structures 100 ft Buffer Proposed Site Locations Installation Boundary Comunication Lines LEGEND Prepared for: Environmental Assessment for

  7. Emergency Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinea, Anoushka Z.

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a site from which NASA LaRC Emergency Preparedness Officials exercise control and direction in an emergency. Research was conducted in order to determine what makes an effective EOC. Specifically information concerning the various types of equipment and communication capability that an efficient EOC should contain (i.e., computers, software, telephone systems, radio systems, etc.) was documented. With this information a requirements document was written stating a brief description of the equipment and required quantity to be used in an EOC and then compared to current capabilities at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  8. An observation of the Galactic center hard X-ray source, 1E 1740.7-2942, with the Caltech coded-aperture telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heindl, William A.; Cook, Walter R.; Grunsfeld, John M.; Palmer, David M.; Prince, Thomas A.; Schindler, Stephen M.; Stone, Edward C.

    1993-01-01

    The Galactic center region hard X-ray source IE 1740.7-2942 has been observed with the Caltech Gamma-Ray Imaging Payload (GRIP) from Alice Springs, Australia, on 1988 April 12 and on 1989 April 3 and 4. We report here results from the 1989 measurements based on 14 hr of observation of the Galactic center region. The observations showed IE 1740.7-2942 to be in its normal state, having a spectrum between 35 and 200 keV characterized by a power law with an exponent of -2.2 +/- 0.3 and flux at 100 keV of (7.0 +/- 0.7) x 10 exp -5 sq cm s keV. No flux was detected above 200 keV. A search for time variability in the spectrum of IE 1740.7-2942 on one hour time scales showed no evidence for variability.

  9. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  10. International Water Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  11. H.E.S.S. Limits on Linelike Dark Matter Signatures in the 100 GeV to 2 TeV Energy Range Close to the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Liu, R.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Öttl, S.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    A search for dark matter linelike signals iss performed in the vicinity of the Galactic Center by the H.E.S.S. experiment on observational data taken in 2014. An unbinned likelihood analysis iss developed to improve the sensitivity to linelike signals. The upgraded analysis along with newer data extend the energy coverage of the previous measurement down to 100 GeV. The 18 h of data collected with the H.E.S.S. array allow one to rule out at 95% C.L. the presence of a 130 GeV line (at l =-1.5 ° , b =0 ° and for a dark matter profile centered at this location) previously reported in Fermi-LAT data. This new analysis overlaps significantly in energy with previous Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. results. No significant excess associated with dark matter annihilations was found in the energy range of 100 GeV to 2 TeV and upper limits on the gamma-ray flux and the velocity weighted annihilation cross section are derived adopting an Einasto dark matter halo profile. Expected limits for present and future large statistics H.E.S.S. observations are also given.

  12. 36 CFR 1253.6 - Records Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... center research rooms are posted at http://www.archives.gov. Contact information for each center is as... Southpark Blvd., Ellenwood, GA 30294. The telephone number is 404-736-2820. (e) NARA—Great Lakes...

  13. On Education and Social Power: The Educational Theories of W.E.B. Du Bois and Their Relevance to African-Centered Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashid, Kamau

    2009-01-01

    W.E.B. Du Bois offered an educational theory that sought to contextualize the role of schools and their relevance to social justice. Responding to the social-historical malaise of African American subordination, he proposed that schools could provide the impetus towards cultural, economic, and political empowerment. Moreover, his theory of…

  14. The e^+e^- -> 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-), 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0) and K^+K^-2(\\pi^+\\pi^-) Cross Sections at Center-of-Mass Energies 0.5--4.5 GeV Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-02-08

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){gamma}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}){gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +} {sup -}){gamma}, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20,000, 33,000 and 4,000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. From the 3({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) mass spectra, the cross sections for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 3({pi}{sup +}{sup -}), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) are measured for center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV. The uncertainty in the cross section measurement is typically 6-15%. We observe the J/{psi} in all these final states and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  15. High efficiency electricity production in the sugar industry of the future: The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research Project (>6MW{sub e})

    SciTech Connect

    Trenka, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) is presently starting up a 100 tpd bagasse Renugas{reg_sign} gasifier which was developed under license from the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). For thousands of years, mankind has used biomass for energy, burning it first in campfires. In more modem times, combustion boiler systems were developed such as those fueled by coal. Through inefficient, these systems answered an increasing need for energy brought on by the industrial revolution. Yesterday`s systems are being replaced with more efficient methods of energy conversion and extraction. Recognizing the untapped potential for biomass power to provide clean and efficient energy, the U.S. Department of Energy established the National Biomass Power Program in 1991. The State of Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism is collaborating in this national program to complement the development of its own sustainable resource program. As a key player in this program, PICHTR will design, construct, and operate a biomass gasification facility that will be the centerpiece of the nation`s biomass gasification technology.

  16. Review of Feminist Bioethics At the Center, On the Margins, edited by Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel E. Baldwin-Ragaven, Petya Fitzpatrick

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The anthology, Feminist Bioethics, edited by Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel E. Baldwin-Ragaven, and Petya Fitzpatrick, examines how feminist bioethics theoretically and methodologically challenges mainstream bioethics, and whether these approaches are useful for exploring difference in other contexts. It offers critical conceptual analyses of "autonomy", "universality", and "trust", and covers topics such as testing for hereditary cancer, prenatal selection for sexual orientation, midwifery, public health, disability, Indigenous research reform in Australia, and China's one child policy.

  17. Use of PEG-asparaginase in newly diagnosed adults with standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with E. coli-asparaginase: a retrospective single-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hua; Wang, Wei-da; Zhu, Meng-Yuan; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Jing-Hua; Lu, Yue

    2016-12-21

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, and the long-term survival varies with different ages. We performed a retrospective analysis of 122 newly diagnosed adults with standard-risk ALL treated with Escherichia coli asparaginase (E. coli-asparaginase, n = 50) and polyethylene glycol-conjugated asparaginase (PEG-asparaginase, n = 72). No treatment-related mortality (TRM) occurred in the E. coli-asparaginase group, and 3 TRM events occurred in the PEG-asparaginase group without relation to asparaginase. In addition, 22 (44.0%) and 48 (66.7%) patients achieved a complete response (CR) on day 14 in the E. coli-asparaginase and PEG-asparaginase groups, respectively (P = 0.032). No different 5-year event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival (OS) rate (P = 0.632 and 0.769) was observed. Multivariate analysis revealed later CR (P = 0.008) and older age (P = 0.049) as adverse prognostic factors for both EFS and OS. In addition, we specifically monitored the known adverse effects of asparaginase, and no asparaginase-related death was observed. Allergy occurred in 9 patients using E. coli-asparaginase, and no patient in the PEG-asparaginase group suffered from allergies (P < 0.001). The incidence of other asparaginase-related toxicities was similar. We conclude that PEG-asparaginase can be safely and effectively used as asparaginase in adults with newly diagnosed standard-risk ALL.

  18. Use of PEG-asparaginase in newly diagnosed adults with standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with E. coli-asparaginase: a retrospective single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-jian; Wang, Hua; Wang, Wei-da; Zhu, Meng-yuan; Liu, Cheng-cheng; Wang, Jing-hua; Lu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, and the long-term survival varies with different ages. We performed a retrospective analysis of 122 newly diagnosed adults with standard-risk ALL treated with Escherichia coli asparaginase (E. coli-asparaginase, n = 50) and polyethylene glycol-conjugated asparaginase (PEG-asparaginase, n = 72). No treatment-related mortality (TRM) occurred in the E. coli-asparaginase group, and 3 TRM events occurred in the PEG-asparaginase group without relation to asparaginase. In addition, 22 (44.0%) and 48 (66.7%) patients achieved a complete response (CR) on day 14 in the E. coli-asparaginase and PEG-asparaginase groups, respectively (P = 0.032). No different 5-year event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival (OS) rate (P = 0.632 and 0.769) was observed. Multivariate analysis revealed later CR (P = 0.008) and older age (P = 0.049) as adverse prognostic factors for both EFS and OS. In addition, we specifically monitored the known adverse effects of asparaginase, and no asparaginase-related death was observed. Allergy occurred in 9 patients using E. coli-asparaginase, and no patient in the PEG-asparaginase group suffered from allergies (P < 0.001). The incidence of other asparaginase-related toxicities was similar. We conclude that PEG-asparaginase can be safely and effectively used as asparaginase in adults with newly diagnosed standard-risk ALL. PMID:28000713

  19. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  20. Teaching Astronomy through e-learning in Poland: Astronomical Education in teacher training conducted by the Regional Teacher Training Center in Skierniewice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Regional Teacher Training Centre (RTTC) in Skierniewice is one of 49 public, accredited institutions in Poland carrying out it statutory goals at the regional level. It has been operating since 1989 and is responsible for organizing of support of schools, institutions, networks of teachers for cooperation and self-education, organizing various forms of in-service training and disseminating examples of good practice. It also has rich experience in teaching by using modern Interactive Computer Technology (ICT) tools and e-learning platform. I present examples about teaching of Astronomical issues through teacher training both as hands on workshops as well as through e-learning. E-learning is playing an important role in organizing educational activities not only in the field of modern didactic but also in learning Science subjects. Teachers find e-learning as a very economical, easy and convenient way of learning and developing their knowledge and skills. Moreover, they are no longer afraid of using new ICT tools and programs which help them to cooperate with students effectively. Since 2011 RTTC in Skierniewice has been an organizer of many on-line in-service programs for teachers, in learning Science. Some of them are organized as blended-learning programs which allow teachers to participate first in hands on activities then continue learning on the Moodle platform. These courses include two 15 and 30-hours of Astronomical topics. Teachers have the opportunity to gain knowledge and receive materials not only about the Universe and the Solar System but also can learn to use tools like Stellarium, Celestia, WorldWide Telescope, Your Sky and other tools. E-learning modules consist of both publishing learning materials in various forms, eg. PowerPoint Presentations, Word & PDF materials, web sites, publications, working sheets as well as practical duties like participation in chats, forums, tasks, Wiki, group workshop. Teachers use these materials for extending their

  1. Differential cross sections for H + D2 → HD(v' = 2, j' = 0,3,6,9) + D at center-of-mass collision energies of 1.25, 1.61, and 1.97 eV.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Nate C-M; Jankunas, Justin; Goswami, Tapas; Zare, Richard N; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2011-05-14

    We have measured differential cross sections (DCSs) for the reaction H + D(2) → HD(v' = 2,j' = 0,3,6,9) + D at center-of-mass collision energies E(coll) of 1.25, 1.61, and 1.97 eV using the photoloc technique. The DCSs show a strong dependence on the product rotational quantum number. For the HD(v' = 2,j' = 0) product, the DCS is bimodal but becomes oscillatory as the collision energy is increased. For the other product states, they are dominated by a single peak, which shifts from back to sideward scattering as j' increases, and they are in general less sensitive to changes in the collision energy. The experimental results are compared to quantum mechanical calculations and show good, but not fully quantitative agreement.

  2. Self-medication and its Effective Modifiable Factors among Elderly Referred Health Care Centers in Shahr-e-Kord in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Motavali, Zahra Sadeghian; Abedi, Heidarali; Davaridolatabadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug overuse is a serious problem for health care, and one of the biggest problems for the socio-economic well-being of different communities. The elderly tend to use more drugs due to changes in their cognitive and physiological factors. One of the best ways to evaluate the health level of elderly people is to evaluate their self-medication. This study was conducted to investigate self-medication among the elderly in Shahr-e-Kord. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 350 people older than 65 in Shahr-e-Kord in 2015. Sampling was done in two stages. In the first stage, the city of Shahr-e-Kord was divided into four areas using geographical maps. Eighty-eight people were selected from each area. The research instrument was a questionnaire called the Health Belief Model (HBM). The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, the chi-squared test, the independent-samples t-test, and the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results No significant relationship was observed between the prevalence of self-medication with demographic variables and level of awareness. But there was a significant difference between sensitivity, perceived severity, and perceived barriers and educational level. There also was a significant difference between the perceived benefits and their income level. There also was a significant difference between the level of awareness, sensitivity, severity, benefits, and barriers of people with and without a history of self-medication (p < 0.05). Conclusion Due to the adverse effects of self-medication and the high prevalence of this activity among the elderly, it is recommended that a training program be developed and implemented to change the knowledge and beliefs of the elderly about self-medication. PMID:28070253

  3. 70th anniversary of the E K Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 February 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 4 February 2016 at the E K Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center (KSC), RAS, devoted to the 70th anniversary of the E K Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, KSC RAS. The agenda posted on the website of the Physical Sciences Division RAS http://www.gpad.ac.ru comprised the following reports: (1) Demishev S V (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Quantum phase transitions in spiral magnets without an inversion center"; (2) Smirnov A I (Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems, RAS, Moscow) "Magnetic resonance of spinons in quantum magnets"; (3) Ryazanov V V (Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Coherent and nonequilibrium phenomena in superconductor- and ferromagnet-based structures"; (4) Mel'nikov A S (Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Mechanisms of long-range proximity effects in superconducting spintronics"; (5) Fel'dman E B (Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) "Magnus expansion paradoxes in the study of equilibrium magnetization and entanglement in multi-pulse spin locking"; (6) Fraerman A A (Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Features of the motion of spin-1/2 particles in a noncoplanar magnetic field"; (7) Salikhov K M (E K Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute, KSC, RAS, Kazan) "Electron paramagnetic resonance applications: promising developments at the E K Zavoisky Kazan Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences"; (8) Vinogradov E A (Institute for Spectroscopy, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow) "Ultrathin film characterization using far-field surface polariton spectroscopy"; (9) Glyavin M Yu (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "High-power terahertz sources for spectroscopy and material diagnostics"; (10) Soltamov V A (Ioffe Institute

  4. The new emergency structure of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia during the L’Aquila 2009 seismic sequence: the contribution of the COES (Seismological Emergency Operation Center - Centro Operativo Emergenza Sismica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, M.; Govoni, A.; Nostro, C.; La Longa, F.; Crescimbene, M.; Pignone, M.; Selvaggi, G.; Working Group, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Centro Nazionale Terremoti (CNT - National Earthquake Center), departement of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), has designed and setup a rapid response emergency structure to face the occurrence of strong earthquakes. This structure is composed by a real time satellite telemetered temporary seismic network (see Abruzzese et al., 2009 Fall AGU) used to improve the hypocentral locations of the INGV National Seismic Network, a stand alone temporary seismic network whose goal is primarily the high dynamic/high resolution data acquisition in the epicentral area and a mobile operational center, the COES (Centro Operativo Emergenza Sismica, Seismological Emergency Operational Center). The COES structure is a sort of mobile office equipped with satellite internet communication that can be rapidly installed in the disaster area to support all the INGV staff operative needs and to cooperate with the Civil Protection department (DPC) aggregating all the scientific information available on the seismic sequence and providing updated information to Civil Protection for the decision making stage during the emergency. The structure is equipped with a heavy load trolley that carries a 6x6 inflatable tent, a satellite router, an UPS, computers, monitors and furniture. The facility can be installed in a couple of hours in the epicentral area and provides a full featured office with dedicated internet connection and VPN access to the INGV data management center in Rome. Just after the April 6 2009 Mw 6.3 earthquake in L’Aquila (Central Italy) the COES has been installed upon request of the Italian Civil Protection (DPC) in the DICOMAC (Directorate of Command and Control - which is the central structure of the DPC that coordinates the emergency activities in the areas affected by the earthquake) located in the Guardia di Finanza headquarters in Coppito nearby L'Aquila (the same location that hosted the G8 meeting). The COES produces real time reports on the

  5. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  6. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  7. Chapter 20: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Robert; Masanet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Data centers use about 2% of the electricity in the United States; a typical data center has 100 to 200 times the energy use intensity of a commercial building. Data centers present tremendous opportunities--energy use can be reduced as much as 80% between inefficient and efficient data centers. Data center efficiency measures generally fall into the following categories: power infrastructure (e.g., more efficient uninterruptible power supplies, power distribution units); cooling (e.g., free cooling, variable-speed drives, temperature and humidity set points); airflow management (e.g., hot aisle/cold aisle, containment, grommets); and information technology efficiency (e.g., server virtualization, efficient servers, efficient data storage).

  8. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  9. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  10. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  11. Measurement of the e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} cross section in the center-of-mass energy range 1.22–2.00 GeV with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 collider

    SciTech Connect

    Shtol, D. A.

    2015-12-15

    In the experiment with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e– collider the cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} has been measured in the center-of-mass energy range from 1.22 to 2.00 GeV. Obtained results are in agreement with previous measurements and have better accuracy. The energy dependence of the e{sup +}e{sup –} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –} cross section has been fitted with the vector-meson dominance model. From this fit the product of the branching fractions B(ρ(1450) → ηπ{sup +}π{sup –})B(ρ(1450) → π{sup +}π{sup –}) has been extracted and compared with the same products for (ρ(1450) → ωΠ{sup 0} and (ρ(1450) → π{sup +}π{sup –} decays. The obtained cross section data have been also used to test the conservation of vector current hypothesis.

  12. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  13. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  14. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  15. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Midwifery Services and Birth Center Accredited 351 N. Water Street Black River Falls, WI 54615 715-284- ... 795-9912 Accredited Since December 1991 42 Del Mar Birth Center Accredited 1416 El Centro Street, Suite ...

  16. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  17. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  18. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  19. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  20. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-07-15

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center".

  1. Regional Warning Center Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    RWC-Sweden is operated by the Lund division of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics located at IDEON, a Science Research Technology Park. The Institute of Technology of Lund and Lund University are just adjacent to IDEON. This creates a lot of synergy effects. Copenhagen, with the Danish National Space Center DNSC), and Atmosphere Space Research Division of Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), is 45 min away via the bridge. The new LOIS Space Centre is located two hours away by car, north of Lund and just outside V¨xj¨. The IRF Lund a o division is aiming at becoming a "Solar and Space Weather Center". We focus on solar magnetic activity, its influence on climate and on space weather effects such the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC). Basic research: A PostDoc position on "Solar Magnetic Activity: Topology and Predictions has recently been created. Research is carried on to improve predictions of solar magnetic activity. Preparations for using upcoming SDO vector magnetic fields are ongoing. Predictions: RWC-Sweden offers real-time forecasts of space weather and space weather effects based on neural networks. We participated in the NASA/NOAA Cycle 24 Prediction Panel. We have also participated in several ESA/EU solar-climate projects New observation facilities: Distributed, wide-area radio facility (LOIS) for solar (and other space physics) observations and a guest prof: Radio facility about 200 km distant, outside V¨xj¨ (Sm˚ a o aland), in Ronneby (Blekinge) and Lund (Sk˚ ane) is planned to be used for tracking of CMEs and basic solar physics studies of the corona. The LOIS station outside V¨xj¨ has a o been up and running for the past three years. Bo Thidé has joined the Lund division e as a guest prof. A new magnetometer at Risinge LOIS station has been installed an calibrated and expected to be operational in March, 2008.

  2. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  3. Center Pivot Irrigated Agriculture, Libya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A view of the Faregh Agricultural Station in the Great Calanscio Sand Sea, Libya (26.5N, 22.0E) about 300 miles southeast of Benghazi. A pattern of water wells have been drilled several miles apart to support a quarter mile center-pivot-swing-arm agricultural irrigation system. The crop grown is alfalfa which is eaten on location by flocks of sheep following the swing arm as it rotates. At maturity, the sheep are flown to market throughout Libya.

  4. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  5. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  6. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  7. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  8. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  9. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  10. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  11. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  12. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  13. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  14. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  15. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  16. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  17. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  18. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  19. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  20. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  1. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  2. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  3. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  4. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  5. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  6. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  7. Teaching Tips. Creating Games for the Physical Education Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ellen; Stork, Steve; Sanders, Steve; Parker, Melissa, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    One strategy for enhancing cognitive outcomes in physical education (PE) is placing PE learning centers in elementary classrooms. The center should have games (e.g., board games, card games, and puzzles) that were created or modified to focus on PE concepts. The article describes two board games created for use in PE learning centers. (SM)

  8. Northeast Regional Planetary Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Saunders, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In 1980, the Northeast Planetary Data Center (NEPDC) was established with Tim Mutch as its Director. The Center was originally located in the Sciences Library due to space limitations but moved to the Lincoln Field Building in 1983 where it could serve the Planetary Group and outside visitors more effectively. In 1984 Dr. Peter Schultz moved to Brown University and became its Director after serving in a similar capacity at the Lunar and Planetary Institute since 1976. Debbie Glavin has served as the Data Center Coordinator since 1982. Initially the NEPDC was build around Tim Mutch's research collection of Lunar Orbiter and Mariner 9 images with only partial sets of Apollo and Viking materials. Its collection was broadened and deepened as the Director (PHS) searched for materials to fill in gaps. Two important acquisitions included the transfer of a Viking collection from a previous PI in Tucson and the donation of surplused lunar materials (Apollo) from the USGS/Menlo Park prior to its building being torn down. Later additions included the pipeline of distributed materials such as the Viking photomosaic series and certain Magellan products. Not all materials sent to Brown, however, found their way to the Data Center, e.g., Voyager prints and negatives. In addition to the NEPDC, the planetary research collection is separately maintained in conjunction with past and ongoing mission activities. These materials (e.g., Viking, Magellan, Galileo, MGS mission products) are housed elsewhere and maintained independently from the NEPDC. They are unavailable to other researchers, educators, and general public. Consequently, the NEPDC represents the only generally accessible reference collection for use by researchers, students, faculty, educators, and general public in the Northeast corridor.

  9. ROSAT Science Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen; Pisarski, Ryszard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) ROSAT SCIENCE DATA CENTER (RSDC) activities for the recent years of our contract. Details have already been reported in the monthly reports. The SAO was responsible for the High Resolution Imager (HRI) detector on ROSAT. We also provided and supported the HRI standard analysis software used in the pipeline processing (SASS). Working with our colleagues at the Max Planck in Garching Germany (MPE), we fixed bugs and provided enhancements. The last major effort in this area was the port from VMS/VAX to VMS/ALPHA architecture. In 1998, a timing bug was found in the HRI standard processing system which degraded the positional accuracy because events accessed incorrect aspect solutions. The bug was fixed and we developed off-line correction routines and provided them to the community. The Post Reduction Off-line Software (PROS) package was developed by SAO and runs in the IRAF environment. Although in recent years PROS was not a contractual responsibility of the RSDC, we continued to maintain the system and provided new capabilities such as the ability to deal with simulated AXAF data in preparation for the NASA call for proposals for Chandra. Our most recent activities in this area included the debugging necessary for newer versions of IRAF which broke some of our software. At SAO we have an operating version of PROS and hope to release a patch even though almost all functionality that was lost was subsequently recovered via an IRAF patch (i.e. most of our problems were caused by an IRAF bug).

  10. Data center networks and network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses and proposes the architectural framework, which is for data center networks. The data center networks require new technical challenges, and it would be good opportunity to change the functions, which are not need in current and future networks. Based on the observation and consideration on data center networks, this paper proposes; (i) Broadcast-free layer 2 network (i.e., emulation of broadcast at the end-node), (ii) Full-mesh point-to-point pipes, and (iii) IRIDES (Invitation Routing aDvertisement for path Engineering System).

  11. Attivita del Centro di Linguistica Applicata nel campo della lingua e della cultura italiana all'estero (Activities of the Italian Center for Applied Linguistics concerning Italian Language and Culture Abroad).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boriosi Katerinov, Maria Clotilde

    1979-01-01

    Outlines the activities of a recently created section of the Italian Center for Applied Linguistics (CILA), dealing with "Teaching Italian Abroad." Describes these activities as encompassing four areas: research, teaching methodology, consultation, teachers' training and bibliographical information. Lists statistical surveys, research papers, and…

  12. "I wz wondering-uhm could 'Raid' uhm 'e'ffect the brain permanently d'y know?": Some Observations on the Intersection of Speaking and Writing in Calls to a Poison Control Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    Focuses on how written records are created during calls to a Poison Control Center. Describes the relationship between writing and speaking in this bureaucratic context. Finds that keeping written records extends the length of call processing time, representing a barrier to handling new calls promptly. (MS)

  13. Mine or Theirs, Where Do Users Go? A Comparison of E-Journal Usage at the OhioLINK Electronic Journal Center Platform versus the Elsevier ScienceDirect Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Juleah

    2015-01-01

    This research provides librarians with a model for assessing and predicting which platforms patrons will use to access the same content, specifically comparing usage at the Ohio Library and Information Network (OhioLINK) Electronic Journal Center (EJC) and at Elsevier's ScienceDirect from 2007 to 2013. Findings show that in the earlier years, the…

  14. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  15. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  16. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  17. America's Blood Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spokesperson Biographies Statements Logo & Style Guidelines Every two seconds someone needs blood. It's About Life. Please Donate ... from the Foundation for America’s Blood Centers. 2 SECONDS Every 2 seconds, someone in the United States ...

  18. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  19. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  20. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  1. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  2. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  3. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  4. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  5. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  6. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... disseminate evidence-based findings into communities that can benefit from these findings, but the centers can also, through the experience of working with those patients, help inform national research and ...

  7. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  8. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  9. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  10. Patient Safety Center Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Enterectomy Bariatric 7/20/05 4 hours/course (28 hours/year) Surgery R 7 Dr. Karen Horvath R5 Lap Enterectomy & Colectomy 11/30/05 4...areas in the UW Schools of Nursing and Dentistry, at the Harborview Research Center Microvascular Surgery lab, with the Seattle Children’s Hospital and...1 laboratory complex (2500 sq ft) has been designed within the University of Washington Medical Center, in the Surgery Pavilion complex

  11. Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng

    1998-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the Center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The Center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The College has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction represents prominent evidence of this record. The basic concept on which the Center was founded is the in-space construction of large space systems, such as space stations, interplanetary space vehicles, and extraterrestrial space structures. Since 1993, the scope of CSC research has evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. With the broadened scope our research projects seek to impact the technological basis for spacecraft such as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites and other special-purpose spacecraft, as well as large space platforms. A summary of accomplishments, including student participation and degrees awarded, during the contract period is presented.

  12. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  13. Preliminary Assessment, Army Reserve Center, Pewaukee, Wisconsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-14

    U.S. ARMY ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER INSTALLATION RESTORATION DIVISION BLDG. E4480 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MARYLAND 21010I - PREPARED BY: PEER CONSULTANTS...Reserve Center in Pewaukee, Wisconsin Pamela A. Lemme; John W. Tucker, Jr. 7. PIERFOnminG ORGANIZATiON KA*6S AND A002=15E) I ~IOI"OGNETO PEER Consultants...environment and provide the infomation necessary to reevaluate the facility’s status on the Federal Facility Docket. PEER Consultants, P.C. was retained to

  14. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  15. New E‧ centers in neutron-irradiated α-quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, R. I.; Pan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Several E‧-type defects have been revealed in neutron-irradiated natural and synthetic α-quartz by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. For the known E'2 center the primary spin Hamiltonian parameter matrices g and A(29Si) (hyperfine interaction with 29Si) have been refined and provide compelling evidence for spin trapping on the long-bond Si atom. The EPR spectra of the new E'11 center demonstrate that the super-hyperfine structure arises from the interaction with 27Al, the first-ever example of Al-associated E‧ centers in crystalline quartz. The matrices g and A(29Si) of E'11 and another new center (E'12) support the forward-oriented configuration proposed for the Ecenter in amorphous silica.

  16. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  17. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  18. Survey: National Meteorological Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center (NMC) is comprised of three operational divisions (Development, Automation, and Forecast) and an Administrative Division. The Development Division develops and implements mathematical models for forecasting the weather. The Automation Division provides the software and processing services to accommodate the models used in daily forecasts. The Forecasting Division applies a combination of numerical and manual techniques to produce analyses and prognoses up to 120 hr into the future. This guidance material is combined with severe storm information from the National Hurricane Center and the National Severe Storms Forecasting Center to develop locally tailored forecasts by the Weather Service Forecast Offices and, in turn, by the local Weather Service Offices. A very general flow of this information is shown. A more detailed illustration of data flow into, within, and from the NMC is given. The interrelations are depicted between the various meteorological organizations and activities.

  19. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  20. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  1. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  2. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  3. Minor Planet Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the activities of the Minor Planet Center for the year of 1998. The main product of this center is the Minor Planet Circulars, augmented by the Minor Planet Circulars Supplement which is a new series introduced in 1997 to include the actual observations, which are now only summarized MPC. The introduction of the Daily Orbit Update (DOU) lists all the orbits computed and identification found since the previous issue. There has been a fivefold increase in the reported Near Earth Objects, which includes the addition of 55 potentially hazardous asteroids.

  4. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  5. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  6. Lied Transplant Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  7. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  8. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  9. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  10. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Community Learning Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The Community Learning Centers plan provides a systemically changed model for the 21st century. This top-to-bottom transformation of current education addresses all aspects of schools with a detailed framework to guide serious educational reformers. This fresh approach to principles of learning, curriculum, staffing, facilities, student as…

  12. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  13. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  14. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  15. Evidence-Centered Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Leong, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Assessing student understanding is a critical part of a teacher's routine. Most assessments are reviewed with a quick eye, but the evidence-centered assessment strategy encourages us to slow down and look more carefully at student work samples. In this article, the author proposes guidelines for the close examination of student work. These…

  16. The Pupil Appraisal Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilborn, Bobbie; Gentile, Lance M.

    The primary purpose of the Pupil Appraisal Center (PAC) is to promote teacher education by providing teachers and students direct experience in resolving behavioral disorders and learning problems. PAC provides specialized teacher training in counseling, reading, hearing, speech, and language development and provides service to area schools for…

  17. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  18. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  20. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  1. Starting a sleep center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  2. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  3. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  4. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  5. Mobile PET Center Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikova, O.; Naumov, N.; Sergienko, V.; Kostylev, V.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most promising technology to monitor cancer and heart disease treatment. Stationary PET center requires substantial financial resources and time for construction and equipping. The developed mobile solution will allow introducing PET technology quickly without major investments.

  6. National Response Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRC is the federal government's national communications center, which is staffed 24 hours a day by U.S. Coast Guard officers and marine science technicians. Sole federal point of contact for reporting all hazardous substance releases and oil spills

  7. Developing a Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Rich, Ed.

    This 12-section handbook, based on information for Colorado but applicable to other states as well, contains resources and lists and explains procedures to establish or expand a career guidance center in a school, government office, or organization. The 12 sections cover the following topics: (1) purpose and philosophy; (2) assessment, advisory…

  8. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  9. National Farm Medicine Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinic Research Institute Careers Contact Us Patient Rights Privacy Location Our System Marshfield Clinic Marshfield Clinic Division of Education Marshfield Labs Security Health Plan Family Health Center Our Partners ... Website Privacy | Terms of Use | Non-discrimination Statement Copyright © 2012 - ...

  10. Automation of The Guiding Center Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Burby, J. Squire and H. Qin

    2013-03-19

    We report on the use of the recently-developed Mathematica package VEST (Vector Einstein Summation Tools) to automatically derive the guiding center transformation. Our Mathematica code employs a recursive procedure to derive the transformation order-by-order. This procedure has several novel features. (1) It is designed to allow the user to easily explore the guiding center transformation's numerous nonunique forms or representations. (2) The procedure proceeds entirely in cartesian position and velocity coordinates, thereby producing manifestly gyrogauge invariant results; the commonly-used perpendicular unit vector fields e1, e2 are never even introduced. (3) It is easy to apply in the derivation of higher-order contributions to the guiding center transformation without fear of human error. Our code therefore stands as a useful tool for exploring subtle issues related to the physics of toroidal momentum conservation in tokamaks

  11. Automation of the guiding center expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Burby, J. W.; Squire, J.; Qin, H.

    2013-07-15

    We report on the use of the recently developed Mathematica package VEST (Vector Einstein Summation Tools) to automatically derive the guiding center transformation. Our Mathematica code employs a recursive procedure to derive the transformation order-by-order. This procedure has several novel features. (1) It is designed to allow the user to easily explore the guiding center transformation's numerous non-unique forms or representations. (2) The procedure proceeds entirely in cartesian position and velocity coordinates, thereby producing manifestly gyrogauge invariant results; the commonly used perpendicular unit vector fields e{sub 1},e{sub 2} are never even introduced. (3) It is easy to apply in the derivation of higher-order contributions to the guiding center transformation without fear of human error. Our code therefore stands as a useful tool for exploring subtle issues related to the physics of toroidal momentum conservation in tokamaks.

  12. Automation of the guiding center expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, J. W.; Squire, J.; Qin, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the use of the recently developed Mathematica package VEST (Vector Einstein Summation Tools) to automatically derive the guiding center transformation. Our Mathematica code employs a recursive procedure to derive the transformation order-by-order. This procedure has several novel features. (1) It is designed to allow the user to easily explore the guiding center transformation's numerous non-unique forms or representations. (2) The procedure proceeds entirely in cartesian position and velocity coordinates, thereby producing manifestly gyrogauge invariant results; the commonly used perpendicular unit vector fields e1,e2 are never even introduced. (3) It is easy to apply in the derivation of higher-order contributions to the guiding center transformation without fear of human error. Our code therefore stands as a useful tool for exploring subtle issues related to the physics of toroidal momentum conservation in tokamaks.

  13. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    PubMed

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  14. Aerial view southwest from center of square showing south portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view southwest from center of square showing south portion of alley, rears of 1007 E Street, 1009 E Street, and the National Capital Press Building and alley (east) wall of 1101 E Street - Square 347 (Commercial Buildings), Tenth, Eleventh, E, & F Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  16. Electronics Principles Inventory, Sheppard Technical Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    AD-A219 935 ( ) UNITED STATES AIR FORCE DTC. E 1- EE -, ... , S MAR 3 0 1990 01% ELECTRONICS PRINCIPLES INVENTORY SHEPPARD TECHNICAL TRAINING CENTER...studies provide valuable informa- tion for curriculum development or validation in terms of percent members requiring a range of electronics principles knowledge

  17. National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Charlyn Harper

    2014-01-01

    The national Quality Improvement Center on early Childhood (QIC-eC) funded four research and demonstration projects that tested child maltreatment prevention approaches. The projects were guided by several key perspectives: the importance of increasing protective factors in addition to decreasing risk factors in child maltreatment prevention…

  18. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  19. Venus' center of figure-center of mass offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Schubert, Gerald; Ford, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan altimetry data reveal that the center of figure (CF) of Venus is displaced approximately 280 m from its center of mass (CM) toward 4.4 deg S, 135.8 deg E, a location in Aphrodite Terra. This offset is smaller than those of other terrestrial planets but larger than the estimated error, which is no more than a few tens of meters. We examine the possibility that the CF-CM offset is related to specific geologic provinces on Venus by deriving three simple models for the offset: a thick-crust model, a hotspot model, and a thick-lithosphere model. The offset caused by a region of thick crust depends upon the region's extent, the crust-mantle density contrast, and the thickness of excess crust. A hotspot-related offset depends on the extent of the thermally anomalous region and the magnitude of the thermal anomaly. Offset due to a region of thick lithosphere depends upon the extent of the region, the average temperature contrast across the lithosphere, and the amount of excess lithosphere. We apply the three models to Venus plateau-shaped highlands, volcanic rises, and lowlands, respectively, in an attempt to match the observed CF-CM offset location and magnitude. The influence of most volcanic rises and of Ishtar Terra on the CF-CM offset must be quite small if we are to explain the direction of the observed offset. The lack of influence of volcanic rises can be explained if the related thermal anomalies are limited to a few hundred degrees or less and are plume-shaped (i.e., characterized by a flattened sublithospheric `head' with a narrow cylindrical feeder `tail'). The unimportance of Ishtar Terra is most easily explained if it lies atop a significant mantle downwelling.

  20. CD40 Ligand and Appropriate Cytokines Induce Switching to IgG, IgA, and IgE and Coordinated Germinal Center and Plasmacytoid Phenotypic Differentiation in a Human Monoclonal IgM+IgD+ B Cell Line1

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Zan, Hong; Schaffer, Andras; Bergsagel, Leif; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Max, Edward E.; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocytes are induced to undergo Ig class switching and a complex phenotypic differentiation by the milieu of the germinal center. Partly as a result of the lack of a suitable in vitro B cell model, the relationship between these processes in the humans has never been formally established in vitro. We have identified a human monoclonal B cell line, CL-01, that expresses surface IgM and IgD and, upon induction with CD40 ligand, IL-4, and IL-10, switches to all seven downstream isotypes, showing typical DNA switch recombination preceded by germline transcription of targeted CH regions. In CL-01 cells, switch-inducing stimuli trigger concomitant changes in expression of surface IgD, CD23, CD38, and CD77 that parallel those reported in ex vivo isolated tonsillar centroblasts, centrocytes, and memory B cells. Eventually, in the presence of IL-6, CL-01 cells express CD56 and accumulate cytoplasmic IgG and IgA, both traits of plasmacytoid differentiation. Analysis of transcription and recombination of the Ig H locus in sorted CL-01 cells suggest that Ig class switching begins in centroblasts, it extends to all isotypes in centrocytes, and it is extinct in memory B cells. Thus, we have induced coordinated Ig class switching, progression through germinal center phenotypic stages, and differentiation to memory B cells and plasma cells at the level of a single B clonotype. Our data suggest that these processes are likely regulated by a common maturation program, the activation of which may require CD40 ligand, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-6 only. PMID:9498752

  1. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  2. Bahrain's offshore banking center

    SciTech Connect

    Gerakis, A.S.; Roncesvalles, O.

    1983-01-01

    The economic effects of Bahrain's schemes for licensing offshore banking units (OBUs) were the immediate response of major international banks and the financial services the banking center has rendered by improving regional money and exchange markets at a time when a Middle East link was needed to service the increasing demand for oil-wealth banking services. Bahrain's leadership also created a favorable climate. Aggressive competition from banks in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have caused some friction, but informal supervision by the Bahrain Monetary Agency (BMA) should be able to avoid serious difficulty. Bahrain's success required a banking infrastructure, a free-enterprise system, a willingness to maintain banking standards, a country small enough to benefit directly from OBU income, and a gap in nearby competing centers. 39 references, 1 figure, 5 tables. (DCK)

  3. The STEREO Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Thompson, W. T.; Kucera, T. A.

    2007-05-01

    The STEREO Science Center (SSC), at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, is the "one-stop shopping" location for STEREO data, observation plans, analysis software, and links to other mission resources. Along with the other data products, a special "Space Weather Beacon" telemetry stream, relayed through an array of antenna partners coordinated by NOAA, provides near-real-time images, and will soon also provide near-real- time radio and in-situ data. Through interaction with the Solar Software library, the SSC also acts as a focal point for software coordination. The SSC is closely integrated with the Virtual Solar Observatory, making data easily accessible to users. Details on access to the SSC will be given and examples of the various types of data available at the SSC will be shown.

  4. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  5. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  6. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  7. Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Christopher Barry

    2007-01-01

    As part of a session at the 2007 Thermal & Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), an overview of the operations at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center was given. Mission support at this site includes the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD); Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), Science - ER-2; Science - G3 UAVSAR; Science - Ikhana and Space Operations. In addition, the presentation describes TFAWS related work at Dryden.

  8. Battle Space Action Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-14

    VREEDE, G. J. D., & KOLFSCHOTEN, G. L . (2008). Extending the contextual and organizational elements of adaptive structurization theory in GSS...Reiter-Palmon, R., & Harland, L . (2009). Computer Assisted Collaboration Engineering and Process Support Systems: The BattleSpace ActionCenters...Collaboration Science, 27 February, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE. 18. BRIGGS, R.O., VREEDE, G.J. DE, REITER-PALMON, R., HARLAND, L

  9. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  10. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  11. National Biocontainment Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    contributing to the advancement of this aim. Progress Topics in Biosecurity Symposia Series . Distinguished guest speakers continue to participate in the...for the Fall 2014 seminars is underway, with confirmed speakers Dr. Kavita Berger, Associate Director of the Center for Science , Technology and...and Surveillance (SACIDS), SUA; Dr. Brocard; Professor Meck Mattee of Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences , Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

  12. Swiftly Computing Center Strings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The center string (or closest string) problem is a classic computer science problem with important applications in computational biology. Given k input strings and a distance threshold d, we search for a string within Hamming distance at most d to each input string. This problem is NP complete. Results In this paper, we focus on exact methods for the problem that are also swift in application. We first introduce data reduction techniques that allow us to infer that certain instances have no solution, or that a center string must satisfy certain conditions. We describe how to use this information to speed up two previously published search tree algorithms. Then, we describe a novel iterative search strategy that is effecient in practice, where some of our reduction techniques can also be applied. Finally, we present results of an evaluation study for two different data sets from a biological application. Conclusions We find that the running time for computing the optimal center string is dominated by the subroutine calls for d = dopt -1 and d = dopt. Our data reduction is very effective for both, either rejecting unsolvable instances or solving trivial positions. We find that this speeds up computations considerably. PMID:21504573

  13. European Materials Research Society Spring Meeting, E-MRS 󈨦 Scientific/Technical Symposia and Exhibition, Held in Congress Center - Palais de la Musique et des Congres - Strasbourg, France on June 16-19, 1998.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA CADMIUM-LITHIUM DEFECTS IN SILICON, C.A. Frehill. M.O. Henry , E. McGlynn, School of Physical...00-9:15 CHARA CTERISATION OF ITO/POROUS SILICON LED STRUCTURES, K.Molnar. T. Mohacsy, P. Varga , E. Vazsonyi, K. Ferencz* and I. Barsony, Research...Palaiseau, France B-I/Pll LASER ASSISTED CVD OF SILICON OXIDE LAYERS, P. Paiva, F. Madelino and O. Conde, Physics Department, University of Lisbon, Campo

  14. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  15. Medical center staff attitudes about spanking.

    PubMed

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Font, Sarah A; Taylor, Catherine A; Foster, Rebecca H; Garza, Ann Budzak; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Several medical professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that parents avoid hitting children for disciplinary purposes (e.g., spanking) and that medical professionals advise parents to use alternative methods. The extent to which medical professionals continue to endorse spanking is unknown. This study is the first to examine attitudes about spanking among staff throughout medical settings, including non-direct care staff. A total of 2580 staff at a large general medical center and 733 staff at a children's hospital completed an online survey; respondents were roughly divided between staff who provide direct care to patients (e.g., physicians, nurses) and staff who do not (e.g., receptionists, lab technicians). Less than half (44% and 46%) of staff at each medical center agreed that spanking is harmful to children, although almost all (85% and 88%) acknowledged that spanking can lead to injury. Men, staff who report being religious, and staff who held non-direct care positions at the medical center reported stronger endorsement of spanking and perceived their co-workers to be more strongly in favor of spanking. Non-direct care staff were more supportive of spanking compared with direct care staff on every item assessed. All staff underestimated the extent to which their co-workers held negative views of spanking. If medical centers and other medical settings are to lead the charge in informing the community about the harms of spanking, comprehensive staff education about spanking is indicated.

  16. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view to the northwest. The power center is the cabinet on the right and the load center is the cabinet on the left of the photograph. A door to the generator barrel of Unit 1 is visible in the background. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  18. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  19. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated for the Earth Resources Observation Systems Program of the Department of the Interior by the Topographic Division of the Geological Survey to provide access to Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) imagery, USGS aerial photography, and NASA aircraft data for the general public, domestic government agencies at all levels, and foreign government agencies at all levels, and foreign governments. Facilities are available for data storage, retrieval, reproduction, and dissemination, and for user assistance and training.

  20. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  1. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  2. Computer Center Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-20

    introduction to the operating systems of the Cray X -MP (COS), DEC VAxcluster (VMS), and CDC (NOS) for applications programmers. Some information has been...Cray X -MP / 24 1-1-2 CDC CYBER 180 model 860A 1-1-2 DEC VAXcluster 1-1-3 DEC Remote Mini 1-1-3 The Integrated Supercomputer Network 1-1-4 User Interface...ADP Control Center 1-2-3 ( Software Available 1-3-1 2 The Cray X -MP 2-1-1 COS Version 1.16 2-1-1 Accessing the Cray X -MP 2-1-1 Cray Detasets 2-1-1

  3. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  4. Southeast Ecological Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlitz, Rachel J.

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems, from deep sea reefs and coastal marshes to freshwater springs and wetlands, are home to diverse assemblages of life. These commercially and ecologically important systems are part of our national heritage, and are often treasured places or refuges that protect rare or threatened species. In the water-rich Southeastern United States, managers face the challenge of understanding how water and land use affect the region's aquatic life. The Southeast Ecological Science Center (SESC) helps address that challenge by providing objective science that can be used to evaluate proposed actions and develop management strategies.

  5. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  6. Seafloor manifold center installed

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, K.

    1982-07-01

    The Shell/Esso Underwater Manifold Center (UMC), designed and tested as a diverless production facility, is a significant step toward really deep water oil and gas production. In May 1982, the 2100 metric ton unit was towed 645 miles from its Dutch fabrication yard and precisely emplaced in 500 ft water in the Cormorant field in only 6 days. When fully installed with all of its wells drilled and testing completed, the UMC will have cost an estimated $700 million. During its anticipated 25 yr operating life, the UMC is expected to produce ca 110 million bbl from the central Cormorant area. Design and operational criteria are described.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  8. A Client-Centered Review of Rogers with Gloria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    Carl Rogers's nondirective theory and his response style with Gloria (E. L. Shostrom, 1965) are discussed in reply to S. A. Wickman and C. Campbell's (2003) "An Analysis of How Carl Rogers Enacted Client-Centered Conversation With Gloria." Client-centered studies of C. Rogers's transcripts give context for reformulating S. A. Wickman and C.…

  9. Fundraising for Your Center: An Opportunity to Build Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsakoyias-Mendes, Vicky

    2010-01-01

    Last summer, the Chabot College Children's Center Evening Program came close to being shut down due to lack of funding. In order to break the typical mold of annual fundraising ideas (e.g., t-shirts, flower pots, and cookie sales) which give low returns, the Center hosted its first fundraising venture called "International Arts Performance…

  10. SU-E-T-529: Is MFO-IMPT Robust Enough for the Treatment of Head and Neck Tumors? A 2-Year Outcome Analysis Following Proton Therapy On the First 50 Oropharynx Patients at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S; Garden, A; Anderson, M; Rosenthal, D; Morrison, W; Gunn, B; Fuller, C; Phan, J; Zhang, X; Poenisch, F; Wu, R; Li, H; Gautam, A; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Zhu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-field optimization intensity modulated proton therapy (MFO-IMPT) for oropharyngeal tumors has been established using robust planning, robust analysis, and robust optimization techniques. While there are inherent uncertainties in proton therapy treatment planning and delivery, outcome reporting are important to validate the proton treatment process. The purpose of this study is to report the first 50 oropharyngeal tumor patients treated de-novo at a single institution with MFO-IMPT. Methods: The data from the first 50 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 2011 to December 2014 on a prospective IRB approved protocol were analyzed. Outcomes were analyzed to include local, regional, and distant treatment failures. Acute and late toxicities were analyzed by CTCAE v4.0. Results: All patients were treated with definitive intent. The median follow-up time of the 50 patients was 25 months. Patients by gender were male (84%) and female (16%). The average age was 61 years. 50% of patients were never smokers and 4% were current smokers. Presentation by stage; I–1, II–0, III– 9, IVA–37 (74%), IVB–3. 88% of patients were HPV/p16+. Patients were treated to 66–70 CGE. One local failure was reported at 13 months following treatment. One neck failure was reported at 12 months. 94% of patients were alive with no evidence of disease. One patient died without evidence of disease. There were no Grade 4 or Grade 5 toxicities. Conclusion: MFO-IMPT for oropharyngeal tumors is robust and provides excellent outcomes 2 years after treatment. A randomized trial is underway to determine if proton therapy will reduce chronic late toxicities of IMRT.

  11. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  12. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  13. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  14. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  15. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  16. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  17. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hall. Staffed by health care workers like nurses and doctors, school-based health centers provide a ... including mental health care. Centers may even have nurse practitioners, medical students, doctors, social workers, drug counselors, ...

  18. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  19. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  20. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events You are here Home National Center on Family Homelessness Center A staggering 2.5 million children ... the impact of homelessness on children, youth, and families. Through research, programs, trainings, and partnerships with the ...

  1. Matera CGS VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanotte, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the VLBI data analysis activities at the Space Geodesy Center (CGS), Matera, from January 2012 through December 2012, and the contributions that the CGS intends to provide for the future as an IVS Analysis Center.

  2. Optoelectronics Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-03

    Stone, A. Malcoci, R. E. Miles, and I . Camara Mayorga, Electron. Lett., 41, 128–129, (2005). 10S. D. Roh, T. S. Yeoh, R. B. Swint, A. E. Huber, C. Y...and K. A. Shore, Unlocking dynamical diversity, Wiley, 2005. 14F. Grillot, K. Veselinov, M. Gioannini, I . Montrosset, J. Even, R. Piron, E. Homeyer, S...Bimberg, IEEE J. Sel. Topics Quantum Electron., 8, pp. 984-991, (2002). 16M. A. Cataluna, D. I . Nikitichev, S. Mikroulis, H. Simos, C. Simos, C

  3. National Center for PTSD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management System (TMS) VA Learning University (VALU) SimLearn Libraries (VALNET) VA eHealth University (VEHU) VA Software Documentation Library (VDL) About VHA Learn about VHA Forms & Publications ...

  4. Center for Artificial Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-14

    students. The curriculum was designed to teach research skills, including modeling complex systems and agent architectures, designing experiments to test the...a complete model of Phoenix, and to lay the groundwork for a curriculum in agentology-the principled design of autonomous agents for complex...Lander, S.E., Lesser, V.R. and Connell , M.E. "Multi-Agent Search and Negotiation in Cooperative Expert Problem Solving," in Proceedings of the [AAAI

  5. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  6. Utilization of Award Fee Contracts at Navy Regional Contracting Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    California 92132-5106 8. Ellen H. Polen 1 Navy Regional Contracting Center, Detachment Long Beach Long Beach, California 90822-5095 9. LT Mark E. Hogenmiller 1 P.O. Box 3601 Erie, Pennsylvania 1650P-0601 77

  7. President Obama and Family Arrive at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, arrive aboard Air Force One at the Cape Canaveral AFS near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center at approximately 2 p.m. E...

  8. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  9. Off-center nuclei in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleus of a galaxy orbits around the mass centroid. Orbital motions appear overstable in numerical experiments started with a galaxy's nucleus at rest atop its mass centroid. The amplitude doubles in 6-10 orbital periods. Orbits precess, nutate, and change their amplitudes, but they keep fairly constant periods. Orbital periods are in resonance with local particle motions, and amplitudes reach a core radius. This resonance suggests that center motions are a local, rather than a global, phenomenon. The overstability implies that a galaxy cannot be formed in nature with its nucleus at rest atop its mass centroid, and that nuclei orbit the mass centroid in real galaxies. These center motions should show up observationally as a shift of the nucleus away from the center defined by nearby isophotes. Off-center nuclei have been reported in many galaxies (e.g., M33, M101, NGC 3379, NGC 3384). Other kinds of observations confirmed the picture of nonsteady galactic centers as well. Gas trapped in moving nuclear regions of a galaxy should show strange flow patterns with possible shocks. The nuclear regions of galaxies including Milky Way and of globular clusters are not likely to be in a static steady state.

  10. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  11. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  12. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA SLR Operational Center is responsible for: 1) NASA SLR network control, sustaining engineering, and logistics; 2) ILRS mission operations; and 3) ILRS and NASA SLR data operations. NASA SLR network control and sustaining engineering tasks include technical support, daily system performance monitoring, system scheduling, operator training, station status reporting, system relocation, logistics and support of the ILRS Networks and Engineering Working Group. These activities ensure the NASA SLR systems are meeting ILRS and NASA mission support requirements. ILRS mission operations tasks include mission planning, mission analysis, mission coordination, development of mission support plans, and support of the ILRS Missions Working Group. These activities ensure than new mission and campaign requirements are coordinated with the ILRS. Global Normal Points (NP) data, NASA SLR FullRate (FR) data, and satellite predictions are managed as part of data operations. Part of this operation includes supporting the ILRS Data Formats and Procedures Working Group. Global NP data operations consist of receipt, format and data integrity verification, archiving and merging. This activity culminates in the daily electronic transmission of NP files to the CDDIS. Currently of all these functions are automated. However, to ensure the timely and accurate flow of data, regular monitoring and maintenance of the operational software systems, computer systems and computer networking are performed. Tracking statistics between the stations and the data centers are compared periodically to eliminate lost data. Future activities in this area include sub-daily (i.e., hourly) NP data management, more stringent data integrity tests, and automatic station notification of format and data integrity issues.

  13. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  14. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  15. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  16. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  17. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  18. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  19. Defect centers in chemical-mechanical polished MOS oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Warren, W.L.; Hetherington, D.L.; Timon, R.P.; Resnick, P.J.; Winokur, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    Defect centers generated in vacuum-ultraviolet irradiated chemical-mechanical polished oxides have been characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance and C-V analysis. Both oxide trap E{sub {gamma}} and interface trap P{sub b0} centers were detected in unpolished and polished oxides. In addition, another interface defect center known as the P{sub b1} center was only identified in the polished oxides, suggesting that the polishing process altered the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.

  20. Finding Center: How Learning Centers Evolved in a Secondary Student-Centered Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movitz, Allison P.; Holmes, Kerry P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors elaborate on the experience of creating for high school students effective multisensory, hands-on learning centers that address a full range of elements from the English language arts curriculum. Allison P. Movitz and Kerry P. Holmes detail the centers Movitz designed for a Mostly Medieval unit to show how learning centers can help…

  1. Agricultural origins: centers and noncenters.

    PubMed

    Harlan, J R

    1971-10-29

    I propose the theory that agriculture originated independently in three different areas and that, in each case, there was a system composed of a center of origin and a noncenter, in which activities of domestication were dispersed over a span of 5,000 to 10,000 kilometers. One system includes a definable Near East center and a noncenter in Africa; another system includes a North Chinese center and a noncenter in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific; the third system includes a Mesoamerican center and a South American noncenter. There are suggestions that, in each case, the center and noncenter interact with each other. Crops did not necessarily originate in centers (in any conventional concept of the term), nor did agriculture necessarily develop in a geographical "center."

  2. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  3. Surface Spectroscopy Center Of Excellence Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We propose to develop a national center of excellence in Regolith Radiative Transfer (RRT), i.e., in modeling spectral reflectivity and emissivity of grainy or structured surfaces. The focus is the regime where the structural elements of grainy surfaces have grain sizes and separations of tens of microns, comparable to the wavelengths carrying diagnostic compositional information. This regime is of fundamental interest to remote sensing of planetary and terrestrial surfaces.

  4. Effects of Task-Centered vs. Topic-Centered Instructional Strategy Approaches on Problem Solving--Learning to Program in Flash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg-Kima, Rinat B.

    2012-01-01

    The task-centered instructional strategy (Merrill, 2009) was designed specifically for the purpose of teaching complex problem-solving skills and emphasizes teaching in the context of a concrete real world task. Nevertheless, unlike other problem-centered instructional methods (e.g., constructivism) the task-centered instructional strategy is a…

  5. The outcome of prostaglandin-E1 and dextran-40 compared to no antithrombotic therapy in head and neck free tissue transfer: analysis of 1,351 cases in a single center.

    PubMed

    Riva, Francesco M G; Chen, Yen-Chou; Tan, Ngian-Chye; Lin, Pao-Yuan; Tsai, Yun-Ta; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2012-07-01

    Free tissue transfer has become a popular technique for soft tissue defect reconstruction in head and neck cancer ablation. Although high success rates and good reliability of free flaps are proven, microvascular thrombosis is still the most critical issue for microsurgeons. Pharmacological antithrombotic agents are widely used but their efficacy is still debated. In this study, we analyzed whether prostaglandin-E1 (PGE1) and dextran-40 can improve the outcomes compared to no antithrombotic therapy at all. We retrospectively reviewed 1,351 free flaps performed for head and neck reconstruction after cancer ablation. Three groups defined were 232 flaps received PGE1, 283 flaps received dextran-40, and 836 received no antithrombotic therapy. The demographics of these three groups indicated no statistical differences. The results showed that flap survival revealed no significant difference among PGE1, dextran-40, and control group (P = 0.734). There was a tendency to hematomas in PGE1 group (P = 0.056) when compared with other two groups. Dextran-40 significantly increased flap failure rate in high-risk patients with diabetes mellitus (P = 0.006) or hypertension (P = 0.003), when compared with PGE1 and control group. These results revealed antithrombotic therapy with PGE1 and dextran-40 do not determine a significant improvement in flap survival.

  6. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  7. Web-based screening and brief intervention for student marijuana use in a university health center: pilot study to examine the implementation of eCHECKUP TO GO in different contexts.

    PubMed

    Palfai, Tibor P; Saitz, Richard; Winter, Michael; Brown, Timothy A; Kypri, Kypros; Goodness, Tracie M; O'Brien, Lauren M; Lu, Jon

    2014-09-01

    This pilot study sought to test the feasibility of procedures to screen students for marijuana use in Student Health Services (SHS) and test the efficacy of a web-based intervention designed to reduce marijuana use and consequences. Students were asked to participate in voluntary screening of health behaviors upon arrival at SHS. One hundred and twenty-three students who used marijuana at least monthly completed assessments and were randomized to one of four intervention conditions in a 2 (intervention: Marijuana eCHECKUP TO GO vs. control)×2 (site of intervention: on-site vs. off-site) between-groups design. Follow-up assessments were conducted online at 3 and 6 months. Latent growth modeling was used to provide effect size estimates for the influence of intervention on outcomes. One thousand and eighty undergraduate students completed screening. The intervention did not influence marijuana use frequency. However, there was evidence of a small overall intervention effect on marijuana-related consequences and a medium effect in stratified analyses in the on-site condition. Analyses of psychological variables showed that the intervention significantly reduced perceived norms regarding peer marijuana use. These findings demonstrate that it is feasible to identify marijuana users in SHS and deliver an automated web-based intervention to these students in different contexts. Effect size estimates suggest that the intervention has some promise as a means of correcting misperceptions of marijuana use norms and reducing marijuana-related consequences. Future work should test the efficacy of this intervention in a full scale randomized controlled trial.

  8. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Among 2011's many accomplishments, we safely retired the Space Shuttle Program after 30 incredible years; completed the International Space Station and are taking steps to enable it to reach its full potential as a multi-purpose laboratory; and helped to expand scientific knowledge with missions like Aquarius, GRAIL, and the Mars Science Laboratory. Responding to national budget challenges, we are prioritizing critical capabilities and divesting ourselves of assets no longer needed for NASA's future exploration programs. Since these facilities do not have to be maintained or demolished, the government saves money. At the same time, our commercial partners save money because they do not have to build new facilities. It is a win-win for everyone. Moving forward, 2012 will be even more historically significant as we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Kennedy Space Center. In the coming year, KSC will facilitate commercial transportation to low-Earth orbit and support the evolution of the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle as they ready for exploration missions, which will shape how human beings view the universe. While NASA's Vision is to lead scientific and technological advances in aeronautics and space for a Nation on the frontier of discovery KSC's vision is to be the world's preeminent launch complex for government and commercial space access, enabling the world to explore and work in space. KSC's Mission is to safely manage, develop, integrate, and sustain space systems through partnerships that enable innovative, diverse access to space and inspires the Nation's future explorers.

  9. Space Operations Learning Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  10. [Health centers: history and future prospects.].

    PubMed

    Colin, Marie-Pierre; Acker, Dominique

    2009-03-29

    Health houses and health centers are often hailed as specifically modern forms of medical practice in mobile healthcare provision. Yet the concept of health center emerged in the seventeenth century. The founding principles of these institutions were to promote access to good-quality universal healthcare and to practice a form of healthcare that treated patients in their globality (i.e. within their social and environmental context) based on public healthcare measures. Though they constitute a response to a specific healthcare project, healthcare centers face a number of specific difficulties that pose a challenge to their durability and development. Payment per consultation is ill-adapted to the remuneration of their services, and methods of remuneration that may be applicable to independent medical practitioners do not apply in the context of health centers, which may struggle to survive without the support of territorial collectivities (i.e. regional and local authorities) or associations. Health houses face similar difficulties in terms of their structural expenses. Expectations are high for trying out new methods of remuneration. The perspective and experience of healthcare centers will likely prove to be essential in this context. Their future needs to be envisaged alongside health houses and medical hubs. The growth of precarity and the increasing difficulties affecting access to healthcare provision need to be taken into account. The choice of the specific type of structure will depend on local realities, on the political will of regional authorities and on the specific projects of healthcare professionals. Yet whatever solution is envisaged, it will not be possible without public funding.

  11. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  12. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  13. Nanomaterials Commercialization Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    the surface morphology, the coating- substrate adhesion, and the diameter of the wire. Table I-Sununary of Preliminary Product Data MPI-1 MPI-2 MPI...not be sufficient m determining the final product , i.e. a specific NanoMetal + substrate combination. Additional properties and processing costs...aircraft. Additionally, the wire design may be modified to meet various product requirements by altering the substrate or coating materials and by

  14. Center for Artificial Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-14

    students. The curriculum was designed to teach research skills, including modeling complex systems and agent architectures, designing experiments to test...a complete model of Phoenix, and to lay the groundwork for a curriculum in agentology-the principled design of autonomous agents for complex...Lesser, V.R. and Connell , M.E. "Multi-Agent Search and Negotiation in Cooperative Expert Problem Solvin&" in Proceedings of the [AAAI] Workshop on

  15. Computer Center CDC Libraries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    TAPDMP9IM/U/U/ DMPCPA /S/5/Ni DUMPXPK/S/5/N/ DMPFIL /M/U/U/ FDMP /M/U/U/ * 01 OFF-LINE EQUIPMENT (LISTERS, REPRODUCERS, ETC.) * BRAILLE /M/U/U/ LISTCMP/M/U...OUTPUT OF EDITLIB ’LISTLIB’ AND ’CONTENT’ DIRECTIVES BRAILLE BRAILLE PRINTER " CALCIBL CALCULATE BEST BLOCK LENGTHS (I.E. - MIN TIME REQUIRED FOR RANDOM

  16. NRH Neuroscience Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Project E3: Neuropsychology Conference The Principal Investigator (Dr. Garmoe) attended fMRI workshops at the National Academy of Neuropsychology...annual conference in 2003. In addition, he met with Dr. Frank Hillary, an experienced fMRI researcher (who at the time was at Kessler), to discuss...feasibility of fMRI designs. Dr. Hillary affirmed the feasibility of fMRI protocols to investigate self-awareness, and possible collaboration was

  17. Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Supply Systems Command,Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound,467 W Street , Bremerton ,WA,98314-5100 8... Bremerton , WA Established: October 1967 Name Changes: Naval Supply Center Puget Sound, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Puget...or Sasebo) deployed Ships in the Western Pacific (WestPac) Naval Base Kitsap at Bremerton and Bangor (NBK at Bremerton or Bangor) Navy Region

  18. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  19. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  20. Optical Measurement Center Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, H.; Abercromby, K.; Mulrooney, M.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2005, an optical measurement center (OMC) was created to measure the photometric signatures of debris pieces. Initially, the OMC was equipped with a 300 W xenon arc lamp, a SBIG 512 x 512 ST8X MEI CCD camera with standard Johnson filters, and a Lynx 6 robotic arm with five degrees of freedom. As research progressed, modifications were made to the equipment. A customized rotary table was built to overcome the robot s limitation of 180 degree wrist rotation and provide complete 360 degree rotation with little human interaction. This change allowed an initial phase angle (source-object-camera angle) of roughly 5 degrees to be adjusted to 7, 10, 15, 18, 20, 25, or 28 degrees. Additionally, the Johnson R and I CCD filters were replaced with the standard astronomical filters suite (Bessell R,I). In an effort to reduce object saturation, the two generic aperture stops were replaced with neutral density filters. Initially data were taken with aluminum debris pieces from the European Space Operations Centre ESOC2 ground test and more recently with samples from a thermal multi-layered insulation (MLI) commonly used on rocket bodies and satellites. The ESOC2 data provided light curve analysis for one type of material but many different shapes, including flat, bent, curled, folded, and torn. The MLI samples are roughly the same size and shape, but have different surfaces that give rise to interesting photometric light curves. In addition, filter photometry was conducted on the MLI pieces, a process that also will be used on the ESOC2 samples. While obtaining light curve data an anomalous drop in intensity was observed when the table revolved through the second 180 degree rotation. Investigation revealed that the robot s wrist rotation is not reliable past 80 degrees, thus the object may be at slightly different angles at the 180 degree transition. To limit this effect, the initial rotation position begins with the object s minimal surface area facing the camera.

  1. Liver transplant center risk tolerance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott R; Karp, Seth J; Curry, Michael P; Barugel, Martin; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Rogers, Christin P; Hanto, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) condition for participation, using benchmark volume/outcomes requirements for certification, have been implemented. Consequently, the ability of a transplant center to assess its risk tolerance is important in successful management. An analysis of SRTR data was performed to determine donor/recipient risk factors for graft loss or patient death in the first year. Each transplant performed was then assigned a prospective relative risk (RR) of failure. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, transplants were selected at random that met the centers' acceptable risk tolerance. Transplant center volume was fixed and its risk tolerance was adjusted to determine the impact on outcomes. The model was run 1000 times on centers with varying volume. The modeling demonstrates that centers with smaller annual volumes must use a more risk taking strategy than larger volume centers to avoid being flagged for CMS volume requirements. The modeling also demonstrates optimal risk taking strategies for centers based upon volume to minimize the probability of being flagged for not meeting volume or outcomes benchmarks. Small volume centers must perform higher risk transplants to meet current CMS requirements and are at risk for adverse action secondary to chance alone.

  2. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Space Propulsion (CASP) is part of the University of Tennessee-Calspan Center for Aerospace Research (CAR). It was formed in 1985 to take advantage of the extensive research faculty and staff of the University of Tennessee and Calspan Corporation. It is also one of sixteen NASA sponsored Centers established to facilitate the Commercial Development of Space. Based on investigators' qualifications in propulsion system development, and matching industries' strong intent, the Center focused its efforts in the following technical areas: advanced chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, AI/Expert systems, fluids management in microgravity, and propulsion materials processing. This annual report focuses its discussion in these technical areas.

  3. National Center for Farmworker Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data Migrant Health Centers Population Estimates Resources Performance Management & Governance Tool Box > Administrative Governance Human Resources Needs Assessment Service Delivery Emergency Preparedness Call for ...

  4. Model for a patient-centered comparative effectiveness research center.

    PubMed

    Costlow, Monica R; Landsittel, Douglas P; James, A Everette; Kahn, Jeremy M; Morton, Sally C

    2015-04-01

    This special report describes the systematic approach the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) undertook in creating an infrastructure for comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research resources. We specifically highlight the administrative structure, communication and training opportunities, stakeholder engagement resources, and support services offered.

  5. 5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Log calving barn (center), loafing shed (right of center), and wood-frame garage (far right). View to southwest. - William & Lucina Bowe Ranch, County Road 44, 0.1 mile northeast of Big Hole River Bridge, Melrose, Silver Bow County, MT

  6. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  7. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive

  8. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  9. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... submit grant applications for the University Transportation Centers (UTCs) program. The Department... national university transportation Centers, regional university transportation Centers, and Tier...

  10. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... opportunity to submit applications for a grant as a Regional Center in the University Transportation Centers... will solicit competitive grant applications for two regional university transportation centers,...

  11. 78 FR 66754 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ..., (Virtual Meeting). Contact Person: Lynn E Luethke, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Center for Scientific... Panel, Social Psychology, Personality and Interpersonal Processes Overflow. Date: December 2, 2013....

  12. Just where exactly is the radar? (a.k.a. the radar antenna phase center).

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-12-01

    The %E2%80%9Clocation%E2%80%9D of the radar is the reference location to which the radar measures range. This is typically the antenna's %E2%80%9Cphase center.%E2%80%9D However, the antenna's phase center is not generally obvious, and may not correspond to any seemingly obvious physical location, such as the focal point of a dish reflector. This report calculates the phase center of an offset-fed dish reflector antenna.

  13. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 technical report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during 1990. The report lists 130 publications, 226 presentations, and 87 new technology reports and patents.

  14. Saving Energy at Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-12

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions essential to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components.

  15. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Univ., IL. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    This document consists of two separate publications: (1) "The Power of Knowing", a brief 12-page description of the Chapin Hall Center for Children, and (2) "Projects and Publications", a 67-page list of the center's projects and publications as of Autumn 1997. "The Power of Knowing" describes the Chapin Hall Center…

  16. Guidelines for ABE Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourifman, Vivian M., Ed.

    A federally funded demonstration project in adult basic education is presented. The project's proposal set forth the development of demonstration adult basic education learning centers within the central cities area of the cities of Camden and Newark, New Jersey. During 22 months of operation on a demonstration basis, each center developed…

  17. Student Centers/Service Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a college building judged to be an outstanding student center/service area in a competition, which evaluated outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. Provides data on the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center,…

  18. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for MISR Level 1B2 files. This is ... version of the IDL package or by using the IDL Virtual Machine application. The IDL Virtual Machine is bundled with IDL and is ...

  19. Center for space microelectronics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during the past year. The report lists 187 publications, 253 presentations, and 111 new technology reports and patents in the areas of solid-state devices, photonics, advanced computing, and custom microcircuits.

  20. Model Learning Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daviess County School District, Owensboro, KY.

    This handbook describes the model learning resources center in operation at Daviess County (Kentucky) State Vocational-Technical School and details its objectives, materials, and methods of operation. The manual is organized in six sections. The first section describes the learning resources center, and details its philosophy, purpose, objectives,…

  1. The Communication Center Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medcalf, Ann Wachob

    This program manual describes the Communication Center at Joseph Kerr Junior High School in Sacramento County, California, which was established in 1975 to prevent student high risk behavior and to encourage positive attitudes in the school community. The philosophy of the Center, which is based on the theories of Rudolf Dreikurs, is described,…

  2. Stennis Space Center Virtual Tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Have you ever wanted to visit Stennis Space Center? Or perhaps you have and you're ready to come back. Either way, you can visit Stennis Space Center from anywhere in world! Click on the video to begin your tour.

  3. Executive Center Makes Rapid Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumarsq, Carolyn C.; Scott, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    In a pilot test, superintendents participated in self-assessment activities in the American Association of School Administrator's Executive Development Center program. Activity stages centered on professional attitudes and skills, personal health, and fitness. Data provided a profile for professional development. Participants felt activities were…

  4. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  5. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  6. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 193 publications, 211 presentations, and 125 new technology reports and patents.

  7. AAFES Shopping Center Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFB, Montana. February. _________. 2006c. Malmstrom Air Force Base Runoff Curve Numbers, Time of Concentration, Peak Discharge. Report Prepared...The existing Base Exchange was constructed in 1957 and the building suffers from dated design features that limit retail merchandising...proposes to construct a new Shopping Center at Malmstrom Air Force Base (AFB), Montana. The Shopping Center would feature retail and food

  8. Sensor Applications at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.; Eckhoff, Anthony J.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transducers used at KSC (Kennedy Space Center), in support of processing and launch of flight vehicles and payloads, are designed and tested to meet specific program requirements. Any equipment, transducer or support instrumentation in direct contact or in support to flight vehicle operations is considered ground support equipment (GSE) and required to meet strict program requirements (i.e. Space Shuttle Program, Space Station Program, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, etc.) Transducers used in KSC applications are based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) transducers and sensors. In order to fully meet KSC requirements, these transducers evolve from standard COTS to modified COTS. The Transducer and Data Acquisition Group of the Instrumentation Branch at Kennedy Space Center is responsible for providing the technical expertise as well as qualification-testing capability to transform these COTS transducers in modified COTS suitable for use around flight hardware.

  9. 78 FR 30303 - National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  10. 78 FR 14549 - National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  11. Recharging behavior of nitrogen-centers in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Philipps, Jan M. Meyer, Bruno K.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Stehr, Jan E.; Buyanova, Irina; Tarun, Marianne C.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2014-08-14

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance was used to study N{sub 2}-centers in ZnO, which show a 5-line spectrum described by the hyperfine interaction of two nitrogen nuclei (nuclear spin I = 1, 99.6% abundance). The recharging of this center exhibits two steps, a weak onset at about 1.4 eV and a strongly increasing signal for photon energies above 1.9 eV. The latter energy coincides with the recharging energy of N{sub O} centers (substitutional nitrogen atoms on oxygen sites). The results indicate that the N{sub 2}-centers are deep level defects and therefore not suitable to cause significant hole-conductivity at room temperature.

  12. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

  13. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education.

  14. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River.

  15. Grasp admittance center. A concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoga, K. B.; Goldenberg, A. A.

    1991-05-01

    The ultimate goal of the research on articulated hands in general is to use them to do tasks in a way similar to that of humans. A systematic analysis reveals that the day-to-day tasks of humans include some common task primitives such as twist, turn, insert, pullout, push, pull, lift, and place. During each of these operations, the grasp dynamic behavior plays an important role and more so in tasks involving manipulation of delicate objects. Introduced in this paper is the concept of the grasp admittance center, a notion that aims to make an articulated grasp exhibit a directionally decoupled dynamic behavior. An admittance center is conceptualized as the superposition of compliance, accommodation, and mobility centers in a desired coordinate frame. A grasp with an admittance center will have three useful features: stability, decoupled force motion relation, and decoupled time-response. These features are also useful to other closed kinematic chain robotic devices such as the cooperating multiarms and multilegged mobile robots engaged in non-quasistatic (dynamic) manipulation tasks. As a preparation to demonstrate the concept experimentally, a method of synthesizing articulated grasps so as to achieve an admittance center has been developed as well as a method of choosing appropriate location and related parameters for the center. The sensitivity of the center to its parameter imprecision has also been analyzed.

  16. NSI operations center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanley, Nancy L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) Network Operations Staff is responsible for providing reliable communication connectivity for the NASA science community. As the NSI user community expands, so does the demand for greater interoperability with users and resources on other networks (e.g., NSFnet, ESnet), both nationally and internationally. Coupled with the science community's demand for greater access to other resources is the demand for more reliable communication connectivity. Recognizing this, the NASA Science Internet Project Office (NSIPO) expands its Operations activities. By January 1990, Network Operations was equipped with a telephone hotline, and its staff was expanded to six Network Operations Analysts. These six analysts provide 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week coverage to assist site managers with problem determination and resolution. The NSI Operations staff monitors network circuits and their associated routers. In most instances, NSI Operations diagnoses and reports problems before users realize a problem exists. Monitoring of the NSI TCP/IP Network is currently being done with Proteon's Overview monitoring system. The Overview monitoring system displays a map of the NSI network utilizing various colors to indicate the conditions of the components being monitored. Each node or site is polled via the Simple Network Monitoring Protocol (SNMP). If a circuit goes down, Overview alerts the Network Operations staff with an audible alarm and changes the color of the component. When an alert is received, Network Operations personnel immediately verify and diagnose the problem, coordinate repair with other networking service groups, track problems, and document problem and resolution into a trouble ticket data base. NSI Operations offers the NSI science community reliable connectivity by exercising prompt assessment and resolution of network problems.

  17. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  18. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  19. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  20. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  1. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  2. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  3. World Reference Center for Arboviruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    multiple sclerosis . Lyme disease was associated in distribution with Ixodes ticks but the etiologic agent was not isolated. The reference center distributed 566 ampoules of reference sera, viruses, and antigens during 1977; mosquito and vertebrate cell lines were also distributed.

  4. Kennedy Space Center Payload Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Ronnie; Engler, Tom; Colloredo, Scott; Zide, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the payload processing functions at Kennedy Space Center. It details some of the payloads processed at KSC, the typical processing tasks, the facilities available for processing payloads, and the capabilities and customer services that are available.

  5. Poison control center - emergency number

    MedlinePlus

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  6. Student-Centered Reading Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, James; Wagner, Betty Jane

    1991-01-01

    Offers student-centered reading activities designed to bring students to reading maturity and involvement in literature. Discusses partner reading, dramatizing and performing texts, transforming texts, journal writing, discussion, and writing. (PRA)

  7. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  8. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  9. Clean Air Technology Center Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  10. Oceans and Human Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ocean and human health science can help prevent disease outbreaks and improve public health through a deeper understanding of the causes ... our Center and the field of oceans and human health science. More Research Learn about the research ...

  11. Kennedy Space Center Design Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humeniuk, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Perform simulations of ground operations leading up to launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA since 1987. We use 3D Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to verify that operations are feasible, efficient and safe.

  12. Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center is EPA's primary resource for services and expertise in the areas of consensus-building, collaborative problem solving, alternative dispute resolution, and environmental collaboration and conflict resolution.

  13. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  14. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  15. Human-Centered Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  16. Parent and Child Living Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushaw, David R.

    1978-01-01

    Parent and child living centers offer a program to improve parenting skills with areas of learning including child growth and development, family management, home care and repair, and personal growth and development. (MM)

  17. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  18. Technology Development Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is developing and testing VLBI technologies and conducts observations with this new equipment. This report gives an overview of the Technology Development Center (TDC) at NICT and summarizes recent activities.

  19. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  20. Center Gets Commuters, Residents Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The new student center at Trenton State College is situated on the walkway between the central campus and the commuter parking areas. The location brings resident and commuter students together. (Author/MLF)

  1. Center Spot: Shoe Box Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jan

    1976-01-01

    This is the second "Center Spot" devoted to Jan Hoffman's "Shoe Box Science," a program that organizes manipulative materials so that children can identify, describe, order, construct, name and distinguish on their own.

  2. The SIRTF Science Center: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Ebert, R.; Latter, W. B.; Moshir, M.; Nichols, J. B.; Potts, S. K.

    1997-12-01

    The SIRTF Science Center (SSC) is charged with designing, planning and developing SIRTF science operations, and with conducting these operations including automated data processing for release to the community once SIRTF is launched. The SSC is also the primary interface between the SIRTF project and its scientific users. This paper will present the charter, scope, organization and development plans for the SSC, and summarize the current status of the Center.

  3. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  4. Joint Center for Robotics (JCR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Unclassified 1 Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) Dr. Jim Overholt 15 April 2008 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is...REPORT DATE APR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ANSI Std Z39-18 Unclassified 2 TARDEC JCR Robotics CAST Projects & Cells “White Hat” Organization - Understand the needs of the user and create

  5. Subpopulations of B lymphocytes in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, G; Cebra-Thomas, J A; Mustain, E; Davie, J M; Alley, C D; Nahm, M H

    1987-10-01

    With two new monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry, we defined three subpopulations among B cells expressing binding sites for peanut agglutinin (i.e., B cells of the germinal center). On monoclonal antibody (5B5) binds globotriaosyl ceramide. The B lymphocytes binding 5B5 have binding sites for peanut agglutinin on the surface and express only small amounts of sIgD and sIgM. When tested against a panel of B cell lines, only Burkitt's lymphoma cells were 5B5+. Moreover, the 5B5+ cells have larger average sizes and a large fraction of proliferating cells. The other monoclonal antibody (HK23) binds a 90,000 protein. Lymphocytes binding HK23 are 5B5- and include T cells and a subpopulation of B cells. In contrast to 5B5+ cells, the HK23+ and peanut agglutinin positive B cells express a large amount of sIgM. These two subpopulations of germinal centers are distinct from the germinal center B cell subpopulation expressing the CD23 (Blast-2) antigen. The CD23+ B cells are 5B5- and express an intermediate level of HK23 antigen. In addition, CD23+ B cells are highly variable in number, whereas the proportions of HK23+ and 5B5+ cells are relatively stable.

  6. Voluntary spatial attention induces spatial facilitation and object-centered suppression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhicheng

    2014-06-01

    Many daily activities require encoding spatial locations relative to a reference object (e.g., "leftness"), known as object-centered space. Integrating object-centered space and visual attention, this study reports a new form of attention called object-centered suppression, as revealed by a novel object-centered paradigm. Specifically, after cueing a location within an object (e.g., on the left), performance at 2 locations within another, uncued object was worse for the location that shared the same object-centered space as the cued location (e.g., on the left) than the location that did not (e.g., on the right). Because these 2 locations were equidistant to the cued location and because both appeared within the same object, the effect could not be explained by space-based or object-based accounts of attention. Alternative accounts based on attentional capture were also refuted. Instead, a novel object-centered Simon effect (stimulus-response interference) reveals automatic object-centered spatial coding, supporting an object-centered account: when attention is disengaged from an invalidly cued location, a negative attention priority signal at the cued location is tagged and transferred across objects in an object-centered manner. Object-centered suppression therefore unveils a new functional footprint of voluntary spatial attention, integrating space-based and object-based selection through object-centered space.

  7. Correlations between Abelian monopoles and center vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Nejad, Seyed Mohsen; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2017-04-01

    We study the correlations between center vortices and Abelian monopoles for SU(3) gauge group. Combining fractional fluxes of monopoles, center vortex fluxes are constructed in the thick center vortex model. Calculating the potentials induced by fractional fluxes constructing the center vortex flux in a thick center vortex-like model and comparing with the potential induced by center vortices, we observe an attraction between fractional fluxes of monopoles constructing the center vortex flux. We conclude that the center vortex flux is stable, as expected. In addition, we show that adding a contribution of the monopole-antimonopole pairs in the potentials induced by center vortices ruins the Casimir scaling at intermediate regime.

  8. The Research Role of a National Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Harry F.

    The functional role of a national center for vocational education depends on the people doing the work; consequently, the center sets its own agenda when it makes personal decisions. A center's role should include two elements: in setting its own research agenda, a center should take a broad perspective on vocational education; and a center should…

  9. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side.

  10. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  11. The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following is a technical report of the progress made under Cooperative Agreement NCC5494, the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST). The period covered by this report is October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001. GEST is a consortium of scientists and engineers, led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to conduct scientific research in Earth and information sciences and related technologies in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). GEST was established through a cooperative agreement signed May 11, 2000, following a competitive procurement process initiated by GSFC.

  12. Center-Surround Inhibition in Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Egner, Tobias

    2016-01-11

    Directing visual attention toward a particular feature or location in the environment suppresses processing of nearby stimuli [1-4]. Echoing the center-surround organization of retinal ganglion cell receptive fields [5], and biasing of competitive local neuronal dynamics in favor of task-relevant stimuli [6], this "inhibitory surround" attention mechanism accentuates the demarcation between task-relevant and irrelevant items. Here, we show that internally maintaining a color stimulus in working memory (WM), rather than visually attending the stimulus in the external environment, produces an analogous pattern of inhibition for stimuli that are nearby in color space. Replicating a well-known effect of attentional capture by stimuli that match WM content [7], visual attention was biased toward (task-irrelevant) stimuli that exactly matched a WM item. This bias was curtailed, however, for stimuli that were very similar to the WM content (i.e., within the inhibitory zone surrounding the focus of WM) and recovered for less similar stimuli (i.e., beyond the bounds of the inhibitory surround). Moreover, the expression of this inhibition effect was positively associated with WM performance across observers. In a second experiment, inhibition also occurred between two similar items simultaneously held in WM. This suggests that maintenance in WM is characterized by an excitatory peak centered on the focus of (internal) attention, surrounded by an inhibitory zone to limit interference by irrelevant and confusable representations. Here, thus, we show for the first time that the same center-surround selection mechanism that focuses visual attention on sensory stimuli also selectively maintains internally activated representations in WM.

  13. Ontogenesis of the thermogenic center in hornets.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Natalya Y; Plotkin, Marian; Volynchik, Stanislav; Bergman, David J; Ishay, Jacob S

    2007-09-01

    In the Oriental hornet, a thermogenic center is located in its prothorax. The present study attempted to elucidate the development of this organ with age, that is, by following the development of the thermogenic center in the hornet from its pupal stage until several days after eclosion of the imago. To this end, use was made of an infrared camera, with which pictures were taken of the prothorax in hornets at various ages, i.e., several days prior eclosion, 24 h after eclosion, and 48-h posteclosion. The photographic findings established that prior to 48-h posteclosion there was no thermally distinct region or spot in the prothorax, but at about 48 h, such a "hot spot," namely, a point whose temperature is greater than that of the rest of the prothorax, does appear, and its appearance coincides with certain specific nest activities like warming of the pupae. Next, an attempt was made to transplant by allograft the region in the prothorax housing the hot spot. Accordingly, several pupae at 2 days prior to eclosion were subjected to the following procedure; their future prothoracic thermogenic center was excised and so also an equally sized piece of cuticle from the dorsal region of their abdomen, and the two now allografted in exchange, i.e., the piece from the prothorax replacing the abdominal piece and vice versa. The result of this exchange-transplant was studied 48 h after eclosion of the operated hornets and showed disruption of heat formation in the prothoracic site coupled with nonappearance of a hot spot in the abdominal site. As for the functional, intact hot spot in the adult hornet, it is characterized by a high concentration of tracheae, with numerous mitochondria in between them that probably contribute to the heat generation.

  14. Finding Communities by Their Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Pei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Detecting communities or clusters in a real-world, networked system is of considerable interest in various fields such as sociology, biology, physics, engineering science, and interdisciplinary subjects, with significant efforts devoted in recent years. Many existing algorithms are only designed to identify the composition of communities, but not the structures. Whereas we believe that the local structures of communities can also shed important light on their detection. In this work, we develop a simple yet effective approach that simultaneously uncovers communities and their centers. The idea is based on the premise that organization of a community generally can be viewed as a high-density node surrounded by neighbors with lower densities, and community centers reside far apart from each other. We propose so-called “community centrality” to quantify likelihood of a node being the community centers in such a landscape, and then propagate multiple, significant center likelihood throughout the network via a diffusion process. Our approach is an efficient linear algorithm, and has demonstrated superior performance on a wide spectrum of synthetic and real world networks especially those with sparse connections amongst the community centers.

  15. Finding Communities by Their Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Pei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Detecting communities or clusters in a real-world, networked system is of considerable interest in various fields such as sociology, biology, physics, engineering science, and interdisciplinary subjects, with significant efforts devoted in recent years. Many existing algorithms are only designed to identify the composition of communities, but not the structures. Whereas we believe that the local structures of communities can also shed important light on their detection. In this work, we develop a simple yet effective approach that simultaneously uncovers communities and their centers. The idea is based on the premise that organization of a community generally can be viewed as a high-density node surrounded by neighbors with lower densities, and community centers reside far apart from each other. We propose so-called “community centrality” to quantify likelihood of a node being the community centers in such a landscape, and then propagate multiple, significant center likelihood throughout the network via a diffusion process. Our approach is an efficient linear algorithm, and has demonstrated superior performance on a wide spectrum of synthetic and real world networks especially those with sparse connections amongst the community centers. PMID:27053090

  16. Child Care Center Characteristics Associated With Preschoolers’ Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A.; Khoury, Jane C.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite children spending long hours in child care centers, it is unknown what center characteristics are associated with children’s moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at the center and over the 24-hour day. Methods Mixed model ANOVA evaluated associations between 23 center characteristics (e.g., policies, facilities, practices, and staff training) and time in MVPA, measured with accelerometers, at the child care center and over the 24-hour day among 388 preschoolers from 30 randomly selected child care centers in Cincinnati, Ohio. Data collection occurred from November 2009 through January 2011; data analyses occurred in 2012–2014. Results Ninety percent of centers reported scheduling two or more outdoor sessions daily, yet only 40% of children had two or more outdoor sessions; 32% had no time outdoors. Eighty-three percent of centers reported scheduling ≥60 minutes outdoors; 28% of children experienced this during observation. Children spent a mean (SE) of 2.0 (0.06) minutes/hour in MVPA. Children with ≥60 minutes outdoor time had 0.6 minutes/hour more MVPA in child care (p=0.001), and 0.5 minutes/hour over the 24-hour day (p=0.001) than those who did not. Presence of an indoor play space, large outdoor playground, portable or fixed play equipment, staff PA training, weather and clothing policies, and TV/computer use were not related to children’s MVPA. Conclusions Outdoor time occurred less frequently than scheduled. Children with ≥60 minutes of outdoor time at the center were more active than children without. Centers may increase preschoolers’ PA by adhering to the scheduled ≥60 minutes of outdoor time daily. PMID:26585052

  17. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  18. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  19. Vet Centers. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-04

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This interim final rule amends regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  20. PACS strategy for imaging centers.

    PubMed

    Bedel, Victoria; Zdanowicz, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) have been available in imaging centers for many years, but they often were less functional, were not well integrated into patient information systems, and lacked the network backbone to implement a system. As modalities are replaced and technology improves, the ability and time for an imaging center to acquire, integrate, and utilize PACS has arrived. However, each imaging center must determine why it should invest in PACS. A business plan is the fundamental need. Each imaging center must understand its target market, growth rate, and staffing plans. Additional considerations lie in current and future modality availability, the need for offsite delivery of images and reports, and the potential need for remote transmission of images. These issues must be identified and prioritized. A multidisciplinary team is essential. The most successful PACS implementation begins with complete involvement from all levels. The team should be comprised of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals, and approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. The team must jointly decide on the project's objectives. These objectives fall under 4 categories: clinical, service, financial, and performance. PACS must be considered a tool to help accomplish each objective. The imaging center must determine its top priorities, then translate them into a technology "wish list." The center can then list those pieces of technology that are most important and prioritize them. There are even more considerations for connecting multiple imaging centers. The team must create a comprehensive request for proposal (RFP) and determine the vendors that will receive the document. Once the RFP responses have been received and the vendor has been selected, an effective training plan must be executed. Training plans should be competency-based, ensuring comfort and competency among all staff. Upon

  1. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  2. Agriculture: About EPA's National Agriculture Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's National Agriculture Center (Ag Center), with the support of the United States Department of Agriculture, serves growers, livestock producers, other agribusinesses, and agricultural information/education providers.

  3. Evaluating Your Campus Mail Center Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Mitchell D.

    2003-01-01

    Describes five strategies to consider when evaluating the security of a campus mail center: mail center efficiency, electronic tracking, identifying dangerous mail, training, and continuity planning. (EV)

  4. Lost Dollars Threaten Research in Public Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Henry R; Vermillion, Eric B

    2017-03-01

    The decrease of federal and state support threatens long-term sustainability of research in publicly supported academic health centers. In weathering these financial threats, research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has undergone 3 substantial changes: institutional salary support goes preferentially to senior faculty, whereas the young increasingly depend on grants; private and government support for research grows apace in clinical departments but declines in basic science departments; and research is judged more on its quantity (numbers of investigators and federal and private dollars) than on its goals, achievements, or scientific quality. We propose specific measures to alleviate these problems. Other large public academic health centers probably confront similar issues, but-except for UCSF-such centers have not been subjected to detailed public analysis.-Bourne, H. R., Vermillion, E. B. Lost dollars threaten research in public academic health centers.

  5. National Geophysical Data Center Tsunami Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, K. J.; Dunbar, P. K.; Brocko, R.

    2008-12-01

    NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology long-term tsunami data archive provides data and derived products essential for tsunami hazard assessment, forecast and warning, inundation modeling, preparedness, mitigation, education, and research. As a result of NOAA's efforts to strengthen its tsunami activities, the long-term tsunami data archive has grown from less than 5 gigabyte in 2004 to more than 2 terabytes in 2008. The types of data archived for tsunami research and operation activities have also expanded in fulfillment of the P.L. 109-424. The archive now consists of: global historical tsunami, significant earthquake and significant volcanic eruptions database; global tsunami deposits and proxies database; reference database; damage photos; coastal water-level data (i.e. digital tide gauge data and marigrams on microfiche); bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data as collected by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys. The tsunami data archive comes from a wide variety of data providers and sources. These include the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, NOAA National Data Buoy Center, NOAA National Ocean Service, IOC/NOAA International Tsunami Information Center, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, tsunami catalogs, reconnaissance reports, journal articles, newspaper articles, internet web pages, and email. NGDC has been active in the management of some of these data for more than 50 years while other data management efforts are more recent. These data are openly available, either directly on-line or by contacting NGDC. All of the NGDC tsunami and related databases are stored in a relational database management system. These data are accessible over the Web as tables, reports, and interactive maps. The maps provide integrated web-based GIS access to individual GIS layers including tsunami sources, tsunami effects, significant earthquakes

  6. Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained from the center's six research projects are reviewed, including research on psychometric assessment of twins with reading disabilities, reading and language processes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and executive functions, linkage analysis and physical mapping, computer-based remediation of reading disabilities, and…

  7. Ames Research Center cryogenics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs describe the Ames Research Center's cryogenics program. Diagrams are given of a fluid management system, a centrifugal pump, a flow meter, a liquid helium test facility, an extra-vehicular activity coupler concept, a dewar support with passive orbital disconnect, a pulse tube refrigerator, a dilution refrigerator, and an adiabatic demagnetization cooler.

  8. College Centers for Older Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judith L.

    Across the nation, colleges are discovering a new group of students: retired learners. Special programs are emerging to meet the unique needs and interests of this mature population. This booklet describes these programs under the generic title, College Centers for Older Learners (CCOLs). CCOLs offer a stimulating college environment for older…

  9. The National Conservation Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jeffrey P.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) which provides a host of benefits for fish and wildlife pros and includes classrooms, laboratories, and residential lodges. Provides information about some of the courses offered such as how to use global positioning systems and water quality testing. (ASK)

  10. Ethnic Heritage Learning Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eric R.

    This paper provides a description and evaluation of the Ethnic Heritage Learning Resource Center, a program designed to provide a concentrated and personalized enrichment program of instruction to children showing severe reading deficiencies. Approximately 1,200 fourth and fifth graders drawn from eight schools in New York City participated. The…

  11. Writing Centers in 2020--Gone!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Thomas L.

    Technology brought the writing center to life because of the word processor, but new technology is actually going to create robotic life that thinks with us, for us, to us. It will offer portability all from a microchip stored in a coat pocket. Technology will continue to expedite today's hurry up world, and this will carry over into the writer's…

  12. Microcomputers in the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherouse, Vicki, Ed.; Post, Richard, Ed.

    Produced to provide educators and library media personnel with some understanding of and direction in the rapidly expanding field of microcomputers and their applications, this monograph includes several articles dealing specifically with media center applications and others concerned more generally with the microcomputer in educational settings.…

  13. Multiple Intelligences Centers and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Carolyn; Freeman, Lynn

    Based upon Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, this book guides elementary school teachers through the process of using classroom learning centers and projects by providing choices for students. The guide is divided into two sections, providing the theoretical background and information on how to develop multiple intelligences learning…

  14. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... has a health center by contacting your child's teacher or the school office. Most school-based health ...

  15. The Web Resource Collaboration Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joanna C.

    2004-01-01

    The Web Resource Collaboration Center (WRCC) is a web-based tool developed to help software engineers build their own web-based learning and performance support systems. Designed using various online communication and collaboration technologies, the WRCC enables people to: (1) build a learning and professional development resource that provides…

  16. Resource Centers for Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Linda R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Shared Information Services is a state-operated network of four resource centers for gifted education in Indiana. The network provides support in the areas of program development, teacher education, classroom teaching resources, and program evaluation. A variety of library and technical assistance services is provided to teachers and others by…

  17. The Mud Center: Recapturing Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Becky J.; Bullard, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Montana child development center's creation of an area in which children could enjoy messy, creative, sensory experiences playing with mud and a wide variety of outdoor props. Discusses how mud play contributed to young children's emerging interests and provided opportunities for expressing creativity, enhancing fine motor skills, and…

  18. Remote Science Operation Center research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in the following areas is discussed: the design, planning and operation of a remote science payload operations control center; design and planning of a data link via satellite; and the design and prototyping of an advanced workstation environment for multi-media (3-D computer aided design/computer aided engineering, voice, video, text) communications and operations.

  19. Learner-Centered Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This chapter offers a theoretical rationale and an explanation of evidence for using research-validated, learner-centered principles and practices in online course development, highlighting the evidence-based practices that have been used successfully to develop online courses that engage and retain students.

  20. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas; Pienkos, Phil; Sluiter, Justin; Magrini, Kim; McMillan, Jim

    2014-07-28

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National Bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  1. NREL National Bioenergy Center Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Foust, Thomas; Pienkos, Phil; Sluiter, Justin; Magrini, Kim; McMillan, Jim

    2016-07-12

    The demand for clean, sustainable, secure energy is growing... and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is answering the call. NREL's National Bioenergy Center is pioneering biofuels research and development and accelerating the pace these technologies move into the marketplace.

  2. Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleidman, Richard; Kaufman, Yoram; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The newly established Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER) located at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt MD is dedicated to fostering interdisciplinary research in all aspects of aerosol science. AEROCENTER will be an incubator for innovative new analysis of existing data and ideas for new space missions. The plan is to tap and harvest ideas from a broad international and interdisciplinary science community and to incorporate these ideas into NASA's aerosol research effort for understanding and predicting the aerosol effect on climate and the environment. In order to achieve this goal the center aims to host several established and developing scientists for a period of 3-6 months each year. AEROCENTER will also develop a new technical infrastructure that will integrate the present aerosol research activities and data resources of GSFC/Greenbelt and GSFC/GISS, increase efficiency in the use of NASA remote sensing data, and increase the involvement of a larger national and international scientific community. The center aims to institutionalize and extend the present knowledge base within NASA into a national resource for the education and research communities.

  3. A Tale of Three Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubey, Lynn; Huffman, Dennis; Grinberg, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Prince George's Community College has developed three distinct models for off-campus centers. Examination of each model reveals the impact of variables such as location, ownership, design, target audience for a particular site (student demographics, community needs, and access issues), the role of partnerships with other institutions, and…

  4. The Center for Educational Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Television, Inc., Manila (Philippines).

    Although 26% of the Philippine national budget is spent on education, serious problems still exist. To update and revitalize the curriculum, to bring efficient teaching to isolated classrooms, and to make available modern audiovisual aids the Center for Educational Television on the campus of Ateneo de Manila University in Quezon City broadcasts…

  5. Osteochondroses: Diseases of Growth Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Arthur M.

    1989-01-01

    Many growth center disorders may be associated with athletic activities like Little League baseball and year-round gymnastics. Osteochondroses are developmental disorders usually diagnosed in growing children and associated with anatomic sites undergoing transition from cartilage to bone. Radiographic methods of diagnosing these problems are…

  6. The DLESE Community Services Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, E.; Aivazian, B.; Manduca, C.; Mogk, D.

    2003-12-01

    The DLESE Community Services Center (DCSC) is one of several centers recently funded by the National Science Foundation to promote greater and more effective use of Digital Library resources. The primary goals of the DCSC are to: (1) increase the current resource user and contributor base to include greater numbers of K-12, informal, and college educators and students, (2) diversify the DLESE user and contributor base to include rich and robust representation of ethnic, cultural, and differently-abled groups, (3) improve the ability of users and contributors to easily find, adapt, and use high quality digital resources in their classrooms, laboratories, and communities and (4) demonstrate how DLESE can support community activity addressing issues in geoscience education. During the course of the next three years we will: (a) solicit, create, and disseminate "exemplars" that highlight effective digital resource use in a variety of diverse educational settings, (b) continue to support and promote on-line DLESE community services, and (c) work to develop a DLESE ambassadors outreach program involving educators, scientists, and students working across the Earth, space, and environmental sciences. Collaborations with the DLESE Evaluation and Data Centers, collection builders, the DLESE Program Center staff, as well as diverse audience groups will be a key focus of our efforts. We invite you to join us as we work to build and support the next generation of digital services and resources for educators and students at all levels.

  7. People-Centered Community Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, John Michael; Angulo, Julio

    1990-01-01

    Criticisms of rational synoptic planning are that it is elitist, simplistic, and supportive of existing power relationships. An alternative, people-centered community planning, views the population to be studied as ideological and historical beings, uses knowledge of and by the people as a base, requires interpersonal as well as analytical skills,…

  8. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Achievement scores drive much of the effort in today's accountability system, however, there is much more that occurs in every school, every day. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability can be used from micro to macro giving School Boards and Administration a process for monitoring the results of the entire school operation effectively and…

  9. Neighborhoods and Neighborhood Centers. Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Mary; And Others

    The first seven essays discuss the rise of community schools in urban public education, neighborhood health centers, churches in the inner city, cooperatives and credit unions in low income urban areas, job training and placement in neighborhood based programs, employment and supervision of nonprofessionals, urban observatories, and social…

  10. Kepler Science Operations Center Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middour, Christopher; Klaus, Todd; Jenkins, Jon; Pletcher, David; Cote, Miles; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Wohler, Bill; Girouard, Forrest; Gunter, Jay P.; Uddin, Kamal; Allen, Christopher; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Clarke, Bruce; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean; Quintana, Elisa; Sommers, Jeneen; Stroozas, Brett; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph; Wu, Hayley; Caldwell, Doug; Bryson, Stephen; Bhavsar,Paresh

    2010-01-01

    We give an overview of the operational concepts and architecture of the Kepler Science Data Pipeline. Designed, developed, operated, and maintained by the Science Operations Center (SOC) at NASA Ames Research Center, the Kepler Science Data Pipeline is central element of the Kepler Ground Data System. The SOC charter is to analyze stellar photometric data from the Kepler spacecraft and report results to the Kepler Science Office for further analysis. We describe how this is accomplished via the Kepler Science Data Pipeline, including the hardware infrastructure, scientific algorithms, and operational procedures. The SOC consists of an office at Ames Research Center, software development and operations departments, and a data center that hosts the computers required to perform data analysis. We discuss the high-performance, parallel computing software modules of the Kepler Science Data Pipeline that perform transit photometry, pixel-level calibration, systematic error-correction, attitude determination, stellar target management, and instrument characterization. We explain how data processing environments are divided to support operational processing and test needs. We explain the operational timelines for data processing and the data constructs that flow into the Kepler Science Data Pipeline.

  11. Center for Intelligent Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Mansour, Y. Shavit, N. 175 Tshsiklis, J.N. P Extremal Properties of Likelihood-Ratio Quantizers 11/1/89 176 Awerbuch, B. P Online Tracking of Mobile ...CENTER FOR INTELLIGENT CONTROL SYSTEMS Brown Umiversity Harvard University Marsachomtta Institute of Tecnology PUBLICATIONS LIST CICS Number Authors

  12. Education Information Centers: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tice, Karin E.; Gill, Stephen Joel

    1991-01-01

    Key findings of an evaluation of the Education Information Centers (EICs) project were that (1) many EICs have affected patrons lives; (2) libraries have improved career collections, attracted new patrons, and become viewed as community resources; (3) library staff have developed better ways to ascertain information needs; and (4) new agency…

  13. Community Learning Centers: Design Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Designs for Learning, Inc., St. Paul, MN.

    If fundamental change in education is to be lasting and effective, it must be a systemic transformation that pervades all aspects of the organization. The New American Schools Development Corporation (NASDC) mission requires rapid, comprehensive change. The Community Learning Centers program described in this document features systemic change with…

  14. Child-Centered Play Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFleet, Rise; Sywulak, Andrea E.; Sniscak, Cynthia Caparosa

    2010-01-01

    Highly practical, instructive, and authoritative, this book vividly describes how to conduct child-centered play therapy. The authors are master clinicians who explain core therapeutic principles and techniques, using rich case material to illustrate treatment of a wide range of difficulties. The focus is on nondirective interventions that allow…

  15. LEARNING AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    THARP, CHARLES D.

    A DESCRIPTION OF THE INCEPTION, OBJECTIVES, OPERATION, EQUIPMENT, AND PERSONNEL OF THE LEARNING AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES CENTER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IS GIVEN. FACULTY COMMITTEES WERE APPOINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI TO WORK OUT THE PHILOSOPHY OF A NEW DIVISION WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY WHICH WOULD MEET THE PROBLEMS OF THE INADEQUACY OF…

  16. Rocket center Peenemuende - Personal memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

    1993-01-01

    A brief history of Peenemuende, the rocket center where Von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under German Army auspices, and the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes, is presented. Emphasis is placed on the expansion of operations beginning in 1942.

  17. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  18. Program Analysis and Design Requirements for tne National Science Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Additions: Plan to add planetarium in a year or so. -No- addition 16,000 S.F. will be added for exhibition Was the Center specifically constructed for this...Theatres/Auditoriums: 3* Planetarium : 0 Use(s) of Each Theater/Auditorium?: planetarium (e.g., laser shows, movies, lectures, Imax? Omnimax, public events...fabrication): Facility Features (Physical Plant): Number of Theatres/Auditoriums: Planetarium : Use(s) of Each Theater/Auditorium?: planetarium (e.g., laser

  19. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - USDA BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed during the spring of 1991 which identified areas for waste reduction at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), Beltsville, Maryland. he areas selected for this joint E...

  20. KTU-GEOD IVS Analysis Center Annual Report 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayikci, Emine Tanir; Teke, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the KTU-GEOD IVS Analysis Center (AC) in 2012 and outlines planned activities for 2013. The analysis of the EUROPE sessions is one of our specific interests, and the combination of different AC solutions for continuous VLBI campaigns, e.g. CONT11, will be investigated.

  1. AN OVERVIEW OF THE EPA ENVIRONMENTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION CENTER (EPIC)

    EPA Science Inventory



    The EPA Environmental Photographic Interpretation Center (EPIC) supports the EPA Regions and Program Offices with remote sensing based technical support and research and development products. Since 1972, EPIC has provided both imagery and imagery-derived products to the E...

  2. AN OVERVIEW OF EPA ENVIRONMENTAL PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION CENTER (EPIC)

    EPA Science Inventory



    The EPA Environmental Photographic Interpretation Center (EPIC) supports the EPA Regions and Program Offices with remote sensing based technical support and research and development products. Since 1972, EPIC has provided both imagery and imagery-derived products to the E...

  3. Community Information and Services Centers: Concepts for Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Cleve

    An experimental program based on a study by the Department of Housing and Urban Development was activated to deliver services to urban residents via automated communications technology. Designed to contribute to improvement in the quality of life, the program of a Community Information and Services Center (CISC) included: outreach programs, i.e.,…

  4. Integrating Adaptive Games in Student-Centered Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Blanco, Angel; Torrente, Javier; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2010-01-01

    The increasing adoption of e-Learning technology is facing new challenges, such as how to produce student-centered systems that can be adapted to each student's needs. In this context, educational video games are proposed as an ideal medium to facilitate adaptation and tracking of students' performance for assessment purposes, but integrating the…

  5. Ambulatory care centers: structure, services, and marketing techniques.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J H; Reeder, C E

    1987-12-01

    A generic definition for an ambulatory care center (ACC) is not apparent. ACCs differ in ownership, primary function, and services offered. ACCs are attempting to expand their patient base by providing nonemergency care, contracting with provider organizations (e.g., HMOs and PPOs), and using aggressive marketing techniques.

  6. Lattice Green's Function for the Body-Centered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaji, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    An expression for the Green's function (GF) of Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) lat tice is evaluated analytically and numerically for a single impurity lattice. Th e density of states (DOS), phase shift, and scattering cross section are express ed in terms of complete elliptic integrals of the first kind.

  7. Connection: Schwartz Center Rounds at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, Lidia; Mack, Sally; Stanzler, Marjorie; Lynch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital, founded the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center®, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care. The Center sponsors Schwartz Rounds®, a multidisciplinary forum in which doctors, nurses, chaplains, social workers, and other staff reflect on important psychosocial issues that arise in caring for patients. Attendees participate in an interactive discussion about issues anchored in a case presentation and share their experiences, thoughts, and feelings. The patient narratives may center on wonderful events and transcendent experiences or tragic stories, during which staff can only bear witness to the suffering. The Rounds focus on caregivers' experiences, and encourage staff to share insights, own their vulnerabilities, and support each other. The primary objective is to foster healing relationships and provide support to professional caregivers, enhance communication among caregivers, and improve the connection between patients and caregivers. Currently, >50,000 clinicians attend monthly Schwartz Rounds at 195 sites in 31 states, numbers that are rapidly growing. In this article we explore the reasons that contribute to the success of this model of multidisciplinary reflection. PMID:20584809

  8. Teachers' Center Handbook, Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meridian Municipal Separate School District, MS.

    This document is a teacher-developed handbook to the Meridian (Mississippi) Public Schools' Teachers' Center. The materials contained in the handbook include: (1) steps involved in implementing the model; (2) organization charts; (3) center rationale and objectives; (4) teacher center tasks; (5) operation of the center in the areas of teacher…

  9. The Information Center--Another Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Karen Takle

    1982-01-01

    Describes the facilities, services, and programs of the IBM Santa Teresa Laboratory's Information/Library/Learning Center. The planning of the center, the center's modular facilities, information and educational services, and the internship and training program for information professionals offered through the center are discussed. Included are…

  10. Counseling Services in Adult Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Gamal; Zaki, Sylvia

    Federal support for adult day care centers began in the United States approximately 10 years ago. To examine the counseling practices in the adult day care centers across the country and to explore how the services are affected by the staffing patterns at these centers, 135 centers completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed…

  11. Options for Organizing the Tanker Airlift Control Center Flight Dispatch Function: An Exploratory Concept Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    Jeffrey A. Sheppard, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /ENS/00E-10 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright...Force, Department of Defense, or the U. S. Government. AFIT/ GMO /ENS/00E-10 OPTIONS FOR ORGANIZING THE TANKER AIRLIFT CONTROL CENTER FLIGHT...Program Goal…….……….…61 vi AFIT/ GMO /ENS/00E-10 Abstract The Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) is the central execution agency for

  12. Observing interference effect in binary (e, 2e) of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangjun; Yang, Jing; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Tian, Qiguo; Wang, Enliang

    2015-04-01

    We present investigations on the two-center and multi-center interference effects of molecules in binary (e, 2e) experiments. The high energy resolution electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) measurements on H2 are reported with final vibrational states resolved. The experimental momentum profiles for ionization transitions to the individual final vibrational states of the ion are obtained. The measured and calculated vibrational ratios of the cross sections deviate from Franck-Condon principle, which can be ascribed to the Young-type two-center interference. Furthermore, with the help of our latest version of EMS spectrometer which has considerably higher sensitivity and much wider momentum range from 0 to 8 a.u., we are able to extend our observations to multi-center interference effect in high symmetry molecules like NF3 and CF4 with several oscillation periods included.

  13. Center of excellence for small robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Carroll, Daniel M.; Laird, Robin T.; Everett, H. R.

    2005-05-01

    The mission of the Unmanned Systems Branch of SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego (SSC San Diego) is to provide network-integrated robotic solutions for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) applications, serving and partnering with industry, academia, and other government agencies. We believe the most important criterion for a successful acquisition program is producing a value-added end product that the warfighter needs, uses and appreciates. Through our accomplishments in the laboratory and field, SSC San Diego has been designated the Center of Excellence for Small Robots by the Office of the Secretary of Defense Joint Robotics Program. This paper covers the background, experience, and collaboration efforts by SSC San Diego to serve as the "Impedance-Matching Transformer" between the robotic user and technical communities. Special attention is given to our Unmanned Systems Technology Imperatives for Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation (RDT&E) of Small Robots. Active projects, past efforts, and architectures are provided as success stories for the Unmanned Systems Development Approach.

  14. Computer based human-centered display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, David L. (Inventor); Temme, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A human centered informational display is disclosed that can be used with vehicles (e.g. aircraft) and in other operational environments where rapid human centered comprehension of an operational environment is required. The informational display integrates all cockpit information into a single display in such a way that the pilot can clearly understand with a glance, his or her spatial orientation, flight performance, engine status and power management issues, radio aids, and the location of other air traffic, runways, weather, and terrain features. With OZ the information is presented as an integrated whole, the pilot instantaneously recognizes flight path deviations, and is instinctively drawn to the corrective maneuvers. Our laboratory studies indicate that OZ transfers to the pilot all of the integrated display information in less than 200 milliseconds. The reacquisition of scan can be accomplished just as quickly. Thus, the time constants for forming a mental model are near instantaneous. The pilot's ability to keep up with rapidly changing and threatening environments is tremendously enhanced. OZ is most easily compatible with aircraft that has flight path information coded electronically. With the correct sensors (which are currently available) OZ can be installed in essentially all current aircraft.

  15. The Propulsion Center at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. Our mission is to move the nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft like access to earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space. Current efforts cover a wide range of exciting areas, including high-energy plasma thrusters, advanced fission and fusion engines, antimatter propulsion systems, beamed energy rockets and sails, and fundamental motive physics. Activities involve concept investigation, proof-of-concept demonstration, and breadboard validation of new propulsion systems. The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC provides an environment where NASA, national laboratories, universities, and industry researchers can pool their skills together to perform landmark propulsion achievements. We offer excellent educational opportunities to students and young researchers-fostering a wellspring of innovation that will revolutionize space transportation.

  16. The Scientific Data Management Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, Arie

    2006-06-30

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center is bringing a set of advanced data management technologies to DOE scientists in various application domains including astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it has established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. The SDM center has provided advanced data management technologies to DOE domain scientists in the areas of storage efficient access, data mining and analysis, and scientific process automation.

  17. (Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope)

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  18. The Fort Collins Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.; Banowetz, Michele M.

    2012-01-01

    With a focus on biological research, the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) develops and disseminates science-based information and tools to support natural resource decision-making. This brochure succinctly describes the integrated science capabilities, products, and services that the FORT science community offers across the disciplines of aquatic systems, ecosystem dynamics, information science, invasive species science, policy analysis and social science assistance, and trust species and habitats.

  19. Sleep and Performance Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    upon the placement of the work period with respect to the circadian rhythm. Additional studies were published by SPRC care factually during the...Research Center (SPRC) conducts human and animal studies in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep research at Washington...Program of Research Field Studies in Humans In a field study of serving police officers, Charles, et al. (2011) found that perceived shorter

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC), including its history and activities. The six enterprises to carry out NASA's mission are: Space Science; Earth Science; Biological and Physical Research; Aerospace Technology; Education (our newest); and Space Flight. These are explained, as well as MSFC's contributions toward these NASA enterprises. The presentation also covers cooperation between MSFC and the Department of Defense (DoD).

  1. Kennedy Space Center exercise program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Cristy

    1993-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  2. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  3. Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reategui, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

  4. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  5. CNC electrical discharge machining centers

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggars, S.R.

    1991-10-01

    Computer numerical control (CNC) electrical discharge machining (EDM) centers were investigated to evaluate the application and cost effectiveness of establishing this capability at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). In line with this investigation, metal samples were designed, prepared, and machined on an existing 15-year-old EDM machine and on two current technology CNC EDM machining centers at outside vendors. The results were recorded and evaluated. The study revealed that CNC EDM centers are a capability that should be established at KCD. From the information gained, a machine specification was written and a shop was purchased and installed in the Engineering Shop. The older machine was exchanged for a new model. Additional machines were installed in the Tool Design and Fabrication and Precision Microfinishing departments. The Engineering Shop machine will be principally used for the following purposes: producing deep cavities in small corner radii, machining simulated casting models, machining difficult-to-machine materials, and polishing difficult-to-hand polish mold cavities. 2 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at KSC because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how KSC has benefited from PE and how KSC has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where KSC's PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  7. Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) conducts integrated research to fulfill the Department of the Interior's responsibilities to the Nation's natural resources. Located on 600 acres along the James River Valley near Jamestown, North Dakota, the NPWRC develops and disseminates scientific information needed to understand, conserve, and wisely manage the Nation's biological resources. Research emphasis is primarily on midcontinental plant and animal species and ecosystems of the United States. During the center's 40-year history, its scientists have earned an international reputation for leadership and expertise on the biology of waterfowl and grassland birds, wetland ecology and classification, mammalian behavior and ecology, grassland ecosystems, and application of statistics and geographic information systems. To address current science challenges, NPWRC scientists collaborate with researchers from other U.S. Geological Survey centers and disciplines (Biology, Geography, Geology, and Water) and with biologists and managers in the Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal agencies, State agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations. Expanding upon its scientific expertise and leadership, the NPWRC is moving in new directions, including invasive plant species, restoration of native habitats, carbon sequestration and marketing, and ungulate management on DOI lands.

  8. Negative U-centers and defect superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Yavidov, B.; Makhmudov, N. A.

    1997-04-01

    A connection between the formation of defect bipolarons (i.e. U-centers or U-bipolarons) and superconductivity in high-Tcsuperconductors (HTSC) is considered in two pairing limits of carriers in realr- andk-spaces. The irrelevance ofr-space U-bipolarons to superconductivity is motivated. It is shown that the formation ofk-space U-bipolarons and their subsequent attractive single particle and pair condensation lead to depressed (in comparison with lattice bipolarons) superconductivity due to a large mass of such U-bipolarons. It is argued that the coexistence ofk-space lattice bipolarons andr-space U-bipolarons leads to the shift of the maximum of the concentration dependenceTc(n)to higher carrier concentrations, in accordance with the observations in HTSC.

  9. Leveraging Benefits Attributable to Centers within the Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2002-04-03

    The purpose of the research reported here was to assess the leveraging benefits attributable to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The term leveraging as used in this study refers to any additional support received by a university-based, IAC-sponsored center that the center would not have received had the IAC Program not been in place. Twenty-two IACs provided information about 120 leveraging activities over the 1997-2001 period. IAC directors indicated that the support for 115 of these projects was linked to the existence of DOE's IAC Program and the experience gained from their participation in the program. Ninety-three of the IAC-influenced projects were quantified, for a monetary value of $5,948,931. The average annual leveraged support was $1,189,786 over the time frame examined. Typical contributors of leveraged support were state governments, utilities, industry, universities, and other DOE and federal agencies. Most of the support was provided to conduct assessments outside of IAC Program criteria (e.g., assessments of government buildings or large manufacturing plants). Significant leveraged support was also provided to IACs for educational activities--such as workshops, seminars, and training--and for miscellaneous energy-related technical projects.

  10. CAT: the INGV Tsunami Alert Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, A.

    2014-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra earthquake, the tsunami threat posed by large earthquakes occurring in the Mediterranean sea was formally taken into account by many countries around the Mediterranean basin. In the past, large earthquakes that originated significant tsunamis occurred nearly once per century (Maramai et al., 2014, Annals of Geophysics). The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO) received a mandate from the international community to coordinate the establishment of the ICG/NEAMTWS (http://neamtic.ioc-unesco.org) through Resolution IOC-XXIII-14. Since then, several countries (France, Turkey, Greece) have started operating as candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (cTWP) in the Mediterranean. Italy started operating as cTWP on October 1st, 2014. The Italian cTWP is formed by INGV ("Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)", DPC ("Dipartimento di Protezione Civile") and ISPRA ("Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale"). INGV is in charge of issuing the alert for potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes, ISPRA provides the sea level recordings and DPC is in charge of disseminating the alert. INGV established the tsunami alert center (CAT, "Centro di Allerta Tsunami") at the end of 2013. CAT is co-located with the INGV national seismic surveillance center operated since many years. In this work, we show the technical and personnel organization of CAT, its response to recent earthquakes, and the new procedures under development for implementation. (*) INGV-CAT WG: Amato A., Basili R., Bernardi F., Bono A., Danecek P., De Martini P.M., Govoni A., Graziani L., Lauciani V., Lomax, A., Lorito S., Maramai A., Mele F., Melini D., Molinari I., Nostro C., Piatanesi A., Pintore S., Quintiliani M., Romano F., Selva J., Selvaggi G., Sorrentino D., Tonini R.

  11. Ultracold plasmas and guiding center drift atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Stanislav Gennadyevich

    This thesis discusses theory questions suggested by recent experiments with ultracold plasmas. In one class of experiments, ultracold plasmas are produced by abruptly photoionizing small clouds of laser cooled atoms, adjusting the photon energy to barely exceed the ionization energy of the cooled atoms. The thesis presents molecular dynamics simulation for the early time evolution of such plasmas. Contrary to earlier speculation, no evidence of strong electron-electron correlations is observed in the simulations even if the initial value of the coupling parameter (Gammae = e2/akTe) is much larger than unity. As electron-electron correlations begin to develop, the correlation energy is released to heat the electrons, raising the electron temperature to the point where Gammae ˜ 1 and limiting further development of correlation. Further heating of the electrons occurs as a by-product of three-body recombination. When a model of laser cooling is added to the simulation, the formation of strong ion-ion correlation is observed. Contrary to earlier suggestion, the rate of three-body recombination is observed to be in reasonable agreement with the traditional formula, R = 3.9 x 10-9 sec-1[ n (cm-3)]2 [Te(° K)]-9/2, but care must be taken to use the correct temporally evolving temperature, Te. Also, the thesis describes the novel dynamics of "guiding center drift atoms". The weakly bound and strongly magnetized antihydrogen atoms recently produced in ultracold plasmas at CERN are examples of such atoms. The atoms are quasi-classical, and the dynamics of the positron is well described by guiding center drift theory. Because of a frequency ordering, the dynamics is integrable, and the thesis characterizes the possible motions of the weakly bound positron-antiproton pair as a function of constants of the motion. Quantum numbers are assigned using the Bohr-Sommerfeld prescription. The thesis also discusses the center of mass motion of the atoms in an electric and magnetic

  12. World Data Center / National Geophysical Data Center's Tsunami Data Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Brantley, K.; Stroker, K.

    2005-12-01

    The WDC for Solid Earth Geophysics (including tsunamis) is operated by NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). NGDC is one of three environmental data centers within the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS). Operating both World and National Data Centers, WDC/NGDC is now providing the long-term archive, data management, and access to national and global tsunami data for research and mitigation of tsunami hazards. Archive responsibilities include the global historic tsunami event and runup database, the bottom pressure recorder data, and access to event-specific tide-gauge data, as well as other related hazards and bathymetric data and information. The WDC/NGDC Worldwide Tsunami Database includes more than 2,400 events since 2,000 BC and more than 7,200 locations where tsunamis were observed. Times of generating earthquakes, tsunami arrival times, travel times, first motion of the wave, and wave periods are included in the database. The WDC/NGDC Worldwide Significant Earthquake Database includes information for more than 6,600 destructive earthquakes from 2,000 B.C. to the present. In the 1980s, NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) developed deep ocean tsunameters for the early detection, measurement, and real-time reporting of tsunamis in the open ocean. The tsunameters were developed by PMEL's Project DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis). A DART system consists of a seafloor bottom pressure recording (BPR) system capable of detecting tsunamis as small as 1 cm, and a moored surface buoy for real-time communications. An acoustic link is used to transmit data from the BPR on the seafloor to the surface buoy. The data are then relayed via a GOES satellite link to ground stations for immediate dissemination to NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers and PMEL. These systems were deployed near regions with a history of tsunami generation, to ensure measurement of the waves as they propagate towards

  13. Revitalizing an Urban Community College Women's Resource Center: Kingsborough Community College--The City University of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Estelle

    This article describes the creation, administration, and services of an urban community college women's center. Information is provided on the center's advisory board charged with broadening the base of support, advising on policy formation, long-term planning, and program development. Strategies utilized to promote the center (e.g., publications,…

  14. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  15. Center-to-center analysis of flow lineation and flow direction in Eocene welded ignimbrites, Twin Peaks, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.J. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Ignimbrites of the Eocene Twin Peaks caldera (Hardyman, 1982) in central Idaho's Challis Volcanic Field comprise both caldera-fill and outflow facies. The vents and mode of emplacement of these ignimbrites are problematic, because the Twin Peaks caldera has been strongly structurally disrupted, and lineations are sparse in the ignimbrites. Six oriented samples from three separate cooling units were studied using the Fry center-to-center method (Seaman and Williams, 1992) in order to determine flow lineation and flow direction of the ignimbrites inside the caldera. Flow lineation is defined in the plane parallel to flattened pumice and assumes that phenocryst are at maximum spacing in this plane. The flow lineation then coincides with the long axis of a center-to-center ellipse. Flow direction is defined in the plane perpendicular to flattening, which is inclined with respect to the flow plane and dips towards the source of flow. Four of five samples from the upper two cooling units near the thickest part of the caldera fill have well developed center-to-center strain ellipsoids producing flow lineations oriented N35W ([+-]7[degree]). The samples from the bottom cooling unit also has a well developed strain ellipsoid, but with a lineation oriented N80E. The difference in flow lineation suggests that the lowest cooling unit had a separate vent. Strain analysis of perpendicular sections are underway to establish the flow direction of the ignimbrites.

  16. Study on load forecasting to data centers of high power density based on power usage effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. C.; Zhang, F.; Yuan, Z.; Zhou, L. M.; Wang, F. M.; Li, W.; Yang, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    There is usually considerable energy consumption in data centers. Load forecasting to data centers is in favor of formulating regional load density indexes and of great benefit to getting regional spatial load forecasting more accurately. The building structure and the other influential factors, i.e. equipment, geographic and climatic conditions, are considered for the data centers, and a method to forecast the load of the data centers based on power usage effectiveness is proposed. The cooling capacity of a data center and the index of the power usage effectiveness are used to forecast the power load of the data center in the method. The cooling capacity is obtained by calculating the heat load of the data center. The index is estimated using the group decision-making method of mixed language information. An example is given to prove the applicability and accuracy of this method.

  17. The Japanese science education centers.

    PubMed

    Glass, B

    1966-10-14

    These six Japanese science education centers signify a sweeping reform of elementary and secondary school science teaching. They achieve their striking results because they are established on a permanent, local basis and are supported mainly by the local boards of education. They have avoided control by pedagogues and specialists in "education." Instead, they are operated by trained scientists and experienced school teachers who work together to devise programs specially suited to the needs of their teachers. With small and practicable steps, the teachers improve their understanding of methods which they can readily test in their own classrooms rooms and laboratories. The laboratory equipment in the science education centers is only slightly superior to that which the teachers have in their own schools, but superior enough to make them desire to improve their own facilities. Major facilities, such as x-ray machines, electron microscopes, telescopes (15-cm), and machine shops, as well as good working collections of minerals and fossils, and adequate greenhouses, permit the teachers to work with more expensive equipment, to gain a firsthand knowledge of its operation, and to bring groups of students to the center to observe what such instruments make possible. The use of American experimental course content improvement programs is widespread. Every science education center I visited is using PSSC, CHEMS, CBA, BSCS, or ESCP materials and studying the philosophy of these programs. Yet no center is entirely dependent on these programs, but uses them critically to supplement and improve its own courses. The emphasis is on good laboratory and field teaching as a basis for understanding scientific methods and concepts. Science as investigation and inquiry, instead of treatment solely as an authoritative body of facts, is coming into its own. The few defects of the science education centers of Japan inhere in the educational situation itself. The centers are at present

  18. Reengineering the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center’s Procurement Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL SMonterey. CQlifonrda N MAR 0 7 1994 lE -J THESiS ___ Reengineering the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center’s Procurement...AND SUBTITLE REENGINEERING THE FLEET AND 5. FDING NUMBERS INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CENTER’S PROCUREMENT PROCESS. 6. AUTHOR(S) Wayne J. Bergeron 7. PERFORMING... Industrial Supply Center. 84 16. _ 16. PRICE CODE 17. 18. 19. 20. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION SECURITY CLASSIFICATION SECURITY CLASSIFICATION LIMITATION OF OF

  19. Athens Neutron Monitor Data Processing Center - ANMODAP Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromichalaki, H.; Gerontidou, M.; Mariatos, G.; Papailiou, M.; Papaioannou, A.; Plainaki, C.; Sarlanis, C.; Souvatzoglou, G.

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic ray measurements in Athens were initiated in November 2000 with a standard 6NM-64 neutron monitor. Within the last years an effort has been made in order to construct an effective database of neutron monitor (NM) and satellite data in real-time, regarding the necessities of space weather monitoring (Athens Neutron Monitor Data Processing Center - ANMODAP Center). The prospective goal of this network is to make possible the receiving of all data in real-time in close sequence from all servers around the globe. The graphical representation of all these data in real-time is available through the website of the station ( http://cosray.phys.uoa.gr). Moreover, a second database that collects data with 1-min resolution operates in a parallel mode. The online services as a special 'Alert' algorithm for Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) and some models created to analyze aspects of GLEs as the neutron monitor Basic Anisotropic Neutron Ground Level Enhancement (BANGLE) model and the Forbush Decreases (FORD) model as well, are presented. Moreover, a short account on work performed on the possible relationship between the geomagnetic activity level and the biological effects is given.

  20. Bridging the Gap: Adaptive Games and Student-Centered VLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Blanco, Ángel; Torrente, Javier; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernández-Manjón, Baltasar

    The widely used e-learning technology is facing new challenges such as how to produce student-centered systems that can be adapted to the needs of each student. Those objectives should be met in a standard compliant way to simplify general adoption. In this context, educational videogames are proposed as an ideal medium to facilitate adaptation and tracking of the students’ performance for assessment purposes. However, there are still barriers between the gaming and e-learning worlds preventing their mutual interaction. In this paper we propose a middleware to bridge this gap, integrating adaptive educational videogames in e-learning environments with a special focus on the ongoing standardization efforts.