Science.gov

Sample records for e states

  1. E1 transitions from octupole vibration states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, P. D.

    1993-04-01

    Electric dipole moments are extracted from data for E1 transitions deexciting octupole vibration states in nineteen nuclei. The moments are then compared to values calculated using the droplet model prescription of Dorso, Myers, and Swiatecki. It is found that the E1 moments in quadrupole deformed nuclei can be reproduced with the droplet model using the same model parameters that reproduce atomic masses and fission barriers. This result supports the suggestion of Butler and Nazarewicz that single particle effects are usually much smaller than macroscopic effects in E1 transitions associated with octupole vibrations in reflection symmetric deformed nuclei.

  2. E-Commerce Marketing State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Tech Prep Curriculum Services.

    This profile provides the curricular framework for Ohio Tech Prep programs in e-commerce marketing beginning in high school and continuing through the end of the associate degree. It includes a comprehensive set of e-commerce marketing competencies that reflect job opportunities and skills required for e-commerce marketing professionals today and…

  3. 26 CFR 31.3121(e)-1 - State, United States, and citizen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false State, United States, and citizen. 31.3121(e)-1... § 31.3121(e)-1 State, United States, and citizen. (a) When used in the regulations in this subpart, the..., the term “United States”, when used in a geographical sense, means the several states (including the...

  4. 26 CFR 31.3121(e)-1 - State, United States, and citizen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false State, United States, and citizen. 31.3121(e)-1... § 31.3121(e)-1 State, United States, and citizen. (a) When used in the regulations in this subpart, the..., the term “United States”, when used in a geographical sense, means the several states (including the...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3121(e)-1 - State, United States, and citizen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false State, United States, and citizen. 31.3121(e)-1... § 31.3121(e)-1 State, United States, and citizen. (a) When used in the regulations in this subpart, the..., the term “United States”, when used in a geographical sense, means the several states (including the...

  6. Hepatitis E and pregnancy: current state.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; Suay-García, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2017-03-20

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for more than 50% of acute viral hepatitis cases in endemic countries. Approximately 2 billion individuals live in hepatitis E-endemic areas and, therefore, are at risk of infection. According to World Health Organization, HEV causes about 20.1 million infections and 70 000 deaths every year. In developing countries with poor sanitation, this disease is transmitted through contaminated water and is associated with large outbreaks, affecting hundreds or thousands of people. In developed countries, autochthonous cases of HEV have been increasingly recognized in the past several years. Hepatitis E virus typically causes an acute, self-limiting illness similar to other acute viral hepatitis, such as hepatitis A or B, with about 0.2% to 1% mortality rate in the general population. However, the course of hepatitis E in pregnancy is different than the mild self-constraining infection described in other populations. During pregnancy, HEV infection can take a fulminant course, resulting in fulminant hepatic failure, membrane rupture, spontaneous abortions, and stillbirths. Studies from various developing countries have shown a high incidence of HEV infection in pregnancy with a significant proportion of pregnant women progressing to fulminant hepatitis with a fatality rate of up to 30%. The present review will highlight new aspects of the HEV infection and pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A baseline understanding of state laws governing e-cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Gourdet, C K; Chriqui, J F; Chaloupka, F J

    2014-07-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have been available for purchase in the USA since 2007, and have grown rapidly in popularity. Currently, there are no federal restrictions on e-cigarettes; therefore, any regulations are under the purview of state and/or local governments. This study examines state laws governing e-cigarettes through youth access restrictions, smoke-free air requirements and/or excise taxation. Codified statutory and administrative laws, attorney general opinions, executive orders, and revenue notices and rulings effective as of 15 November 2013 for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, were compiled using Boolean searches in Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw. All laws were analysed by two study authors to determine the presence and components of relevant provisions. Two categories of laws were identified; (1) explicit e-cigarette laws and (2) laws focused on tobacco-derived and/or nicotine-containing products. Thirty-four states' laws address e-cigarettes either explicitly or as part of language applying to tobacco-derived or nicotine-containing products. Laws explicitly addressing e-cigarettes primarily focus on youth access (22 states) or smoke-free air (12 states); only Minnesota imposes an excise tax on e-cigarettes. Similarly, tobacco-derived or nicotine-containing products are primarily regulated through youth access restrictions (6 states), smoke-free air laws (5 states), or excise taxation (2 states). In the current absence of federal law governing e-cigarettes, more than one-half of the states have taken the initiative to regulate these products. The opportunity exists for the remaining states to incorporate e-cigarette-related restrictions into their pre-existing tobacco control laws. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Study of the process e+e-→π+π-η using initial state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Fritsch, M.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Li, Y.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rotondo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Lacker, H. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Seddon, R. M.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cheaib, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Zani, L.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Ahmed, H.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We study the process e+e- →π+π- η γ , where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 8000 fully reconstructed events of this process are selected from the BABAR data sample with an integrated luminosity of 469 fb-1 . Using the π+π-η invariant mass spectrum, we measure the e+e-→π+π- η cross section in the e+e- center-of-mass energy range from 1.15 to 3.5 GeV. The cross section is well described by the Vector-Meson dominance model with four ρ -like states. We observe 49 ±9 events of the J /ψ decay to π+π- η and measure the product ΓJ /Ψ →e+e-BJ /Ψ →π+π-η=2.34 ±0.4 3stat±0.1 6syst eV .

  9. Study of the process e + e – → π + π – η using initial state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    Here, we study the process e +e –→π +π –ηγ, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 8000 fully reconstructed events of this process are selected from the BABAR data sample with an integrated luminosity of 469 fb –1. Using the π +π –η invariant mass spectrum, we measure the e +e –→π +π –η cross section in the e +e – center-of-mass energy range from 1.15 to 3.5 GeV. The cross section is well described by the Vector-Meson dominance model with four ρ-like states. We observe 49±9 events of the J/ψ decay to π +π –ηmore » and measure the product Γ J/Ψ→e+e–BJ/Ψ→π+π–η=2.34±0.43 stat±0.16 syst eV.« less

  10. Study of the process e + e – → π + π – η using initial state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2018-03-21

    Here, we study the process e +e –→π +π –ηγ, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 8000 fully reconstructed events of this process are selected from the BABAR data sample with an integrated luminosity of 469 fb –1. Using the π +π –η invariant mass spectrum, we measure the e +e –→π +π –η cross section in the e +e – center-of-mass energy range from 1.15 to 3.5 GeV. The cross section is well described by the Vector-Meson dominance model with four ρ-like states. We observe 49±9 events of the J/ψ decay to π +π –ηmore » and measure the product Γ J/Ψ→e+e–BJ/Ψ→π+π–η=2.34±0.43 stat±0.16 syst eV.« less

  11. Comparison between hadronic final states produced in μ p and e + e - interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, M.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J. J.; Badelek, B.; Beaufays, J.; Bee, C. P.; Benchouk, C.; Berghoff, G.; Bird, I.; Blum, D.; Böhm, E.; de Bouard, X.; Brasse, F. W.; Braun, H.; Broll, C.; Brown, S.; Brück, H.; Calen, H.; Chima, J. S.; Ciborowski, J.; Clifft, R.; Coignet, G.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Dreyer, T.; Drees, J.; Düren, M.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, A.; Edwards, M.; Ernst, T.; Eszes, G.; Favier, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Flauger, W.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gajewski, J.; Gamet, R.; Gayler, J.; Geddes, N.; Grafström, P.; Grard, F.; Haas, J.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F. J.; Hayman, P.; Heusse, P.; Jaffré, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janata, F.; Jancso, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kabuss, E. M.; Kellner, G.; Korbel, V.; Krüger, J.; Kullander, S.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Maire, M.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Maselli, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanet, F.; Montgomery, H. E.; Nagy, E.; Nassalski, J.; Norton, P. R.; Oakham, F. G.; Osborne, A. M.; Pascaud, C.; Pawlik, B.; Payre, P.; Peroni, C.; Peschel, H.; Pessard, H.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pönsgen, B.; Pötsch, M.; Renton, P.; Ribarics, P.; Rith, K.; Rondio, E.; Sandacz, A.; Scheer, M.; Schlagböhmer, A.; Schiemann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Schneegans, M.; Scholz, M.; Schröder, T.; Schouten, M.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stier, H. E.; Studt, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Thénard, J. M.; Thompson, J. C.; de La Torre, A.; Toth, J.; Urban, L.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W. S. C.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Windmolders, R.; Wolf, G.

    1987-12-01

    A comparison is made between the properties of the final state hadrons produced in 280 GeV μ p interactions and in e + e - annihilation. The Lund model of hadroproduction is used as an aid in understanding the differences observed. The hadron distributions from μ p and e + e - interactions are consistent with the quark parton model assumption of environmental independence, provided that the differences in heavy quark production and hard QCD effects in the two processes are taken into account. A comparison with a K + p experiment is also made. Values are also determined for the Lund model parameters σq = 0.410 ± 0.002 ± 0.020 GeV and σ' = 0.29{-0.15/-0.13 +0.09+0.10} GeV, controlling the transverse momenta in fragmentation and intrinsic transverse momenta of the struck quark respectively.

  12. The State of E-Learning in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Council on Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to improve Canadians' understanding of e-learning--particularly of the challenges, limitations and benefits--so that Canada may move forward in appropriate and relevant ways. Levels of adoption of e-learning have been significantly slower than predicted. This report also identifies areas related to e-learning where…

  13. Observation of 1(-)0(-) final states from psi(2S) decays and e(+)e(-) annihilation.

    PubMed

    Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Rosner, J L; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E

    2005-01-14

    Using CLEO data collected from CESR e(+)e(-) collisions at the psi(2S) resonance and nearby continuum at sqrt[s]=3.67 GeV, we report the first significantly nonzero measurements of light vector-pseudoscalar hadron pair production (including rhopi, omegapi, rhoeta, and K(*0)K0 ) and the pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) final state, both from psi(2S) decays and direct e(+)e(-) annihilation.

  14. Predissociation and collisional depopulation of the Cs/sub 2/(E) state

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Huennekens, J.

    1984-11-15

    We report here an experimental study of depopulation mechanisms of the Cs/sub 2/(E) state. By combining ratios of atomic to molecular fluorescence with E state lifetimes obtained by the phase shift technique, all studied as a function of Cs density, we were able to obtain absolute values for predissociation, radiative, and collisional depopulation rates as well as the total quenching rates for the Cs/sub 2/(E) state. The results are discussed in relation to those of other experiments.

  15. Positronium formation in Ss state in e+-Li scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, K. P.; Basu, D.; Basu, Madhumita

    1990-01-01

    There are ample theoretical reasons to investigate positron-alkali atom scattering. Moreover, recent measurement on positron-alkali atom system by a Detroit group has renewed much interest in investigating these processes. Positronium (Ps) formation in excited 2s state in positron-Li scattering at intermediate and high energies were studied including second order effects following Basu and Ghosh.

  16. XML and E-Journals: The State of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wusteman, Judith

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the introduction of the use of XML (Extensible Markup Language) in publishing electronic journals. Topics include standards, including DTDs (Document Type Definition), or document type definitions; aggregator requirements; SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language); benefits of XML for e-journals; XML metadata; the possibility of…

  17. State E-Government Strategies: Identifying Best Practices and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-23

    Barrett and Greene, op. cit., pp. 88-89. 10 Blackstone , Erwin A., Michael L. Bognanno, and Simon Hakim. Innovations in E-Government: The Thoughts of...According to Darrell M. West, a leading expert on digital government, “When economic times are good and governments have abundant resources, tax ...government is generally still in the stage of providing online services and transactions such as renewing drivers’ licenses or filing taxes . Funding

  18. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  19. The eastern states exposition: an exploration of Big E tourist expenditures

    Treesearch

    Robert S. Bristow; Heather Cantillon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prepare a visitor economic expenditure study for the 1999 Eastern States Exposition, better known as the Big E. The study was executed as part of a class project in Recreation Geography offered the Fall 1999 semester at Westfield State College. The students undertook an economic expenditure study at the Big E by studying tourism...

  20. Solid state characterization of E2101, a novel antispastic drug.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Ikuo; Ashizawa, Kazuhide

    2002-10-01

    E2101, a novel antispastic drug, was found to exist in at least two polymorphs that were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). These two species are designated forms I and II. The physicochemical and thermodynamic properties of these polymorphs were characterized by variable temperature XRD, thermal analysis, hygroscopicity measurements, and dissolution studies. The transition temperature was also estimated from the solubilities determined at various temperatures. The E2101 polymorphs were anhydrous and adsorbed little moisture under high humidity conditions. The melting onsets and heats of fusion for form I were 148.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C and 38.2 +/- 1.0 kJ/mol, respectively, and for form II were 139.8 +/- 0.4 degrees C and 35.2 +/- 0.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The intrinsic dissolution rate of form II in JP 2 medium was 1.5-fold faster than that of form I, corresponding to the rank order of the aqueous solubility and the enthalpy of fusion. Accordingly, form I was thought to be thermodynamically more stable than form II and thus suitable for further development. According to the thermal analysis and variable temperature XRD results, the recrystallization of form I occurred at approximately 145 degrees C after form II melted, however, no crystal transition behavior was observed below the lower melting point. The DSC thermograms at various heating rates and van't Hoff plots from the solubility studies indicated that the polymorphic pair would be monotropic. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association

  1. E-Learning, State and Educational System in Middle East Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashidi, Hamid; Arani, Abbas Madandar; Kakia, Lida

    2012-01-01

    E-learning has provided men with new opportunities in teaching-learning procedures. A historical review of educational systems literature reveals that e-learning has spread out among people much faster than any other learning methods. E-learning as a state-of-the-art technology, has caused great innovations in materials development in those…

  2. 75 FR 4268 - Establishment of Class D and E Airspace and Modification of Class E Airspace; State College, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... E Airspace; State College, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... College, PA, to accommodate a new air traffic control tower at University Park Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations. DATES...

  3. Hawaii state legislator views on e-cigarettes and likelihood of legislative action.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Deborah Taira; Seto, Jason; Guimaraes, Alexander; Masterson, James; Davis, James; Seto, Todd B

    2015-01-01

    To examine perspectives on e-cigarette use and regulations in Hawaii through key informant interviews with state legislators. E-cigarette use is rapidly increasing, with sales in 2013 topping $1 billion in the United States, but e-cigarettes are still a largely unregulated industry. Although e-cigarettes are thought by most to be a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes, long-term health effects are not yet known. Semistructured key informant interviews were conducted with Hawaii state legislators (n = 15). We found a lack of consensus among legislators, which suggests that substantial legislative action is unlikely in the upcoming session. However, most legislators believe that some type of incremental legislation will pass, such as enactment of a small tax, limitations on advertising to protect adolescents, or regulations concerning where people can use e-cigarettes. Legislators eagerly await further research to clarify the overall benefits and harms of e-cigarettes at both the individual and population levels.

  4. Experiment and Theory for Nuclear Reactions in Nano-Materials Show e14 - e16 Solid-State Fusion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Russ

    2005-03-01

    Nano-lattices of deuterium loving metals exhibit coherent behavior by populations of deuterons (d's) occupying a Bloch state. Therein, coherent d-overlap occurs wherein the Bloch condition reduces the Coulomb barrier.Overlap of dd pairs provides a high probability fusion will/must occur. SEM photo evidence showing fusion events is now revealed by laboratories that load or flux d into metal nano-domains. Solid-state dd fusion creates an excited ^4He nucleus entangled in the large coherent population of d's.This contrasts with plasma dd fusion in collision space where an isolated excited ^4He nucleus seeks the ground state via fast particle emission. In momentum limited solid state fusion,fast particle emission is effectively forbidden.Photographed nano-explosive events are beyond the scope of chemistry. Corroboration of the nuclear nature derives from photographic observation of similar events on spontaneous fission, e.g. Cf. We present predictive theory, heat production, and helium isotope data showing reproducible e14 to e16 solid-state fusion reactions.

  5. The laboratory millimeter-wave spectrum of methyl formate in its ground torsional E state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plummer, G. M.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.; Blake, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Over 250 rotational transitions of the internal rotor methyl formate (HCOOCH3) in its ground v(t) = 0 degenerate (E) torsional substate have been measured in the millimeter-wave spectral region. These data and a number of E-state lines identified by several other workers have been analyzed using an extension of the classical principal-axis method in the high barrier limit. The resulting rotational constants allow accurate prediction of the v(t) = 0 E substate methyl formate spectrum below 300 GHz between states with angular momentum J not greater than 30 and rotational energy of not more than 350/cm. The calculated transition frequencies for the E state, when combined with the results of the previous analysis of the ground-symmetric, nondegenerate state, account for over 200 of the emission lines observed toward Orion in a recent survey of the 215-265 GHz band.

  6. What factors predict the passage of state-level e-cigarette regulations?

    PubMed

    Maclean, Johanna Catherine; Oney, Melissa; Marti, Joachim; Sindelar, Jody

    2018-05-01

    E-cigarettes are controversial products. They may help addicted smokers to consume nicotine in a less harmful manner or to quit tobacco cigarettes entirely, but these products may also entice youth into smoking. This controversy complicates e-cigarette regulation as any regulation may lead to health improvements for some populations, and health declines for other populations. Using data from 2007 to 2016, we examine factors that are plausibly linked with U.S. state e-cigarette regulations. We find that less conservative states are more likely to regulate e-cigarettes and that states with stronger tobacco lobbies are less likely to regulate e-cigarettes. This information can help policymakers as they determine how best to promote public health through regulation. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Child-Resistant Packaging for E-Liquid: A Review of US State Legislation.

    PubMed

    Frey, Leslie T; Tilburg, William C

    2016-02-01

    A growing number of states have introduced or enacted legislation requiring child-resistant packaging for e-liquid containers; however, these laws involve varying terms, packaging standards, and enforcement provisions, raising concerns about their effectiveness. We evaluated bills against 4 benchmarks: broad product definitions that contemplate future developments in the market, citations to a specific packaging standard, stated penalties for violations, and express grants of authority to a state entity to enforce the packaging requirements. Our findings showed that 3 states meet all 4 benchmarks in their enacted legislation. We encourage states to consider these benchmarks when revising statutes or drafting future legislation.

  8. Child-Resistant Packaging for E-Liquid: A Review of US State Legislation

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, William C.

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of states have introduced or enacted legislation requiring child-resistant packaging for e-liquid containers; however, these laws involve varying terms, packaging standards, and enforcement provisions, raising concerns about their effectiveness. We evaluated bills against 4 benchmarks: broad product definitions that contemplate future developments in the market, citations to a specific packaging standard, stated penalties for violations, and express grants of authority to a state entity to enforce the packaging requirements. Our findings showed that 3 states meet all 4 benchmarks in their enacted legislation. We encourage states to consider these benchmarks when revising statutes or drafting future legislation. PMID:26691114

  9. 29 CFR 1902.44 - Requirements applicable to State plans granted affirmative 18(e) determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATE PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Procedures for Determinations Under Section 18(e) of the Act Procedures for 18... least as effective as” operations under the Federal program in providing employee safety and health...

  10. Request Strategies in Professional E-Mail Correspondence: Insights from the United States Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the rhetorical features of e-mail correspondence, this is the first study to examine the request strategies in e-mails written by native English-speaking professionals from a variety of industries in the United States. This study uses Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper's (1989) speech act framework to analyze the request…

  11. 395. J.L.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    395. J.L.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; EAST BAY CROSSING; TOWER E-4; GENERAL PLAN; DRG. NO. 58 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Molecular orbital imaging of the acetone S2 excited state using time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Keiya; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-13

    We report a time-resolved (e, 2e) experiment on the deuterated acetone molecule in the S2 Rydberg state with a lifetime of 13.5 ps. The acetone S2 state was prepared by a 195 nm pump laser and probed with electron momentum spectroscopy using a 1.2 keV incident electron beam of 1 ps temporal width. In spite of the low data statistics as well as of the limited time resolution (±35  ps) due to velocity mismatch, the experimental results clearly demonstrate that electron momentum spectroscopy measurements of short-lived transient species are feasible, opening the door to time-resolved orbital imaging in momentum space.

  13. Measurement of initial-state–final-state radiation interference in the processes e + e – → μ + μ – γ and e + e – → π + π – γ [Measurement of ISR-FSR interference in the processes e + e – → μ + μ – γ and e + e – → π + π – γ

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2015-10-28

    Charge asymmetry in the processes e +e – → μ +μ –γ and e +e – → π +π –γ is measured using 232 fb –1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at e +e – center-of-mass energies near 10.58 GeV. An observable is introduced and shown to be very robust against detector asymmetries while keeping a large sensitivity to the physical charge asymmetry that results from the interference between initial- and final-state radiation (FSR). The asymmetry is determined as a function of the invariant mass of the final-state tracks from production threshold to a few GeV/c 2. Itmore » is compared to the expectation from QED for e +e – → μ +μ –γ, and from theoretical models for e +e – → π +π –γ. A clear interference pattern is observed in e +e – → π +π –γ, particularly in the vicinity of the f 2(1270) resonance. As a result, the inferred rate of lowest-order FSR production is consistent with the QED expectation for e +e – → μ +μ –γ, and is negligibly small for e +e – → π +π –γ.« less

  14. Measurement of initial-state–final-state radiation interference in the processes e + e – → μ + μ – γ and e + e – → π + π – γ [Measurement of ISR-FSR interference in the processes e + e – → μ + μ – γ and e + e – → π + π – γ

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    Charge asymmetry in the processes e +e – → μ +μ –γ and e +e – → π +π –γ is measured using 232 fb –1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at e +e – center-of-mass energies near 10.58 GeV. An observable is introduced and shown to be very robust against detector asymmetries while keeping a large sensitivity to the physical charge asymmetry that results from the interference between initial- and final-state radiation (FSR). The asymmetry is determined as a function of the invariant mass of the final-state tracks from production threshold to a few GeV/c 2. Itmore » is compared to the expectation from QED for e +e – → μ +μ –γ, and from theoretical models for e +e – → π +π –γ. A clear interference pattern is observed in e +e – → π +π –γ, particularly in the vicinity of the f 2(1270) resonance. As a result, the inferred rate of lowest-order FSR production is consistent with the QED expectation for e +e – → μ +μ –γ, and is negligibly small for e +e – → π +π –γ.« less

  15. Characteristics and Effectiveness of the U.S. State E-Government-to-Business Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Truell, Allen; Alexander, Melody W.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the user-interface characteristics and effectiveness of the e-government-to-business (G2B) sites of the 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. A group of 306 online users were trained to assess the sites. The findings indicate that the majority of the state G2B sites included the user-interface characteristics that provided online…

  16. RES-E Support Policies In The Baltic States: Development Aspect (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-02-01

    Despite quite similar conditions (natural resources) for electricity production from renewable energy sources (RES-E) in three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), significant differences exist in these countries as to the RES-E production volume. In Latvia this volume is the highest, while in Estonia and Lithuania it is half as high. One of the factors that determine the RES-E production volumes is support policies, which in the Baltic States are different. The main objective of this work was to analyze and compare these support policies. The results have shown that for rapid RES-E development the most effective policy is to be market-oriented (as in Estonia), whereas for more stable development such policy should be producer-oriented (as in Lithuania).

  17. Hawaii state legislator views on e-cigarettes and likelihood of legislative action

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Deborah Taira; Seto, Jason; Guimaraes, Alexander; Masterson, James; Davis, James; Seto, Todd B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine perspectives on e-cigarette use and regulations in Hawaii through key informant interviews with state legislators. Background E-cigarette use is rapidly increasing, with sales in 2013 topping $1 billion in the United States, but e-cigarettes are still a largely unregulated industry. Although e-cigarettes are thought by most to be a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes, long-term health effects are not yet known. Methods Semistructured key informant interviews were conducted with Hawaii state legislators (n = 15). Results We found a lack of consensus among legislators, which suggests that substantial legislative action is unlikely in the upcoming session. However, most legislators believe that some type of incremental legislation will pass, such as enactment of a small tax, limitations on advertising to protect adolescents, or regulations concerning where people can use e-cigarettes. Conclusion Legislators eagerly await further research to clarify the overall benefits and harms of e-cigarettes at both the individual and population levels. PMID:26340417

  18. Special Report: E-Waste Management in the United States and Public Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Jessica; Grandhi, Radhika; Kim, Stephani S; Mase, William A; Reponen, Tiina; Ho, Shuk-mei; Chen, Aimin

    2016-10-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) generation is increasing worldwide, and its management becomes a significant challenge because of the many toxicants present in electronic devices. The U.S. is a major producer of e-waste, although its management practice and policy regulation are not sufficient to meet the challenge. We reviewed e-waste generation, current management practices and trends, policy challenges, potential health impact, and toxicant exposure prevention in the U.S. A large amount of toxic metals, flame retardants, and other persistent organic pollutants exist in e-waste or can be released from the disposal of e-waste (e.g., landfill, incineration, recycling). Landfill is still a major method used to dispose of obsolete electronic devices, and only about half of the states have initiated a landfill ban for e-waste. Recycling of e-waste is an increasing trend in the past few years. There is potential, however, for workers to be exposed to a mixture of toxicants in e-waste and these exposures should be curtailed. Perspectives and recommendations are provided regarding managing e-waste in the U.S. to protect public health, including enacting federal legislation, discontinuing landfill disposal, protecting workers in recycling facilities from toxicant exposure, reducing toxicant release into the environment, and raising awareness of this growing environmental health issue among the public.

  19. Mathematical E-Learning: State of the Art and Experiences at the Open University of Catalonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juan, A.; Huertas, A.; Steegmann, C.; Corcoles, C.; Serrat, C.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present a review of the state of the art in mathematical e-learning and some personal experiences on this area developed during the last eleven years at the Open University of Catalonia (UOC), a completely online university located in Spain. The article discusses important aspects related to online mathematics courses offered in…

  20. Examining eXtension: Diffusion, Disruption, and Adoption among Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Cayla; Miller, Greg

    2016-01-01

    As eXtension unveils its new membership model, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach must determine how best to support professionals and clientele using the technology. This article reports on a study that used the diffusion of innovations and disruptive innovation theories to assess Iowa Extension professionals' adoption and perceptions…

  1. 389. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    389. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; WEST BAY CROSSING; SUSPENDED STRUCTURE; TYPICAL DETAILS; DRG. NO. 42 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 381. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    381. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; WEST BAY CROSSING; SUSPENDED STRUCTURE; ERECTION; DRG. NO. 43 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 387. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    387. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; TOWERS 2, 3, 5 & 6; BRACING DETAILS - LOWER DECK; CONTRACT NO. 6; DRAWING NO. 27 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 399. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    399. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; EAST BAY CROSSING; 504FOOT SPANS; TYPICAL DETAILS; DRG. NO. 64 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 360. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    360. J.H.E., Delineator Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; WEST BAY CROSSING; SAN FRANCISCO ANCHORAGE; TYPICAL SECTIONS; DRG. NO. 13 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 377. F.A.N. and Q.E.D., Delineators Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    377. F.A.N. and Q.E.D., Delineators Date Unknown STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; WEST BAY CROSSING; YERBA BUENA CABLE BENT; DRG. NO. 34 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 388. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    388. D.E.M., Delineator December 1932 STATE OF CALIFORNIA; DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS; SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE; SUPERSTRUCTURE - WEST BAY CROSSING; SUSPENDED STRUCTURE; SIDE SPAN TRUSSES AT ANCHORAGES; CONTRACT NO. 6; DRAWING NO. 40 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. The Hammett relationship and reactions in the excited electronic state: hemithioindigo Z/E-photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Thorben; Schadendorf, Torsten; Priewisch, Beate; Rück-Braun, Karola; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2008-01-31

    The photochemical reaction dynamics of a set of photochromic compounds based on thioindigo and stilbene molecular parts (hemithioindigos, HTI) are presented. Photochemical Z/E isomerization around the central double bond occurs with time constants of 216 ps (Z --> E) and 10 ps (E --> Z) for a 5-methyl-hemithioindigo. Chemical substitution on the stilbene moiety causes unusually strong changes in the reaction rate. Electron-donating substituents in the position para to the central double bond (e.g., para-methoxy) strongly accelerate the reaction, while the reaction is drastically slowed by electron-withdrawing groups in this position (e.g., para-nitrile). We correlate the experimental data of seven HTI-compounds in a quantitative manner using the Hammett equation and present a qualitative explanation for the application of ground-state Hammett constants to describe the photoisomerization reaction.

  9. Reduced probabilities for E2 transitions between excited collective states of triaxial even–even nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nadyrbekov, M. S., E-mail: nodirbekov@inp.uz; Bozarov, O. A.

    Reduced probabilities for intra- and interband E2 transitions in excited collective states of even–even lanthanide and actinide nuclei are analyzed on the basis of a model that admits an arbitrary triaxiality. They are studied in detail in the energy spectra of {sup 154}Sm, {sup 156}Gd, {sup 158}Dy, {sup 162,164}Er, {sup 230,232}Th, and {sup 232,234,236,238}U even–even nuclei. Theoretical and experimental values of the reduced probabilities for the respective E2 transitions are compared. This comparison shows good agreement for all states, including high-spin ones. The ratios of the reduced probabilities for the E2 transitions in question are compared with results following frommore » the Alaga rules. These comparisons make it possible to assess the sensitivity of the probabilities being considered to the presence of quadrupole deformations.« less

  10. Environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for E-waste management.

    PubMed

    Ikhlayel, Mahdi

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for proper e-waste handling using Jordan as a case study. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was employed to evaluate five advanced management systems represent state-of-the-art treatment technologies, including sanitary landfilling; proper recycling of metals, materials, and precious metals (PMs); and incineration of plastic and the hazardous portion of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Six e-waste products that contribute the most to the e-waste in Jordan were included in the assessment of each scenario, which resulted in 30 total cases of e-waste management. The findings indicated that landfills for the entire components of the e-waste stream are the worst option and should be avoided. The most promising e-waste management scenario features integrated e-waste processes based on the concept of Integrated Waste Management (IWM), including recycling materials such as non-PMs and PMs, incinerating plastic and the hazardous content of PCBs using the energy recovered from incineration, and using sanitary landfills of residues. For this scenario, the best environmental performance was obtained for the treatment of mobile phones. Incineration of the portion of hazardous waste using energy recovery is an option that deserves attention. Because scenario implementation depends on more than just the environmental benefits (e.g., economic cost and technical aspects), the study proposes a systematic approach founded on the IWM concept for e-waste management scenario selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology and Transmission of Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Infections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Megan G; Foster, Monique A; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2018-04-30

    There are many similarities in the epidemiology and transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype (gt)3 infections in the United States. Both viruses are enterically transmitted, although specific routes of transmission are more clearly established for HAV than for HEV: HAV is restricted to humans and primarily spread through the fecal-oral route, while HEV is zoonotic with poorly understood modes of transmission in the United States. New cases of HAV infection have decreased dramatically in the United States since infant vaccination was recommended in 1996. In recent years, however, outbreaks have occurred among an increasingly susceptible adult population. Although HEV is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries, it is rarely diagnosed in the United States. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. Beyond Section 508: The Spectrum of Legal Requirements for Accessible e-Government Web Sites in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Paul T.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, a number of federal laws establish requirements that electronic government (e-government) information and services be accessible to individuals with disabilities. These laws affect e-government Web sites at the federal, state, and local levels. To this point, research about the accessibility of e-government Web sites has…

  13. 34 CFR 694.12 - Under what conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? 694.12 Section 694.12 Education Regulations of the Offices... conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? (a)(1) State... 404E scholarships to students in accordance with the requirements of § 694.13 or § 694.14, as...

  14. 34 CFR 694.12 - Under what conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? 694.12 Section 694.12 Education Regulations of the Offices... conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? (a)(1) State... 404E scholarships to students in accordance with the requirements of § 694.13 or § 694.14, as...

  15. 34 CFR 694.12 - Under what conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? 694.12 Section 694.12 Education Regulations of the Offices... conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? (a)(1) State... 404E scholarships to students in accordance with the requirements of § 694.13 or § 694.14, as...

  16. 34 CFR 694.12 - Under what conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? 694.12 Section 694.12 Education Regulations of the Offices... conditions do State and Partnership GEAR UP grantees make section 404E scholarship awards? (a)(1) State... 404E scholarships to students in accordance with the requirements of § 694.13 or § 694.14, as...

  17. Emergence of low noise frustrated states in E/I balanced neural networks.

    PubMed

    Recio, I; Torres, J J

    2016-12-01

    We study emerging phenomena in binary neural networks where, with a probability c synaptic intensities are chosen according with a Hebbian prescription, and with probability (1-c) there is an extra random contribution to synaptic weights. This new term, randomly taken from a Gaussian bimodal distribution, balances the synaptic population in the network so that one has 80%-20% relation in E/I population ratio, mimicking the balance observed in mammals cortex. For some regions of the relevant parameters, our system depicts standard memory (at low temperature) and non-memory attractors (at high temperature). However, as c decreases and the level of the underlying noise also decreases below a certain temperature T t , a kind of memory-frustrated state, which resembles spin-glass behavior, sharply emerges. Contrary to what occurs in Hopfield-like neural networks, the frustrated state appears here even in the limit of the loading parameter α→0. Moreover, we observed that the frustrated state in fact corresponds to two states of non-vanishing activity uncorrelated with stored memories, associated, respectively, to a high activity or Up state and to a low activity or Down state. Using a linear stability analysis, we found regions in the space of relevant parameters for locally stable steady states and demonstrated that frustrated states coexist with memory attractors below T t . Then, multistability between memory and frustrated states is present for relatively small c, and metastability of memory attractors can emerge as c decreases even more. We studied our system using standard mean-field techniques and with Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining a perfect agreement between theory and simulations. Our study can be useful to explain the role of synapse heterogeneity on the emergence of stable Up and Down states not associated to memory attractors, and to explore the conditions to induce transitions among them, as in sleep-wake transitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  18. E-Cigarette Advice to Patients From Physicians and Dentists in the United States.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Olivier; McMillen, Robert C; Klein, Jonathan D; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2018-06-01

    To report on adults' recall of discussion by physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey (Internet and random digit dialing) in the United States. Adults who ever used e-cigarettes. Participant-reported discussion about the potential benefits and harms of e-cigarettes with their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the past 12 months. Fisher exact test for the analysis between benefits and harms for each type of provider and for rates of advice between provider types. Among the 3030 adults who completed the survey, 523 (17.2%) had ever used e-cigarettes. Of those who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year, 7.3%, 1.7%, and 10.1%, respectively, reported discussing potential harms of e-cigarettes. Conversely, 5.8%, 1.7%, and 9.3% of patients who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year reported that the clinician discussed the potential benefits of e-cigarettes. Each clinician type was as likely to discuss harms as benefits. Rates of advice were similar between doctors and child's doctors but lower for dentists. Rates were comparable when the analysis was limited to current e-cigarette users, participants with children, or those who reported using both e-cigarettes and combusted tobacco. Few physicians and dentists discuss either the harms or benefits of e-cigarettes with their patients. These data suggest an opportunity to educate, train, and provide resources for physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes and their use.

  19. The Annie E. Casey Foundation 2006 Kids Count Pocket Guide. State Profiles of Child Well-Being Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Kids Count, a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, is a national and state by- state effort to track the status of children in the United States. By providing policymakers and citizens with benchmarks of child well-being, Kids Count seeks to enrich local, state, and national discussions concerning ways to secure better futures for all…

  20. The eΠ3g state of C2: A pathway to dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, B. A.; Krechkivska, O.; Nauta, K.; Bacskay, G. B.; Kable, S. H.; Schmidt, T. W.

    2017-07-01

    The lowest 13 vibrational levels, v = 0-12, of the eΠ3g state of the C2 molecule have been measured by laser-induced fluorescence of new bands of the Fox-Herzberg system. The newly observed levels, v = 5-12, which span the eΠ3g electronic state up to and beyond the first dissociation threshold of C2, were analyzed to afford highly accurate molecular constants, including band origins, and rotational and spin-orbit constants. The spin-orbit coupling constants of the previously published lowest five levels are revised in sign and magnitude, requiring an overhaul of previously published molecular constants. The analysis is supported by high level ab initio calculations. Lifetimes of all observed levels were recorded and found to be in excellent agreement with ab initio predicted values up to v = 11. v = 12 was found to exhibit a much reduced lifetime and fluorescence quantum yield, which is attributed to the onset of predissociation. This brackets the dissociation energy of ground state XΣ+1g C2 between 6.1803 and 6.2553 eV, in agreement with the Active Thermochemical Tables.

  1. Pediatric Exposure to E-Cigarettes, Nicotine, and Tobacco Products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Alisha; Spiller, Henry A; Casavant, Marcel J; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Smith, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the epidemiologic characteristics and outcomes of exposures to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), nicotine, and tobacco products among young children in the United States. A retrospective analysis of exposures associated with nicotine and tobacco products among children younger than 6 years old was conducted by using National Poison Data System data. From January 2012 through April 2015, the National Poison Data System received 29 141 calls for nicotine and tobacco product exposures among children younger than 6 years, averaging 729 child exposures per month. Cigarettes accounted for 60.1% of exposures, followed by other tobacco products (16.4%) and e-cigarettes (14.2%). The monthly number of exposures associated with e-cigarettes increased by 1492.9% during the study period. Children <2 years old accounted for 44.1% of e-cigarette exposures, 91.6% of cigarette exposures, and 75.4% of other tobacco exposures. Children exposed to e-cigarettes had 5.2 times higher odds of a health care facility admission and 2.6 times higher odds of having a severe outcome than children exposed to cigarettes. One death occurred in association with a nicotine liquid exposure. The frequency of exposures to e-cigarettes and nicotine liquid among young children is increasing rapidly and severe outcomes are being reported. Swift government action is needed to regulate these products to help prevent child poisoning. Prevention strategies include public education; appropriate product storage and use away from children; warning labels; and modifications of e-cigarette devices, e-liquid, and e-liquid containers and packaging to make them less appealing and less accessible to children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of an unoccupied surface resonance state in B i2T e2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisa, Nurmamat; Krasovskii, E. E.; Ishida, Y.; Sumida, K.; Chen, Jiahua; Yoshikawa, T.; Chulkov, E. V.; Kokh, K. A.; Tereshchenko, O. E.; Shin, S.; Kimura, Akio

    2018-03-01

    Electronic structure and electron dynamics in the ternary topological insulator B i2T e2Se are studied with time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using optical pumping. An unoccupied surface resonance split off from the bulk conduction band previously indirectly observed in scanning tunneling measurements is spectroscopically identified. Furthermore, an unoccupied topological surface state (TSS) is found, which is serendipitously located at about 1.5 eV above the occupied TSS, thereby facilitating direct optical transitions between the two surface states at ℏ ω =1.5 eV in an n -type topological insulator. An appreciable nonequilibrium population of the bottom of the bulk conduction band is observed for longer than 15 ps after the pump pulse. This leads to a long recovery time of the lower TSS, which is constantly populated by the electrons coming from the bulk conduction band. Our results demonstrate B i2T e2Se to be an ideal platform for designing future optoelectronic devices based on topological insulators.

  3. The Advertising Strategies of Early E-cigarette Brand Leaders in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Haardörfer, Regine; Cahn, Zachary; Lewis, Michael; Kothari, Shreya; Sarmah, Raina; Getachew, Betelihem; Berg, Carla J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We examined differential advertising strategies used by 4 major United States e-cigarette companies with differential affiliations with the traditional tobacco industry (ie, Njoy - independent, Blu – acquired, Vuse and MarkTen – launched by cigarette companies) over time. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study regarding e-cigarette adspend, adspend per media channel (eg, TV, print), and advertising messaging strategies among these 4 top e-cigarette brands from January 2013 through December 2015. Results E-cigarette adspend increased from $59 million in 2013 to $91 million in 2014, followed by a sharp decline to $37 million in 2015. These companies showed distinct spending trajectories overall and across media channels, with Njoy and Vuse spending a higher proportion of their dollars on TV and Blu and MarkTen spending more on print. Marketing messages were also different by company. Key themes included switching from cigarettes (particularly by Njoy and Blu), circumventing smoke-free policies (particularly by Blu), and technological advancement (particularly by Vuse and MarkTen). Conclusions These e-cigarette brands have shifted their adspend, use of media channels, and advertising messaging strategies over time. Some differing strategies may reflect the different affiliations of each brand to the traditional cigarette industry. PMID:29392167

  4. The Advertising Strategies of Early E-cigarette Brand Leaders in the United States.

    PubMed

    Haardörfer, Regine; Cahn, Zachary; Lewis, Michael; Kothari, Shreya; Sarmah, Raina; Getachew, Betelihem; Berg, Carla J

    2017-04-01

    We examined differential advertising strategies used by 4 major United States e-cigarette companies with differential affiliations with the traditional tobacco industry (ie, Njoy - independent, Blu - acquired, Vuse and MarkTen - launched by cigarette companies) over time. We conducted a mixed-methods study regarding e-cigarette adspend, adspend per media channel (eg, TV, print), and advertising messaging strategies among these 4 top e-cigarette brands from January 2013 through December 2015. E-cigarette adspend increased from $59 million in 2013 to $91 million in 2014, followed by a sharp decline to $37 million in 2015. These companies showed distinct spending trajectories overall and across media channels, with Njoy and Vuse spending a higher proportion of their dollars on TV and Blu and MarkTen spending more on print. Marketing messages were also different by company. Key themes included switching from cigarettes (particularly by Njoy and Blu), circumventing smoke-free policies (particularly by Blu), and technological advancement (particularly by Vuse and MarkTen). These e-cigarette brands have shifted their adspend, use of media channels, and advertising messaging strategies over time. Some differing strategies may reflect the different affiliations of each brand to the traditional cigarette industry.

  5. State-of-the-art of recycling e-wastes by vacuum metallurgy separation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-16

    In recent era, more and more electric and electronic equipment wastes (e-wastes) are generated that contain both toxic and valuable materials in them. Most studies focus on the extraction of valuable metals like Au, Ag from e-wastes. However, the recycling of metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, and organics has not attracted enough attentions. Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) processes can reduce pollution significantly using vacuum technique. It can effectively recycle heavy metals and organics from e-wastes in an environmentally friendly way, which is beneficial for both preventing the heavy metal contaminations and the sustainable development of resources. VMS can be classified into several methods, such as vacuum evaporation, vacuum carbon reduction and vacuum pyrolysis. This paper respectively reviews the state-of-art of these methods applied to recycling heavy metals and organics from several kinds of e-wastes. The method principle, equipment used, separating process, optimized operating parameters and recycling mechanism of each case are illustrated in details. The perspectives on the further development of e-wastes recycling by VMS are also presented.

  6. E-Estuary: Developing a Decision-support System for Coastal Management in the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ready access to geographic information is needed to support management decisions for estuaries at local, state, regional, and national scales. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E...

  7. Res-E Support Policies in the Baltic States: Electricity Price Aspect (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinaite, V.; Priedite, I.

    2015-04-01

    Increasing volumes of electricity derived from renewable energy sources (RES-E) affect the electricity market prices and the prices for final electricity consumers in the Baltic States. The results of a multivariate regression analysis show that in 2013 the RES-E contributed to decreasing the electricity market prices in the Baltic States. However, the final electricity consumers pay for the promotion of RES-E through the approved RES-E component which has a tendency to increase. It is estimated that in 2013 the net benefits from the wind electricity promotion were achieved in Lithuania and Latvia while the net cost - in Estonia. This suggests that the economic efficiency of the wind electricity support scheme based on the application of feed-in tariffs was higher than that based on the feed-in premium. Rakstā analizēta elektroenerģijas ražošanas no atjaunojamiem energoresursiem (AER-E) palielināšanas ietekme uz elektroenerģijas tirgus cenu un gala cenu elektroenerģijas lietotājiem Baltijas valstīs. Daudzfaktoru regresijas analīzes rezultāti atklāja, ka AER-E 2013. gadā varētu samazināt elektroenerģijas tirgus cenas Baltijas valstīs. Tomēr jāņem vērā, ka elektroenerģijas lietotāja gala cenā ir iekļauta AER-E atbalsta komponente, kurai ir raksturīgi palielināties. Aprēķināts, ka no vēja elektroenerģijas ražošanas Latvijā un Lietuvā tika iegūta tīrā peļņa, bet Igaunijā tikai nosedza pašizmaksu. Tas liecina, ka vēja elektroenerģijas atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz obligātā iepirkuma atbalsta principu, ir augstāka ekonomiskā efektivitāte, nekā atbalsta shēmai, kas balstīta uz piemaksu par no AER saražoto elektroenerģiju obligātā iepirkuma ietvaros.

  8. Search for C=+ charmonium and bottomonium states in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+ X at B factories

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Chao Kuangta; He Zhiguo

    2009-12-01

    We study the production of C=+ charmonium states X in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+X at B factories with X={eta}{sub c}(nS) (n=1, 2, 3), {chi}{sub cJ}(mP) (m=1, 2), and {sup 1}D{sub 2}(1D). In the S- and P-wave case, contributions of QED with one-loop QCD corrections are calculated within the framework of nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD), and in the D-wave case only the QED contribution is considered. We find that in most cases the one-loop QCD corrections are negative and moderate, in contrast to the case of double charmonium production e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+X, where one-loop QCD corrections are positive and large in most cases.more » We also find that the production cross sections of some of these states in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+X are larger than that in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+X by an order of magnitude even after the negative one-loop QCD corrections are included. We then argue that search for the X(3872), X(3940), Y(3940), and X(4160) in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}+X at B factories may be helpful to clarify the nature of these states. For completeness, the production of bottomonium states in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation is also discussed.« less

  9. A LOW-E MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING PROBE FOR BIOLOGICAL SOLID STATE NMR AT 750 MHz

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Seth A.; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Shetty, Kiran; Brey, William W.; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Crossed-coil NMR probes are a useful tool for reducing sample heating for biological solid state NMR. In a crossed-coil probe, the higher frequency 1H field, which is the primary source of sample heating in conventional probes, is produced by a separate low-inductance resonator. Because a smaller driving voltage is required, the electric field across the sample and the resultant heating is reduced. In this work we describe the development of a magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR probe utilizing a dual resonator. This dual resonator approach, referred to as “Low-E,” was originally developed to reduce heating in samples of mechanically aligned membranes. The study of inherently dilute systems, such as proteins in lipid bilayers, via MAS techniques requires large sample volumes at high field to obtain spectra with adequate signal-to-noise ratio under physiologically relevant conditions. With the Low-E approach, we are able to obtain homogeneous and sufficiently strong radiofrequency fields for both 1H and 13C frequencies in a 4 mm probe with a 1H frequency of 750 MHz. The performance of the probe using windowless dipolar recoupling sequences is demonstrated on model compounds as well as membrane embedded peptides. PMID:19138870

  10. Stress state and movement potential of the Kar-e-Bas fault zone, Fars, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Zafarmand, Bahareh

    2017-08-01

    The Kar-e-Bas or Mengharak basement-inverted fault is comprised of six segments in the Zagros foreland folded belt of Iran. In the Fars region, this fault zone associated with the Kazerun, Sabz-Pushan and Sarvestan faults serves as a lateral transfer zone that accommodates the change in shortening direction from the western central to the eastern Zagros. This study evaluates the recent tectonic stress regime of the Kar-e-Bas fault zone based on inversion of earthquake focal mechanism data, and quantifies the fault movement potential of this zone based on the relationship between fault geometric characteristics and recent tectonic stress regimes. The trend and plunge of σ 1 and σ 3 are S25°W/04°-N31°E/05° and S65°E/04°-N60°W/10°, respectively, with a stress ratio of Φ = 0.83. These results are consistent with the collision direction of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent. The near horizontal plunge of maximum and minimum principle stresses and the value of stress ratio Φ indicate that the state of stress is nearly strike-slip dominated with little relative difference between the value of two principal stresses, σ 1 and σ 2. The obliquity of the maximum compressional stress into the fault trend reveals a typical stress partitioning of thrust and strike-slip motion in the Kar-e-Bas fault zone. Analysis of the movement potential of this fault zone shows that its northern segment has a higher potential of fault activity (0.99). The negligible difference between the fault-plane dips of the segments indicates that their strike is a controlling factor in the changes in movement potential.

  11. Corresponding-states behavior of SPC/E-based modified (bent and hybrid) water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Volker C.

    2017-02-01

    The remarkable and sometimes anomalous properties of water can be traced back at the molecular level to the tetrahedral coordination of molecules due to the ability of a water molecule to form four hydrogen bonds to its neighbors; this feature allows for the formation of a network that greatly influences the thermodynamic behavior. Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important for our understanding of water. Molecular models of water, such as SPC/E, are needed for this purpose, and they have proved to capture many important features of real water. Modifications of the SPC/E model have been proposed, some changing the H-O-H angle (bent models) and others increasing the importance of dispersion interactions (hybrid models), to study the structural features that set water apart from other polar fluids and from simple fluids such as argon. Here, we focus on the properties at liquid-vapor equilibrium and study the coexistence curve, the interfacial tension, and the vapor pressure in a corresponding-states approach. In particular, we calculate Guggenheim's ratio for the reduced apparent enthalpy of vaporization and Guldberg's ratio for the reduced normal boiling point. This analysis offers additional insight from a more macroscopic, thermodynamic perspective and augments that which has already been learned at the molecular level from simulations. In the hybrid models, the relative importance of dispersion interactions is increased, which turns the modified water into a Lennard-Jones-like fluid. Consequently, in a corresponding-states framework, the typical behavior of simple fluids, such as argon, is seen to be approached asymptotically. For the bent models, decreasing the bond angle turns the model essentially into a polar diatomic fluid in which the particles form linear molecular arrangements; as a consequence, characteristic features of the corresponding-states behavior of hydrogen halides emerge.

  12. Regulation profiles of e-cigarettes in the United States: a critical review with qualitative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Pluye, Pierre; Gore, Genevieve; Granikov, Vera; Filion, Kristian B; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2015-06-03

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have been steadily increasing in popularity since their introduction to US markets in 2007. Debates surrounding the proper regulatory mechanisms needed to mitigate potential harms associated with their use have focused on youth access, their potential for nicotine addiction, and the renormalization of a smoking culture. The objective of this study was to describe the enacted and planned regulations addressing this novel public health concern in the US. We searched LexisNexis Academic under Federal Regulations and Registers, as well as State Administrative Codes and Registers. This same database was also used to find information about planned regulations in secondary sources. The search was restricted to US documents produced between January 1(st), 2004, and July 14(th), 2014. We found two planned regulations at the federal level, and 74 enacted and planned regulations in 44 states. We identified six state-based regulation types, including i) access, ii) usage, iii) marketing and advertisement, iv) packaging, v) taxation, and vi) licensure. These were further classified into 10 restriction subtypes: sales, sale to minors, use in indoor public places, use in limited venues, use by minors, licensure, marketing and advertising, packaging, and taxation. Most enacted restrictions aimed primarily to limit youth access, while few regulations enforced comprehensive restrictions on product use and availability. Current regulations targeting e-cigarettes in the US are varied in nature and scope. There is greater consensus surrounding youth protection (access by minors and/or use by minors, and/or use in limited venues), with little consensus on multi-level regulations, including comprehensive use bans in public spaces.

  13. Ab initio calculations of torsionally mediated hyperfine splittings in E states of acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Reid, E. M.; Guislain, B.; Hougen, J. T.; Alekseev, E. A.; Krapivin, I.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum chemistry packages can be used to predict with reasonable accuracy spin-rotation hyperfine interaction constants for methanol, which contains one methyl-top internal rotor. In this work we use one of these packages to calculate components of the spin-rotation interaction tensor for acetaldehyde. We then use torsion-rotation wavefunctions obtained from a fit to the acetaldehyde torsion-rotation spectrum to calculate the expected magnitude of hyperfine splittings analogous to those observed at relatively high J values in the E symmetry states of methanol. We find that theory does indeed predict doublet splittings at moderate J values in the acetaldehyde torsion-rotation spectrum, which closely resemble those seen in methanol, but that the factor of three decrease in hyperfine spin-rotation constants compared to methanol puts the largest of the acetaldehyde splittings a factor of two below presently available Lamb-dip resolution.

  14. Quasiparticle interference of Fermi arc states in the type-II Weyl semimetal candidate WT e2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Xing; Peng, Lang; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Jian; Yi, Chang-Jiang; Xian, Jing-Jing; Shi, You-Guo; Fu, Ying-Shuang

    2018-04-01

    Weyl semimetals possess linear dispersions through pairs of Weyl nodes in three-dimensional momentum spaces, whose hallmark arclike surface states are connected to Weyl nodes with different chirality. WT e2 was recently predicted to be a new type of Weyl semimetal. Here, we study the quasiparticle interference (QPI) of its Fermi arc surface states by combined spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. We observed the electron scattering on two types of WT e2 surfaces unambiguously. Its scattering signal can be ascribed mainly to trivial surface states. We also address the QPI feature of nontrivial surface states from theoretical calculations. The experimental QPI patterns show some features that are likely related to the nontrivial Fermi arc states, whose existence is, however, not conclusive. Our study provides an indispensable clue for studying the Weyl semimetal phase in WT e2 .

  15. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs in Durango State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis F; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Alvarado-Félix, Ángel O

    2018-02-01

    No information about hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in pigs in the northern Mexican state of Durango exists. We determined the seroprevalence and correlates of anti-HEV IgG antibodies in pigs in Durango, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study, we studied 427 pigs raised in backyards (n = 328), or slaughtered (n = 99) in Durango. Sera of pigs were analyzed for anti-HEV IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassay. Antibodies to HEV were found in 193 (45.2%) of the 427 pigs studied. A significantly higher seroprevalence was observed in slaughtered pigs (79.8%) than in backyard pigs (34.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that HEV seropositivity was associated with age, sex, breed, climate, altitude, mean annual temperature, mean annual rainfall, and farm raising. Logistic regression analysis showed that HEV seropositivity was associated with the origin (Sonora State) of pigs (OR=6.51; 95%CI: 3.74-11.32; P < 0.001), and mean annual rainfall (≤600 mm) (OR=1.78; 95%CI: 1.01-3.15; P = 0.04). A high seroprevalence of HEV infection in pigs slaughtered for human consumption in Durango City was found. This is the first report of an association between HEV seropositivity in pigs and climatic factors. Infection factors found may help for the optimal planning of preventive measures against HEV infection. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Is the E-Liquid Industry Regulating Itself? A Look at E-Liquid Internet Vendors in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Dmitriy; Timberlake, David S; Williams, Rebecca S

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether the nascent, but rapidly growing e-liquid industry prohibits Internet sales to minors and employs safety measures to prevent accidental poisonings. A stratified simple random sample (n = 120) was selected from the target population (N = 1107) of US online vendors of e-liquid in July 2015. The vendors were stratified and subsequently oversampled by trade association membership and vendor popularity. Three minors aged 16 to 17, who were supervised by adult research staff, attempted to purchase e-liquid from the 120 online vendors using debit cards issued in their names. Measures included vendors' use of age verification, warning labels on e-liquid bottles, and child-resistant packaging. Statistically significant differences were observed by vendor popularity, but not by membership in a trade association. The differences by vendor popularity, however, occurred for measures that were limited to an age warning and list of ingredients. The most striking finding was the scant vendors (n = 4) who successfully prevented the sale of e-liquid to the minors. In contrast, 87.5% and 53.9% of the bottles contained child-resistant packaging and a health warning label, respectively. Irrespective of trade association membership or vendor popularity, online vendors of e-liquids are not taking the proper precautions in preventing sales to minors. The FDA's upcoming deeming rules on e-cigarette products should include explicit requirements for offline and online e-liquid vendors, particularly the use of effective age verification, warning labels, and child-resistant packaging. This study demonstrates that, in the absence of any current FDA regulation of e-liquid products, self-regulation among vendors is not effective in preventing product acquisition by minors. Lax oversight of the e-liquid industry may draw consumers to bypass current tobacco control restrictions implemented in face-to-face sales settings. As a consequence, there may

  17. E-Government Attempts in Small Island Developing States: The Rate of Corruption with Virtualization.

    PubMed

    Sari, Arif

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, many Small Island Developing State (SIDS) governments have worked to increase openness and transparency of their transactions as a means to enhance efficiency and reduce corruption in their economies. In order to achieve a cost-effective and efficient strategy to implement a transparent government, Information Communication Technologies offer an opportunity of virtualization by deploying e-government services to promote transparency, accountability and consistency in the public sector and to minimize corruption. This paper explores the potential impact of government virtualization by SIDS and against corruption by comparing the corruption perception index (CPI) rates of 15 SIDS countries. The CPI relates to the degree by which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians by business people and country analysts. In order to reveal the long-term impact of virtual deployment and its consequences on corruption, an in-depth case analysis based on the CPI index rates was conducted on the deployment of the e-government system in Cyprus.

  18. Observation of a Neutral Charmoniumlike State Zc(4025 )0 in e+e-→(D*D¯ *)0π0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Eren, E. E.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We report a study of the process e+e-→(D*D¯ *)0π0 using e+e- collision data samples with integrated luminosities of 1092 pb-1 at √{s }=4.23 GeV and 826 pb-1 at √{s }=4.26 GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. We observe a new neutral structure near the (D*D¯*)0 mass threshold in the π0 recoil mass spectrum, which we denote as Zc(4025 )0. Assuming a Breit-Wigner line shape, its pole mass and pole width are determined to be (4025. 5-4.7+2.0±3.1 ) MeV /c2 and (23.0 ±6.0 ±1.0 ) MeV , respectively. The Born cross sections of e+e-→Zc(4025 )0π0→(D*D¯ *)0π0 are measured to be (61.6 ±8.2 ±9.0 ) pb at √{s }=4.23 GeV and (43.4 ±8.0 ±5.4 ) pb at √{s }=4.26 GeV . The first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  19. Restricted Enzooticity of Hepatitis E Virus Genotypes 1 to 4 in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Meng, Jihong; Dai, Xing; Liang, Jiu-Hong; Feagins, Alicia R.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Belfiore, Natalia M.; Bradford, Carol; Corn, Joseph L.; Cray, Carolyn; Glass, Gregory E.; Gordon, Melvin L.; Hesse, Richard A.; Montgomery, Donald L.; Nicholson, William L.; Pilny, Anthony A.; Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Shaver, Douglas D.; Drobeniuc, Jan; Purdy, Michael A.; Fields, Howard A.; Kamili, Saleem; Teo, Chong-Gee

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis E is recognized as a zoonosis, and swine are known reservoirs, but how broadly enzootic its causative agent, hepatitis E virus (HEV), is remains controversial. To determine the prevalence of HEV infection in animals, a serological assay with capability to detect anti-HEV-antibody across a wide variety of animal species was devised. Recombinant antigens comprising truncated capsid proteins generated from HEV-subgenomic constructs that represent all four viral genotypes were used to capture anti-HEV in the test sample and as an analyte reporter. To facilitate development and validation of the assay, serum samples were assembled from blood donors (n = 372), acute hepatitis E patients (n = 94), five laboratory animals (rhesus monkey, pig, New Zealand rabbit, Wistar rat, and BALB/c mouse) immunized with HEV antigens, and four pigs experimentally infected with HEV. The assay was then applied to 4,936 sera collected from 35 genera of animals that were wild, feral, domesticated, or otherwise held captive in the United States. Test positivity was determined in 457 samples (9.3%). These originated from: bison (3/65, 4.6%), cattle (174/1,156, 15%), dogs (2/212, 0.9%), Norway rats (2/318, 0.6%), farmed swine (267/648, 41.2%), and feral swine (9/306, 2.9%). Only the porcine samples yielded the highest reactivities. HEV RNA was amplified from one farmed pig and two feral pigs and characterized by nucleotide sequencing to belong to genotype 3. HEV infected farmed swine primarily, and the role of other animals as reservoirs of its zoonotic spread appears to be limited. PMID:21998412

  20. 20 CFR 30.626 - How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable... Benefits with State Workers' Compensation Benefits § 30.626 How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state workers' compensation programs? (a) OWCP will reduce...

  1. Is the E-Liquid Industry Regulating Itself? A Look at E-Liquid Internet Vendors in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Timberlake, David S.; Williams, Rebecca S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess whether the nascent, but rapidly growing e-liquid industry prohibits Internet sales to minors and employs safety measures to prevent accidental poisonings. Methods: A stratified simple random sample (n = 120) was selected from the target population (N = 1107) of US online vendors of e-liquid in July 2015. The vendors were stratified and subsequently oversampled by trade association membership and vendor popularity. Three minors aged 16 to 17, who were supervised by adult research staff, attempted to purchase e-liquid from the 120 online vendors using debit cards issued in their names. Measures included vendors’ use of age verification, warning labels on e-liquid bottles, and child-resistant packaging. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed by vendor popularity, but not by membership in a trade association. The differences by vendor popularity, however, occurred for measures that were limited to an age warning and list of ingredients. The most striking finding was the scant vendors (n = 4) who successfully prevented the sale of e-liquid to the minors. In contrast, 87.5% and 53.9% of the bottles contained child-resistant packaging and a health warning label, respectively. Conclusions: Irrespective of trade association membership or vendor popularity, online vendors of e-liquids are not taking the proper precautions in preventing sales to minors. The FDA’s upcoming deeming rules on e-cigarette products should include explicit requirements for offline and online e-liquid vendors, particularly the use of effective age verification, warning labels, and child-resistant packaging. Implications: This study demonstrates that, in the absence of any current FDA regulation of e-liquid products, self-regulation among vendors is not effective in preventing product acquisition by minors. Lax oversight of the e-liquid industry may draw consumers to bypass current tobacco control restrictions

  2. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella, E. coli, and Campylobacter in pigs from swine producing states in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Foodborne illness is a global public health problem and foodborne infections with Salmonella and Campylobacter continue to be problematic in the Unites States. Although gastroenteritis associated with foodborne infections often resolves without treatment, the development of antimicrob...

  3. Responsiveness to a Prospective Student E-Mail Inquiry by Community Colleges in the Nine Mega-States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadinger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated e-mail responsiveness by community colleges in the nine mega-states to an inquiry from a prospective student. Noel-Levitz (2006b) reported that prospective students want to receive an e-mail with information about an institution prior to applying for admission. Specifically, high school juniors and seniors want…

  4. E-Estuary: Developing a Decision-support System for Coastal Management in the Counterminous Untied States (Coastal Geotools 09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ready access to geographic information is needed to support management decisions for estuaries at local, state, regional, and national scales. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E-Estuary ...

  5. E-Estuary: Developing a Decision Support System for Coastal Management in the Conterminous United States (IAHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ready access to geographic information is needed to support management decisions for estuaries at local, state, regional, and national scales. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E-Estuary ...

  6. E-Social Astuteness Skills for ICT-Supported Equitable Prosperity and a Capable Developmental State in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Zoran; Taylor, Wallace; Sharif, Mymoena; Claassen, Walter; Wesso, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Over 350 national and international delegates at the 2nd e-Skills Summit and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Global ICT Forum on Human Capital Development have agreed that the e-skilling agenda in South Africa is making a "profound difference" but still not sufficient to build a capable developmental state. The delegates…

  7. State Library Agencies, Fiscal Year 2002. E.D. Tabs. NCES 2004?304

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Barbara; Kroe, Elaine; O'Shea, Patricia; Sheckells, Cindy; Dorinski, Suzanne; Freeman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This report contains data on state library agencies in the 50 states and the District of Columbia for state fiscal year (FY) 2002. The data were collected through the State Library Agencies (StLA) Survey. This report presents selected findings and background information about the survey. The body of this report is composed of tables providing an…

  8. Measurement of the e+e-→π+π-J/ψ Cross Section Via Initial-State Radiation at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. Z.; Shen, C. P.; Wang, P.; McOnie, S.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bedny, I.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kaji, H.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Marlow, D.; Matyja, A.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mori, T.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Palka, H.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Peak, L. S.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2007-11-01

    The cross section for e+e-→π+π-J/ψ between 3.8 and 5.5GeV/c2 is measured using a 548fb-1 data sample collected on or near the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at KEKB. A peak near 4.25GeV/c2, corresponding to the so called Y(4260), is observed. In addition, there is another cluster of events at around 4.05GeV/c2. A fit using two interfering Breit-Wigner shapes describes the data better than one that uses only the Y(4260), especially for the lower-mass side of the 4.25 GeV enhancement.

  9. Concomitant outbreaks of yellow fever and hepatitis E virus in Darfur States, Sudan, 2012.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah S; Soghaier, Mohammed A; Mohammed, Sozan; Khogali, Hayat S; Osman, Muntasir M; Abdalla, Abdalla M

    2016-01-31

    Yellow fever (YF) is a vector-borne disease transmitted to humans by infected Aedes mosquitoes, while hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne disease that is transmitted through the fecal-oral route. Both diseases have very close clinical presentation, namely fever, jaundice, malaise, and dark urine; they differ in severity and outcome. In this cross-sectional, laboratory-based study, an attempt was made to measure the correlation of concomitant YF and HEV infection in Darfur States during the previous YF outbreak in 2012. Results found concomitant outbreaks of YF and HEV at the same time with very weak statistical correlation between the two infections during the outbreak period, with Cramer's V correlation 0.05 and insignificant p value of 0.86. This correlation indicates that clinicians and care providers in tropical areas have to deal with clinical case definitions used for disease surveillance very carefully since prevalence of HEV infection is relatively common and this increases the possibility of misclassification and missing YF cases, particularly initial index cases, in a season or outbreak.

  10. National and State Trends in Sales of Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes, U.S., 2011–2015

    PubMed Central

    Marynak, Kristy L.; Gammon, Doris G.; King, Brian A.; Loomis, Brett R.; Fulmer, Erika B.; Wang, Teresa W.; Rogers, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, self-reported cigarette smoking has declined among youth and adults, while electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased. However, sales trends for these products are less certain. This study assessed national and state patterns of U.S. cigarette and e-cigarette unit sales. Methods Trends in cigarette and e-cigarette unit sales were analyzed using retail scanner data from September 25, 2011 through January 9, 2016 for: (1) convenience stores; and (2) all other outlets combined, including supermarkets, mass merchandisers, drug, dollar, and club stores, and military commissaries (online, tobacco-only, and “vape“ shops were not available). Data by store type were available for the total contiguous U.S. and 29 states; combined data were available for the remaining states, except Alaska, Hawaii, and DC. Results During 2011–2015, cigarette sales exhibited a small, significant decrease; however, positive year-over-year growth occurred in convenience stores throughout most of 2015. E-cigarette unit sales significantly increased during 2011–2015, but year-over-year growth slowed and was occasionally negative. Cigarette unit sales exceeded e-cigarettes by 64:1 during the last 4-week period. During 2014–2015, cigarette sales increases occurred in 15 of 48 assessed states; e-cigarette sales increased in 18 states. Conclusions Despite overall declines during 2011–2015, cigarette sales in 2015 grew for the first time in a decade. E-cigarette sales growth was positive, but slowed over the study period in assessed stores. Cigarette sales continued to exceed e-cigarette sales, reinforcing the importance of efforts to reduce the appeal and accessibility of cigarettes and other combusted tobacco products. PMID:28285828

  11. National and State Trends in Sales of Cigarettes and E-Cigarettes, U.S., 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Marynak, Kristy L; Gammon, Doris G; King, Brian A; Loomis, Brett R; Fulmer, Erika B; Wang, Teresa W; Rogers, Todd

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, self-reported cigarette smoking has declined among youth and adults, while electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased. However, sales trends for these products are less certain. This study assessed national and state patterns of U.S. cigarette and e-cigarette unit sales. Trends in cigarette and e-cigarette unit sales were analyzed using retail scanner data from September 25, 2011 through January 9, 2016 for: (1) convenience stores; and (2) all other outlets combined, including supermarkets, mass merchandisers, drug, dollar, and club stores, and military commissaries (online, tobacco-only, and "vape" shops were not available). Data by store type were available for the total contiguous U.S. and 29 states; combined data were available for the remaining states, except Alaska, Hawaii, and DC. During 2011-2015, cigarette sales exhibited a small, significant decrease; however, positive year-over-year growth occurred in convenience stores throughout most of 2015. E-cigarette unit sales significantly increased during 2011-2015, but year-over-year growth slowed and was occasionally negative. Cigarette unit sales exceeded e-cigarettes by 64:1 during the last 4-week period. During 2014-2015, cigarette sales increases occurred in 15 of 48 assessed states; e-cigarette sales increased in 18 states. Despite overall declines during 2011-2015, cigarette sales in 2015 grew for the first time in a decade. E-cigarette sales growth was positive, but slowed over the study period in assessed stores. Cigarette sales continued to exceed e-cigarette sales, reinforcing the importance of efforts to reduce the appeal and accessibility of cigarettes and other combusted tobacco products. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Angular analysis of the e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ process near the open charm threshold using initial-state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhukova, V.

    2018-01-10

    Here, we repormore » t a new measurement of the exclusive e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ cross sections as a function of the center-of-mass energy from the D ( * ) ± D * ∓ threshold through $$ \\sqrt{s}=6.0 $$ GeV, using the initial-state radiation technique. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector with an integrated luminosity of 951 fb -1. The accuracy of the cross section measurement is increased by a factor of 2 over the first Belle study. We perform the first angular analysis of the e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ process and decompose this exclusive cross section into three components corresponding to the D * helicities.« less

  13. Angular analysis of the e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ process near the open charm threshold using initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukova, V.

    Here, we repormore » t a new measurement of the exclusive e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ cross sections as a function of the center-of-mass energy from the D ( * ) ± D * ∓ threshold through $$ \\sqrt{s}=6.0 $$ GeV, using the initial-state radiation technique. The analysis is based on a data sample collected with the Belle detector with an integrated luminosity of 951 fb -1. The accuracy of the cross section measurement is increased by a factor of 2 over the first Belle study. We perform the first angular analysis of the e + e - → D ( * ) ± D * ∓ process and decompose this exclusive cross section into three components corresponding to the D * helicities.« less

  14. Modeling the Health Effects of Expanding e-Cigarette Sales in the United States and United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kalkhoran, Sara; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing. Population health effects will depend on cigarette smoking behaviors, levels of dual use with conventional cigarettes, and e-cigarette toxicity. OBJECTIVE To evaluate potential health effects of various scenarios of increasing promotion and use of e-cigarettes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A base case model was developed using data on actual cigarette and e-cigarette use patterns that quantifies transitions from an initial state of no cigarette or e-cigarette use to 1 of 5 final states: never use of cigarettes or e-cigarettes, cigarette use, e-cigarette use, dual use of cigarettes and e-cigarettes, or quit. Seven scenarios were created that cover a range of use patterns, depending on how the e-cigarette market might develop, as well as a range of possible long-term health effects of e-cigarette use. Scenarios for changes from the base case were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. Separate sets of base case model parameters were evaluated for the US and UK populations. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We assigned unitless health “costs” for each final state on a scale of 0 to 100. Population health “costs” were compared with the base case (status quo) assuming e-cigarette use health “costs” from 1% to 50% as dangerous as conventional cigarette use health costs. RESULTS Compared with the base case, a harm reduction scenario in which e-cigarette use increases only among smokers who are interested in quitting with more quit attempts and no increased initiation of e-cigarette use among nonsmokers, and another scenario in which e-cigarettes are taken up only by youth who would have smoked conventional cigarettes, had population-level health benefits regardless of e-cigarette health costs in both the United States and United Kingdom. Conversely, scenarios in which e-cigarette promotion leads to renormalization of cigarette smoking or e-cigarettes are used primarily by youth

  15. eHealth patient-provider communication in the United States: interest, inequalities, and predictors.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Kiara K; Salemi, Jason L; Salihu, Hamisu M; Zoorob, Roger J

    2017-04-01

    Health-related Internet use and eHealth technologies, including online patient-provider communication (PPC), are continually being integrated into health care environments. This study aimed to describe sociodemographic and health- and Internet-related correlates that influence adult patients' interest in and electronic exchange of medical information with health care providers in the United States. Nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey ( N  = 3677) were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression analyses were performed to examine associations between patient-level characteristics and online PPC behavior and interests. Most respondents were Internet users (82.8%), and 61.5% of information seekers designated the Internet as their first source for health information. Younger respondents (<50 years), Hispanics, those from higher-income households, and those perceiving access to personal health information as important were more likely to be interested in online PPC. Despite varying levels of patient interest, 68.5% had no online PPC in the last year. However, Internet users (odds ratio, OR = 2.87, 95% CI, 1.35-6.08), college graduates (OR = 2.92, 95% CI, 1.42-5.99), and those with frequent provider visits (OR = 1.94, 95% CI, 1.02-3.71) had a higher likelihood of online PPC via email or fax, while Hispanics and those from higher-income households were 2-3 times more likely to communicate via text messaging or phone/mobile apps. Patients' interest in and display of online PPC-related behaviors vary by age, race/ethnicity, education, income, Internet access/behaviors, and information type. These findings can inform efforts aimed at improving the use and adoption of eHealth technologies, which may contribute to a reduction in communication inequalities and health care disparities. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical

  16. Dollar$ & $en$e. Part VI: Knowledge management: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, I

    2001-01-01

    In Part I of this series, I introduced the concept of memes (1). Memes are ideas or concepts--the information world equivalent of genes. The goal of this series of articles is to infect you with memes so you will assimilate, translate, and express them. No matter what our area of expertise or "-ology," we all are in the information business. Our goal is to be in the wisdom business. In the previous articles in this series, I showed that when we convert raw data into wisdom, we are moving along a value chain. Each step in the chain adds a different amount of value to the final product: timely, relevant, accurate, and precise knowledge that then can be applied to create the ultimate product in the value chain--wisdom. In part II of this series, I introduced a set of memes for measuring the cost of adding value (2). In part III of this series, I presented a new set of memes for measuring the added value of knowledge, i.e., intellectual capital (3). In part IV of this series, I discussed practical knowledge management tools for measuring the value of people, structural, and customer capital (4). In part V of this series, I applied intellectual capital and knowledge management concepts at the individual level, to help answer a fundamental question: what is my added value (5)? In the final part of this series, I will review the state of intellectual capital and knowledge management development to date and outline the direction of current knowledge management initiatives and research projects.

  17. Identification of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar infection in Maceió, Alagoas State, northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rafael V; Fontes, Gilberto; Duarte, Iasmin A C; Santos-Júnior, José A; Rocha, Eliana M M

    2016-10-31

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the prevalence of E. histolytica and E. dispar by examining stool samples obtained from 1,003 students of public schools in Maceió, Alagoas, Brazil. All stool samples were processed using the spontaneous sedimentation technique and examined microscopically for the presence of Entamoeba species. In order to distinguish infections caused by E. histolytica, fecal samples presenting cysts of Entamoeba were subjected to specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The analysis of the fecal specimens by microscopy identified 6.4% (64/1,003) students positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii cysts. The prevalence of E. histolytica detected by ELISA was 3.0% (30/1,003) and by PCR 2.8% (28/1,003), but the difference is not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The prevalence of E. dispar in schoolchildren was 5.0% (50/1,003). Mixed infections with E. histolytica and E. dispar were also detected by PCR.  Even though immunological and molecular methods have shown similar results for identification of E. histolytica, ELISA is advantageous over the PCR since it is relatively cheaper and easier to perform. Our study demonstrated the occurrence of E. histolytica in Maceió and highlights the need to introduce a specific diagnostic test to detect amoebiasis cases in public laboratories.

  18. Correlations between polarisation states of W particles in the reaction e - e +→ W - W + at LEP2 energies 189-209 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2009-10-01

    In a study of the reaction e - e +→ W - W + with the DELPHI detector, the probabilities of the two W particles occurring in the joint polarisation states transverse-transverse ( TT), longitudinal-transverse plus transverse-longitudinal ( LT) and longitudinal-longitudinal ( LL) have been determined using the final states WW{rightarrow}lν qbar{q} ( l= e, μ). The two-particle joint polarisation probabilities, i.e. the spin density matrix elements ρ TT , ρ LT , ρ LL , are measured as functions of the W - production angle, θ _{W-}, at an average reaction energy of 198.2 GeV. Averaged over all \\cosθ_{W-}, the following joint probabilities are obtained: bar{ρ}_{TT}=(67±8)%, bar{ρ}_{LT}=(30±8)%, bar{ρ}_{LL}=(3±7)%. These results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 63.0%, 28.9% and 8.1%, respectively. The related polarisation cross-sections σ TT , σ LT and σ LL are also presented.

  19. Paper Trail: An Angry Professor Uses a State Law to Get Colleagues' E-Mail Messages and Other Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2005-01-01

    Angry over the department's vote not to hire his wife, University of Georgia history of science professor Alexei Kojevnikov obtained access to professors' and administrators' e-mails and documents related to the hiring process and spousal hires. This article discusses the controversy from different perspectives, the state of Georgia's law that…

  20. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Understanding State of Matter and Solubility Concepts by Using 5E Learning Cycle Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceylan, Eren; Geban, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of 5E learning cycle model based instruction and traditionally designed chemistry instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of state of matter and solubility concepts. In this study, 119 tenth grade students from chemistry courses instructed by same teacher from an Anatolian…

  1. Status and Developments of eLearning in the EU10 Member States: The Cases of Estonia, Hungary and Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ala-Mutka, Kirsti; Gaspar, Pal; Kismihok, Gabor; Suurna, Margit; Vehovar, Vasja

    2010-01-01

    This article summarises research carried out between 2006 and 2008 by IPTS (Institution for Prospective Technological Studies) in collaboration with a consortium of experts from 10 member states, led by ICEGEC. The project gathered information on eLearning developments to assess drivers and barriers and to suggest implications for policy and…

  2. 45 CFR 1355.21 - State plan requirements for titles IV-E and IV-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and the Indian Tribe must make available for public review and inspection the Child and Family... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State plan requirements for titles IV-E and IV-B. 1355.21 Section 1355.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF...

  3. Confirmation of a charged charmoniumlike state Zc(3885 )∓ in e+e-→π±(D D¯ *)∓ with double D tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, J. J.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the process e+e-→π±(D D¯ *)∓ using data samples of 1092 pb-1 at √{s }=4.23 GeV and 826 pb-1 at √{s }=4.26 GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII storage ring. With full reconstruction of the D meson pair and the bachelor π± in the final state, we confirm the existence of the charged structure Zc(3885 )∓ in the (D D¯*)∓ system in the two isospin processes e +e-→π+D0D*- and e+e-→π+D-D*0. By performing a simultaneous fit, the statistical significance of Z c (3885 )∓ signal is determined to be greater than 10 σ , and its pole mass and width are measured to be Mpole=(3881.7 ±1.6 (stat )±1.6 (syst )) MeV /c2 and Γpole=(26.6 ±2.0 (stat )±2.1 (syst )) MeV , respectively. The Born cross section times the (D D¯*)∓ branching fraction (σ (e+e-→π±Zc(3885 )∓)×B r(Zc(3885 )∓→(DD¯*)∓) ) is measured to be (141.6 ±7.9 (stat )±12.3 (syst )) pb at √{s }=4.23 GeV and (108.4 ±6.9 (stat )±8.8 (syst )) pb at √{s }=4.26 GeV . The polar angular distribution of the π±-Zc(3885 )∓ system is consistent with the expectation of a quantum number assignment of JP=1+ for Zc(3885)∓.

  4. 26 CFR 1.6050E-1 - Reporting of State and local income tax refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... income and the number of exemptions claimed on the Federal income tax return are taken into account in... the laws of State X. Thus, this amount may not be taken into account by the refund officer of State X... page that it is made under this section and shall be signed by the refund officer. In general, the...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 122 - Rainfall Zones of the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Appendix E to Part 122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Pt. 122, App. E... Protection Agency, Office of Water, Nonpoint Source Division, Washington, DC, 1986. [55 FR 48073, Nov. 16...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 122 - Rainfall Zones of the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix E to Part 122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Pt. 122, App. E... Protection Agency, Office of Water, Nonpoint Source Division, Washington, DC, 1986. [55 FR 48073, Nov. 16...

  7. Online medical care: the current state of "eVisits" in acute primary care delivery.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Ryan; Talbert, Jeffery; Thornbury, William C; Perin, Nathan R; Goodin, Amie J

    2015-02-01

    Online technologies offer the promise of an efficient, improved healthcare system. Patients benefit from increased access to care, physicians are afforded greater flexibility in care delivery, and the health system itself benefits from lower costs to provide such care. One method of incorporating online care into clinical practice, called electronic office visits or "eVisits," allows physicians to provide a consultation with patients online. We performed an analysis of the current published literature on eVisits as well as present emerging research describing the use of mobile platforms as the delivery model. We focused on the role of eVisits in acute primary care practice. A literature review was conducted using electronic databases with a variety of search terms related to the use of eVisits in primary care. Several advantages to eVisit utilization in the primary care setting were identified, namely, improvements in efficiency, continuity of care, quality of care, and access to care. Barriers to eVisit implementation were also identified, including challenges with incorporation into workflow, reimbursement, physician technological literacy, patient health literacy, overuse, security, confidentiality, and integration with existing medical technologies. Only one study of patient satisfaction with eVisit acute primary care services was identified, and this suggests that previous analyses of eVisit utilization are lacking this key component of healthcare service delivery evaluations. The delivery of primary care via eVisits on mobile platforms is still in adolescence, with few methodologically rigorous analyses of outcomes of efficiency, patient health, and satisfaction.

  8. E-cigarette marketing exposure and combustible tobacco use among adolescents in the United States.

    PubMed

    Auf, Rehab; Trepka, Mary Jo; Selim, Moaz; Ben Taleb, Ziyad; De La Rosa, Mario; Cano, Miguel Ángel

    2018-03-01

    E-cigarette advertising has been shown to be associated with use of e-cigarettes, but its association with tobacco use has not been studied. Therefore, we examined the association between e-cigarettes advertisement and tobacco use. Data from nationally representative 22,007 middle and high school students (grades 6-12) were used to conduct the analysis. Logistic regression models estimated the adjusted odds ratios (AOR) of ever and current use of cigarette, hookah, cigar, and polytobacco use. Odds ratios were weighted and adjusted for study design, non-response rates, school level, gender, race/ethnicity, e-cigarette use, and smoking at home. E-cigarette marketing exposure was significantly associated with ever use of cigarettes (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5), hookah (AOR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7), cigars (AOR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.4-1.6), and polytobacco (AOR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.5-1.8). Likewise, E-cigarette marketing exposure was significantly associated with current use of cigarettes (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6), hookah (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.03-1.7), cigars (AOR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6), and polytobacco use (AOR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.5-2.1). The results suggest that e-cigarette advertisement is associated with use of cigarettes, hookah, cigars, and polytobacco products. These results add to the evidence about the risks of e-cigarette marketing and highlight the need for stricter regulation of e-cigarette advertisements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Map3k8 Modulates Monocyte State and Atherogenesis in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Garcia, Carlos; Sánchez, Ángela; Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; Cales, Carmela; Barranquero, Cristina; Muñoz, Marta; Merino, Ramón; Escudero, Paula; Sanz, Maria-Jesús; Osada, Jesús; Aranda, Ana; Alemany, Susana

    2017-02-01

    Map3k8 (Cot/Tpl2) activates the MKK1/2-ERK1/2, MAPK pathway downstream from interleukin-1R, tumor necrosis factor-αR, NOD-2R (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like 2R), adiponectinR, and Toll-like receptors. Map3k8 plays a key role in innate and adaptive immunity and influences inflammatory processes by modulating the functions of different cell types. However, its role in atherogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed the role of this kinase in this pathology. We show here that Map3k8 deficiency results in smaller numbers of Ly6C high CD11c low and Ly6C low CD11c high monocytes in ApoE - /- mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Map3k8 -/- ApoE -/- monocytes displayed high rates of apoptosis and reduced amounts of Nr4a1, a transcription factor known to modulate apoptosis in Ly6C low CD11c high monocytes. Map3k8 -/- ApoE -/- splenocytes and macrophages showed irregular patterns of cytokine and chemokine expression. Map3k8 deficiency altered cell adhesion and migration in vivo and decreased CCR2 expression, a determinant chemokine receptor for monocyte mobilization, on circulating Ly6C high CD11c low monocytes. Map3k8 -/- ApoE -/- mice fed an HFD showed decreased cellular infiltration in the atherosclerotic plaque, with low lipid content. Lesions had similar size after Map3k8 +/+ ApoE -/- bone marrow transplant into Map3k8 -/- ApoE -/- and Map3k8 +/+ ApoE -/- mice fed an HFD, whereas smaller plaques were observed after the transplantation of bone marrow lacking both ApoE and Map3k8. Map3k8 decreases apoptosis of monocytes and enhances CCR2 expression on Ly6C high CD11c low monocytes of ApoE -/- mice fed an HFD. These findings explain the smaller aortic lesions in ApoE -/- mice with Map3k8 -/- ApoE -/- bone marrow cells fed an HFD, supporting further studies of Map3k8 as an antiatherosclerotic target. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. (e, 2e) simple ionization of {{\\rm{H}}}_{3}^{+} by fast electron impact: use of triangular three-center continuum and bound state wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, S.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Joulakian, B. B.

    2017-07-01

    The variation of the multiply differential cross section of the (e, 2e) simple ionization of {{{H}}}3+, with the incident and ejection energy values, as well as the directions of the ejected and scattered electrons, is studied. The calculations have been performed in the frame of the perturbative first Born procedure, which has required the development of equilateral triangular three center bound and continuum state wave functions. The results explore the optimal conditions and the particularities of the triangular targets, such as the appearance of interference patterns in the variation of the four fold differential cross section (FDCS) with the scattering angle for a fixed orientation of the molecule. The comparison between the results obtained by two H3 + ground wave functions, with and without a correlation term r 12, shows that the effect of correlation on the magnitude of the triple differential cross section is not large, but it produces some modification in the structure of the FDCS.

  11. Vitamin E and the Healing of Bone Fracture: The Current State of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Borhanuddin, Boekhtiar; Mohd Fozi, Nur Farhana; Naina Mohamed, Isa

    2012-01-01

    Background. The effect of vitamin E on health-related conditions has been extensively researched, with varied results. However, to date, there was no published review of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Purpose. This paper systematically audited past studies of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Methods. Related articles were identified from Medline, CINAHL, and Scopus databases. Screenings were performed based on the criteria that the study must be an original study that investigated the independent effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Data were extracted using standardised forms, followed by evaluation of quality of reporting using ARRIVE Guidelines, plus recalculation procedure for the effect size and statistical power of the results. Results. Six animal studies fulfilled the selection criteria. The study methods were heterogeneous with mediocre reporting quality and focused on the antioxidant-related mechanism of vitamin E. The metasynthesis showed α-tocopherol may have a significant effect on bone formation during the normal bone remodeling phase of secondary bone healing. Conclusion. In general, the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing remained inconclusive due to the small number of heterogeneous and mediocre studies included in this paper. PMID:23304211

  12. A multinuclear solid-state NMR study of the dimethyltin chalcogenides ((CH 3) 2SnE) 3, E  S,Se,Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Ian D.; Jones, C. H. W.; Sharma, R. D.

    The solid-state NMR spectra, measured using MAS, are reported for 13C, 119Sn, 77Se, and 125Te in the compounds (Me 2SnE) 3, E  S, Se, or Te. For ((CH 3) 2SnS) 3, tetragonal, three inequivalent carbons and two inequivalent tins are observed consistent with a reinterpretation of the crystal structure data of this compound which shows a twofold axis through opposing tin and sulfur atoms, the molecule being in a twisted-boat conformation. For the monoclinic form six inequivalent carbons and three inequivalent tins were observed. Chemical shifts for 13C and 119Sn and the magnitudes of the 2JSn Sn coupling constants are reported. The tetragonal forms of ((CH 3) 2SnSe) 3 and ((CH 3) 2SnTe) 3 show the presence of two inequivalent tin and chalcogen atoms and three inequivalent carbons, again consistent with a twofold axis. In these compounds it is possible to identify the three different observed single-bond coupling constants with the distinct crystallographically determined tin-chalcogen bonds. The 13C, 119Sn, 77Se, and 125Te chemical shifts are reported, together with the magnitude of 1JSn E (E  Se or Te). In addition to isotropic shifts and couplings, chemical-shift anisotropies are reported for Sn, Se, and Te.

  13. (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.; Lynch, D. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the results of ab initio calculations of photoelectron angular distributions and vibrational branching ratios for the (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state are reported, and these are compared with the experimental data of Anderson et al. (1984). These results show that the observed non-Franck-Condon behavior is predominantly due to the R dependence of the transition matrix elements, and to a lesser degree to the energy dependence. This work presents the first molecular REMPI study employing a correlated wave function to describe the Rydberg-valence mixing in the resonant intermediate state.

  14. Magnetic moments, E3 transitions and the structure of high-spin core excited states in 211Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, A. R.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Byrne, A. P.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Poletti, S. J.; Gerl, J.; Lewis, P. M.

    1985-05-01

    The results of g-factor measurements of high-spin states in 211Rn are: Ex = 8856 + Δ' keV (Jπ = 63/2-), g = 0.626(7); 6101 + Δ' KeV (49/2+), 0.766(8); 5347 + Δ' KeV (43/2-), 0.74(2); 3927 + Δ KeV (35/2+), 1.017(12); 1578 + Δ KeV (17/2-), 0.912(9). These results together with measured E3 transition strengths and shell model calculations are used to assign configurations to the core excited states in 211Rn. Mixed configurations are required to explain the g-factors and enhanced E3 strengths simultaneously.

  15. E-cigarette Availability and Promotion Among Retail Outlets Near College Campuses in Two Southeastern States

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eunyoung Y.; Egan, Kathleen L.; Sutfin, Erin L.; Reboussin, Beth A.; Spangler, John; Wolfson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: E-cigarettes are relatively new products that simulate the smoking experience. This descriptive study assessed changes in e-cigarette availability and promotions among retailers in 11 college communities in North Carolina and Virginia during a 1-year period. Methods: During the spring of 2012 and 2013, observers completed assessments in 320 tobacco-selling retailers, including grocery and convenience stores, pharmacies, and tobacco shops. Assessors collected e-cigarette availability, advertising, price, and promotions. Results: E-cigarette availability increased among retailers from 24.7% in 2012 to 59.9% in 2013. They were available in the form of disposables and reusable kits and were most frequently available in tobacco shops, convenience stores, and pharmacies. The average price for disposables was $9.70 (SD = 1.07) in 2012 and $9.61 (SD = 2.10) in 2013; the average price for kits was $39.58 (SD = 15.79) in 2012 and $32.59 (SD = 18.65) in 2013. The presence of interior advertising increased from 12.7% to 50.6% (p < .0001), and the presence of exterior advertising increased from 7.6% to 22.8% (p = .0002). Convenience stores with gas (16.4%–70.4%; p < .0001) and without gas (6.0%–48.4%; p < .0001) had significant increases in the presence of interior advertising. Convenience stores with gas also had a significant increase in the presence of exterior advertising (8.2%–33.3%; p < .0001). Only 3% of retailers offered price promotions. Conclusions: Availability of e-cigarettes, including rechargeable kits and disposables, more than doubled during the study. The presence of interior and exterior advertising also significantly increased. Results underscore the need for further surveillance to understand how these environmental characteristics impact individual exposure and use of e-cigarettes. PMID:24847099

  16. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    surrounding states are truely in a unique position to contribute to the needs of the nation and I look forward to the outcome of the Enviromental ...to the needs of the nation and I look forward to the outcome of the Enviromental Impact Statement and subsequent Record of Decision. Thank you for

  17. Sexual Harassment in the State Workforce. Results of a Survey. S.H.E. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunwoody-Miller, Vera; Gutek, Barbara A.

    State workers in California were surveyed to determine if they had been sexually harassed on the job, and what they knew about procedures and laws for dealing with such harassment. Responses were received from 1,151 professional and administrative employees representing a sexual and ethnic distribution similar to the total civil service work force…

  18. T-state inhibitors of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase that prevent the allosteric transition.

    PubMed

    Heng, Sabrina; Stieglitz, Kimberly A; Eldo, Joby; Xia, Jiarong; Cardia, James P; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2006-08-22

    Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) catalyzes the committed step in pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis, the reaction between carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and l-aspartate to form N-carbamoyl-l-aspartate and inorganic phosphate. The enzyme exhibits homotropic cooperativity and is allosterically regulated. Upon binding l-aspartate in the presence of a saturating concentration of CP, the enzyme is converted from the low-activity low-affinity T state to the high-activity high-affinity R state. The potent inhibitor N-phosphonacetyl-l-aspartate (PALA), which combines the binding features of Asp and CP into one molecule, has been shown to induce the allosteric transition to the R state. In the presence of only CP, the enzyme is the T structure with the active site primed for the binding of aspartate. In a structure of the enzyme-CP complex (T(CP)), two CP molecules were observed in the active site approximately 7A apart, one with high occupancy and one with low occupancy. The high occupancy site corresponds to the position for CP observed in the structure of the enzyme with CP and the aspartate analogue succinate bound. The position of the second CP is in a unique site and does not overlap with the aspartate binding site. As a means to generate a new class of inhibitors for ATCase, the domain-open T state of the enzyme was targeted. We designed, synthesized, and characterized three inhibitors that were composed of two phosphonacetamide groups linked together. These two phosphonacetamide groups mimic the positions of the two CP molecules in the T(CP) structure. X-ray crystal structures of ATCase-inhibitor complexes revealed that each of these inhibitors bind to the T state of the enzyme and occupy the active site area. As opposed to the binding of Asp in the presence of CP or PALA, these inhibitors are unable to initiate the global T to R conformational change. Although the best of these T-state inhibitors only has a K(i) value in the micromolar range, the

  19. Measurement of the e + e - → π + π - π 0 π 0 cross section using initial-state radiation at BABAR

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2017-11-29

    Here, the process e +e –→π +π –2π 0γ is investigated by means of the initial-state radiation technique, where a photon is emitted from the incoming electron or positron. Using 454.3 fb –1 of data collected around a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.58 GeV by the BABAR experiment at SLAC, approximately 150000 signal events are obtained. The corresponding nonradiative cross section is measured with a relative uncertainty of 3.6% in the energy region around 1.5 GeV, surpassing all existing measurements in precision. Using this new result, the channel’s contribution to the leading order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the anomalous magneticmore » moment of the muon is calculated as (gπ +π–2π0 μ–2)/2=(17.9 ± 0.1 stat ± 0.6 syst)×10–10 in the energy range 0.85 GeV < E CM < 1.8 GeV. In the same energy range, the impact on the running of the fine-structure constant at the Z 0-pole is determined as Δαπ +π–2π0(M 2 Z)=(4.44 ± 0.02 stat ± 0.14 syst) × 10 –4. Furthermore, intermediate resonances are studied and especially the cross section of the process e +e –→ωπ 0→π +π –2π 0 is measured.« less

  20. Measurement of the e + e - → π + π - π 0 π 0 cross section using initial-state radiation at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    Here, the process e +e –→π +π –2π 0γ is investigated by means of the initial-state radiation technique, where a photon is emitted from the incoming electron or positron. Using 454.3 fb –1 of data collected around a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.58 GeV by the BABAR experiment at SLAC, approximately 150000 signal events are obtained. The corresponding nonradiative cross section is measured with a relative uncertainty of 3.6% in the energy region around 1.5 GeV, surpassing all existing measurements in precision. Using this new result, the channel’s contribution to the leading order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the anomalous magneticmore » moment of the muon is calculated as (gπ +π–2π0 μ–2)/2=(17.9 ± 0.1 stat ± 0.6 syst)×10–10 in the energy range 0.85 GeV < E CM < 1.8 GeV. In the same energy range, the impact on the running of the fine-structure constant at the Z 0-pole is determined as Δαπ +π–2π0(M 2 Z)=(4.44 ± 0.02 stat ± 0.14 syst) × 10 –4. Furthermore, intermediate resonances are studied and especially the cross section of the process e +e –→ωπ 0→π +π –2π 0 is measured.« less

  1. Development of e-Career Guidance Programme for Secondary Schools in Akwa Ibom State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Imitoro E.; Udofia, Nsikak-Abasi; Udoh, Nsisong A.; Anagbogu, Mercy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study developed and field tested an electronic career guidance package for secondary schools, the e-Career Guidance System. The study was an educational research and development study and thus utilised the instrumentation research design. The formative evaluation of the developed programme was carried out using the pretest-posttest…

  2. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Germanos, Nicholas M Civ USAF HQ ACC/A7NS From: Sent: To: Subject: Dear Mr. Germanos, Ginger Hobbs Monday, July 15, 2013 9:45PM Germanos...considerat ion of all t he facts. Thank you, Ginger Hobbs 1 E-757 Germanos, Nicholas M Civ USAF HQ ACC/A7NS From: Sent: To: Subject: Kara Schwartz

  3. E-cigarette availability and promotion among retail outlets near college campuses in two southeastern states.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Kimberly G; Song, Eunyoung Y; Egan, Kathleen L; Sutfin, Erin L; Reboussin, Beth A; Spangler, John; Wolfson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    E-cigarettes are relatively new products that simulate the smoking experience. This descriptive study assessed changes in e-cigarette availability and promotions among retailers in 11 college communities in North Carolina and Virginia during a 1-year period. During the spring of 2012 and 2013, observers completed assessments in 320 tobacco-selling retailers, including grocery and convenience stores, pharmacies, and tobacco shops. Assessors collected e-cigarette availability, advertising, price, and promotions. E-cigarette availability increased among retailers from 24.7% in 2012 to 59.9% in 2013. They were available in the form of disposables and reusable kits and were most frequently available in tobacco shops, convenience stores, and pharmacies. The average price for disposables was $9.70 (SD = 1.07) in 2012 and $9.61 (SD = 2.10) in 2013; the average price for kits was $39.58 (SD = 15.79) in 2012 and $32.59 (SD = 18.65) in 2013. The presence of interior advertising increased from 12.7% to 50.6% (p < .0001), and the presence of exterior advertising increased from 7.6% to 22.8% (p = .0002). Convenience stores with gas (16.4%-70.4%; p < .0001) and without gas (6.0%-48.4%; p < .0001) had significant increases in the presence of interior advertising. Convenience stores with gas also had a significant increase in the presence of exterior advertising (8.2%-33.3%; p < .0001). Only 3% of retailers offered price promotions. Availability of e-cigarettes, including rechargeable kits and disposables, more than doubled during the study. The presence of interior and exterior advertising also significantly increased. Results underscore the need for further surveillance to understand how these environmental characteristics impact individual exposure and use of e-cigarettes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Identifying state resources and support programs on e-government websites for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Peterson, Justin D; Albert, Jon D

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study identified resources and programs that are available nationwide on the Internet to support individuals and families with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), with a focus on intellectual disability. This evaluation included easily identifiable information on specific resources and highlighted unique programs found in individual states that were linked from e-government websites. Researchers documented the ease of access and available information for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. A number of disparities and areas for improvement were recorded for states and I/DD websites. The researchers conclude that a number of additional health and support services will be needed to address the growing needs of this vulnerable population.

  5. Charge 2e/3 Superconductivity and Topological Degeneracies without Localized Zero Modes in Bilayer Fractional Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Barkeshli, Maissam

    2016-08-26

    It has been recently shown that non-Abelian defects with localized parafermion zero modes can arise in conventional Abelian fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. Here we propose an alternate route to creating, manipulating, and measuring topologically protected degeneracies in bilayer FQH states coupled to superconductors, without the creation of localized parafermion zero modes. We focus mainly on electron-hole bilayers, with a ±1/3 Laughlin FQH state in each layer, with boundaries that are proximity coupled to a superconductor. We show that the superconductor induces charge 2e/3 quasiparticle-pair condensation at each boundary of the FQH state, and that this leads to (i) topologically protected degeneracies that can be measured through charge sensing experiments and (ii) a fractional charge 2e/3 ac Josephson effect. We demonstrate that an analog of non-Abelian braiding is possible, despite the absence of a localized zero mode. We discuss several practical advantages of this proposal over previous work, and also several generalizations.

  6. WE-E-211-01: Medical Physics in Federal and State Governments.

    PubMed

    Mills, T; Winter, D; Keith, S; Fletcher, D

    2012-06-01

    In 2010, FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) launched an "Initiative to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure from Medical Imaging" and held a public meeting on "Device Improvements to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure from Medical Imaging" March 30- 31, 2010). In follow-up, FDA is pursuing efforts using its regulatory authority as it applies to imaging equipment and manufacturers and also partnering with professional organizations such as AAPM, industry and other governmental agencies to incorporate radiation protection principles into facility quality assurance, personnel credentialing, and training requirements.The current U.S. Federal guidance on medical x-rays was published in 1976 and addresses film imaging for radiographie and dental modalities. The Medical Workgroup of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has modernized that document to address both diagnostic and interventional approaches, film and digital imaging, and the broad range of modalities that include radiography, computed tomography, interventional fluoroscopy, dentistry, bone densitometry, and veterinary practice. The current scope and status of the document will be presented.The Military Health System is committed to providing state-of- the-art care to its beneficiaries; both at home and abroad. Personnel constraints and the continuing wars oversees have created obstacles to this objective. In the past decade, tremendous advances have occurred in Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Teleradiology. Military Radiology seeks to leverage these advances as a means of surmounting many of the challenges it faces. In this talk, the current status of DoD teleradiology and EHR will be presented. 1. To provide a venue in which physicists working in the public sector can interface and discuss specific issues related to supporting the federal and state governments 2. To provide a venue for medical physicists to voice specific concerns with federal/state

  7. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    and household cleaners. pesticides, phthalates from vinyl flooring and personal c-..are products, pollutants from pressure-treated wood products...even considering VTANG at BTV. If you are here visiting the base please stop by the Delta ticket counter and say hi. sincerely, Joseph Scot t Venuti...nvalid . Regards, Gregory Epler Wood Greg EplerWood 1 E-871 Mr. Nicholas Gennanos HQACC/A7PS 129 Andrews Street Suite 332 GREGORY EPLER

  8. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    studies such as this one, and other research conducted in most recent decade. Of course, the housing designation ("not compatible with residential...such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis, progress, quarterly, research , special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED...appear in the report, e.g. 001; AFAPL30480105. 6. AUTHOR(S). Enter name(s) of person(s) responsible for writing the report, performing the research

  9. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis, progress, quarterly, research , special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED...appear in the report, e.g. 001; AFAPL30480105. 6. AUTHOR(S). Enter name(s) of person(s) responsible for writing the report, performing the research ...negatively impacted by the noise] SAFTY ALL NEW military aircraft designs suffer crashes during their initial development peri~ Bringing the F-35

  10. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    hreatens the well being of our community, whether through noi se and emissions or the risk of accidents from an under- test ed and flawed design . The...such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis, progress, quarterly, research , special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED...appear in the report, e.g. 001; AFAPL30480105. 6. AUTHOR(S). Enter name(s) of person(s) responsible for writing the report, performing the research

  11. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    her sight and hearing at a young . said that hearing loss was the greater atni ction f()r reason. r,\\ professionals in the music mdustry. their...A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report totals 2440 pages 14. ABSTRACT Development and fielding of...cognitive development of James A. Dumont, Esq. R0252 GP-20 NO-8 E-483 Comments of Richard Joseph eta! on F-35A Operational Basing DEIS July

  12. Cross sections for the reactions e+e-→K+K-π+π-, K+K-π0π0, and K+K-K+K- measured using initial-state radiation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the processes e+e-→K+K-π+π-γ, K+K-π0π0γ, and K+K-K+K-γ, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84 000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that the K+K-π+π-γ data can be compared with direct measurements of the e+e-→K+K-π+π- reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e+e-→K+K-π0π0 or e+e-→K+K-K+K- reactions, and we present an update of our previous result based on a data sample that is twice as large. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e+e-→ϕ(1020)ππγ reaction and confirm the presence of the Y(2175) resonance in the ϕ(1020)f0(980) and K+K-f0(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/ψ in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the ψ(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding products of branching fraction and electron width.

  13. Reversible Photoinduced Reductive Elimination of H2 from the Nitrogenase Dihydride State, the E(4)(4H) Janus Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Khadka, Nimesh; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2016-02-03

    We recently demonstrated that N2 reduction by nitrogenase involves the obligatory release of one H2 per N2 reduced. These studies focus on the E4(4H) "Janus intermediate", which has accumulated four reducing equivalents as two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides. E4(4H) is poised to bind and reduce N2 through reductive elimination (re) of the two hydrides as H2, coupled to the binding/reduction of N2. To obtain atomic-level details of the re activation process, we carried out in situ 450 nm photolysis of E4(4H) in an EPR cavity at temperatures below 20 K. ENDOR and EPR measurements show that photolysis generates a new FeMo-co state, denoted E4(2H)*, through the photoinduced re of the two bridging hydrides of E4(4H) as H2. During cryoannealing at temperatures above 175 K, E4(2H)* reverts to E4(4H) through the oxidative addition (oa) of the H2. The photolysis quantum yield is temperature invariant at liquid helium temperatures and shows a rather large kinetic isotope effect, KIE = 10. These observations imply that photoinduced release of H2 involves a barrier to the combination of the two nascent H atoms, in contrast to a barrierless process for monometallic inorganic complexes, and further suggest that H2 formation involves nuclear tunneling through that barrier. The oa recombination of E4(2H)* with the liberated H2 offers compelling evidence for the Janus intermediate as the point at which H2 is necessarily lost during N2 reduction; this mechanistically coupled loss must be gated by N2 addition that drives the re/oa equilibrium toward reductive elimination of H2 with N2 binding/reduction.

  14. Transition State Charge Stabilization and Acid-Base Catalysis of mRNA Cleavage by the Endoribonuclease RelE

    PubMed Central

    Dunican, Brian F.; Hiller, David A.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial toxin RelE is a ribosome-dependent endoribonuclease. It is part of a type II toxin-antitoxin system that contributes to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. During amino acid starvation RelE cleaves mRNA in the ribosomal A-site, globally inhibiting protein translation. RelE is structurally similar to microbial RNases that employ general acid-base catalysis to facilitate RNA cleavage. The RelE active-site is atypical for acid-base catalysis, in that it is enriched for positively charged residues and lacks the prototypical histidine-glutamate catalytic pair, making the mechanism of mRNA cleavage unclear. In this study we use a single-turnover kinetic analysis to measure the effect of pH and phosphorothioate substitution on the rate constant for cleavage of mRNA by wild-type RelE and seven active-site mutants. Mutation and thio-effects indicate a major role for stabilization of increased negative change in the transition state by arginine 61. The wild-type RelE cleavage rate constant is pH-independent, but the reaction catalyzed by many of the mutants is strongly pH dependent, suggestive of general acid-base catalysis. pH-rate curves indicate that wild-type RelE operates with the pKa of at least one catalytic residue significantly downshifted by the local environment. Mutation of any single active-site residue is sufficient to disrupt this microenvironment and revert the shifted pKa back above neutrality. pH-rate curves are consistent with K54 functioning as a general base and R81 as a general acid. The capacity of RelE to effect a large pKa shift and facilitate a common catalytic mechanism by uncommon means furthers our understanding of other atypical enzymatic active sites. PMID:26535789

  15. Measurement of the e+e-→π+π-π0π0 cross section using initial-state radiation at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Fritsch, M.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rotondo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Lacker, H. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cheaib, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The process e+e-→π+π-2 π0γ is investigated by means of the initial-state radiation technique, where a photon is emitted from the incoming electron or positron. Using 454.3 fb-1 of data collected around a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=10.58 GeV by the BABAR experiment at SLAC, approximately 150000 signal events are obtained. The corresponding nonradiative cross section is measured with a relative uncertainty of 3.6% in the energy region around 1.5 GeV, surpassing all existing measurements in precision. Using this new result, the channel's contribution to the leading order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is calculated as (gμπ+π-2 π0-2 )/2 =(17.9 ±0.1stat±0.6syst)×10-10 in the energy range 0.85 GeV e+e-→ω π0→π+π-2 π0 is measured.

  16. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the intra-2E(g)E(3/2)-state vibrational relaxation time in Ti(3+):Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Yoo, K. M.; Alfano, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Ti(3+)-doped Al2O3 has been recently demonstrated to be a tunable solid-state laser system with Ti(3+) as the laser-active ion. In this paper, the kinetics of vibrational transitions in the 2E(g)E(3/2) electronic state of Ti(3+):Al2O3a (crucial for characterizing new host materials for the Ti ion) was investigated. A 527-nm 5-ps pulse was used to excite a band of higher vibrational levels of the 2E(g)E(3/2) state, and the subsequent growth of population in the zero vibrational level and lower vibrational levels was monitored by a 3.9-micron picosecond probe pulse. The time evolution curve in the excited 2E(g)E(3/2) state at room temperature was found to be characterized by a sharp rise followed by a long decay, the long lifetime decay reflecting the depopulation of the zero and the lower vibrational levels of the 2E(g)E(3/2) state via radiative transitions. An upper limit of 3.5 ps was estimated for intra-2E(g)E(3/2)-state vibrational relaxation time.

  17. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Sheetak: Low Cost - Solid State Cooling

    ScienceCinema

    Pokharna, Himanshu; Ghoshal, Uttam

    2018-05-30

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These "performer videos" highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. Himanshu Pokharna, Vice President of Sheetak Uttam Ghoshal, President and CEO of Sheetak.

  18. Oligomerization state of water channels and glycerol facilitators. Involvement of loop E.

    PubMed

    Lagrée, V; Froger, A; Deschamps, S; Pellerin, I; Delamarche, C; Bonnec, G; Gouranton, J; Thomas, D; Hubert, J F

    1998-12-18

    The major intrinsic protein (MIP) family includes water channels aquaporins (AQPs) and facilitators for small solutes such as glycerol (GlpFs). Velocity sedimentation on sucrose gradients demonstrates that heterologous AQPcic expressed in yeast or Xenopus oocytes behaves as an homotetramer when extracted by n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG) and as a monomer when extracted by SDS. We performed an analysis of GlpF solubilized from membranes of Escherichia coli or of mRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes. The GlpF protein extracted either by SDS or by nondenaturing detergents, OG and Triton X-100, exhibits sedimentation coefficients only compatible with a monomeric form of the protein in micelles. We then substituted in loop E of AQPcic two amino acids predicted to play a role in the functional/structural properties of the MIPs. In two expression systems, yeast and oocytes, the mutant AQPcic-S205D is monomeric in OG and in SDS. The A209K mutation does not modify the tetrameric form of the heterologous protein in OG. This study shows that the serine residue at position 205 is essential for AQPcic tetramerization. Because the serine in this position is highly conserved among aquaporins and systematically replaced by an acid aspartic in GlpFs, we postulate that glycerol facilitators are monomers whereas aquaporins are organized in tetramers. Our data suggest that the role of loop E in MIP properties partly occurs through its ability to allow oligomerization of the proteins.

  19. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Physiographic Provinces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of each physiographic province (Fenneman and Johnson, 1946) in square meters, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data are from Fenneman and Johnson's Physiographic Provinces of the United States, which is based on 8 major divisions, 25 provinces, and 86 sections representing distinctive areas having common topography, rock type and structure, and geologic and geomorphic history (Fenneman and Johnson, 1946).The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  20. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Bedrock Geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of bedrock geology types in square meters compiled for every catchment of MRB_E2RF1 catchments for Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is the "Geology of the Conterminous United States at 1:2,500,000 Scale--A Digital Representation of the 1974 P.B. King and H.M. Beikman Map" (Schuben and others, 1994). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  1. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e 3

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; ...

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbTe 3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298–355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk q CDW = 0.30 ± 0.01c*. However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW statesmore » coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbTe 3. As a result, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature T CDW.« less

  2. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling Sheetak: Low Cost - Solid State Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pokharna, Himanshu; Ghoshal, Uttam

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. A few videos were selected for showing during the Summit to attendees. These "performer videos" highlight innovative research that is ongoing and related to the main topics of the Summit's sessions. Featured in this video are David Marcus, Founder of General Compression, and Eric Ingersoll, CEO of General Compression. Himanshu Pokharna,more » Vice President of Sheetak Uttam Ghoshal, President and CEO of Sheetak.« less

  3. Search for the standard model higgs boson in eτ final states

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, Ian James

    2013-05-01

    Presented in this dissertation is a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson using the DØ detector at Fermilab in Batavia, IL. The SM is a fantastically accurate theory describing the fundamental interactions and particles of the Universe. The only undiscovered particle in the SM is the Higgs boson, which is hypothesized to be responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking and giving mass to all other particles. Considered in this search is the process H + X → eτ hjj, where e is an electron, τ h is the hadronic decay of a tau, and j is a jet, using pmore » $$\\bar{p}$$ collisions at center of mass energy√s = 1.96 TeV. This search includes three production modes: associated production, gluon fusion and vector boson fusion. It also utilizes two decay channels: H→ ττ and H → WW. A new technique, dubbed the Global Boosted Decision Tree, is introduced which offers a means of providing continuity to a multivariate search as a function of a particular parameter, in this case, the mass of the Higgs boson. The observed (expected) limit on the ratio of cross section times branching fraction to the SM at 95% confidence level is 14.6 (16.0) at m H = 125 GeV. This result is combined with the related channel H + X → μτ hjj and produced an observed (expected) limit of 9.0 (11.3) at m H = 125 GeV.« less

  4. Measurement of the e +e -→π +π - cross section between 600 and 900 MeV using initial state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Ablikim, M.

    2015-11-28

    We extract the e +e -→π +π - cross section in the energy range between 600 and 900 MeV, exploiting the method of initial state radiation. A data set with an integrated luminosity of 2.93 fb -1 taken at a center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider is used. The cross section is measured with a systematic uncertainty of 0.9%. We extract the pion form factor |F π| 2 as well as the contribution of the measured cross section to the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to (g-2) μ. In conclusion, we find thismore » value to be a π μ π,LO (600–900 MeV) = (368.2 ±2.5 stat±3.3 sys) ·10 -10, which is between the corresponding values using the BaBar or KLOE data.« less

  5. Two-year trends and predictors of e-cigarette use in 27 European Union member states.

    PubMed

    Filippidis, Filippos T; Laverty, Anthony A; Gerovasili, Vasiliki; Vardavas, Constantine I

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed changes in levels of ever use, perceptions of harm from e-cigarettes and sociodemographic correlates of use among European Union (EU) adults during 2012-2014, as well as determinants of current use in 2014. We analysed data from the 2012 (n=26 751) and 2014 (n=26 792) waves of the adult Special Eurobarometer for Tobacco survey. Point prevalence of current and ever use was calculated and logistic regression assessed correlates of current use and changes in ever use, and perception of harm. Correlates examined included age, gender, tobacco smoking, education, area of residence, difficulties in paying bills and reasons for trying an e-cigarette. The prevalence of ever use of e-cigarettes increased from 7.2% in 2012 to 11.6% in 2014 (adjusted OR (aOR)=1.91). EU-wide coefficient of variation in ever e-cigarette use was 42.1% in 2012 and 33.4% in 2014. The perception that e-cigarettes are harmful increased from 27.1% in 2012 to 51.6% in 2014 (aOR=2.99), but there were major differences in prevalence and trends between member states. Among those who reported that they had ever tried an e-cigarette in the 2014 survey, 15.3% defined themselves as current users. Those who tried an e-cigarette to quit smoking were more likely to be current users (aOR=2.82). Ever use of e-cigarettes increased during 2012-2014. People who started using e-cigarettes to quit smoking tobacco were more likely to be current users, but the trends vary by country. These findings underscore the need for more research into factors influencing e-cigarette use and its potential benefits and harms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. The digital divide in public e-health: barriers to accessibility and privacy in state health department websites.

    PubMed

    West, Darrell M; Miller, Edward Alan

    2006-08-01

    State health departments have placed a tremendous amount of information, data, and services online in recent years. With the significant increase in online resources at official health sites, though, have come questions concerning equity of access and the confidentiality of electronic medical materials. This paper reports on an examination of public health department websites maintained by the 50 state governments. Using a content analysis of health department sites undertaken each year from 2000 to 2005, we investigate several dimensions of accessibility and privacy: readability levels, disability access, non-English accessibility, and the presence of privacy and security statements. We argue that although progress has been made at improving the accessibility and confidentiality of health department electronic resources, there remains much work to be done to ensure quality access for all Americans in the area of public e-health.

  7. Analysis of the E2 transitions for /sup 3/H-/alpha/ cluster states of /sup 7/Li by the resonating group method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Pu; Zhao Xuan; Zeng Fanan

    1989-07-01

    It is suggested that the ground state and the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd excited states of /sup 7/Li are /sup 3/H-/alpha/ cluster-structure states. Using the resonating group method (RGM), the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of these states as well as the reduced E2 transition probabilities between these states are calculated and are consistent with the experimental values. The results show that the RGM is much better than the harmonic oscillator model used by Bernheim /ital et/ /ital al/. in predicting the E2 transition rates.

  8. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part E - The Denver & Rio Grande Western Route

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Marius R.

    1922-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens, as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has published a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. The present volume is an addition to this series and covers one of the finest scenic routes of the continent. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend

  9. Public safety answering point readiness for wireless E-911 in New York State.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Bob W; Scott, Jay M; Brown, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    To determine the level of wireless enhanced 911 readiness among New York's primary public safety answering points. This descriptive study utilized a simple, single-page survey that was distributed in August 2001, with telephone follow-up concluding in January 2002. Surveys were distributed to directors of the primary public safety answering points in each of New York's 62 counties. Information was requested regarding current readiness for providing wireless enhanced 911 service, hardware and software needs for implementing the service, and the estimated costs for obtaining the necessary hardware and software. Two directors did not respond and could not be contacted by telephone; three declined participation; one did not operate an answering point; and seven provided incomplete responses, resulting in usable data from 49 (79%) of the state's public safety answering points. Only 27% of the responding public safety answering points were currently wireless enhanced 911 ready. Specific needs included obtaining or upgrading computer systems (16%), computer-aided dispatch systems (53%), mapping software (71%), telephone systems (27%), and local exchange carrier trunk lines (42%). The total estimated hardware and software costs for achieving wireless enhanced 911 readiness was between 16 million and 20 million dollars. New York's primary public safety answering points are not currently ready to provide wireless enhanced 911 service, and the cost for achieving readiness could be as high as 20 million dollars.

  10. E2 decay strength of the M1 scissors mode of ^{156}Gd and its first excited rotational state.

    PubMed

    Beck, T; Beller, J; Pietralla, N; Bhike, M; Birkhan, J; Derya, V; Gayer, U; Hennig, A; Isaak, J; Löher, B; Ponomarev, V Yu; Richter, A; Romig, C; Savran, D; Scheck, M; Tornow, W; Werner, V; Zilges, A; Zweidinger, M

    2017-05-26

    The E2/M1 multipole mixing ratio δ_{1→2} of the 1_{sc}^{+}→2_{1}^{+} γ-ray decay in ^{156}Gd and hence the isovector E2 transition rate of the scissors mode of a well-deformed rotational nucleus has been measured for the first time. It has been obtained from the angular distribution of an artificial quasimonochromatic linearly polarized γ-ray beam of energy 3.07(6) MeV scattered inelastically off an isotopically highly enriched ^{156}Gd target. The data yield first direct support for the deformation dependence of effective proton and neutron quadrupole boson charges in the framework of algebraic nuclear models. First evidence for a low-lying J^{π}=2^{+} member of the rotational band of states on top of the 1^{+} band head is obtained, too, indicating a significant signature splitting in the K=1 scissors mode rotational band.

  11. E 2 decay strength of the M 1 scissors mode of 156Gd and its first excited rotational state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Pietralla, N.; Bhike, M.; Birkhan, J.; Derya, V.; Gayer, U.; Hennig, A.; Isaak, J.; Löher, B.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Tornow, W.; Werner, V.; Zilges, A.; Zweidinger, M.

    2017-05-01

    The E 2 /M 1 multipole mixing ratio δ1 →2 of the 1sc+→21+ γ -ray decay in 156Gd and hence the isovector E 2 transition rate of the scissors mode of a well-deformed rotational nucleus has been measured for the first time. It has been obtained from the angular distribution of an artificial quasimonochromatic linearly polarized γ -ray beam of energy 3.07(6) MeV scattered inelastically off an isotopically highly enriched 156Gd target. The data yield first direct support for the deformation dependence of effective proton and neutron quadrupole boson charges in the framework of algebraic nuclear models. First evidence for a low-lying Jπ=2+ member of the rotational band of states on top of the 1+ band head is obtained, too, indicating a significant signature splitting in the K =1 scissors mode rotational band.

  12. Status of the cyclotron/P.E.T. facility at the State University of New York at Buffalo

    SciTech Connect

    Toorongian, S.A.; Haka, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    A new P.E.T./Cyclotron facility has been constructed on the Main St. campus of the State University of New York at Buffalo to service the needs of Nuclear Medicine departments in Buffalo and throughout the Western New York area. This facility is jointly funded and operated by S.U.N.Y. and the Veterans Administration. The cyclotron, as well as the research labs and a nuclear pharmacy to prepare non-positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals, are located in a newly constructed facility on campus. The P.E.T. scanner is located in the Veterans Administration Hospital adjacent to the campus. The two annexes are connected by a pneumatic transportmore » {open_quotes}rabbit{close_quotes} system. The cyclotron and all radiopharmaceutical synthesis apparatus have been purchased from Ion Beam Applications s.a. of Lovain-la-Neuve Belgium.« less

  13. Attenuation Factors for B(E2) in the Microscopic Description of Multiphonon States ---A Simple Model Analysis---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyanagi, K.

    1982-05-01

    With an exactly solvable O(4) model of Piepenbring, Silvestre-Brac and Szymanski, we demonstrate that the attenuation factor for the B(E2) values, derived by the lowest-order approximation of the multiphonon method, takes excellent care of the kinematical anharmonicity effects, if multiphonon states are defined in the intrinsic subspace orthogonal to the pairing rotation. It is also shown that the other attenuation effect characterizing the interacting boson model is not a dominant effect in the model analysed here.

  14. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States)

    ScienceCinema

    Clinton, William J.

    2018-05-03

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Former President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, gave the final keynote address of the 2012 Summit on February 29. He addressed the importance of government investment in research that will help move the world toward a cleaner and more secure energy future.

  15. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States)

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, William J.

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Former President Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, gave the final keynote address of the 2012 Summit on February 29. He addressed the importance of government investment in research that will help move the world toward a cleaner and more secure energy future.

  16. Serological evidence for a hepatitis e virus-related agent in goats in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sanford, B J; Emerson, S U; Purcell, R H; Engle, R E; Dryman, B A; Cecere, T E; Buechner-Maxwell, V; Sponenberg, D P; Meng, X J

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an important public health disease in many developing countries and is also endemic in some industrialized countries. In addition to humans, strains of HEV have been genetically identified from pig, chicken, rat, mongoose, deer, rabbit and fish. While the genotypes 1 and 2 HEV are restricted to humans, the genotypes 3 and 4 HEV are zoonotic and infect humans and other animal species. As a part of our ongoing efforts to search for potential animal reservoirs for HEV, we tested goats from Virginia for evidence of HEV infection and showed that 16% (13/80) of goat sera from Virginia herds were positive for IgG anti-HEV. Importantly, we demonstrated that neutralizing antibodies to HEV were present in selected IgG anti-HEV positive goat sera. Subsequently, in an attempt to genetically identify the HEV-related agent from goats, we conducted a prospective study in a closed goat herd with known anti-HEV seropositivity and monitored a total of 11 kids from the time of birth until 14 weeks of age for evidence of HEV infection. Seroconversion to IgG anti-HEV was detected in seven of the 11 kids, although repeated attempts to detect HEV RNA by a broad-spectrum nested RT-PCR from the faecal and serum samples of the goats that had seroconverted were unsuccessful. In addition, we also attempted to experimentally infect laboratory goats with three well-characterized mammalian strains of HEV but with no success. The results indicate that a HEV-related agent is circulating and maintained in the goat population in Virginia and that the goat HEV is likely genetically very divergent from the known HEV strains. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Quantum Chemical Calculations of Torsionally Mediated Hyperfine Splittings in States of E Symmetry of Acetaldehyde (CH_{3}CHO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Reid, Elias M.; Guislain, Bradley; Hougen, Jon T.; Alekseev, E. A.; Krapivin, Igor

    2017-06-01

    Hyperfine splittings in methanol have been revisited in three recent publications. (i) Coudert et al. [JCP 143 (2015) 044304] published an analysis of splittings observed in the low-J range. They calculated 32 spin-rotation, 32 spin-spin, and 16 spin-torsion hyperfine constants using the ACES2 package. Three of these constants were adjusted to fit hyperfine patterns for 12 transitions. (ii) Three present authors and collaborators [JCP 145 (2016) 024307] analyzed medium to high-J experimental Lamb-dip measurements in methanol and presented a theoretical spin-rotation explanation that was based on torsionally mediated spin-rotation hyperfine operators. These contain, in addition to the usual nuclear spin and overall rotational operators, factors in the torsional angle α of the form {e^{plusmn;{inα}}}. Such operators have non-zero matrix elements between the two components of a torsion-rotation ^{tr}E state, but have zero matrix elements within a ^{tr}A state. More than 55 hyperfine splittings were successfully fitted using three parameters and the fitted values agree well with ab initio values obtained in (i). (iii) Lankhaar et al. [JCP 145 (2016) 244301] published a reanalysis of the data set from (i), using CFOUR recalculated hyperfine constants based on their rederivation of the relevant expressions. They explain why their choice of fixed and floated parameters leads to numerical values for all parameters that seem to be more physical than those in (i). The results in (ii) raise the question of whether large torsionally-mediated spin-rotation splittings will occur in other methyl-rotor-containing molecules. This abstract presents ab initio calculations of torsionally mediated hyperfine splittings in the E states of acetaldehyde using the same three operators as in (ii) and spin-rotation constants computed by Gaussian09. We explored the first 13 K states for J from 10 to 40 and ν_{t} = 0, 1, and 2. Our calculations indicate that hyperfine splittings in CH_{3}CHO

  18. Modeling the Health Effects of Expanding e-Cigarette Sales in the United States and United Kingdom: A Monte Carlo Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalkhoran, Sara; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is increasing. Population health effects will depend on cigarette smoking behaviors, levels of dual use with conventional cigarettes, and e-cigarette toxicity. To evaluate potential health effects of various scenarios of increasing promotion and use of e-cigarettes. A base case model was developed using data on actual cigarette and e-cigarette use patterns that quantifies transitions from an initial state of no cigarette or e-cigarette use to 1 of 5 final states: never use of cigarettes or e-cigarettes, cigarette use, e-cigarette use, dual use of cigarettes and e-cigarettes, or quit. Seven scenarios were created that cover a range of use patterns, depending on how the e-cigarette market might develop, as well as a range of possible long-term health effects of e-cigarette use. Scenarios for changes from the base case were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. Separate sets of base case model parameters were evaluated for the US and UK populations. We assigned unitless health "costs" for each final state on a scale of 0 to 100. Population health "costs" were compared with the base case (status quo) assuming e-cigarette use health "costs" from 1% to 50% as dangerous as conventional cigarette use health costs. Compared with the base case, a harm reduction scenario in which e-cigarette use increases only among smokers who are interested in quitting with more quit attempts and no increased initiation of e-cigarette use among nonsmokers, and another scenario in which e-cigarettes are taken up only by youth who would have smoked conventional cigarettes, had population-level health benefits regardless of e-cigarette health costs in both the United States and United Kingdom. Conversely, scenarios in which e-cigarette promotion leads to renormalization of cigarette smoking or e-cigarettes are used primarily by youth who never would have smoked showed net health harms across all e-cigarette health costs. In other

  19. Equation of State for the Thermodynamic Properties of trans-1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene [R-1234ze(E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thol, Monika; Lemmon, Eric W.

    2016-03-01

    An equation of state for the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of the hydrofluoroolefin refrigerant R-1234ze(E) is presented. The equation of state (EOS) is expressed in terms of the Helmholtz energy as a function of temperature and density. The formulation can be used for the calculation of all thermodynamic properties through the use of derivatives of the Helmholtz energy. Comparisons to experimental data are given to establish the uncertainty of the EOS. The equation of state is valid from the triple point (169 K) to 420 K, with pressures to 100 MPa. The uncertainty in density in the liquid and vapor phases is 0.1 % from 200 K to 420 K at all pressures. The uncertainty increases outside of this temperature region and in the critical region. In the gaseous phase, speeds of sound can be calculated with an uncertainty of 0.05 %. In the liquid phase, the uncertainty in speed of sound increases to 0.1 %. The estimated uncertainty for liquid heat capacities is 5 %. The uncertainty in vapor pressure is 0.1 %.

  20. Experimental investigation of the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground and excited electronic states of the tropyl radical. Part II. Vibrational analysis of the A 2E"3-X 2E"2 electronic transition.

    PubMed

    Sioutis, Ilias; Stakhursky, Vadim L; Tarczay, György; Miller, Terry A

    2008-02-28

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser-excited dispersed fluorescence (LEDF) spectra of the cycloheptatrienyl (tropyl) radical C7H7 have been observed under supersonic jet-cooling conditions. Assignment of the LIF excitation spectrum yields detailed information about the A-state vibronic structure. The LEDF emission was collected by pumping different vibronic bands of the A 2E"3<--X 2E"2 electronic spectrum. Analysis of the LEDF spectra yields valuable information about the vibronic levels of the X 2E"2 state. The X- and A-state vibronic structures characterize the Jahn-Teller distortion of the respective potential energy surfaces. A thorough analysis reveals observable Jahn-Teller activity in three of the four e'3 modes for the X 2E"2 state and two of the three e'1 modes for the A 2E"3 state and provides values for their deperturbed vibrational frequencies as well as linear Jahn-Teller coupling constants. The molecular parameters characterizing the Jahn-Teller interaction in the X and A states of C7H7 are compared to theoretical results and to those previously obtained for C5H5 and C6H6+.

  1. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Surficial Geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of surficial geology types in square meters compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is the "Digital data set describing surficial geology in the conterminous US" (Clawges and Price, 1999).The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2008). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  2. Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of N2. III - Transitions in the 12.5-14.2-eV energy-loss region at incident energies of 40 and 60 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Trajmar, S.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of electron energy-loss data at incident electron energies of 40 and 60 eV has led to the determination of normalized absolute differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of five optically-allowed singlet states, two known triplet states, and two unknown triplet-like states of N2, lying in the energy-loss range 12.5-14.2 eV. The range of scattering angles was 5 to 138 deg. The optically allowed transitions and the known triplet excitations are identified. Cross sections for excitation to two unidentified triplet-like states at 13.155 and 13.395 eV were also obtained. The relationship of the generalized oscillator strength for the dipole-allowed states obtained from the described data to known optical oscillator strengths is discussed.

  3. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.

    2011-08-19

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{supmore » -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.« less

  4. Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphism with blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake in the sedentary state and after exercise training in the HERITAGE family study.

    PubMed

    Leon, Arthur S; Togashi, Kenji; Rankinen, Tuomo; Després, Jean-Piérre; Rao, D C; Skinner, James S; Wilmore, Jack H; Bouchard, Claude

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of apolipoprotein E (apo E) genotypes to plasma lipid and maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) was studied in the sedentary state and after a supervised exercise training program in black and white men and women. At baseline, the apo E 2/3 genotype was associated with the lowest, and apo E 3/4 and E4/4 with the highest low-density liporpotein (LDL) cholesterol and apo B levels in men and women of both races, while female (not male) carriers of apo E3 had higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels than carriers of other genotypes. Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in carriers of both apo E2 and apo E4 in white men only. Racial and sex differences were noted in lipid responses to exercise training across genotypes with a significantly greater increase in HDL cholesterol observed only in white female carriers of apo E 2/3 and E3/3, as compared to apo E4/4. Apo E polymorphism was not found to be associated with Vo(2max) levels either in the sedentary state nor the Vo(2max) response to exercise training, contrary to previous reports.

  5. The Feasibility of the Use of E-Books for Replacing Lost or Brittle Books in the Kent State University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lareau, Susan

    This study examined the feasibility of ordering an e-book (electronic book) to replace a lost or brittle book in the Kent State University (Ohio) library. The study checked a representative sample of 234 books lost during July to December 2000 to see the availability of the book in e-form, as well as the cost of the print versus the e-book…

  6. Structural and resting-state MRI detects regional brain differences in young and mid-age healthy APOE-e4 carriers compared with non-APOE-e4 carriers.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Nicholas G; Evans, Simon L; Tofts, Paul S; King, Sarah L; Tabet, Naji; Rusted, Jennifer M

    2016-05-01

    The presence of the e4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is the best-known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the link between functional and behavioural differences and regional brain volume and cortical thickness differences in those who carry the e4 allele (e4+) and those who only carry the e3 allele (e3/e3). We studied these genotype populations in two age groups: a young group (average age, 21 years) and a mid-age group (average age, 50 years). High-resolution T1 -weighted MRI scans were analysed with Freesurfer to measure regional white matter brain volume and cortical thickness differences between genotype groups at each age. These data were correlated with behavioural findings in the same cohort. Resting-state MRI was also conducted to identify differences in underlying brain functional connectivity. We found that there was a positive correlation between the thickness of the parahippocampal cortex in young e4+ individuals and performance on an episodic memory task. Young e4+ individuals also showed a positive correlation between white matter volume in the left anterior cingulate and performance on a covert attention task. At mid-age, e4+ individuals had structural differences relative to e3/e3 individuals in these areas: the parahippocampal cortex was thicker and white matter volume in the left anterior cingulate was greater than in e3/e3 individuals. We discuss the possibility that an over-engagement with these regions by e4+ individuals in youth may have a neurogenic effect that is observable later in life. The cuneus appears to be an important region for APOE-driven differences in the brain, with greater functional connectivity among young e3/e3 individuals and greater white matter volume in young e4+ individuals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hydride Conformers of the Nitrogenase FeMo-cofactor Two-Electron Reduced State E2(2H), Assigned Using Cryogenic Intra Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Cavity Photolysis.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy A; Khadka, Nimesh; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2018-03-24

    Early studies in which nitrogenase was freeze-trapped during enzymatic turnover revealed the presence of high-spin ( S = 3 / 2 ) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals from the active-site FeMo-cofactor (FeMo-co) in electron-reduced intermediates of the MoFe protein. Historically denoted as 1b and 1c, each of the signals is describable as a fictitious spin system, S' = 1 / 2 , with anisotropic g' tensor, 1b with g' = [4.21, 3.76, ?] and 1c with g' = [4.69, ∼3.20, ?]. A clear discrepancy between the magnetic properties of 1b and 1c and the kinetic analysis of their appearance during pre-steady-state turnover left their identities in doubt, however. We subsequently associated 1b with the state having accumulated 2[e - /H + ], denoted as E 2 (2H), and suggested that the reducing equivalents are stored on the catalytic FeMo-co cluster as an iron hydride, likely an [Fe-H-Fe] hydride bridge. Intra-EPR cavity photolysis (450 nm; temperature-independent from 4 to 12 K) of the E 2 (2H)/1b state now corroborates the identification of this state as storing two reducing equivalents as a hydride. Photolysis converts E 2 (2H)/1b to a state with the same EPR spectrum, and thus the same cofactor structure as pre-steady-state turnover 1c, but with a different active-site environment. Upon annealing of the photogenerated state at temperature T = 145 K, it relaxes back to E 2 (2H)/1b. This implies that the 1c signal comes from an E 2 (2H) hydride isomer of E 2 (2H)/1b that stores its two reducing equivalents either as a hydride bridge between a different pair of iron atoms or an Fe-H terminal hydride.

  8. Isotopic and quantum-rovibrational-state effects for the ion-molecule reaction in the collision energy range of 0.03-10.00 eV.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Xiong, Bo; Chang, Yih Chung; Ng, C Y

    2017-03-29

    We report detailed quantum-rovibrational-state-selected integral cross sections for the formation of H 3 O + via H-transfer (σ HT ) and H 2 DO + via D-transfer (σ DT ) from the reaction in the center-of-mass collision energy (E cm ) range of 0.03-10.00 eV, where (vvv) = (000), (100), and (020) and . The E cm inhibition and rotational enhancement observed for these reactions at E cm < 0.5 eV are generally consistent with those reported previously for H 2 O + + H 2 (D 2 ) reactions. However, in contrast to the vibrational inhibition observed for the latter reactions at low E cm < 0.5 eV, both the σ HT and σ DT for the H 2 O + + HD reaction are found to be enhanced by (100) vibrational excitation, which is not predicted by the current state-of-the-art theoretical dynamics calculations. Furthermore, the (100) vibrational enhancement for the H 2 O + + HD reaction is observed in the full E cm range of 0.03-10.00 eV. The fact that vibrational enhancement is only observed for the reaction of H 2 O + + HD, and not for H 2 O + + H 2 (D 2 ) reactions suggests that the asymmetry of HD may play a role in the reaction dynamics. In addition to the strong isotopic effect favoring the σ HT channel of the H 2 O + + HD reaction at low E cm < 0.5 eV, competition between the σ HT and σ DT of the H 2 O + + HD reaction is also observed at E cm = 0.3-10.0 eV. The present state-selected study of the H 2 O + + HD reaction, along with the previous studies of the H 2 O + + H 2 (D 2 ) reactions, clearly shows that the chemical reactivity of H 2 O + toward H 2 (HD, D 2 ) depends not only on E cm , but also on the rotational and vibrational states of H 2 O + (X 2 B 1 ). The detailed σ HT and σ DT values obtained here with single rovibrational-state selections of the reactant H 2 O + are expected to be valuable benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical calculations on the chemical dynamics of the title reaction.

  9. A review on the state-of-the-art privacy-preserving approaches in the e-health clouds.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Assad; Khan, Samee U

    2014-07-01

    Cloud computing is emerging as a new computing paradigm in the healthcare sector besides other business domains. Large numbers of health organizations have started shifting the electronic health information to the cloud environment. Introducing the cloud services in the health sector not only facilitates the exchange of electronic medical records among the hospitals and clinics, but also enables the cloud to act as a medical record storage center. Moreover, shifting to the cloud environment relieves the healthcare organizations of the tedious tasks of infrastructure management and also minimizes development and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, storing the patient health data in the third-party servers also entails serious threats to data privacy. Because of probable disclosure of medical records stored and exchanged in the cloud, the patients' privacy concerns should essentially be considered when designing the security and privacy mechanisms. Various approaches have been used to preserve the privacy of the health information in the cloud environment. This survey aims to encompass the state-of-the-art privacy-preserving approaches employed in the e-Health clouds. Moreover, the privacy-preserving approaches are classified into cryptographic and noncryptographic approaches and taxonomy of the approaches is also presented. Furthermore, the strengths and weaknesses of the presented approaches are reported and some open issues are highlighted.

  10. Absence of quantum anomalous Hall state in 4 d transition-metal-doped B i2S e3 : An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bei; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Junyi

    2017-11-01

    The realization of insulating ferromagnetic states in topological insulator (TI) systems, with sufficiently high Curie temperatures (TC) and large magnetically induced gaps, has been the key bottleneck towards the realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). Despite the limited reports on 3 d or 4 f transition-metal (TM)-doped B i2S e3 , there remains a lack of systematic studies on 4 d TMs, which may be potential candidates since the atomic sizes of 4 d TMs and that of Bi are similar. Here, we report a theoretical work that probes the magnetic behaviors of the 4 d TM-doped B i2S e3 system. We discovered that among the 4 d TMs, Nb and Mo can create magnetic moments of 1.76 and 2.96 μ B in B i2S e3 , respectively. While Mo yields a stable gapless antiferromagnetic ground state, Nb favors a strong ferromagnetic order, with the magnetic coupling strength (TC) ˜6 times of that induced by the traditional Cr impurity. Yet, we found that Nb is still unfavorable to support the QAH state in B i2S e3 because of the reduced correlation in the t2 g band that gives a gapless character. This rationale is not only successful in interpreting why Nb, the strongest candidate among 4 d TMs for achieving ferromagnetism in B i2S e3 , actually cannot lead to QAHE in the B i2S e3 system even with the assistance of codoping but also is particularly important to fully understand the mechanism of acquisition of insulating ferromagnetic states inside TI. On the other hand, we discovered that Mo-doped B i2S e3 favors strong antiferromagnetic states and may lead to superconducting states.

  11. Spin dependence of intra-ground-state-band E2 transitions in the SU(3) limit of the sdg interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, G. L.; Ji, H. Y.

    1998-04-01

    B(E2, L+2-->L) transitions in the sdg interacting boson model SU(3) limit are studied with a general E2 transition operator. Analytical expressions are obtained using a group theoretic method. It is found that when using transition operators of the form (d†g~+g†d~)2 or (g†g~)2, the B(E2, L+2-->L) values in the ground-state band have an L(L+3) dependent term. As L increases, the B(E2) values can be larger than the rigid rotor model value. Application to 236,238U is discussed.

  12. Doubly magic 208Pb: High-spin states, isomers, and E 3 collectivity in the yrast decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broda, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Iskra, Ł. W.; Wrzesinski, J.; Fornal, B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kondev, F. G.; Królas, W.; Lauritsen, T.; Podolyak, Zs.; Seweryniak, D.; Shand, C. M.; Szpak, B.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.; Brown, B. A.

    2017-06-01

    Yrast and near-yrast levels up to spin values in excess of I =30 ℏ have been delineated in the doubly magic 208Pb nucleus following deep-inelastic reactions involving 208Pb targets and, mostly, 430-MeV 48Ca and 1440-MeV 208Pb beams. The level scheme was established up to an excitation energy of 16.4 MeV, based on multifold γ-ray coincidence relationships measured with the Gammasphere array. Below the well-known, 0.5-μs 10+ isomer, ten new transitions were added to earlier work. The delineation of the higher parts of the level sequence benefited from analyses involving a number of prompt- and delayed-coincidence conditions. Three new isomeric states were established along the yrast line with Iπ=20- (10 342 keV), 23+ (11 361 keV), and 28- (13 675 keV), and respective half-lives of 22(3), 12.7(2), and 60(6) ns. Gamma transitions were also identified preceding in time the 28- isomer; however, only a few could be placed in the level scheme and no firm spin-parity quantum numbers could be proposed. In contrast, for most states below this 28- isomer, firm spin-parity values were assigned, based on total electron-conversion coefficients, deduced for low-energy (<500 keV ) transitions from γ-intensity balances, and on measured γ-ray angular distributions. The latter also enabled the quantitative determination of mixing ratios. The transition probabilities extracted for all isomeric transitions in 208Pb have been reviewed and discussed in terms of the intrinsic structure of the initial and final levels involved. Particular emphasis was placed on the many observed E 3 transitions as they often exhibit significant enhancements in strength [of the order of tens of Weisskopf units (W.u.)] comparable to the one seen for the neutron j15 /2→g9 /2 E 3 transition in 209Pb. In this context, the enhancement of the 725-keV E 3 transition (56 W.u.) associated with the decay of the highest-lying 28- isomer observed in this work remains particularly challenging to explain. Large

  13. Energy Scan of the e^{+}e^{-}→h_{b}(nP)π^{+}π^{-} (n=1, 2) Cross Sections and Evidence for ϒ(11020) Decays into Charged Bottomoniumlike States.

    PubMed

    Mizuk, R; Bondar, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Behera, P; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Chobanova, V; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Doležal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W-S; Hsu, C-L; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Katrenko, P; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Kotchetkov, D; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lubej, M; Luo, T; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Negishi, K; Niiyama, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Paul, S; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Ritter, M; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumiyoshi, T; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Varner, G; Vorobyev, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yelton, J; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2016-09-30

    Using data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^{+}e^{-} collider, we measure the energy dependence of the e^{+}e^{-}→h_{b}(nP)π^{+}π^{-} (n=1, 2) cross sections from thresholds up to 11.02 GeV. We find clear ϒ(10860) and ϒ(11020) peaks with little or no continuum contribution. We study the resonant substructure of the ϒ(11020)→h_{b}(nP)π^{+}π^{-} transitions and find evidence that they proceed entirely via the intermediate isovector states Z_{b}(10610) and Z_{b}(10650). The relative fraction of these states is loosely constrained by the current data: The hypothesis that only Z_{b}(10610) is produced is excluded at the level of 3.3 standard deviations, while the hypothesis that only Z_{b}(10650) is produced is not excluded at a significant level.

  14. The E3Σ1+ (63S1)←A3Π0+(53P1) transition in CdAr revisited: The spectrum and new analysis of the E3Σ1+ Rydberg state interatomic potential.

    PubMed

    Urbańczyk, T; Krośnicki, M; Kędziorski, A; Koperski, J

    2018-05-05

    Revisited study of the E 3 Σ 1 + (6 3 S 1 )←A 3 Π 0+ (5 3 P 1 ) transition in CdAr using both theoretical and experimental approach is presented. Systematic detection of the E 3 Σ 1 + in ,υ'←A 3 Π 0+ ,υ″=6 transition frequencies with higher accuracy and spectrally narrower laser extended and improved analysis and simulation of the LIF excitation spectrum. More consistent characterization of the E 3 Σ 1 + in -Rydberg state inner well using inversed perturbation approach methodology was achieved. Free←bound transitions in the E 3 Σ 1 + in ←A 3 Π 0+ ,υ″=6 excitation were taken into account in the analysis and simulation of the recorded spectrum. The updated spectroscopic characterization of the A 3 Π 0+ state was also revisited. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The E3Σ1+ (63S1) ← A3Π0+(53P1) transition in CdAr revisited: The spectrum and new analysis of the E3Σ1+ Rydberg state interatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk, T.; Krośnicki, M.; Kędziorski, A.; Koperski, J.

    2018-05-01

    Revisited study of the E3Σ1+ (63S1) ← A3Π0+(53P1) transition in CdAr using both theoretical and experimental approach is presented. Systematic detection of the E3Σ1+in,υ' ← A3Π0+,υ″ = 6 transition frequencies with higher accuracy and spectrally narrower laser extended and improved analysis and simulation of the LIF excitation spectrum. More consistent characterization of the E3Σ1+in-Rydberg state inner well using inversed perturbation approach methodology was achieved. Free ← bound transitions in the E3Σ1+in ← A3Π0+,υ″ = 6 excitation were taken into account in the analysis and simulation of the recorded spectrum. The updated spectroscopic characterization of the A3Π0+ state was also revisited.

  16. Human papillomavirus type 18 variant lineages in United States populations characterized by sequence analysis of LCR-E6, E2, and L1 regions.

    PubMed

    Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Peyton, Cheri L; Torrez-Martínez, Norah; Anderson, D Nelson; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2005-07-20

    While HPV 16 variant lineages have been well characterized, the knowledge about HPV 18 variants is limited. In this study, HPV 18 nucleotide variations in the E2 hinge region were characterized by sequence analysis in 47 control and 51 tumor specimens. Fifty of these specimens were randomly selected for sequencing of an LCR-E6 segment and 20 samples representative of LCR-E6 and E2 sequence variants were examined across the L1 region. A total of 2770 nucleotides per HPV 18 variant genome were considered in this study. HPV 18 variant nucleotides were linked among all gene segments analyzed and grouped into three main branches: Asian-American (AA), European (E), and African (Af). These three branches were equally distributed among controls and cases and when stratified by Hispanic and non-Hispanic ethnicities. Among invasive cervical cancer cases, no significant differences in the three HPV variant branches were observed among ethnic groups or when stratified by histopathology (squamous vs. adenocarcinoma). The Af branch showed the greatest nucleotide variability when compared to the HPV 18 reference sequence and was more closely related to HPV 45 than either AA or E branches. Our data also characterize nucleotide and amino acid variations in the L1 capsid gene among HPV 18 variants, which may be relevant to vaccine strategies and subsequent studies of naturally occurring HPV 18 variants. Several novel HPV 18 nucleotide variations were identified in this study.

  17. Analytic Empirical Potential and its Comparison to State of the Art ab initio Calculations for the 6e^- Excited b(1^3Π_u)-STATE of Li_2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2015-06-01

    Despite only having 6e^-, the most sophisticated Li_2(b,1^3Π_u) calculation has an r_e that disagrees with the empirical value by over 1500% of the latter's uncertainty, and energy spacings that disagree with those of the empirical potential by up to over 1.5cm-1. The discrepancy here is far more than for the ground state of the 5e^- system BeH, for which the best ab initio calculation gives an r_e which disagrees with the empirical value by less than 200% of the latter's uncertainty. In addition to this discrepancy, other reasons motivating the construction of an analytic empirical potential for Li_2(b,1^3Π_u) include (1) the fact that it is the most deeply bound Li_2 state, (2) it is the only Li_2 state out of the lowest five, for which no analytic empirical potential has yet been built, (3) the state it mixes with, the A(1^1σ_u)-state, is one of the most thoroughly characterized molecular states, but has a small gap of missing data in part of the region where it mixes with the b-state, and (4) it is one of the states accessible by new ultra-high precision techniques based on photoassociation. Finally (5) there is currently a discrepancy between the most sophisticated 3e- ab initio calculation, and the most current empirical value, for the first Li(^2S)-Li(^2P) interaction term (C_3), despite the latter being the most precise experimentally determined oscillator strength for any system, by an order of magnitude^e. The b-state is one of the states that has this exact C_3 interaction term. Musial & Kucharski (2014) J. Chem. Theor. Comp. 10, 1200. Dattani N. S. (2015) J. Mol. Spec. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jms.2014.09.005. Semczuk M., Li X., Gunton W., Haw M., Dattani N. S., Witz J., Mills A., Jones D. J., Madison K. W. (2013) Phys. Rev. A 87, 052505 Gunton W., Semczuk M., Dattani N. S., Madison K. W. (2013) Phys. Rev. A 88, 062510 Tang L.-Y., Yan Z.-C., Shi T.-Y., Mitroy J (2011) Phys. Rev. A 84, 052502. Le Roy R. J., Dattani N. S., Coxon J. A., Ross A. J

  18. Seep Detection using E/V Nautilus Integrated Seafloor Mapping and Remotely Operated Vehicles on the United States West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L. J.; Raineault, N.; Kane, R.; Saunders, M.; Heffron, E.; Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus has been mapping the seafloor off the west coast of the United States, from Washington to California, for the past three years with a Kongsberg EM302 multibeam sonar. This system simultaneously collects bathymetry, seafloor and water column backscatter data, allowing an integrated approach to mapping to more completely characterize a region, and has identified over 1,000 seafloor seeps. Hydrographic multibeam sonars like the EM302 were designed for mapping the bathymetry. It is only in the last decade that major mapping projects included an integrated approach that utilizes the seabed and water column backscatter information in addition to the bathymetry. Nautilus mapping in the Eastern Pacific over the past three years has included a number of seep-specific expeditions, and utilized and adapted the preliminary mapping guidelines that have emerged from research. The likelihood of seep detection is affected by many factors: the environment: seabed geomorphology, surficial sediment, seep location/depth, regional oceanography and biology, the nature of the seeps themselves: size variation, varying flux, depth, and transience, the detection system: design of hydrographic multibeam sonars limits use for water column detection, the platform: variations in the vessel and operations such as noise, speed, and swath overlap. Nautilus integrated seafloor mapping provided multiple indicators of seep locations, but it remains difficult to assess the probability of seep detection. Even when seeps were detected, they have not always been located during ROV dives. However, the presence of associated features (methane hydrate and bacterial mats) serve as evidence of potential seep activity and reinforce the transient nature of the seeps. Not detecting a seep in the water column data does not necessarily indicate that there is not a seep at a given location, but with multiple passes over an area and by the use of other contextual data, an area may

  19. An Accurate New Potential Function for Ground-State X{e}_2 from UV and Virial Coefficient Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Mackie, J. Cameron; Chandrasekhar, Pragna

    2011-06-01

    Determining accurate analytic pair potentials for rare gas dimers has been a longstanding goal in molecular physics. However, most potential energy functions reported to date fail to optimally represent the available spectroscopic data, in spite of the fact that such data provide constraints of unparalleled precision on the attractive potential energy wells of these species. A recent study of ArXe showed that it is a straightforward matter to combine multi-isotopologue spectroscopic data (in that case, microwave, and high resolution UV measurements) and virial coefficients in a direct fit to obtain a flexible analytic potential function that incorporates the theoretically predicted damped inverse-power long-range behaviour. The present work reports the application of this approach to Xe_2, with a direct fit to high resolution rotationally resolved UV emission data for v''=0 and 1, band head data for v''=0-9, and virial coefficient data for T=165-950 K being used to obtain an accurate new potential energy function for the ground state of this Van der Waals molecule. Analogous results for other rare-gas pairs will also be presented, as time permits. L. Piticco, F. Merkt, A.A. Cholewinski, F.R. McCourt and R.J. Le Roy, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 264, 83 (2010). A. Wüest and K.G. Bruin and F. Merkt, Can. J. Chem. 82, 750 (2004). D.E. Freeman, K. Yoshino, and Y. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 61, 4880 (1974). J.H. Dymond, K.N. Marsh, R.C. Wilhoit and K.C. Wong, in Landold-Börnstein, New Series, Group IV, edited by M. Frenkel and K.N. Marsh, Vol. 21 (2003).

  20. Hadronic vacuum polarization and e+e- → μ+μ- cross section: Reanalysis with new precise data for σh with 4π final states included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    The interference effect between leptonic radiative corrections and hadronic polarization functions is calculated via optical theorem for μ-pair production in vicinity of narrow resonances. Within seven most dominant exclusive channels of the production cross section σh(e+e- → hadrons) one achieves high acuracy which is necessary for the comparison with experiments. The result is compared with KLOE and KLOE2 experiments for μ-μ+ and μ-μ+γ productions at φ and ω/ρ meson energy.

  1. [Pediatric drug development: ICH harmonized tripartite guideline E11 within the United States of America, the European Union, and Japan].

    PubMed

    Pflieger, M; Bertram, D

    2014-10-01

    To address the lack of appropriate pediatric drugs available on the global market, in 2000 the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) issued the ICH E11 guideline regarding the Clinical Investigation of Medicinal Products in the Pediatric Population. This guideline considerably changes the environment of drug development for children. It has been written specifically to harmonize, promote, and facilitate high-quality and ethical clinical research for children within the ICH regions, i.e., the United States of America (USA), the European Union (EU), and Japan. This article details the various regulations applicable in each ICH region following the publication of the guideline. The framework of rewards, incentives, and obligations for pharmaceutical companies established for the development of pediatric drugs are compared. It appears that the USA and the EU have both developed specific regulations for pediatric drug development while Japan has not. However, in Japan, pharmaceutical companies (PCs) are encouraged to develop pediatric drugs voluntarily, and they may be granted additional months of market exclusivity or the postponement of the drug re-examination deadline. In both the USA and the EU, regulations aimed to increase the number of clinical studies conducted in children, in order to ensure that the necessary data are generated, determining the conditions in which a drug may be authorized to treat the pediatric population. PCs are encouraged to develop pediatric assessment, including pediatric clinical trials, which is described in a pediatric plan submitted to the relevant authorities. A system of rewards for PCs submitting an application for marketing authorization containing pediatric use information has been put in place to cover the additional investment for testing drugs in children. Subject to conditions, these rewards consist in a 6-month extension of the patent or

  2. Doubly magic Pb 208 : High-spin states, isomers, and E 3 collectivity in the yrast decay

    DOE PAGES

    Broda, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Iskra, Ł. W.; ...

    2017-06-12

    Yrast and near-yrast levels up to spin values in excess of I = 30h have been delineated in the doubly-magic 208Pb nucleus following deep-inelastic reactions involving 208Pb targets and, mostly, 430-MeV 48Ca and 1440-MeV 208Pb beams. The level scheme was established up to an excitation energy of 16.4 MeV, based on multi-fold γ-ray coincidence relationships measured with the Gammasphere array. Below the well-known, 0.5-μs 10 + isomer, ten new transitions were added to earlier work. The delineation of the higher parts of the level sequence benefited from analyses involving a number of prompt- and delayed-coincidence conditions. Three new isomeric statesmore » were established along the yrast line with I π = 20 - (10342 keV), 23 + (11361 keV), and 28 - (13675 keV), and respective half-lives of 22(3), 12.7(2), and 60(6) ns. Gamma transitions were also identified preceding in time the 28 - isomer, however, only a few could be placed in the level scheme and no firm spin-parity quantum numbers could be proposed. In contrast, for most states below this 28 - isomer, firm spin-parity values were assigned, based on total electron-conversion coefficients, deduced for low-energy (<500 keV) transitions from γ-intensity balances, and on measured γ-ray angular distributions. The latter also enabled the quantitative determination of mixing ratios. The transition probabilities extracted for all isomeric transitions in 208Pb have been reviewed and discussed in terms of the intrinsic structure of the initial and final levels involved. Particular emphasis was placed on the many observed E3 transitions as they often exhibit significant enhancements in strength (of the order of tens of W.u.) comparable to the one seen for the neutron j 15/2→g 9/2 E3 transition in 209Pb. In this context, the enhancement of the 725-keV E3 transition (56 W.u.) associated with the decay of the highest-lying 28 - isomer observed in this work remains particularly challenging to explain. Large

  3. Studies of the g factors of the ground 4A2 and the first excited 2E state of Cr 3+ ions in emerald

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Guo, Li-Xin; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Wei, Bing

    2011-09-01

    By using complete diagonalization method, the zero-field splitting and g factors of the ground 4A2 and the first excited 2E states of Cr 3+ ions in emerald are calculated. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The dependencies of the g factors on the crystal field parameters, including Dq, v, and v', have been studied. It is shown that, the g factors of the ground state varied with the crystal field parameters approximately in a linear way, but the g factors of the first excited state varied nonlinearly with these parameters.

  4. Role of E-Payment System in Promoting Accountability in Government Ministries as Perceived by Accounting Education Graduates and Accountants in Ministry of Finance of Ebonyi State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azih, Nonye; Nwagwu, Lazarus

    2015-01-01

    This paper identified the role of electronic payment system in promoting accountability in government ministries as well as the challenges facing the implementation of e-payment in government ministries in Ebonyi State. The study was guided by two research questions and two hypotheses. The population of the study comprised of 112 accountants as…

  5. A Comparative Analysis of E-Learning Policy Formulation in the European Union and the United States: Discursive Convergence and Divergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erichsen, Elizabeth Roumell; Salajan, Florin D.

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a framework that compares the content and purposes of "federal" level European Union (EU) and United States (US) e-learning policy to ascertain trends, patterns, and points of convergence and divergence across the years 1994-2010. It reveals that the EU and US are applying similar rhetoric for policy framing,…

  6. Effect of warning statements in e-cigarette advertisements: an experiment with young adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Schleicher, Nina C; Fortmann, Stephen P; Henriksen, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    This on-line experiment examined whether the addition of ingredient- or industry-themed warning statements in television advertisements for e-cigarettes would affect young adults' craving for and risk perceptions of e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes, as well as intent to purchase e-cigarettes. Advertisements for two leading e-cigarette brands were edited to contain a warning statement about product ingredients or about the tobacco industry. Participants were assigned randomly to one of eight treatments or one of two brand-specific control conditions without any warning statement. Young adults (n=900, aged 18-34 years) in a web panel were recruited from three groups: recent e-cigarette users, current smokers who used combustible cigarettes exclusively and non-users of either product. Craving and risk perceptions (addictiveness, harmful to health in general, harmful to others) were measured separately for e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes. The Juster scale measured intention to purchase e-cigarettes. Exposure to both types of warnings was associated with lower craving for e-cigarettes among e-cigarette users and smokers who experienced any craving (P<0.01) and lower intention to purchase among all participants (P<0.001). Only exposure to ingredient-themed warnings was associated with lower craving for combustible cigarettes (P<0.05). Participants who saw industry-themed warnings reported greater perceptions of general harm (P<0.001), but also rated e-cigarettes as less addictive than the control conditions (P<0.05). The addition of ingredient- or industry-themed warning statements to e-cigarette television advertising similarly reduces craving and purchase intent for e-cigarettes, but has inconsistent effects on perceived risks. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. E-Government and Citizen Adoption of Innovations: Factors Underlying Citizen Use of the Internet for State Tax Filing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Electronic government has been embraced by many organizations seeking to dramatically improve service delivery, but results to date have often fallen short of expectations. This dissertation is focused on state revenue agencies and their electronic tax filing mechanisms for state individual income taxes. It asks: What factors best explain whether…

  8. Chapter E: History and Overview of the U.S. Diatomite Mining Industry, with Emphasis on the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, Phillip R.; Dolley, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    The United States is the largest producer and consumer of diatomite in the world. In 2001, the United States produced about a third of the estimated global production of 1.95 million metric tons (Mt) of diatomite (Dolley, 2003). In any given year, the United States accounts for at least 50 percent of all the diatomite exported in the world (Roskill, 1994). Seven diatomite companies operating in the United States produce diatomite in various grades for a range of applications, including filtration, absorbents, fillers, insulation, and cement manufacture. Economic deposits of diatomite within the United States depend on variations in the physical and chemical properties between and within deposits, potential end uses, and proximity to suitable markets. On the basis of historical production figures, estimated U.S. diatomite-production capacity is currently about 800,000 metric tons per year (t/yr).

  9. Measurement of the e + e - → K s 0 K ± π ∓ π 0 and K s 0 K ± π ∓ η cross sections using initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    The processes e + e - → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K ±π ∓π 0 and e + e - → K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K ±π ∓η are studied over a continuum of energies from threshold to 4 GeV with the initial-state photon radiation method. Using 454 fb -1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring, the first measurements of the cross sections for these processes are obtained. The intermediate resonance structures from K* 0(Kπ) 0, K *(892) ± (Kπ) ∓ , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$K ±ρ ∓ are studied. Lastly, the J / ψ is observed in all of these channels, and corresponding branching fractions are measured.« less

  10. Measurement of the e + e - → K s 0 K ± π ∓ π 0 and K s 0 K ± π ∓ η cross sections using initial-state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2017-05-30

    The processes e + e - → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K ±π ∓π 0 and e + e - → K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K ±π ∓η are studied over a continuum of energies from threshold to 4 GeV with the initial-state photon radiation method. Using 454 fb -1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring, the first measurements of the cross sections for these processes are obtained. The intermediate resonance structures from K* 0(Kπ) 0, K *(892) ± (Kπ) ∓ , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$K ±ρ ∓ are studied. Lastly, the J / ψ is observed in all of these channels, and corresponding branching fractions are measured.« less

  11. 12 CFR Appendix E to Part 208 - Capital Adequacy Guidelines for State Member Banks; Market Risk Measure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide information about the impact of adverse market events on a bank's covered positions. Backtests provide information about the accuracy of an internal model by comparing a bank's daily VAR measures to... Banks; Market Risk Measure E Appendix E to Part 208 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF...

  12. Demographic Variables and Students Use of E-Learning Resources in Public Secondary Schools Libraries in Rivers State of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owate, C. N.; Afolabi, M.; Akanwa, P. C.

    2017-01-01

    The applications of e-learning resources to studies, teaching and learning by both staff and students have been investigated. However, the provision of e-learning tools for stake-holders is a modern goal to improving as well as achieving the quality of educational system in the twenty first century is imperative. Students' demographic variables…

  13. A longitudinal study of the relationship between receptivity to e-cigarette advertisements and e-cigarette use among baseline non-users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes, United States.

    PubMed

    Agaku, Israel T; Davis, Kevin; Patel, Deesha; Shafer, Paul; Cox, Shanna; Ridgeway, William; King, Brian A

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between receptivity to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) advertisements at baseline and e-cigarette use at follow-up among adult baseline non-users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. A nationally representative online panel was used to survey non-users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes ( n  = 2191) at baseline and 5-month follow-up. At baseline, respondents were shown an e-cigarette advertisement and asked if they were aware of it (exposure). Among those exposed, receptivity was self-rated for each ad using a validated scale of 1 to 5 for agreement with each of six items: "worth remembering," "grabbed my attention," "powerful," "informative," "meaningful," and "convincing." Logistic regression was used to measure the relationship between receptivity at baseline and e-cigarette use at follow-up. Among baseline non-users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes, 16.6% reported exposure to e-cigarette advertisements at baseline; overall mean receptivity score was 2.77. Among baseline non-users who reported exposure to e-cigarette advertisements, incidence of e-cigarette use at follow-up was 2.7%; among baseline non-users who reported not being exposed to e-cigarette advertisements, incidence of e-cigarette use at follow-up was 1.3%. The attributable risk percentage for e-cigarette initiation from e-cigarette advertisement exposure was 59.3%; the population attributable risk percentage from e-cigarette advertisement exposure was 22.6%. Receptivity at baseline was associated with e-cigarette use at follow-up (aOR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.04-2.37). Receptivity to e-cigarette advertisements at baseline was associated with greater odds of e-cigarette use at follow-up among baseline non-users of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Understanding the role of advertising in e-cigarette initiation could help inform public health policy.

  14. Strategic and Operational Relevance of Heavy Lift in the United States Marine Corps: CH-53E Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    strategic and operational relevance of the capabilities of the CH-53E: - Operation EASTERN EXIT - The recovery of Basher 52 (Captain Scott O’Grady Rescue...that were required, but also carried a significant payload. Recovery of Basher 52 Captain Scott O’Grady’s F-16 was shot down while flying over Bosnia...theater Combat Search And Rescue (CSAR) assets. When the call to recover Basher 52 came in, the CH-53E was the aircraft of choice. The CH-53E could not

  15. Strategic and Operational Relevance of Heavy Lift in the United States Marine Corps: CH-53E Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    capabilities of the CH-53E: - Operation EASTERN EXIT - The recovery of Basher 52 (Captain Scott O’Grady Rescue) - Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (covered in the...significant payload. Recovery of Basher 52 Captain Scott O’Grady’s F-16 was shot down while flying over Bosnia on the 2nd of June 1995. The 24th MEU(SOC...When the call to recover Basher 52 came in, the CH-53E was the aircraft of choice. The CH-53E could not only aerial refuel and remain on station ,but

  16. Strategic and Operational Relevance of Heavy Lift in the United States Marine Corps: CH-53E Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    capabilities of the CH-53E: - Operation EASTERN EXIT - The recovery of Basher 52 (Captain Scott O’Grady Rescue) - Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (covered in the...significant payload. Recovery of Basher 52 Captain Scott O’Grady’s F-16 was shot down while flying over Bosnia on the 2nd of June 1995. The 24th MEU(SOC...When the call to recover Basher 52 came in, the CH-53E was the aircraft of choice. The CH-53E could not only aerial refuel and remain on station ,but

  17. Navigating the digital divide: A systematic review of eHealth literacy in underserved populations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chesser, Amy; Burke, Anne; Reyes, Jared; Rohrberg, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    eHealth provides an important mechanism to connect medically underserved populations with health information, but little is known about gaps in eHealth literacy research in underserved adult populations within the U.S. Between June and July 2013, three systematic literature reviews of five databases were conducted and a subsequent hand search was completed. Identified literature was screened and studies meeting exclusion and inclusion criteria were synthesized and analyzed for common themes. Of the 221 articles critically appraised, 15 met these criteria. Thirty-five of these studies were excluded due to international origin. Of the articles meeting the inclusion criteria, underserved populations assessed included immigrant women, the elderly, low-income, the un- and underemployed, and African-American and Hispanic populations. eHealth literacy assessments utilized included one or two item screeners, the eHEALS scale, health information competence and cognitive task analysis. Factors examined in relation to eHealth literacy included age, experience, overall health literacy, education, income and culture. The majority did not assess the impact of locality and those that did were predominately urban. These data suggest that there is a gap in the literature regarding eHealth literacy knowledge for underserved populations, and specifically those in rural locations, within the U.S.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Allosteric Regulation of eIF4A Protein from the Open to Closed State, Induced by ATP and RNA Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hongqing; Li, Chaoqun; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2014-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) plays a key role in the process of protein translation initiation by facilitating the melting of the 5′ proximal secondary structure of eukaryotic mRNA for ribosomal subunit attachment. It was experimentally postulated that the closed conformation of the eIF4A protein bound by the ATP and RNA substrates is coupled to RNA duplex unwinding to promote protein translation initiation, rather than an open conformation in the absence of ATP and RNA substrates. However, the allosteric process of eIF4A from the open to closed state induced by the ATP and RNA substrates are not yet fully understood. Methodology In the present work, we constructed a series of diplex and ternary models of the eIF4A protein bound by the ATP and RNA substrates to carry out molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations and conformation analysis and explore the allosteric properties of eIF4A. Results The results showed that the eIF4A protein completes the conformational transition from the open to closed state via two allosteric processes of ATP binding followed by RNA and vice versa. Based on cooperative allosteric network analysis, the ATP binding to the eIF4A protein mainly caused the relative rotation of two domains, while the RNA binding caused the proximity of two domains via the migration of RNA bases in the presence of ATP. The cooperative binding of ATP and RNA for the eIF4A protein plays a key role in the allosteric transition. PMID:24465900

  19. Dollar Summary of Prime Contract Awards by Contractor, State or Country, and Place. Part 3 (E&E Reisen - Hiawatha Rubber Co)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    w ui 3j W3A b a w ww w w u i U j L A u a w Wa 4*to a o a N C4 anL (a "Cc cm em an a aD a A a GOO F6 46 404 S. >0 I.J man com 04 R 12 CM e4cc ~ m I...I WC: I co r aCCa 001 I-I 0. 0 NCJ o #1.U0 1-- 44 4 -4W C )C (JN -4~y 001 4 4 1I~ C’I1- mmcoco 44 I I. 4 C . a I- U. >- -4.- 010 00 - 1 . Za -C 4 vm...6W1-6z x. z-z- U~.L 4c -C I.--.4- z~L L W~mm 09~ ac -4- U..CI -I io ACLZ 0 U 3 0 0 (0 62 0 z I. zzz (A 6 000 Csd 314" 6 6 CA (ft 4.WU U . U A F4 F6 I I

  20. Experimentation with e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid: a cross-sectional study in 28 European Union member states.

    PubMed

    Filippidis, Filippos T; Laverty, Anthony A; Vardavas, Constantine I

    2016-10-06

    To describe patterns of experimentation with electronic cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid, their self-reported impact on smoking cessation and to identify factors associated with self-reported successful quit attempts within the European Union (EU). A cross-sectional study. 28 European Union member states. We analysed data from wave 82.4 of the Special Eurobarometer survey, collected in December 2014 from all 28 EU member states. The total sample size was n=27 801 individuals aged ≥15 years; however, our analyses were conducted in different subgroups with sample sizes ranging from n=470 to n=9363. Data on e-cigarette experimentation and its self-reported impact on smoking cessation were collected. Logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with experimentation of e-cigarettes as cessation aids and with successful quitting. Logistic regression was also used to assess changes in the use of e-cigarettes as cessation aids between 2012 (using data from wave 77.1 of the Eurobarometer) and 2014 in each member state. E-cigarettes were often experimented with as a cessation aid, especially among younger smokers (OR=5.29) and those who reported financial difficulties (OR=1.33). In total, 10.6% of those who had ever attempted to quit smoking and 27.4% of those who did so using a cessation aid had experimented with e-cigarettes as a cessation aid. Among those who had used e-cigarettes as a cessation aid, those with higher education were more likely to have been successful in quitting (OR=2.23). There was great variation in trends of use of e-cigarette as a cessation aid between member states. Experimentation with e-cigarettes as a potential cessation aid at a population level has increased throughout the EU in recent years, and certain population groups are more likely to experiment with them as cessation aids. Research on the potential population impact of these trends is imperatively needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  1. Literature Review of Cloud Based E-learning Adoption by Students: State of the Art and Direction for Future Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Kayali, Mohammad; Safie, Nurhizam; Mukhtar, Muriati

    2016-11-01

    Cloud computing is a new paradigm shift in information technology. Most of the studies in the cloud are business related while the studies in cloud based e-learning are few. The field is still in its infancy and researchers have used several adoption theories to discover the dimensions of this field. The purpose of this paper is to review and integrate the literature to understand the current situation of the cloud based e-learning adoption. A total of 312 articles were extracted from Science direct, emerald, and IEEE. Screening processes were applied to select only the articles that are related to the cloud based e-learning. A total of 231 removed because they are related to business organization. Next, a total of 63 articles were removed because they are technical articles. A total of 18 articles were included in this paper. A frequency analysis was conducted on the paper to identify the most frequent factors, theories, statistical software, respondents, and countries of the studies. The findings showed that usefulness and ease of use are the most frequent factors. TAM is the most prevalent adoption theories in the literature. The mean of the respondents in the reviewed studies is 377 and Malaysia is the most researched countries in terms of cloud based e-learning. Studies of cloud based e-learning are few and more empirical studies are needed.

  2. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Income Replacement and Reemployment Programs in Michigan and Neighboring States. W.E. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbury, Stephen A.

    Income replacement and reemployment programs in Michigan and its neighboring states were examined in the context of recent changes in federal policy regarding compensation and services for individuals who have lost their jobs or sustained job-related injuries. The analysis focused primarily on the following programs: (1) Unemployment Insurance…

  4. George E. Valley, Jr. Prize Talk: Quantum Frustrated Magnetism and its Expression in the Ground State Selection of Pyrochlore Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Kate

    In the search for novel quantum states of matter, such as highly entangled Quantum Spin Liquids, ``geometrically frustrated'' magnetic lattices are essential for suppressing conventional magnetic order. In three dimensions, the pyrochlore lattice is the canonical frustrated geometry. Magnetic materials with pyrochlore structures have the potential to realize unusual phases such as ``quantum spin ice'', which is predicted to host emergent magnetic monopoles, electrons, and photons as its fundamental excitations. Even in pyrochlores that form long range ordered phases, this often occurs through unusual routes such as ``order by disorder'', in which the fluctuation spectrum dictates the preferred ordered state. The rare earth-based pyrochlore series R2Ti2O7 provides a fascinating variety of magnetic ground states. I will introduce the general anisotropic interaction Hamiltonian that has been successfully used to describe several materials in this series. Using inelastic neutron scattering, the relevant anisotropic interaction strengths can be extracted quantitatively. I will discuss this approach, and its application to two rare earth pyrochlore materials, Er2Ti2O7 and Yb2Ti<2O7, whose ground state properties have long been enigmatic. From these studies, ErTi2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7 have been suggested to be realizations of "quantum order by disorder" and "quantum spin ice", respectively. This research was supported by NSERC of Canada and the National Science Foundation.

  5. Resolving the 3D spatial orientation of helix I in the closed state of the colicin E1 channel domain by FRET. Insights into the integration mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Ho, Derek; Merrill, A Rod

    2016-10-15

    Current evidence suggests that the closed-state membrane model for the channel-forming domain of colicin E1 involves eight amphipathic α-helices (helices I-VII and X) that adopt a two-dimensional arrangement on the membrane surface. Two central hydrophobic α-helices in colicin E1 (VIII and IX) adopt a transmembrane location-the umbrella model. Helices I and II have been shown to participate in the channel by forming a transmembrane segment (TM1) in the voltage-induced open channel state. Consequently, it is paramount to determine the relative location and orientation of helix I in the two-dimensional arrangement of the membrane. A new, low-resolution, three-dimensional model of the closed state of the colicin E1 channel was constructed based on FRET measurements between three naturally occurring Trp residues and three sites in helix I, in addition to previously reported FRET distances for the channel domain. Furthermore, a new mechanism for the channel integration process involving the transition of the soluble to membrane-bound form is presented based on a plethora of kinetic data for this process. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major Rivers Basins in the Conterminous United States: Total Precipitation, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the catchment-average total precipitation in millimeters multiplied by 100 for 2002, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data were the Near-Real-Time Monthly High-Resolution Precipitation Climate Data Set for the Conterminous United States (2002) raster data set produced by the Spatial Climate Analysis Service at Oregon State University. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  7. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: 30-Year Average Daily Minimum Temperature, 1971-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents thecatchment-average for the 30-year (1971-2000) average daily minimum temperature in Celsius multiplied by 100 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data were the United States Average Monthly or Annual Minimum Temperature, 1971 - 2000 raster data set produced by the PRISM Group at Oregon State University. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  8. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: 30-Year Average Annual Precipitation, 1971-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the 30-year (1971-2000) average annual precipitation in millimeters multiplied by 100 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data were the United States Average Monthly or Annual Minimum Precipitation, 1971 - 2000 raster data set produced by the PRISM Group at Oregon State University. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; J.W. Brakebill, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 2008). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  9. A correlated ab initio study of the X2A1 and A2E states of MgCH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    The X2A1 and A2E states of the MgCH3 radical have been studied with correlation consistent basis sets and the coupled cluster method RCCSD(T) in order to compare with two recent experimental efforts [M. A. Anderson and L. M. Ziurys, Astrophys. J. 452, L157 (1995); R. Rubino, J. M. Williamson, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 5964 (1995)]. The best computed values [RCCSD(T)/cc-pCVTZ] for the X2A1 state are (experimental results in parentheses): Ae = 160.433 GHz, Be = 10.948 GHz (B0 = 11.008 GHz), and Mue = 1.011 D. The Mg-CH3 bond is weak, 26.3 kcal/mol. Values for the A2E state are Ae = 154.648 GHz (A0 = 149.666 GHz), Be = 10.87 GHz (B0 = 10.932 GHz), and Mue = 1.022 D. The excitation energy (Te) for the A2E <-- X2A1 transition is 19 999 cm-1 (T00 = 20 030 cm-1). A brief discussion of bonding trends in Mg-containing radials is included.

  10. Lactobacillus Fermentum Improves Tacrolimus-Induced Hypertension by Restoring Vascular Redox State and Improving eNOS Coupling.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Jiménez, Rosario; Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Algieri, Francesca; Chueca-Porcuna, Natalia; Sánchez, Manuel; de la Visitación, Néstor; Olivares, Mónica; García, Federico; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Gálvez, Julio; Duarte, Juan

    2018-05-30

    Our aim was to analyse whether the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716 (LC40) could prevent endothelial dysfunction and hypertension induced by tacrolimus in mice. Tacrolimus increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and these effects were partially prevented by LC40. Endothelial dysfunction induced by tacrolimus was related to both increased NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and uncoupled eNOS driven-superoxide production and Rho-kinase mediated eNOS inhibition. LC40 treatment prevented all the aortic changes induced by tacrolimus. LC40 restored the imbalance between T-helper 17 (Th17)/ regulatory T (Treg) cells induced by tacrolimus in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen. Tacrolimus induced gut dysbiosis, i.e. it decreased microbial diversity, increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and decreased acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria and these effects were prevented by LC40. Fecal microbiota transplantation from LC40 treated mice to control mice prevented the increase in SBP and the impaired relaxation to acetylcholine induced by tacrolimus. LC40 treatment prevented hypertension and endothelial dysfunction induced by tacrolimus by inhibiting gut dysbiosis. These effects were associated with a reduction in vascular oxidative stress, mainly through NOX2 down-regulation and prevention of eNOS-uncoupling, and inflammation possibly because of decreased Th17 and increased Treg cells polarization in mesenteric lymph nodes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Adlai E. Stevenson Speeches from the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton University in Milner Library, Illinois State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michael

    The document introduces and lists tape recordings of Adlai E. Stevenson's speeches from 1952 until his death in 1965. The objective is to supplement the tapes and to aid in their usage by offering background information. The guide is presented in two sections. Section I offers an overview of the political atmosphere in 1952 and 1956 and…

  12. The State of Simulations: Soft-Skill Simulations Emerge as a Powerful New Form of E-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Clark

    2001-01-01

    Presents responses of leaders from six simulation companies about challenges and opportunities of soft-skills simulations in e-learning. Discussion includes: evaluation metrics; role of subject matter experts in developing simulations; video versus computer graphics; technology needed to run simulations; technology breakthroughs; pricing;…

  13. Personal Data Protection in E-Government: Globalization or Glocalization? A Comparative Study of the United States, Germany and China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yuehua

    2010-01-01

    The development and diffusion of information and communication technologies, particularly the internet, creates a worldwide trend of using ICTs and the internet to deliver public services. This new form of electronic administration--e-government--potentially offers great benefits to society in that it can enhance public service efficiency,…

  14. 77 FR 42462 - Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health; Proposed Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... Modification of 18(e) Plan Approval AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of... Federal Building, 90 7th Street, Suite 18-100, San Francisco, California 94103, (415) 625-2546, fax (415... INFORMATION: Background Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (the Act, 29 U.S.C. 667...

  15. eHealth in Treatment of Offenders in Forensic Mental Health: A Review of the Current State.

    PubMed

    Kip, Hanneke; Bouman, Yvonne H A; Kelders, Saskia M; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette J E W C

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of offenders in forensic mental health is complex. Often, these in- or outpatients have low treatment motivation, suffer from multiple disorders, and have poor literacy skills. eHealth may be able to improve treatment outcomes because of its potential to increase motivation and engagement, and it can overcome the predominant one-size-fits-all approach by being tailored to individual patients. To examine its potential, this systematic review studies the way that eHealth has been used and studied in forensic mental health and identifies accompanying advantages and disadvantages for both patients and treatment, including effectiveness. A systematic search in Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science was performed up until December 2017. Studies were included if they focused on technological interventions to improve the treatment of forensic psychiatric patients. The search resulted in 50 studies in which eHealth was used for treatment purposes. Multiple types of studies and technologies were identified, such as virtual reality, web-based interventions, and videoconferencing. The results confirmed the benefits of technology, for example, the acquisition of unique information about offenders, effectiveness, and tailoring to specific characteristics, but indicated that these are not fully taken advantage of. To overcome the barriers and obtain the benefits, eHealth has to have a good fit with patients and the forensic psychiatric context. It has to be seamlessly integrated in existing care and should not be added as an isolated element. To bridge the gap between the current situation and eHealth's potential, further research on development, implementation, and evaluation should be conducted.

  16. Assessing the Effectiveness of On-Farm and Abattoir Interventions in Reducing Pig Meat-Borne Salmonellosis within E.U. Member States.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew A; Simons, Robin L; Swart, Arno N; Kelly, Louise; Hald, Tine; Snary, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    As part of the evidence base for the development of national control plans for Salmonella spp. in pigs for E.U. Member States, a quantitative microbiological risk assessment was funded to support the scientific opinion required by the EC from the European Food Safety Authority. The main aim of the risk assessment was to assess the effectiveness of interventions implemented on-farm and at the abattoir in reducing human cases of pig meat-borne salmonellosis, and how the effects of these interventions may vary across E.U. Member States. Two case study Member States have been chosen to assess the effect of the interventions investigated. Reducing both breeding herd and slaughter pig prevalence were effective in achieving reductions in the number of expected human illnesses in both case study Member States. However, there is scarce evidence to suggest which specific on-farm interventions could achieve consistent reductions in either breeding herd or slaughter pig prevalence. Hypothetical reductions in feed contamination rates were important in reducing slaughter pig prevalence for the case study Member State where prevalence of infection was already low, but not for the high-prevalence case study. The most significant reductions were achieved by a 1- or 2-log decrease of Salmonella contamination of the carcass post-evisceration; a 1-log decrease in average contamination produced a 90% reduction in human illness. The intervention analyses suggest that abattoir intervention may be the most effective way to reduce human exposure to Salmonella spp. However, a combined farm/abattoir approach would likely have cumulative benefits. On-farm intervention is probably most effective at the breeding-herd level for high-prevalence Member States; once infection in the breeding herd has been reduced to a low enough level, then feed and biosecurity measures would become increasingly more effective. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. A critique of the US Surgeon General's conclusions regarding e-cigarette use among youth and young adults in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Polosa, Riccardo; Russell, Christopher; Nitzkin, Joel; Farsalinos, Konstantinos E

    2017-09-06

    In December 2016, the Surgeon General published a report that concluded e-cigarette use among youth and young adults is becoming a major public health concern in the United States of America. Re-analysis of key data sources on nicotine toxicity and prevalence of youth use of e-cigarettes cited in the Surgeon General report as the basis for its conclusions. Multiple years of nationally representative surveys indicate the majority of e-cigarette use among US youth is either infrequent or experimental, and negligible among never-smoking youth. The majority of the very small proportion of US youth who use e-cigarettes on a regular basis, consume nicotine-free products. The sharpest declines in US youth smoking rates have occurred as e-cigarettes have become increasingly available. Most of the evidence presented in the Surgeon General's discussion of nicotine harm is not applicable to e-cigarette use, because it relies almost exclusively on exposure to nicotine in the cigarette smoke and not to nicotine present in e-cigarette aerosol emissions. Moreover, the referenced literature describes effects in adults, not youth, and in animal models that have little relevance to real-world e-cigarette use by youth. The Surgeon General's report is an excellent reference document for the adverse outcomes due to nicotine in combination with several other toxicants present in tobacco smoke, but fails to address the risks of nicotine decoupled from tobacco smoke constituents. The report exaggerates the toxicity of propylene glycol (PG) and vegetable glycerin (VG) by focusing on experimental conditions that do not reflect use in the real-world and provides little discussion of emerging evidence that e-cigarettes may significantly reduce harm to smokers who have completely switched. The U.S. Surgeon General's claim that e-cigarette use among U.S. youth and young adults is an emerging public health concern does not appear to be supported by the best available evidence on the health risks

  18. Management strategies on the industrialization road of state-of-the-art technologies for e-waste recycling: the case study of electrostatic separation--a review.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-02-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) management is pressing as global production has increased significantly in the past few years and is rising continuously at a fast rate. Many countries are facing hazardous e-waste mountains, most of which are disposed of by backyard recyclers, creating serious threats to public health and ecosystems. Industrialization of state-of-the-art recycling technologies is imperative to enhance the comprehensive utilization of resources and to protect the environment. This article aims to provide an overview of management strategies solving the crucial problems during the process of industrialization. A typical case study of electrostatic separation for recycling waste printed circuit boards was discussed in terms of parameters optimization, materials flow control, noise assessment, risk assessment, economic evaluation and social benefits analysis. The comprehensive view provided by the review could be helpful to the progress of the e-waste recycling industry.

  19. Cytostatica efficiency enhancement by vitamins C, E and β-carotene under irradiation. State of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2001-01-01

    A review is presented on the enhancement of MMC (mitomycin C) efficiency by the vitamins C, E and β-carotene using E. coil bacteria (AB 1157) and leukemia cells (HL 60) as a model for experiments in vitro. New and previously published spectroscopic and kinetic data of transients obtained by pulse radiolysis of MMC and the above mentioned vitamins were also discussed. Based on all these results a possible cascade electron transfer process from vit. C→ vit. E→ β-car.→MMC or oxidants in the living cells is presented. By vit. C deficiency a cell mutation might occur, possibly leading to appearance of cancer. The presented radiation chemical and radiation biological characteristic data are of importance as a basis for the development of an improved chemo-radiation therapy of cancer.

  20. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  1. Structural Transition and Antibody Binding of EBOV GP and ZIKV E Proteins from Pre-Fusion to Fusion-Initiation State.

    PubMed

    Lappala, Anna; Nishima, Wataru; Miner, Jacob; Fenimore, Paul; Fischer, Will; Hraber, Peter; Zhang, Ming; McMahon, Benjamin; Tung, Chang-Shung

    2018-05-10

    Membrane fusion proteins are responsible for viral entry into host cells—a crucial first step in viral infection. These proteins undergo large conformational changes from pre-fusion to fusion-initiation structures, and, despite differences in viral genomes and disease etiology, many fusion proteins are arranged as trimers. Structural information for both pre-fusion and fusion-initiation states is critical for understanding virus neutralization by the host immune system. In the case of Ebola virus glycoprotein (EBOV GP) and Zika virus envelope protein (ZIKV E), pre-fusion state structures have been identified experimentally, but only partial structures of fusion-initiation states have been described. While the fusion-initiation structure is in an energetically unfavorable state that is difficult to solve experimentally, the existing structural information combined with computational approaches enabled the modeling of fusion-initiation state structures of both proteins. These structural models provide an improved understanding of four different neutralizing antibodies in the prevention of viral host entry.

  2. [Molecular detection of hepatitis E virus in pig livers destined for human consumption in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Martínez, Marco Antonio; Roig-Sagués, Artur Xavier; Cedillo-Rosales, Sibilina; Zamora-Ávila, Diana Elisa; Avalos-Ramírez, Ramiro

    2013-04-01

    Molecular detection of HEV in pig livers destined for human consumption in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. 87 livers were collected from pigs slaughtered in TIF and 40 livers from butchers. A 212 pb fragment of HEV ORF2 gene was amplified by semi-nested RT-PCR. 19.54% (17) of tif's and 22.5% (9) of butcher's livers were positive for HEV. Sequencing of the amplified products showed a 94%-95% homology with the sequences reported for genotype 3. Our results indicate that HEV is circulating in swine herds in the state, constituting a probable source of contamination of pig meat products.

  3. Solid-State NMR Investigation of Drug-Excipient Interactions and Phase Behavior in Indomethacin-Eudragit E Amorphous Solid Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lubach, Joseph W; Hau, Jonathan

    2018-02-20

    To investigate the nature of drug-excipient interactions between indomethacin (IMC) and methacrylate copolymer Eudragit® E (EE) in the amorphous state, and evaluate the effects on formulation and stability of these amorphous systems. Amorphous solid dispersions containing IMC and EE were spray dried with drug loadings from 20% to 90%. PXRD was used to confirm the amorphous nature of the dispersions, and DSC was used to measure glass transition temperatures (T g ). 13 C and 15 N solid-state NMR was utilized to investigate changes in local structure and protonation state, while 1 H T 1 and T 1ρ relaxation measurements were used to probe miscibility and phase behavior of the dispersions. T g values for IMC-EE solid dispersions showed significant positive deviations from predicted values in the drug loading range of 40-90%, indicating a relatively strong drug-excipient interaction. 15 N solid-state NMR exhibited a change in protonation state of the EE basic amine, with two distinct populations for the EE amine at -360.7 ppm (unprotonated) and -344.4 ppm (protonated). Additionally, 1 H relaxation measurements showed phase separation at high drug load, indicating an amorphous ionic complex and free IMC-rich phase. PXRD data showed all ASDs up to 90% drug load remained physically stable after 2 years. 15 N solid-state NMR experiments show a change in protonation state of EE, indicating that an ionic complex indeed forms between IMC and EE in amorphous solid dispersions. Phase behavior was determined to exhibit nanoscale phase separation at high drug load between the amorphous ionic complex and excess free IMC.

  4. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Mean Annual R-factor, 1971-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average annual R-factor, rainfall-runoff erosivity measure, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data are from Christopher Daly of the Spatial Climate Analysis Service, Oregon State University, and George Taylor of the Oregon Climate Service, Oregon State University (2002). The ERF1_2 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  5. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments in Selected Major River Basins of the Conterminous United States: Contact Time, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average contact time, in units of days, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). Contact time, as described in Vitvar and others (2002), is defined as the baseflow residence time in the subsurface. The source data set was the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 1-kilometer grid for the conterminous United States (D.M. Wolock, U.S. Geological Survey, written commun., 2008). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) RF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  6. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Estimated Mean Annual Natural Ground-Water Recharge in the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  7. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Average Saturation Excess-Overland Flow, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average value of saturation overland flow, in percent of total streamflow, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Saturation Overland Flow Estimated by TOPMODEL for the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  8. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Base-Flow Index, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean base-flow index expressed as a percent, compiled for every catchment of MRB_E2RF1 catchments of Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). Base flow is the component of streamflow that can be attributed to ground-water discharge into streams. The source data set is Base-Flow Index for the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every catchment of MRB_E2RF1 catchments for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  9. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Hydrologic Landscape Regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of Hydrologic Landscape Regions (HLR) compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is a 100-meter version of Hydrologic Landscape Regions of the United States (Wolock, 2003). HLR groups watersheds on the basis of similarities in land-surface form, geologic texture, and climate characteristics. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  10. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: STATSGO Soil Characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents estimated soil variables compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The variables included are cation exchange capacity, percent calcium carbonate, slope, water-table depth, soil thickness, hydrologic soil group, soil erodibility (k-factor), permeability, average water capacity, bulk density, percent organic material, percent clay, percent sand, and percent silt. The source data set is the State Soil ( STATSGO ) Geographic Database (Wolock, 1997). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  11. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Level 3 Ecoregions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the estimated area of level 3 ecological landscape regions (ecoregions), as defined by Omernik (1987), compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Level III Ecoregions of the Continental United States (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  12. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Mean Infiltration-Excess Overland Flow, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean value for infiltration-excess overland flow as estimated by the watershed model TOPMODEL, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Infiltration-Excess Overland Flow Estimated by TOPMODEL for the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  13. Using activity triggered e-diaries to reveal the associations between physical activity and affective states in older adult's daily living.

    PubMed

    Kanning, Martina; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-09-17

    Evidence suggests that older adults show positive affects after participating in exercise bouts. However, it is less clear, if and how physical activities in daily living enhance affective states, too. This is dissatisfying, as most of older adults' physical activities are part of their daily living. To answer these questions we used activity-triggered e-diaries to investigate the within-subject effects of physical activity on three dimensions of affective states (valence, energetic arousal, calmness) during everyday life. Older adults (N = 74) between 50 and 70 years took part in the study during three consecutive days. Physical activity in daily living was objectively assessed using accelerometers. Affects were measured 10 min after a study participant surpassed a predefined threshold for activity or inactivity. The participants were prompted by an acoustic signal to assess their momentary affective states on an e-diary. Data were analyzed with hierarchical multilevel analyses. Whenever older individuals were more physically active, they felt more energized (energetic arousal) and agitated (calmness). However, they did not feel better (valence). Interestingly, body mass index (BMI) and valence were associated in a significant cross-level interaction. BMI acts as a moderating variable in the way that lower BMI scores were associated with higher levels of valence scores after being physically active. The innovative ambulatory assessment used here affords an interesting insight to the affective effects of daily activity of older adults. These effects are no simple and no linear ones, i.e. physical activity is not associated with positive affects per se as shown several times in experimental studies with single activity bouts. Rather there is a differentiating association seen as an enhanced feeling of energy and agitation, which is not accompanied by a better feeling. Socio-emotional selectivity theory may support the finding that older individuals are

  14. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Average Daily Maximum Temperature, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2008). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  15. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Average Daily Minimum Temperature, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  16. Absolute differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the 10.8-11.5 eV energy-loss states of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Campbell, L.; Brunger, M. J.; Hoshino, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Itikawa, Y.; Kimura, M.; Buenker, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of electronic states of CO2 in the 10.8-11.5 eV energy-loss range are reported. These data were obtained at the incident electron energies 20,30,60,100 and 200 eV and over the scattered electron angular range 3.5°-90°. The accuracy of our experimental methods has been established independently by using several different normalization techniques at both Sophia and Flinders Universities. Generalized oscillator strengths were derived from our measured DCSs and then extrapolated to zero momentum transfer, in order to determine the optical oscillator strengths. These optical oscillator strengths, where possible, are compared with the results from previous measurements and calculations.

  17. Prevalence of anti-gelatin IgE antibodies in people with anaphylaxis after measles-mumps rubella vaccine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pool, Vitali; Braun, M Miles; Kelso, John M; Mootrey, Gina; Chen, Robert T; Yunginger, John W; Jacobson, Robert M; Gargiullo, Paul M

    2002-12-01

    Anaphylaxis after immunization, although rare, is serious and potentially life-threatening. Understanding risk factors for this reaction is therefore important. Gelatin is added to many vaccines as a heat stabilizer. Japanese researchers have demonstrated a strong association between immediate hypersensitivity reactions to measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, and Japanese encephalitis immunizations and subsequent detection of anti-gelatin immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. They suggested that previous receipt by these patients of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccines with trace amounts of gelatin was responsible for the sensitization. We aimed to assess whether a similar association exists for vaccinees in the United States who reported anaphylaxis after receipt of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) or measles vaccines and to review recent trends in reporting of hypersensitivity reactions. We conducted a retrospective case-control study. Cases of anaphylaxis that met a predefined case definition were identified from the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Mayo Clinic patients who received MMR vaccine uneventfully served as controls. The study subjects were interviewed to obtain the history of allergies. Sera from study subjects and their matched controls were tested for IgE antibodies to gelatin, whole egg, and vaccine viral antigens using solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Data from the Biologics Surveillance System on annual numbers of doses of MMR and varicella vaccines distributed in the United States were used to evaluate possible changes in reporting of selected allergic adverse events. Fifty-seven study subjects were recruited into the study and interviewed. Of these, 22 provided serum samples for IgE testing. Twenty-seven subjects served as a comparison group and provided a sample for IgE testing; 21 of these completed an allergy history questionnaire. Self-reported history of food allergies was present more frequently in the interviewed study

  18. High incidence of 3-thalassemia, hemoglobin E, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in populations of malaria-endemic southern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Than, Aung Myint; Harano, Teruo; Harano, Keiko; Myint, Aye Aye; Ogino, Tetsuya; Okadaa, Shigeru

    2005-08-01

    Samples from 916 members of various ethnic groups from malaria-endemic southern Shan State, Myanmar, were analyzed for 3-thalassemia (3-thal), 3-thalassemia (3-thal), abnormal hemoglobin variants, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Of these subjects, 530 (57.9%) were found to have at least one of these red cell genetic disorders. The overall frequencies for the various red cell genetic disorders were as follows: 3-thal, 37.5% (343/916); hemoglobin E (Hb-E), 20.3% (186/916); G6PD-Mahidol, 17.5% (160/916); and 3-thal, 0.3% (3/916). The frequencies of combined disorders were 6.9% (63/ 916) for 3-thal/Hb-E, 5.7% (52/916) for 3-thal/G6PD-Mahidol, 2.8% (26/916) for Hb-E/G6PD-Mahidol, 1.1% (10/916) for 3-thal/Hb-E/G6PD-Mahidol, and 0.1% (1/916) for 3-thal/3-thal/G6PD-Mahidol. Of the various ethnic and non-ethnic groups, the Bamar population showed the highest frequencies of 3-thal (56.9%, 177/311), Hb-E (28.3%, 88/311), and G6PD-Mahidol (21.2%, 66/311) (all duplicated and triplicated cases were included). In addition, 2 new mutations, an 3 gene triplication (/333(anti3.7); 0.2%, 2/916) and Hb-Neapolis (0.1%, 1/916), were detected. Our results showed that race was the dominant factor affecting the frequencies of red cell genetic disorders in malaria-endemic areas of Myanmar.

  19. Phosphopeptidomics Reveals Differential Phosphorylation States and Novel SxE Phosphosite Motifs of Neuropeptides in Dense Core Secretory Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Christopher B.; Toneff, Thomas; Mosier, Charles; Podvin, Sonia; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Hook, Vivian

    2018-05-01

    Neuropeptides are vital for cell-cell communication and function in the regulation of the nervous and endocrine systems. They are generated by post-translational modification (PTM) steps resulting in small active peptides generated from prohormone precursors. Phosphorylation is a significant PTM for the bioactivity of neuropeptides. From the known diversity of distinct neuropeptide functions, it is hypothesized that the extent of phosphorylation varies among different neuropeptides. To assess this hypothesis, neuropeptide-containing dense core secretory vesicles from bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells were subjected to global phosphopeptidomics analyses by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Phosphopeptides were identified directly by LC-MS/MS and indirectly by phosphatase treatment followed by LC-MS/MS. The data identified numerous phosphorylated peptides derived from neuropeptide precursors such as chromogranins, secretogranins, proenkephalin and pro-NPY. Phosphosite occupancies were observed at high and low levels among identified peptides and many of the high occupancy phosphopeptides represent prohormone-derived peptides with currently unknown bioactivities. Peptide sequence analyses demonstrated SxE as the most prevalent phosphorylation site motif, corresponding to phosphorylation sites of the Fam20C protein kinase known to be present in the secretory pathway. The range of high to low phosphosite occupancies for neuropeptides demonstrates cellular regulation of neuropeptide phosphorylation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Phosphopeptidomics Reveals Differential Phosphorylation States and Novel SxE Phosphosite Motifs of Neuropeptides in Dense Core Secretory Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Christopher B.; Toneff, Thomas; Mosier, Charles; Podvin, Sonia; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Hook, Vivian

    2018-03-01

    Neuropeptides are vital for cell-cell communication and function in the regulation of the nervous and endocrine systems. They are generated by post-translational modification (PTM) steps resulting in small active peptides generated from prohormone precursors. Phosphorylation is a significant PTM for the bioactivity of neuropeptides. From the known diversity of distinct neuropeptide functions, it is hypothesized that the extent of phosphorylation varies among different neuropeptides. To assess this hypothesis, neuropeptide-containing dense core secretory vesicles from bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells were subjected to global phosphopeptidomics analyses by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Phosphopeptides were identified directly by LC-MS/MS and indirectly by phosphatase treatment followed by LC-MS/MS. The data identified numerous phosphorylated peptides derived from neuropeptide precursors such as chromogranins, secretogranins, proenkephalin and pro-NPY. Phosphosite occupancies were observed at high and low levels among identified peptides and many of the high occupancy phosphopeptides represent prohormone-derived peptides with currently unknown bioactivities. Peptide sequence analyses demonstrated SxE as the most prevalent phosphorylation site motif, corresponding to phosphorylation sites of the Fam20C protein kinase known to be present in the secretory pathway. The range of high to low phosphosite occupancies for neuropeptides demonstrates cellular regulation of neuropeptide phosphorylation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Changes of Functional and Directed Resting-State Connectivity Are Associated with Neuronal Oscillations, ApoE Genotype and Amyloid Deposition in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Lars; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Anwar, Abdul R.; Kollias, Spyros; Leh, Sandra E.; Riese, Florian; Unschuld, Paul G.; Siniatchkin, Michael; Gietl, Anton F.; Hock, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of effects associated with cognitive impairment using electroencephalography (EEG) power mapping allows the visualization of frequency-band specific local changes in oscillatory activity. In contrast, measures of coherence and dynamic source synchronization allow for the study of functional and effective connectivity, respectively. Yet, these measures have rarely been assessed in parallel in the context of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and furthermore it has not been examined if they are related to risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) such as amyloid deposition and apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE) allele occurrence. Here, we investigated functional and directed connectivities with Renormalized Partial Directed Coherence (RPDC) in 17 healthy controls (HC) and 17 participants with MCI. Participants underwent ApoE-genotyping and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET) to assess amyloid deposition. We observed lower spectral source power in MCI in the alpha and beta bands. Coherence was stronger in HC than MCI across different neuronal sources in the delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. The directed coherence analysis indicated lower information flow between fronto-temporal (including the hippocampus) sources and unidirectional connectivity in MCI. In MCI, alpha and beta RPDC showed an inverse correlation to age and gender; global amyloid deposition was inversely correlated to alpha coherence, RPDC and beta and gamma coherence. Furthermore, the ApoE status was negatively correlated to alpha coherence and RPDC, beta RPDC and gamma coherence. A classification analysis of cognitive state revealed the highest accuracy using EEG power, coherence and RPDC as input. For this small but statistically robust (Bayesian power analyses) sample, our results suggest that resting EEG related functional and directed connectivities are sensitive to the cognitive state and are linked to ApoE and amyloid burden. PMID:29081745

  2. Total coliform and E. coli in public water systems using undisinfected ground water in the United States.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip; Javier, Julie

    2017-06-01

    Public water systems (PWSs) in the United States generate total coliform (TC) and Escherichia coli (EC) monitoring data, as required by the Total Coliform Rule (TCR). We analyzed data generated in 2011 by approximately 38,000 small (serving fewer than 4101 individuals) undisinfected public water systems (PWSs). We used statistical modeling to characterize a distribution of TC detection probabilities for each of nine groupings of PWSs based on system type (community, non-transient non-community, and transient non-community) and population served (less than 101, 101-1000 and 1001-4100 people). We found that among PWS types sampled in 2011, on average, undisinfected transient PWSs test positive for TC 4.3% of the time as compared with 3% for undisinfected non-transient PWSs and 2.5% for undisinfected community PWSs. Within each type of PWS, the smaller systems have higher median TC detection than the larger systems. All TC-positive samples were assayed for EC. Among TC-positive samples from small undisinfected PWSs, EC is detected in about 5% of samples, regardless of PWS type or size. We evaluated the upper tail of the TC detection probability distributions and found that significant percentages of some system types have high TC detection probabilities. For example, assuming the systems providing data are nationally-representative, then 5.0% of the ∼50,000 small undisinfected transient PWSs in the U.S. have TC detection probabilities of 20% or more. Communities with such high TC detection probabilities may have elevated risk of acute gastrointestinal (AGI) illness - perhaps as great or greater than the attributable risk to drinking water (6-22%) calculated for 14 Wisconsin community PWSs with much lower TC detection probabilities (about 2.3%, Borchardt et al., 2012). Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Serological evidence for a hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related agent in goats in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, B.J.; Emerson, S.U.; Purcell, R.H.; Engle, R.E.; Dryman, B.A.; Cecere, T.E.; Buechner-Maxwell, V.; Sponenberg, D.P.; Meng, X.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an important public health disease in many developing countries and is also endemic in some industrialized countries. In addition to humans, strains of HEV have been genetically identified from pig, chicken, rat, mongoose, deer, rabbit and fish. While the genotypes 1 and 2 HEV are restricted to humans, the genotypes 3 and 4 HEV are zoonotic and infect humans and other animal species. As a part of our ongoing efforts to search for potential animal reservoirs for HEV, we tested goats from Virginia for evidence of HEV infection and showed that 16% (13/80) of goat sera from Virginia herds were positive for IgG anti-HEV. Importantly, we demonstrated that neutralizing antibodies to HEV were present in selected IgG anti-HEV positive goat sera. Subsequently, in an attempt to genetically identify the HEV-related agent from goats, we conducted a prospective study in a closed goat herd with known anti-HEV seropositivity and monitored a total of 11 kids from the time of birth until 14 weeks of age for evidence of HEV infection. Seroconversion to IgG anti-HEV was detected in 7 of the 11 kids, although repeated attempts to detect HEV RNA by a broad-spectrum nested RT-PCR from the fecal and serum samples of the goats that had seroconverted were unsuccessful. In addition, we also attempted to experimentally infect laboratory goats with three well-characterized mammalian strains of HEV but with no success. The results indicate that a HEV-related agent is circulating and maintained in the goat population in Virginia and that the goat HEV is likely genetically very divergent from the known HEV strains. PMID:22909079

  4. Heavy metals distribution and risk assessment in soil from an informal E-waste recycling site in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Isimekhai, Khadijah A; Garelick, Hemda; Watt, John; Purchase, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Informal E-waste recycling can pose a risk to human health and the environment which this study endeavours to evaluate. The distribution of a number of heavy metals in soil from an informal recycling site in the largest market for used and new electronics and electrical equipment in West Africa was investigated. The potential bioavailability of heavy metals, extent of contamination, potential risk due to the recycling activities and impact of external factors such as rainfall were also assessed. The concentrations of all the heavy metals tested were higher in the area where burning of the waste occurred than at the control site, suggesting an impact of the recycling activities on the soil. The order of total metal concentrations was Cu > Pb > Zn > Mn > Ni > Sb > Cr > Cd for both the dry and wet seasons. The total concentrations of Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn were all significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the dry season than in the wet season. The concentrations of Cu (329-7106 mg kg -1 ), Pb (115-9623 mg kg -1 ) and Zn (508-8178 mg kg -1 ) were consistently higher than international soil guideline values. Using a sequential extraction method, the potential bioavailability of the heavy metals was indicated as Cd > Sb > Zn > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr. When the risk was assessed using the Potential Ecological Risk Index (PERI), Cu was found to contribute the most to the potential ecological risk and Cd gave rise to the greatest concern due to its high toxic-response factor within the study site. Similarly, utilising the Risk Assessment Code (RAC) suggested that Cd posed the most risk in this site. This research establishes a high level of contamination in the study site and underscores the importance of applying the appropriate chemical speciation in risk assessment.

  5. Inactivation of infectious hepatitis E virus present in commercial pig livers sold in local grocery stores in the United States.

    PubMed

    Feagins, A R; Opriessnig, T; Guenette, D K; Halbur, P G; Meng, X J

    2008-03-31

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen and pigs are a known reservoir. Recently we showed that approximately 11% of commercial pig livers sold in local U.S. grocery stores for food consumptions are contaminated by infectious HEV. In this study, a swine bioassay was used to determine if the infectious HEV in contaminated commercial pig livers could be inactivated by traditional cooking methods. Group 1 pigs (n=5) were each inoculated intravenously (i.v.) with a HEV-negative liver homogenate as negative controls, group 2 pigs (n=5) were each inoculated i.v. with a pool of two HEV-positive pig liver homogenates as positive controls, groups 3, 4 and 5 pigs (n=5, each group) were each inoculated i.v. with a pool of homogenates of two HEV-positive livers incubated at 56 degrees C for 1 h, stir-fried at 191 degrees C (internal temperature of 71 degrees C) for 5 min or boiled in water for 5 min, respectively. As expected, the group 2 positive control pigs all became infected whereas the group 1 negative control pigs remained negative. Four of the five pigs inoculated with HEV-positive liver homogenates incubated at 56 degrees C for 1 h also became infected. However, pigs in groups 4 and 5 did not become infected. The results indicated that HEV in contaminated commercial pig livers can be effectively inactivated if cooked properly, although incubation at 56 degrees C for 1 h cannot inactivate the virus. Thus, to reduce the risk of food-borne HEV transmission, pig livers must be thoroughly cooked.

  6. SU-E-I-56: Diagnostic Lead Apron Radiation Exposure Comparison Between Manufacture-Stated and Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Several vendors of diagnostic lead apron used routinely in radiology/fluoroscopy claim to manufacture 0.5 mm lead equivalent shielding. The purpose of this investigation was to address the concern of the weight of lead aprons versus the radiation protection they provide. Methods: Seven diagnostic lead aprons were measured and compared for their radiation transmission and attenuation characteristics. The measurements were performed on a Philips Integris. Two settings were used, normal (76 kVp, 14.3 mA) and high (110 kVp, 12.3 mA) to represent typical patient and large patient thickness. Plastic water was placed on the table to represent patient scatter. Amore » Capintec PM-500 ion chamber was placed at approximate chest height where hospital personnel would stand. An uncovered, i.e. lead-unhindered, ion chamber reading was taken to establish the baseline reading of an unprotected personnel. The ion chamber was then wrapped with 0.5mm 99.9% pure Pb material to establish the measurement reading when a diagnostic lead apron attenuates as adequately as 0.5mm Pb. The lead aprons were measured one at a time with the ion chamber fully covered and enclosed within the aprons. Results: On Normal fluoroscopy setting, the 0.5mm pure Pb showed a transmission of 0.4%. No aprons showed a transmission value as low as 0.5mm Pb. The lowest transmission value measured from the aprons was 2.0%, having a 1.5% higher transmission than pure lead. On High fluoroscopy setting, the lowest apron transmission measurement was at 2.8%, which was comparable to the 0.5mm pure Pb which gave a transmission of 3.0%. Conclusion: At Normal fluoroscopy setting, the 0.5mm Pb provided an attenuation that could not be matched by any apron measured. At High fluoroscopy setting, only one apron exhibited comparable transmission values as 0.5mm pure Pb.« less

  7. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  8. New measurements and analysis of the far-infrared spectrum of CH2DOH in the lowest torsional vibrational state (e0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra

    2016-05-01

    In this work the far infrared (FIR) absorption spectrum has been measured for the asymmetrically mono deuterated Methanol (CH2DOH) species in the wavenumber range of 15-1200 cm-1 better accuracy and signal/noise ratio than known before. Assignments have been made for b-type transitions in the lowest lying torsional vibrational state trans-(e0) for a wide range of rotational angular momentum. The assignments have been rigorously confirmed by the residual loop defect methods. The rR-branch wavenumbers are analyzed by the usual state dependent expansion parameters and the Q-Branch origins. These origins have been used to calculate the torsional and torsional-rotation interaction contributions. These findings are in good agreement with predicted from the Hamiltonian model described in recent publications. A large number of assignments have also been made in the millimeter wave spectrum recorded earlier and thereby evaluated the asymmetry splitting parameters for 4 different axial rotational angular momentum quantum numbers. The analysis and interpretation of the spectra are reported. New assignments for about 260 transitions are included the text and a catalog of about 1500 transitions belonging to the e0 species is prepared (Appendix 1) and is made available through the open server in "Research Gate" and will be freely available to others.

  9. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: NLCD 2001 Land Use and Land Cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the estimated area of land use and land cover from the National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (LaMotte, 2008), compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set represents land use and land cover for the conterminous United States for 2001. The National Land Cover Data Set for 2001 was produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. The MRLC Consortium is a partnership of Federal agencies (http://www.mrlc.gov), consisting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering the South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5) and the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins.

  10. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: NLCD 2001 Imperviousness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean percent impervious surface from the Imperviousness Layer of the National Land Cover Dataset 2001, (LaMotte and Wieczorek, 2010), compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set represents imperviousness for the conterminous United States for 2001. The Imperviousness Layer of the National Land Cover Data Set for 2001 was produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. The MRLC Consortium is a partnership of Federal agencies (http://www.mrlc.gov), consisting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002;Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  11. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: NLCD 2001 Tree Canopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean percent tree canopy from the Canopy Layer of the National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (LaMotte and Wieczorek, 2010), compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set represents tree canopy percentage for the conterminous United States for 2001. The Canopy Layer of the National Land Cover Data Set for 2001 was produced through a cooperative project conducted by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium. The MRLC Consortium is a partnership of Federal agencies (http://www.mrlc.gov), consisting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  12. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Normalized Atmospheric Deposition for 2002, Nitrate (NO3)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average normalized (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer multiplied by 100, of Nitrate (NO3) for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). Estimates of NO3 deposition are based on National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) measurements (B. Larsen, U.S. Geological Survey, written. commun., 2007). De-trending methods applied to the year 2002 are described in Alexander and others, 2001. NADP site selection met the following criteria: stations must have records from 1995 to 2002 and have a minimum of 30 observations. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  13. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Normalized Atmospheric Deposition for 2002, Total Inorganic Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average normalized atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer multiplied by 100, of Total Inorganic Nitrogen for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). Estimates of Total Inorganic Nitrogen deposition are based on National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) measurements (B. Larsen, U.S. Geological Survey, written. commun., 2007). De-trending methods applied to the year 2002 are described in Alexander and others, 2001. NADP site selection met the following criteria: stations must have records from 1995 to 2002 and have a minimum of 30 observations. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  14. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Level 3 Nutrient Ecoregions, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the area of each level 3 nutrient ecoregion in square meters compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data are from the 2002 version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Aggregations of Level III Ecoregions for National Nutrient Assessment & Management Strategy (USEPA, 2002). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  15. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Average Atmospheric (Wet) Deposition of Inorganic Nitrogen, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer, of inorganic nitrogen for the year 2002 compiled for every catchment for MRB_E2RF1 of Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set for wet deposition was from the USGS's raster data set atmospheric (wet) deposition of inorganic nitrogen for 2002 (Gronberg, 2005). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every catchment of MRB_E2RF1 catchments for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  16. Implementing the CASPiE course-based research experience at the United States Military Academy: Affective responses and effects on critical thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Anthony Michael

    The Center for Authentic Science Practices in Education (CASPiE) pioneered a course-based research experience approach to teaching chemistry laboratory courses. The method had previously been studied in a variety of institutional settings. Recently, the United States Military Academy at West Point decided to develop CASPiE-style modules for the introductory honors chemistry course. This research setting presents clean experimental-control comparisons and a group of faculty who were completely new to the method. Equipping students with authentic research experiences early in their education is important regardless of the institution. However, cadets at a military academy must make decisions relatively early (the outset of their second year) as to what their career trajectory will be as eventual officers. In the new CASPiE-based experience, cadets are given the opportunity to select from one of three different modules (analytical chemistry, toxicology, and chemical engineering) in which to participate during the course. These three modules represent subsections of an overall Army waste-to-energy research project. Cadets generate unique hypotheses, real data, and research posters towards the advancement of the project. Posters are then presented in a session. that includes an audience of project stakeholders, course instructors, and other academy faculty and staff. Here, I will present my research methods, evaluative procedures, and findings in the affective domain, critical thinking, and laboratory content comprehension.

  17. Half-life of the 15 /2+ state of 135I: A test of E 2 seniority relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoletti, P.; Simpson, G. S.; Carroll, R.; Régis, J.-M.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T.; de France, G.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Bruce, A. M.; Drouet, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghitǎ, D. G.; Ilieva, S.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Kröll, T.; Larijarni, C.; Lalkovski, S.; Licǎ, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Paziy, V.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Scheck, M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Thiamova, G.; Townsley, C.; Vancraeyenest, A.; Vedia, V.; Gargano, A.; Van Isacker, P.

    2017-02-01

    The half-life of the 15 /21+ state of the 3-valence-proton nucleus 135I has been measured to be 1.74(8) ns using the EXILL-FATIMA mixed array of Ge and LaBr3 detectors. The nuclei were produced following the cold neutron-induced fission of a 235U target at the PF1B beam line of the Institut Laue-Langevin. The extracted B (E 2 ;15 /2+→11 /2+) value enabled a test of seniority relations for the first time between E 2 transition rates. Large-scale shell-model calculations were performed for 134Te and 135I, and reinterpreted in a single-orbit approach. The results show that the two-body component of the E 2 operator can be large whereas energy shifts due to the three-body component of the effective interaction are small.

  18. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Normalized Atmospheric Deposition for 2002, Ammonium (NH4)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the average normalized (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer multiplied by 100, of ammonium (NH4) for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). Estimates of NH4 deposition are based on National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) measurements (B. Larsen, U.S. Geological Survey, written. commun., 2007). De-trending methods applied to the year 2002 are described in Alexander and others, 2001. NADP site selection met the following criteria: stations must have records from 1995 to 2002 and have a minimum of 30 observations. The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  19. Co-cultivation of mutant Penicillium oxalicum SAU(E)-3.510 and Pleurotus ostreatus for simultaneous biosynthesis of xylanase and laccase under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Pallavi; Vivekanand, V; Pareek, Nidhi; Sharma, Amit; Singh, Rajesh P

    2011-10-01

    Co-cultivation of mutant Penicillium oxalicum SAU(E)-3.510 and Pleurotus ostreatus MTCC 1804 was evaluated for the production of xylanase-laccase mixture under solid-state fermentation (SSF) condition. Growth compatibility between mutant P. oxalicum SAU(E)-3.510 and white rot fungi (P. ostreatus MTCC 1804, Trametes hirsuta MTCC 136 and Pycnoporus sp. MTCC 137) was analyzed by growing them on potato dextrose agar plate. Extracellular enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Under derived conditions, paired culturing of mutant P. oxalicum SAU(E)-3.510 and P. ostreatus MTCC 1804 resulted in 58% and 33% higher levels of xylanase and laccase production, respectively. A combination of sugarcane bagasse and black gram husk in a ratio of 3:1 was found to be the most ideal solid substrate and support for fungal colonization and enzyme production during co-cultivation. Maximum levels of xylanase (8205.31 ± 168.31 IU g(-1)) and laccase (375.53 ± 34.17 IU g(-1)) during SSF were obtained by using 4 g of solid support with 80% of moisture content. Furthermore, expressions of both xylanase and laccase were characterized during mixed culture by zymogram analysis. Improved levels of xylanase and laccase biosynthesis were achieved by co-culturing the mutant P. oxalicum SAU(E)-3.510 and P. ostreatus MTCC 1804. This may be because of efficient substrate utilization as compared to their respective monocultures in the presence of lignin degradation compounds because of synergistic action of xylanase and laccase. Understanding and developing the process of co-cultivation appears productive for the development of mixed enzyme preparation with tremendous potential for biobleaching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [La combinazione di gemcitabina e oxaliplatino (GEMOX) nel trattamento del carcinoma pancreatico in fase avanzata di malattia: le notizie sulla mia morte sono state esagerate?

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Riassunto. L'analisi è stata condotta al fine di valutare l'effetto sia sulla sopravvivenza globale (OS) sia sulla sopravvivenza libera da progressione di malattia (PFS) della chemioterapia di combinazione in prima linea per il carcinoma pancreatico in fase avanzata di malattia. La presente analisi è limitata agli studi randomizzati controllati (RCT) di fase III. Successivamente è stata applicata la European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) agli RCT di fase III analizzati per ricavare uno score relativo all'entità del beneficio clinico ottenuto per ciascun RCT. Sono state calcolate inoltre le differenze in termini di PFS tra i diversi bracci di trattamento rapportandole con i costi dei farmaci necessari per ottenere il beneficio di PFS. La nostra analisi ha valutato 11 RCT di fase III, per un totale di 4572 pazienti. Combinando i costi della terapia con la misura dell'efficacia espressa dalla PFS, è stato ottenuto un costo di 74,12 euro (€) per mese di vita guadagnato in termini di PFS con la combinazione di 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan e oxaliplatino (FOLFIRINOX), 90,14 € per la combinazione di gemcitabina e oxaliplatino (GEMOX) e 4708,7 € per la combinazione di nab-paclitaxel e gemcitabina. Da questo punto di vista riteniamo che l'utilizzo delle "vecche chemioterapie di combinazione" (per es., GEMOX) non dovrebbe essere completamente abbandonato, ma valutato sul singolo paziente, sulla base di diversi fattori (età, ECOG PS, comorbilità, carico di malattia), al fine di ottenere una reale "tailored therapy".

  1. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The openmore » space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.« less

  2. Geometry optimization and excited state properties of the new symmetric (E)-Stilbene derivative for application in thermostable polarizing PVA-films: A combined experimental and DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Siyamak; Almodarresiyeh, Hora Alhosseini; Filippovich, Liudmila; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Kumar, Rakesh; Darroudi, Mahdieh; Mashayekhi, Mahsa

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, quantum-chemical calculations used for the structural analysis of the new symmetric (E)-Stilbene derivative: (Potassium 2,2‧-((ethane-1,2-diylbis(4,1-phenylene))bis(azanediyl))diacetate) (P) (Trans isomer) using DFT/B3LYP/LanL2MB level of theory. The FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra of the compound P are presented. The electronic absorption spectrum of the P in aqueous medium was calculated using TDB3LYP/LanL2MB method. The excitation energies, electronic transitions and oscillator strengths for studied structure have also been calculated. The experimental, calculated UV/Vis and emission spectra of the P are presented and discussed. The geometry optimization of the molecule P in excited state and its electronic spectrum was carried out by the same method. In excited state the molecule P loses its symmetry and becomes unstable form. First time on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and the new designed structure P thermostable polarizing film absorbing at λmax = 410 nm was created. Polarizing Efficiency (PE) of obtained film is 96% at Stretching Degree (Rs) 3.0. In oriented PVA-films is the phenomenon of anisotropy of thermal conductivity (λ||/λ⊥) which is very important for development of thermostable polarizing films.

  3. Assessment and modeling of E-waste generation based on growth rate from different telecom companies in the State of Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Anzi, Bader S; Al-Burait, Abdul Aziz; Thomas, Ashly; Ong, Chi Siang

    2017-12-01

    The present work assesses the production rate of cell phone e-waste in Kuwait by comparing the number of clients in three telecommunication service providers like Zain, Ooredoo, and Viva in the state of Kuwait over a period of 7 years from 2008 to 2015. An online survey was conducted to evaluate the growth in the number of clients in three cell phone companies, and the data analysis was carried out using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) software. The prediction of the growth percentage of the number of clients in each telecommunication company was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and followed by the regression model. The study shows that there is an increase in the number of clients in all three companies (Zain, Ooredoo, and Viva) between year 2008 and 2015, and it was estimated that approximately 7.9 million cell phone users would be achieved in the first quarter of 2015. Based on this predicted number of cell phone users, the production of e-waste would be 3 kt per year with an average growth of 12.7%.

  4. E3 ligase FLRF (Rnf41) regulates differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors by governing steady-state levels of cytokine and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xin; Infante, Jorge; Nachtman, Ronald G.; Jurecic, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Objective FLRF (Rnf41) gene was identified through screening of subtracted cDNA libraries form murine hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. Subsequent work has revealed that FLRF acts as E3 ubiquitin ligase, and that it regulates steady-state levels of neuregulin receptor ErbB3, and participates in degradation of IAP protein BRUCE and parkin. The objective of this study was to start exploring the role of FLRF during hematopoiesis. Methods FLRF was over-expressed in a murine multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cell line EML, which can differentiate into almost all blood cell lineages, and in pro-B progenitor cell line BaF3. The impact of FLRF over-expression on EML cell differentiation into myelo-erythroid lineages was studied using hematopoietic colony-forming assays. The interaction of FLRF with cytokine receptors and receptor levels in control cells and EML and BaF3 cells over-expressing FLRF were examined with Western and immunoprecipitation. Results Remarkably, over-expression of FLRF significantly attenuated erythroid and myeloid differentiation of EML cells in response to cytokines Epo and IL-3, and retinoic acid (RA), and resulted in significant and constitutive decrease of steady-state levels of IL-3, Epo and RA receptor RARα in EML and BaF3 cells. Immunoprecipitation has revealed that FLRF interacts with IL-3, Epo and RARα receptors in EML and BaF3 cells, and that FLRF-mediated down-regulation of these receptors is ligand binding-independent. Conclusions The results of this study have revealed new FLRF-mediated pathway for ligand-independent receptor level regulation, and support the notion that through maintaining basal levels of cytokine receptors, FLRF is involved in the control of hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation into myelo-erythroid lineages. PMID:18495327

  5. E3 ligase FLRF (Rnf41) regulates differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors by governing steady-state levels of cytokine and retinoic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Infante, Jorge; Nachtman, Ronald G; Jurecic, Roland

    2008-09-01

    FLRF (Rnf41) gene was identified through screening of subtracted cDNA libraries form murine hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. Subsequent work has revealed that FLRF acts as E3 ubiquitin ligase, and that it regulates steady-state levels of neuregulin receptor ErbB3 and participates in degradation of IAP protein BRUCE and parkin. The objective of this study was to start exploring the role of FLRF during hematopoiesis. FLRF was overexpressed in a murine multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cell line EML, which can differentiate into almost all blood cell lineages, and in pro-B progenitor cell line BaF3. The impact of FLRF overexpression on EML cell differentiation into myeloerythroid lineages was studied using hematopoietic colony-forming assays. The interaction of FLRF with cytokine receptors and receptor levels in control cells and EML and BaF3 cells overexpressing FLRF were examined with Western and immunoprecipitation. Remarkably, overexpression of FLRF significantly attenuated erythroid and myeloid differentiation of EML cells in response to cytokines erythropoietin (EPO) and interleukin-3 (IL-3), and retinoic acid (RA), and resulted in significant and constitutive decrease of steady-state levels of IL-3, EPO, and RA receptor-alpha (RARalpha) in EML and BaF3 cells. Immunoprecipitation has revealed that FLRF interacts with IL-3, EPO, and RARalpha receptors in EML and BaF3 cells, and that FLRF-mediated downregulation of these receptors is ligand binding-independent. The results of this study have revealed new FLRF-mediated pathway for ligand-independent receptor level regulation, and support the notion that through maintaining basal levels of cytokine receptors, FLRF is involved in the control of hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation into myeloerythroid lineages.

  6. Structure and function in rhodopsin: Rhodopsin mutants with a neutral amino acid at E134 have a partially activated conformation in the dark state*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Myoung; Altenbach, Christian; Thurmond, Robin L.; Khorana, H. Gobind; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    1997-01-01

    The Glu-134–Arg-135 residues in rhodopsin, located near the cytoplasmic end of the C helix, are involved in G protein binding, or activation, or both. Furthermore, the charge-neutralizing mutation Glu-134 to Gln-134 produces hyperactivity in the activated state and produces constitutive activity in opsin. The Glu/Asp-Arg charge pair is highly conserved in equivalent positions in other G protein-coupled receptors. To investigate the structural consequences of charge-neutralizing mutations at Glu-134 and Arg-135 in rhodopsin, single spin-labeled side chains were introduced at sites in the cytoplasmic domains of helices C (140), E (227), F (250), or G (316) to serve as “molecular sensors” of the local helix bundle conformation. In each of the spin-labeled rhodopsins, a Gln substitution was introduced at either Glu-134 or Arg-135, and the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the spin label was used to monitor the structural response of the helix bundle. The results indicate that a Gln substitution at Glu-134 induces a photoactivated conformation around helices C and G even in the dark state, an observation of potential relevance to the hyperactivity and constitutive activity of the mutant. In contrast, little change is induced in helix F, which has been shown to undergo a dominant motion upon photoactivation. This result implies that the multiple helix motions accompanying photoactivation are not strongly coupled and can be induced to take place independently. Gln substitution at Arg-135 produces only minor structural changes in the dark- or light-activated conformation, suggesting that this residue is not a determinant of structure in the regions investigated, although it may be functionally important. PMID:9405602

  7. E 2 / M 1 Mixing Ratios in Transitions From the Gamma-Vibrational-Bands to the Ground-State-Rotational-Bands of 102 , 104 , 106 , 108Mo, 108 , 110 , 112Ru, and 112 , 114 , 116Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, Jonathan M.; Fenker, B.; Goodin, C.; Hamilton, J. H.; Wang, E. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Daniel, A. V.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Oganesson, Yu. Ts.; Zhu, S. J.

    2017-09-01

    E 2 / M 1 mixing ratios have been measured for transitions from states in the γ-vibrational-bands (Iγ+) to states in the ground-state-bands (Ig+ or [I- 1 ] g +) of the neutron rich, deformed isotopes, 102 , 104 , 106 , 108Mo, 108 , 110 , 112Ru, and 112 , 114 , 116Pd, including from states as high as 9γ+. These measurements were done using the GAMMASPHERE detector array, which, at the time of the experiment, had 101 working HPGe detectors, arranged at 64 different angles. A 62 μCi source of 252Cf was placed inside GAMMASPHERE yielding 5.7 ×1011 γ - γ - γ and higher coincidence events. The angular correlation between the transitions from the γ-band to the ground band, and the pure E2 transitions within the ground band were then measured. These angular correlations yielded the mixing ratios, demonstrating that these transitions are all pure or nearly pure E2, in agreement with theory. In order to correct for possible attenuation due to the lifetime of the intermediate state in these correlations, the g-factors of the intermediate states needed to be known. Therefore, the g-factors of the 2g+ states in the ground state band have been measured. Supported by the US Department of Energy; Grant No. DE-FG0588ER40407, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  8. E2/M1 mixing ratios in transitions from the gamma vibrational bands to the ground state rotational bands of 102, 104, 106, 108Mo, 108, 110, 112Ru, and 112, 114, 116Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, J. M.; Fenker, B.; Hamilton, J. H.; Goodin, C.; Zachary, C. J.; Wang, E.; Ramayya, A. V.; Daniel, A. V.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    E2/ M1 mixing ratios have been measured for transitions from states in the γ vibrational bands ( I+_{γ}) to states in the ground state bands (I+ or [I-1]+) of the neutron rich, even-even, deformed isotopes, 102, 104, 106, 108Mo, 108, 110, 112Ru, and 112, 114, 116Pd, including from states as high as 9+_{γ}. These measurements were done using the GAMMASPHERE detector array, which, at the time of the experiment, had 101 working HPGe detectors, arranged at 64 different angles. A 62 μCi source of 252Cf was placed inside GAMMASPHERE yielding 5.7× 10^{11} γ-γ-γ and higher coincidence events. The angular correlations between the transitions from the γ-bands to the ground bands, and the pure E2 transitions within the ground band were then measured. These angular correlations yielded the mixing ratios, demonstrating that these transitions are pure or nearly pure E2, in agreement with theory. In order to correct for possible attenuation due to the lifetime of the intermediate state in these correlations, the g-factors of the intermediate states needed to be known. Therefore, the g-factors of the 2+ states in the ground state band have been measured.

  9. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Artificial Drainage (1992) and Irrigation (1997)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  10. A quantum-rovibrational-state-selected study of the reaction in the collision energy range of 0.05-10.00 eV: translational, rotational, and vibrational energy effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuntao; Xiong, Bo; Chang, Yih-Chung; Pan, Yi; Lo, Po Kam; Lau, Kai Chung; Ng, C Y

    2017-04-12

    We report detailed absolute integral cross sections (σ's) for the quantum-rovibrational-state-selected ion-molecule reaction in the center-of-mass collision energy (E cm ) range of 0.05-10.00 eV, where (vvv) = (000), (100), and (020), and . Three product channels, HCO + + OH, HOCO + + H, and CO + + H 2 O, are identified. The measured σ(HCO + ) curve [σ(HCO + ) versus E cm plot] supports the hypothesis that the formation of the HCO + + OH channel follows an exothermic pathway with no potential energy barriers. Although the HOCO + + H channel is the most exothermic, the σ(HOCO + ) is found to be significantly lower than the σ(HCO + ). The σ(HOCO + ) curve is bimodal, indicating two distinct mechanisms for the formation of HOCO + . The σ(HOCO + ) is strongly inhibited at E cm < 0.4 eV, but is enhanced at E cm > 0.4 eV by (100) vibrational excitation. The E cm onsets of σ(CO + ) determined for the (000) and (100) vibrational states are in excellent agreement with the known thermochemical thresholds. This observation, along with the comparison of the σ(CO + ) curves for the (100) and (000) states, shows that kinetic and vibrational energies are equally effective in promoting the CO + channel. We have also performed high-level ab initio quantum calculations on the potential energy surface, intermediates, and transition state structures for the titled reaction. The calculations reveal potential barriers of ≈0.5-0.6 eV for the formation of HOCO + , and thus account for the low σ(HOCO + ) and its bimodal profile observed. The E cm enhancement for σ(HOCO + ) at E cm ≈ 0.5-5.0 eV can be attributed to the direct collision mechanism, whereas the formation of HOCO + at low E cm < 0.4 eV may involve a complex mechanism, which is mediated by the formation of a loosely sticking complex between HCO + and OH. The direct collision and complex mechanisms proposed also allow the rationalization of the vibrational inhibition at low E cm and the vibrational enhancement at

  11. E3 Success Story - Accelerating Adoption of E3 Recommendations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The state of Michigan, along with numerous local and state partners, formed E3 Michigan in 2010. This partnership will allow for up to 10 E3 assessments in southeast Michigan and 10 E3 assessments in western Michigan.

  12. High-accuracy calculations of the ground, 1 1A1', and the 2 1A1', 2 3A1', and 1 1E' excited states of H3+.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-01-21

    Accurate variational Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the 1 (1)A(1) ('), 2 (1)A(1) ('), 2 (3)A(1) ('), and 1 (1)E(') states of the H(3) (+) ion at the ground-state equilibrium geometry are reported. The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of explicitly correlated spherical Gaussian functions with shifted centers. In the variational optimization the analytical gradient of the energy with respect to the nonlinear exponential parameters of the Gaussians has been employed. The energies obtained in the calculations are the best variational estimates ever calculated for the four states. One-electron densities for the states, as well as a D(3h)-restricted potential energy surface of the ground state calculated around the equilibrium geometry, are also presented and discussed.

  13. Job Prospects for E/E Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the trends in employment in the electrical/electronics (E/E) engineering industry. States that although the number of E/E graduates grew at a rate of over 11 percent from 1985 to 1986, the economy continues to be the major determinant in the job outlook in the field. (TW)

  14. Seroprevalence for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection among volunteer blood donors of the Regional Blood Bank of Londrina, State of Paraná , Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bortoliero, André Luiz; Bonametti, Ana Maria; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Matsuo, Tiemi; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out among 996 volunteer blood donors enrolled from May 1999 to December 1999 to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection among volunteer blood donors of the Regional Blood Bank of Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil, and to evaluate whether the rate of seroprevalence of IgG anti-HEV antibodies is associated with sociodemographic variables and with seropositivity for hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. All participants answered the questionnaire regarding the sociodemographic characteristics. Serum samples were tested for IgG antibodies to HEV (anti-HEV) by an enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). All serum samples positive for anti-HEV IgG and 237 serum samples negative for anti-HEV were also assayed for IgG anti-HAV antibodies by ELISA. Anti-HEV IgG was confirmed in 23/996 samples, resulting in a seroprevalence of 2.3% for HEV infection, similar to previous results obtained in developed countries. No significant association was found between the presence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies and the sociodemographic variables including gender, age, educational level, rural or urban areas, source of water, and sewer system (p > 0.05). Also, no association with seropositivity for anti-HAV IgG antibodies was observed (p > 0.05). Although this study revealed a low seroprevalence of HEV infection in the population evaluated, the results showed that this virus is circulating among the population from Londrina, South Brazil, and point out the need of further studies to define the clinical and epidemiological importance of HEV infection and to identify additional risk factors involved in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this infection in this population.

  15. Search for sneutrino production in eμ final states in 5.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at square root s =1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2010-11-05

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into eμ final states using 5.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Having observed no evidence for production of eμ resonances, we set direct bounds on the RPV couplings λ311' and λ312 as a function of sneutrino mass.

  16. Dalitz plot analyses of J / ψ → π + π - π 0 , J / ψ → K + K - π 0 , and J / ψ → K s 0 K ± π ∓ produced via e + e - annihilation with initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    We study the processes e + e - → γ ISR J / ψ , where J / ψ → π + π - π 0 , J / ψ → K + K - π 0 , and J / ψ → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K ± π ∓ using a data sample of 519 fb - 1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e + e - collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ ( n S ) ( n = 2 , 3 , 4 ) resonances.« less

  17. Effects of selenium on the structure and function of recombinant human S-adenosyl-L-methionine dependent arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhirong; Song, Xiaoli; Xing, Zhi; Geng, Jinlong; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong; Wang, Zhilin

    2009-05-01

    The effects of Se(IV) on the structure and function of recombinant human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) purified from the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli were studied. The coding region of human AS3MT complementary DNA was amplified from total RNA extracted from HepG2 cell by reverse transcription PCR. Soluble and active human AS3MT was expressed in the E. coli with a Trx fusion tag under a lower induction temperature of 25 degrees C. Spectra (UV-vis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence) were first used to probe the interaction of Se(IV) and recombinant human AS3MT and the structure-function relationship of the enzyme. The recombinant human AS3MT had a secondary structure of 29.0% alpha-helix, 23.9% beta-pleated sheet, 17.9% beta-turn, and 29.2% random coil. When Se(IV) was added, the content of the alpha-helix did not change, but that of the beta-pleated sheet increased remarkably in the conformation of recombinant human AS3MT. Se(IV) inhibited the enzymatic methylation of inorganic As(III) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC(50) value for Se(IV) was 2.38 muM. Double-reciprocal (1/V vs. 1/[inorganic As(III)]) plots showed Se(IV) to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the methylation of inorganic As(III) by recombinant human AS3MT with a K (i) value of 2.61 muM. We hypothesized that Se(IV) interacts with the sulfhydryl group of cysteine(s) in the structural residues rather than the cysteines of the active site (Cys156 and Cys206). When Se(IV) was combined with cysteine(s) in the structural residues, the conformation of recombinant human AS3MT changed and the enzymatic activity decreased. Considering the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence, Cys72 and/or Cys226 are deduced to be primary targets for Se(IV).

  18. Comparative study of inelastic squared form factors of the vibronic states of B 1Σu+ , C 1Πu , and E F 1Σg+ for molecular hydrogen: Inelastic x-ray and electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Long-Quan; Kang, Xu; Peng, Yi-Geng; Xu, Xin; Liu, Ya-Wei; Wu, Yong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2018-03-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of the valence-shell excitations of hydrogen has been performed by the high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and electron scattering as well as the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction method. Momentum-transfer-dependent inelastic squared form factors for the vibronic series belonging to the B 1Σu+ ,C 1Πu , and E F 1Σg+ electronic states of molecular hydrogen have been derived from the inelastic x-ray scattering method at an impact photon energy around 10 keV, and the electron energy-loss spectra measured at an incident electron energy of 1500 eV. It is found that both the present and the previous calculations cannot satisfactorily reproduce the inelastic squared form-factor profiles for the higher vibronic transitions of the B 1Σu+ state of molecular hydrogen, which may be due to the electronic-vibrational coupling for the higher vibronic states. For the C 1Πu state and some vibronic excitations of E F 1Σg+ state, the present experimental results are in good agreement with the present and previous calculations, while the slight differences between the inelastic x-ray scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy results in the larger squared momentum-transfer region may be attributed to the increasing role of the higher-order Born terms in the electron-scattering process.

  19. District 75/Citywide E.C.I.A. Chapter 1, P.L. 89-313 Handicapped Program, 1989-90. State Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    This New York City Public Schools program was designed to augment the basic instruction of students with severe handicaps who were formerly educated within state-operated or state-supported schools or institutions. The program's teacher trainer provided up-to-date materials and equipment, individual consultation, support, and group training to…

  20. Frequency of Youth E-Cigarette and Tobacco Use Patterns in the United States: Measurement Precision Is Critical to Inform Public Health.

    PubMed

    Villanti, Andrea C; Pearson, Jennifer L; Glasser, Allison M; Johnson, Amanda L; Collins, Lauren K; Niaura, Raymond S; Abrams, David B

    2017-11-01

    E-cigarette use occurs with tobacco product use in youth. Using the 2014 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS), we examined past 30-day frequency of cigarette, cigar, smokeless, and e-cigarette use in the context of past 30-day and ever tobacco product use in US middle and high school students (N = 22 007). Frequency of product-specific use was examined by exclusive versus concurrent use with another product in the past 30 days (poly-use). In 2014, the majority (83%) of US middle and high school students had not used tobacco or e-cigarettes in the past 30 days. In the 9.3% of youth reporting any past 30-day e-cigarette use, 63% also reported using a tobacco product; among the 3.3% past 30-day exclusive e-cigarette users, about two-thirds (2.1%) had ever used combustible or non-combustible tobacco products and one-third (1.2%) had not. Few never tobacco users had used e-cigarettes on 10 or more days in the past month (absolute percent < 0.1%). Among past 30-day cigarette and smokeless users, the two highest frequency categories were 1-2 days and daily use; among past 30-day e-cigarette and cigar users, prevalence decreased with increasing frequency of use. The majority of past 30-day cigarette, cigar, smokeless, and e-cigarette users reported poly-use. Prevalence estimates for a single product mask the complex patterns of frequency, temporality, and poly-use in youth. Two-thirds of past 30-day exclusive e-cigarette users have ever used tobacco. Poly-use is the dominant pattern of tobacco and e-cigarette use among US middle and high school students. Our study highlights the complexity of tobacco use patterns in US middle and high school students. Future studies addressing the full public health impact of movement into or out of combustible tobacco use will require longitudinal data with appropriate measures of tobacco and e-cigarette product-specific use (eg, frequency and intensity), as well as adequate sample size and a sufficient number of waves to determine how

  1. One-way Z→E isomerization around the double bond of N-methoxy- 1- (2-anthryl) ethanimine in the excited triplet state. Direct observation of one-way isomerization from Z triplet to E triplet of the C dbnd N bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Tatsuo; Furuya, Yasunori; Furuuchi, Hideo; Tokumaru, Katsumi

    1993-09-01

    On direct as well as benzil-sensitized irradiation in degassed benzene N-methoxy-1-(2-anthryl) ethanimine ( I), ArC (CH 3) dbnd N sbnd OCH 3 (Ar: 2-anthryl), underwent one-way Z→E isomerization through a quantum chain process. The barrier to Z→E isomerization of I in the excited triplet state was determined by directly observing the change of T—T absorption spectra from the Z triplet to the E triplet. Based on these results the potential energy surface of photoisomerization of I is discussed.

  2. Heavy metals in hair of residents in an e-waste recycling area, south China: contents and assessment of bodily state.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Yuan, Jian-Gang; He, Luo-Yiyi; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Luo, Yong; Chen, She-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian; Yang, Zhong-Yi

    2011-11-01

    Heavy metals were measured in hair from occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed populations in an e-waste recycling area and from residents from a control rural town. The levels of five heavy metals were in the following order of Zn > Pb, Cu > Cd > Ni, with the highest levels found in the occupationally exposed workers. The levels of Cd, Pb, and Cu were significantly higher in residents from the e-waste recycling area than in the control area. Elevated Cd, Pb, and Cu contents along with significant positive correlations between them in hair from the e-waste recycling area indicated that these metals were likely to have originated from the e-waste recycling activities. The similarity in heavy metal pattern between children and occupationally exposed workers indicated that children are particularly vulnerable to heavy metal pollution caused by e-waste recycling activities. The increased Cu exposure might be a benefit for the insufficient intake of Cu in the studied area. However, the elevated hair Cd and Pb levels implied that the residents in the e-waste area might be at high risk of toxic metal, especially for children and occupationally exposed workers.

  3. Tables of E2 transition probabilities from the first 2 + states in even-even nuclei [B(E2) evaluation for 0 + 1 → 2 + 1 transitions in even-even nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Pritychenko, B.; Birch, M.; Singh, B.; ...

    2015-11-03

    A complete B(E2)↑ evaluation and compilation for even-even nuclei has been presented. The present paper is a continuation of P.H. Stelson and L. Grodzins, and S. Raman et al. nuclear data evaluations and was motivated by a large number of new measurements. It extends the list of evaluated nuclides from 328 to 452, includes an extended list of nuclear reaction kinematics parameters and comprehensive shell model analysis. Evaluation policies for analysis of experimental data have been discussed and conclusions are given. Moreover, future plans for B(E2)↑ systematics and experimental technique analyses of even-even nuclei are outlined.

  4. Charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon in the energy range 1 to 300 keV/e observed with AMPTE/CCE in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremser, G.; Stuedemann, W.; Wilken, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon are presented that were obtained with the charge-energy-mass spectrometer onboard the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft. Data were selected for two different local time sectors (apogee at 1300 LT and 0300 LT, respectively), three L-ranges (4-6, 6-8, and greater than 8), and quiet to moderately disturbed days (Kp less than or equal to 4). The charge state distributions reveal the existence of all charge states of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere. The relative importance of the different charge states strongly depends on L and much less on local time. The observations confirm that the solar wind and the ionosphere contribute to the oxygen population, whereas carbon only originates from the solar wind. The L-dependence of the charge state distributions can be interpreted in terms of these different ion sources and of charge exchange and diffusion processes that largely influence the distribution of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere.

  5. Dalitz plot analyses of J / ψ → π + π - π 0 , J / ψ → K + K - π 0 , and J / ψ → K s 0 K ± π ∓ produced via e + e - annihilation with initial-state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2017-04-10

    Here, we study the processes e +e - → γ ISR J/ψ , where J/ψ → π +π -π 0, J/ψ → K +K -π 0 , and J / ψ → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K ± π ∓ using a data sample of 519 fb -1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e +e - collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ (nS) (n = 2 , 3 , 4) resonances. We measure the ratio of branching fractions R 1 = $$B(J/ψ →K^+K^- π^0)\\atop{B(J/ψ →π^+π^- π^0)}$$ and R 2= $$B(J/ψ →K^0_SK^±π^∓)\\atop{B(J/ψ →π^+π^- π^0)}$$. We perform Dalitz plot analyses of the three J/ψ decay modes and measure fractions for resonances contributing to the decays. We also analyze the J/ψ → $π^+π^- π^0$ decay using the Veneziano model. We observe structures compatible with the presence of ρ (1450) in all three J/ψ decay modes and measure the relative branching fraction: R (p(1450)) = $$Bp(1450)→K^+K^-)\\atop{B(p(1450)→π^+π^-)}$$ +0.307 ± 0.084 (stat) ± 0.082 (sys).« less

  6. Dalitz plot analyses of J / ψ → π + π - π 0 , J / ψ → K + K - π 0 , and J / ψ → K s 0 K ± π ∓ produced via e + e - annihilation with initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    Here, we study the processes e +e - → γ ISR J/ψ , where J/ψ → π +π -π 0, J/ψ → K +K -π 0 , and J / ψ → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K ± π ∓ using a data sample of 519 fb -1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e +e - collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ (nS) (n = 2 , 3 , 4) resonances. We measure the ratio of branching fractions R 1 = $$B(J/ψ →K^+K^- π^0)\\atop{B(J/ψ →π^+π^- π^0)}$$ and R 2= $$B(J/ψ →K^0_SK^±π^∓)\\atop{B(J/ψ →π^+π^- π^0)}$$. We perform Dalitz plot analyses of the three J/ψ decay modes and measure fractions for resonances contributing to the decays. We also analyze the J/ψ → $π^+π^- π^0$ decay using the Veneziano model. We observe structures compatible with the presence of ρ (1450) in all three J/ψ decay modes and measure the relative branching fraction: R (p(1450)) = $$Bp(1450)→K^+K^-)\\atop{B(p(1450)→π^+π^-)}$$ +0.307 ± 0.084 (stat) ± 0.082 (sys).« less

  7. New method for taking into account finite nuclear mass in the determination of the absence of bound states: Application to e/sup +/H

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, E.A.G.

    1982-06-07

    It has been known since the work of Aronson, Kleinman and Spruch, and Armour that, if the proton is considered to be infinitely massive, no bound state of a system made up of a positron and a hydrogen atom can exist. In this Letter a new method is introduced for taking into account finite nuclear mass. With use of this method it is shown that the inclusion of the finite mass of the proton does not result in the appearance of a bound state. This is the first time that this result has been established.

  8. Prime Contract Awards Alphabetically by Contractor, by State or Country, and Place. Part 16. (Robert E. Rivera Const. Co.-Singapore Aircraft Industries)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    E 0 , f- ~ - el 2.0 >f ~~.- 0 V?0 ) *-’Q) Q: Z 10 1Z o Oc 4V cc o S7 - L E) o 0 0 a) .97 -L ) U c c r_ In CL M) E2 -4 CL W) > V a) C. L- L. - C V...4 -140)(m0)) 00000000000000000 ))))))))))))))) 11 a)1 W-4N,41 I N -IN m Go00 0000* 400000000000000000000000O0000000 II El W-40 1102 42 02222Z...34 :: mmmmmmimmcl3mmmmmmmm m commmmm U-4 zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz z zzzzzz M-4c,)O:: in m in m m o 0 0 In In In In In In In on In In U") In In en CY) U) In W W) 9) U"I M-4" " C14

  9. Many States but Only One Country: The Federative Structure of the Federal Republic of Germany. Sonderdienst SO 2-86(e).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Konrad

    Federalism is conducive to two important elements of the political process: competition and the search for compromise. This is a reason for the prosperity and political stability of the Federal Republic of Germany. Many citizens can involve themselves in the political life of the nation, whether at the federal or state level. With its area of…

  10. Estimating Returns to College Attainment: Comparing Survey and State Administrative Data Based Estimates. Appendices A, B, C, D, and E. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Wen, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    The increasing availability of massive administrative datasets linking postsecondary enrollees with post-college earnings records has stimulated a wealth of new research on the returns to college, and has accelerated state and federal efforts to hold institutions accountable for students' labor market outcomes. Many of these new research and…

  11. Time-resolved single-turnover of caa(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus. Fifth electron of the fully reduced enzyme converts O(H) into E(H) state.

    PubMed

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Belevich, Ilya; Belevich, Nikolai P; Soulimane, Tewfik; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-09-01

    The oxidative part of the catalytic cycle of the caa(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus was followed by time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Rate constants, chemical nature and the spectral properties of the catalytic cycle intermediates (Compounds A, P, F) reproduce generally the features typical for the aa(3)-type oxidases with some distinctive peculiarities caused by the presence of an additional 5-th redox-center-a heme center of the covalently bound cytochrome c. Compound A was formed with significantly smaller yield compared to aa(3) oxidases in general and to ba(3) oxidase from the same organism. Two electrons, equilibrated between three input redox-centers: heme a, Cu(A) and heme c are transferred in a single transition to the binuclear center during reduction of the compound F, converting the binuclear center through the highly reactive O(H) state into the final product of the reaction-E(H) (one-electron reduced) state of the catalytic site. In contrast to previous works on the caa(3)-type enzymes, we concluded that the finally produced E(H) state of caa(3) oxidase is characterized by the localization of the fifth electron in the binuclear center, similar to the O(H)→E(H) transition of the aa(3)-type oxidases. So, the fully-reduced caa(3) oxidase is competent in rapid electron transfer from the input redox-centers into the catalytic heme-copper site. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Practice Characteristics of Emergency Department Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (eCPR) Programs in the United States: The Current State of the Art of Emergency Department Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ED ECMO)

    PubMed Central

    Tonna, Joseph E.; Johnson, Nicholas J; Greenwood, John; Gaieski, David F; Shinar, Zachary; Bellezo, Joseph M.; Becker, Lance; Shah, Atman P.; Youngquist, Scott T.; Mallin, Michael P; Fair, James Franklin; Gunnerson, Kyle J.; Weng, Cindy; McKellar, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the current scope and practices of centers performing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) on the undifferentiated patient with cardiac arrest in the emergency department. Methods We contacted all US centers in January 2016 that had submitted adult eCPR cases to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry and surveyed them, querying for programs that had performed eCPR in the Emergency Department (ED ECMO). Our objective was to characterize the following domains of ED ECMO practice: program characteristics, patient selection, devices and techniques, and personnel. Results Among 99 centers queried, 70 responded. Among these, 36 centers performed ED ECMO. Nearly 93% of programs are based at academic/teaching hospitals. 65% of programs are less than 5 years old, and 60% of programs perform ≤ 3 cases per year. Most programs (90%) had inpatient eCPR or salvage ECMO programs prior to starting ED ECMO programs. The majority of programs do not have formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most programs preferentially obtain vascular access via the percutaneous route (70%) and many (40%) use mechanical CPR during cannulation. The most commonly used console is the Maquet Rotaflow®. Cannulation is most often performed by cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, and nearly all programs (>85%) involve CT surgeons, perfusionists, and pharmacists. Conclusions Over a third of centers that submitted adult eCPR cases to ELSO have performed ED ECMO. These programs are largely based at academic hospitals, new, and have low volumes. They do not have many formal inclusion or exclusion criteria, and devices and techniques are variable. PMID:27523953

  13. Practice characteristics of Emergency Department extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) programs in the United States: The current state of the art of Emergency Department extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ED ECMO).

    PubMed

    Tonna, Joseph E; Johnson, Nicholas J; Greenwood, John; Gaieski, David F; Shinar, Zachary; Bellezo, Joseph M; Becker, Lance; Shah, Atman P; Youngquist, Scott T; Mallin, Michael P; Fair, James Franklin; Gunnerson, Kyle J; Weng, Cindy; McKellar, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    To characterize the current scope and practices of centers performing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) on the undifferentiated patient with cardiac arrest in the emergency department. We contacted all US centers in January 2016 that had submitted adult eCPR cases to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry and surveyed them, querying for programs that had performed eCPR in the Emergency Department (ED ECMO). Our objective was to characterize the following domains of ED ECMO practice: program characteristics, patient selection, devices and techniques, and personnel. Among 99 centers queried, 70 responded. Among these, 36 centers performed ED ECMO. Nearly 93% of programs are based at academic/teaching hospitals. 65% of programs are less than 5 years old, and 60% of programs perform ≤3 cases per year. Most programs (90%) had inpatient eCPR or salvage ECMO programs prior to starting ED ECMO programs. The majority of programs do not have formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most programs preferentially obtain vascular access via the percutaneous route (70%) and many (40%) use mechanical CPR during cannulation. The most commonly used console is the Maquet Rotaflow(®). Cannulation is most often performed by cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, and nearly all programs (>85%) involve CT surgeons, perfusionists, and pharmacists. Over a third of centers that submitted adult eCPR cases to ELSO have performed ED ECMO. These programs are largely based at academic hospitals, new, and have low volumes. They do not have many formal inclusion or exclusion criteria, and devices and techniques are variable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: NEW YORK STATE MULTI-VENDOR BIOREMEDIATION - R.E. WRIGHT ENVIRONMENTAL, INC.'S IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc.‘s (REWEI) In-situ Bioremediation Treatment System is an in-situ bioremediation technology for the treatment of soils contaminated with organic compounds. According to the Developer, contaminated soils are remediated in-situ by stimulating the a...

  15. Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2004 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2003-04. E.D. TAB. NCES 2005-182

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Laura G.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Whitmore, Roy W.; Cong, June; Levine, Burton; Berzofsky, Marcus; Broyles, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This E.D. TAB presents findings from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) fall 2004 data collection, which included two survey components: Institutional Characteristics for the 2004-05 academic year, and Completions covering the period July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2004. These data were collected through the IPEDS web-based…

  16. Enhanced efficiency of solid-state NMR investigations of energy materials using an external automatic tuning/matching (eATM) robot.

    PubMed

    Pecher, Oliver; Halat, David M; Lee, Jeongjae; Liu, Zigeng; Griffith, Kent J; Braun, Marco; Grey, Clare P

    2017-02-01

    We have developed and explored an external automatic tuning/matching (eATM) robot that can be attached to commercial and/or home-built magic angle spinning (MAS) or static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probeheads. Complete synchronization and automation with Bruker and Tecmag spectrometers is ensured via transistor-transistor-logic (TTL) signals. The eATM robot enables an automated "on-the-fly" re-calibration of the radio frequency (rf) carrier frequency, which is beneficial whenever tuning/matching of the resonance circuit is required, e.g. variable temperature (VT) NMR, spin-echo mapping (variable offset cumulative spectroscopy, VOCS) and/or in situ NMR experiments of batteries. This allows a significant increase in efficiency for NMR experiments outside regular working hours (e.g. overnight) and, furthermore, enables measurements of quadrupolar nuclei which would not be possible in reasonable timeframes due to excessively large spectral widths. Additionally, different tuning/matching capacitor (and/or coil) settings for desired frequencies (e.g. 7 Li and 31 P at 117 and 122MHz, respectively, at 7.05 T) can be saved and made directly accessible before automatic tuning/matching, thus enabling automated measurements of multiple nuclei for one sample with no manual adjustment required by the user. We have applied this new eATM approach in static and MAS spin-echo mapping NMR experiments in different magnetic fields on four energy storage materials, namely: (1) paramagnetic 7 Li and 31 P MAS NMR (without manual recalibration) of the Li-ion battery cathode material LiFePO 4 ; (2) paramagnetic 17 O VT-NMR of the solid oxide fuel cell cathode material La 2 NiO 4+δ ; (3) broadband 93 Nb static NMR of the Li-ion battery material BNb 2 O 5 ; and (4) broadband static 127 I NMR of a potential Li-air battery product LiIO 3 . In each case, insight into local atomic structure and dynamics arises primarily from the highly broadened (1-25MHz) NMR lineshapes that the e

  17. Enhanced efficiency of solid-state NMR investigations of energy materials using an external automatic tuning/matching (eATM) robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, Oliver; Halat, David M.; Lee, Jeongjae; Liu, Zigeng; Griffith, Kent J.; Braun, Marco; Grey, Clare P.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed and explored an external automatic tuning/matching (eATM) robot that can be attached to commercial and/or home-built magic angle spinning (MAS) or static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probeheads. Complete synchronization and automation with Bruker and Tecmag spectrometers is ensured via transistor-transistor-logic (TTL) signals. The eATM robot enables an automated "on-the-fly" re-calibration of the radio frequency (rf) carrier frequency, which is beneficial whenever tuning/matching of the resonance circuit is required, e.g. variable temperature (VT) NMR, spin-echo mapping (variable offset cumulative spectroscopy, VOCS) and/or in situ NMR experiments of batteries. This allows a significant increase in efficiency for NMR experiments outside regular working hours (e.g. overnight) and, furthermore, enables measurements of quadrupolar nuclei which would not be possible in reasonable timeframes due to excessively large spectral widths. Additionally, different tuning/matching capacitor (and/or coil) settings for desired frequencies (e.g.7Li and 31P at 117 and 122 MHz, respectively, at 7.05 T) can be saved and made directly accessible before automatic tuning/matching, thus enabling automated measurements of multiple nuclei for one sample with no manual adjustment required by the user. We have applied this new eATM approach in static and MAS spin-echo mapping NMR experiments in different magnetic fields on four energy storage materials, namely: (1) paramagnetic 7Li and 31P MAS NMR (without manual recalibration) of the Li-ion battery cathode material LiFePO4; (2) paramagnetic 17O VT-NMR of the solid oxide fuel cell cathode material La2NiO4+δ; (3) broadband 93Nb static NMR of the Li-ion battery material BNb2O5; and (4) broadband static 127I NMR of a potential Li-air battery product LiIO3. In each case, insight into local atomic structure and dynamics arises primarily from the highly broadened (1-25 MHz) NMR lineshapes that the eATM robot is uniquely

  18. Very slow decay of a defect related emission band at 2.4 eV in AlN: Signatures of the Si related shallow DX state

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprecht, M., E-mail: matthias.lamprecht@uni-ulm.de; Grund, C.; Neuschl, B.

    2016-04-21

    We report on a defect related luminescence band at 2.4 eV in aluminum nitride bulk crystals, for which we find strong indications to be related to silicon DX centers. Time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy using a sub-bandgap excitation reveals two different recombination processes with very long decay times of 13 ms and 153 ms at low temperature. Based on the results of temperature and excitation dependent photoluminescence experiments, the process with the shorter lifetime is assigned to a donor-acceptor pair transition involving the shallow silicon donor state, which can be emptied with a thermal dissociation energy of 65 meV. The slower process with a thermalmore » quenching energy of 15 meV is assigned to the slightly deeper Si DX state known from electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, which is transferred back to the shallow donor state.« less

  19. Comparative Effects of Ethanol (E85), Gasoline, and Wind-Powered Electric Vehicles on Cancer, Mortality, Climate-Relevant Emissions, and Land requirements in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, a nested global-through-urban air pollution/weather forecast model is combined with high- resolution future emission inventories, population data, and health effects data to examine the effect of converting from gasoline to a high-ethanol blend (E85) on cancer, mortality, and hospitalization in the U.S. as a whole and Los Angeles in particular. The effects of both are then compared with those from converting to wind-powered battery-electric vehicles (WBEVs). Under the base-case emission scenario, which accounted for projected improvements in gasoline and E85 vehicle emission controls, complete conversion to E85, which is unlikely due to land-use constraints, was found to increase ozone-related mortality, hospitalization, and asthma by about 9 percent in Los Angeles and 4 percent in the U.S. as a whole relative to 100 percent gasoline. Ozone increases in Los Angeles and the northeast U.S. were partially offset by decreases in the southeast. E85 also increased PAN in the U.S. but was estimated to cause little change in cancer risk relative to gasoline. Both gasoline and ethanol are anticipated to cause at least 10,000-20,000 premature deaths in the U.S. in 2020, which would be eliminated upon conversion to WBEVs. WBEVs require 30 times less land area than corn ethanol and 20 times less land area than cellulosic ethanol for powering the same vehicle fleet. About 70,000-120,000 5 MW wind turbines in average wind speeds exceeding 8 m/s could power all U.S. onroad vehicles, eliminating up to 26 percent of U.S. carbon, compared with a best-case carbon reduction of 0.2 percent for corn-ethanol and 4 percent for cellulosic ethanol, based on recent lifecycle emission data and landuse constraints. In sum, both gasoline and E85 pose public health risks, with E85 causing equal or possibly more damage. The conversion to battery-electric vehicles or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles powered by wind or another clean renewable, is a significantly superior solution to

  20. Cross sections for the reactions e + e - → K S 0 K L 0 π 0 , K S 0 K L 0 η , and K S 0 K L 0 π 0 π 0 from events with initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.

    Here, we study the processes e + e - → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 γ , K $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η γ , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 π 0 γ , where the photon is radiated from the initial state, providing cross section measurements for the hadronic final states over a continuum of center-of-mass energies. The results are based on 469 fb -1 of data collected at or near the Υ ( 4 S ) resonance with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present the first measurements of the e + e - → K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 , K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0π 0 cross sections up to a center-of-mass energy of 4 GeV and study their intermediate resonance structures. We observe J / ψ decays to all of these final states for the first time, present measurements of their J / ψ branching fractions, and search for ψ (2S) decays.« less

  1. Cross sections for the reactions e + e - → K S 0 K L 0 π 0 , K S 0 K L 0 η , and K S 0 K L 0 π 0 π 0 from events with initial-state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2017-03-06

    Here, we study the processes e + e - → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 γ , K $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η γ , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 π 0 γ , where the photon is radiated from the initial state, providing cross section measurements for the hadronic final states over a continuum of center-of-mass energies. The results are based on 469 fb -1 of data collected at or near the Υ ( 4 S ) resonance with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present the first measurements of the e + e - → K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 , K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0π 0 cross sections up to a center-of-mass energy of 4 GeV and study their intermediate resonance structures. We observe J / ψ decays to all of these final states for the first time, present measurements of their J / ψ branching fractions, and search for ψ (2S) decays.« less

  2. Glaucoma and vitamins A, C, and E supplement intake and serum levels in a population-based sample of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S Y; Singh, K; Lin, S C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential association between glaucoma prevalence and supplemental intake, as well as serum levels of vitamins A, C and E. Methods This cross-sectional study included 2912 participants in the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, age ≥40 years, who self-reported a presence or absence of glaucoma. Participants were interviewed regarding the use of dietary supplements during the preceding 30-day period. Participants also underwent serum measurements of vitamins A, C, and E (both alpha- and gamma-tocopherol). Information on the primary outcome measure, presence or absence of glaucoma, as well as demographic information, comorbidities and health-related behaviors, was assessed via interview. Results Multivariate odds ratios for self-reported glaucoma, comparing the highest quartile of consumption to no consumption, and adjusted for potential confounding variables were 0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13–1.82) for vitamin A, 0.47 (95% CI 0.23–0.97) for vitamin C, and 2.59 (95% CI 0.89–7.56) for vitamin E. Adjusted odds ratios for self-reported glaucoma comparing the highest vs lowest quintiles of vitamin serum levels were 1.44 (95% CI 0.79–2.62) for vitamin A, 0.94 (95% CI 0.42–2.11) for vitamin C, 1.40 (95% CI 0.70–2.81) for alpha-tocopherol, and 0.64 (95% CI 0.24–1.70) for gamma-tocopherol. Conclusion Neither supplementary consumption with nor serum levels of vitamins A and E were found to be associated with glaucoma prevalence. While low- and high-dose supplementary consumption of vitamin C was found to be associated with decreased odds of glaucoma, serum levels of vitamin C did not correlate with glaucoma prevalence. PMID:23429409

  3. Glaucoma and vitamins A, C, and E supplement intake and serum levels in a population-based sample of the United States.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Singh, K; Lin, S C

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the potential association between glaucoma prevalence and supplemental intake, as well as serum levels of vitamins A, C and E. This cross-sectional study included 2912 participants in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, age ≥40 years, who self-reported a presence or absence of glaucoma. Participants were interviewed regarding the use of dietary supplements during the preceding 30-day period. Participants also underwent serum measurements of vitamins A, C, and E (both alpha- and gamma-tocopherol). Information on the primary outcome measure, presence or absence of glaucoma, as well as demographic information, comorbidities and health-related behaviors, was assessed via interview. Multivariate odds ratios for self-reported glaucoma, comparing the highest quartile of consumption to no consumption, and adjusted for potential confounding variables were 0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13-1.82) for vitamin A, 0.47 (95% CI 0.23-0.97) for vitamin C, and 2.59 (95% CI 0.89-7.56) for vitamin E. Adjusted odds ratios for self-reported glaucoma comparing the highest vs lowest quintiles of vitamin serum levels were 1.44 (95% CI 0.79-2.62) for vitamin A, 0.94 (95% CI 0.42-2.11) for vitamin C, 1.40 (95% CI 0.70-2.81) for alpha-tocopherol, and 0.64 (95% CI 0.24-1.70) for gamma-tocopherol. Neither supplementary consumption with nor serum levels of vitamins A and E were found to be associated with glaucoma prevalence. While low- and high-dose supplementary consumption of vitamin C was found to be associated with decreased odds of glaucoma, serum levels of vitamin C did not correlate with glaucoma prevalence.

  4. Calculation of State Specific Rate Coefficients for Non-Equilibrium Hypersonics Applications: from H(Psi) = E(Psi) to k(T) = A *exp(-E(sub a)/RT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David; Chaban, Galina; Panesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Development of High-Fidelity Physics-Based Models to describe hypersonic flight through the atmospheres of Earth and Mars is underway at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal is to construct chemistry models of the collisional and radiative processes that occur in the bow shock and boundary layers of spacecraft during atmospheric entry that are free of empiricism. In this talk I will discuss our philosophy and describe some of our progress. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, internal energy relaxation, collisional dissociation and radiative emission and absorption. For this work we start by solving the Schrodinger equation to obtain accurate interaction potentials and radiative properties. Then we invoke classical mechanics to compute state-specific heavy particle collision cross sections and reaction rate coefficients. Finally, phenomenological rate coefficients and relaxation times are determined from master equation solutions.

  5. Carpool incentives and opportunities. Report of the United States Congress pursuant to Section 3(e) Public Law 93-239. Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1975-02-01

    The report includes (1) a description of methods and programs used to promote carpooling, (2) a discussion of the success of these methods, (3) an evaluation of a broad range of incentives to promote carpooling, and (4) recommendations on government actions to encourage carpooling. The report recommended that the Federal Government broaden its efforts to encourage carpooling to set an example as a major employer. The report also recommends that State and local governments expand efforts to encourage carpooling through (1) the development of highway projects providing preferential treatment for carpools, and (2) assistance to employers in promoting carpooling amongmore » their employees.« less

  6. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes investigation revealed atypical enteropathogenic E. coli as putative emerging diarrheal agents in children living in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dias, Regiane C B; Dos Santos, Bruna C; Dos Santos, Luis F; Vieira, Melissa A; Yamatogi, Ricardo S; Mondelli, Alessandro L; Sadatsune, Terue; Sforcin, José M; Gomes, Tânia A T; Hernandes, Rodrigo T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes, a leading cause of diarrhea worldwide, among diarrheal and healthy children, up to 5 years of age, living in the city of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil. DEC, investigated by PCR detection of virulence factor-encoding genes associated with the distinct pathotypes, was isolated from 18.0% of the patients, and 19.0% of the controls, with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), the most frequent pathotype, being detected in equal proportion between patients and controls (10.0%). Among the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) isolates, only one isolate was able to produce the localized adherence pattern to HeLa cells, being thus the only typical EPEC identified. All the remaining EPEC were classified as atypical (aEPEC), and detected in 8.0% and 8.5% of the patients and controls, respectively. Regarding the serotypes, 26.5% of the analyzed EPEC isolates belonged to classical EPEC-serogroups, and the only two STEC found were serotyped as O26:H11 (patient) and O119:H7 (control). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 43.6%, 29.5% and 2.6% of the DEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and gentamicin, respectively. Our data indicate that EAEC remains prevalent among children living in Botucatu, and revealed atypical EPEC as emerging putative diarrheal agents in this geographical region. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Nutrient Inputs from Fertilizer and Manure, Nitrogen and Phosphorus (N&P), 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the total amount of nitrogen and phosphorus, in kilograms for the year 2002, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of the Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is County-Level Estimates of Nutrient Inputs to the Land Surface of the Conterminous United States, 1982-2001 (Ruddy and others, 2006). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  8. Prime Contract Awards Alphabetically by Contractor, by State or Country, and Place, FY83, Part 6 (Johnson Textile & Plastics Co-McKee Robert E Gen Contractor).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    M15 0 INC TEXARKANA TEXAS 093818 7840 44 147-83-C0101 D C E 1 2 2 Y129 000 C2 CONSTRUCTION/OTHER AIRFIELD 8 A 3 4 J 018 1 B J 1 1 76 JOWETT INC 147...RENTAL OF EQ/ADP EQUIP 8 A 4 5 J 1013 5 B J 1 I 3u. KETRON INC ION TOTAL 3 825 2 F D2701 1053 N00039-8, 2 D PAlO 1345 N00140- TEXARKANA TEXAS 029859...F4265C KIEBCO FOODS INC 1 4 J 0013H 2017 DLA131 4 J 0013H 2026 DLA13) .1STING OCTOBER - SEPTEMBER FY 83. PAGE 4137 MPC613 ALPHABETIC I I SM 222 V 0

  9. State of the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education Finance, 2017

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, a group of school finance scholars and public school practitioners gathered in Jacksonville, Florida, for the National Education Finance Academy's annual conference to discuss, among an array of topics, the state of P-20 finance in all 50 states. At the roundtable discussion, 36 states were represented, and scholars representing 30 states…

  10. Production of glutaminase(E.C. 3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in solid-state fermentation and modeling the growth of Z. rouxii therein.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2010-04-01

    Glutaminase production in Zygosacchromyces rouxii by solid-state fermentation (SSF) is detailed. Substrates screening showed best results with oatmeal (OM) and wheatbran (WB). Further, a 1:1 combination of OM: WB gave 0.614units/gds with artificial sea water (ASW) as moistening agent. Evaluation of additional carbon, nitrogen, aminoacids and minerals supplementation was done. A central composite design was employed to investigate effects of four variables, viz. moisture content, glucose, corn steep liquor and glutamine on production. A 4-fold increase in enzyme production was obtained. Studies were undertaken to analyze the time course model the microbial growth and nutrient utilization during SSF. Logistic equation (R2=0.8973), describing the growth model of Z.rouxii was obtained, with maximum values of micronm and Xm at 0.326h-1 and 7.35% of dry matter weight loss, respectively. A good-fit model to describe utilization of total carbohydrate (R2=0.9906) nitrogen concentration (R2=0.9869) with time was obtained. The model was used successfully to predict enzyme production (R2=0.7950).

  11. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ν μ interactions on hydrocarbon at < E ν > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore » inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  12. The e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup 0}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){eta}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} cross sections measured with initial-state radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){eta}{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}{gamma} with the hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 4300, 5500, and 375 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the obtained cross sections from the threshold to about 5 GeV can be compared with corresponding direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements, currently available only for the {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{supmore » -} and {omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} submodes of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup 0} channel. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and we extract their cross sections where possible. In particular, we isolate the contribution from e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{omega}(782){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and study the {omega}(1420) and {omega}(1650) resonances. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all these final states and several intermediate states, as well as the {psi}(2S) in some modes, and we measure the corresponding branching fractions.« less

  13. Total reaction cross sections of electronic state-specified transition metal cations: V + +C2H6, C3H8, and C2H4 at 0.2 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lary; Hanton, Scott D.; Weisshaar, James C.

    1990-03-01

    We describe a crossed beam experiment which measures total cross sections for reaction of electronic state-specified V+ with small hydrocarbons at well-defined collision energy E=0.2 eV. The V+ state distribution created at each ionizing wavelength is directly measured by angle-integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (preceding paper). Reactant and product ions are collected and analyzed by pulsed time-of-flight mass spectrometry following a reaction time of 6 μs. Tests of the performance of the apparatus are described in detail. Our experiment defines the reactant V+ electronic state distribution and the collision energy much more precisely than previous work. For all three hydrocarbons C2H6, C3H8, and C2H4, H2 elimination products dominate at 0.2 eV. We observe a dramatic dependence of cross section on the V+ electronic term. The second excited term 3d34s(3F) is more reactive than either lower energy quintet term 3d4(5D) or 3d34s(5F) by a factor of ≥270, 80, and ≥6 for the C2H6, C3H8, and C2H4 reactions, respectively. The 3d34s(3F) reaction cross sections at 0.2 eV are 20±11 Å2, 37±19 Å2, and 2.7±1.6 Å2, respectively, compared with Langevin cross sections of ˜80 Å2. For the C2H6 and C3H8 reactions, cross sections are independent of initial spin-orbit level J within the 3F term to the limits of our accuracy. Comparison with earlier work by Armentrout and co-workers shows that electronic excitation to d3s(3F) is far more effective at promoting H2 elimination than addition of the same total kinetic energy to reactants. Electron spin is clearly a key determinant of V+ reactivity with small hydrocarbons. We suggest that triplet V+ reacts much more efficiently than quintet V+ because of its ability to conserve total electron spin along paths to insertion in a C-H bond of the hydrocarbon.

  14. A novel vehicle for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to humans: multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections associated with consumption of ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough--United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    Neil, Karen P; Biggerstaff, Gwen; MacDonald, J Kathryn; Trees, Eija; Medus, Carlota; Musser, Kimberlee A; Stroika, Steven G; Zink, Don; Sotir, Mark J

    2012-02-15

     Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) associated with numerous foodborne outbreaks in the United States and is an important cause of bacterial gastrointestinal illness. In May 2009, we investigated a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections.  Outbreak-associated cases were identified using serotyping and molecular subtyping procedures. Traceback investigation and product testing were performed. A matched case-control study was conducted to identify exposures associated with illness using age-, sex-, and state-matched controls.  Seventy-seven patients with illnesses during the period 16 March-8 July 2009 were identified from 30 states; 35 were hospitalized, 10 developed hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and none died. Sixty-six percent of patients were <19 years; 71% were female. In the case-control study, 33 of 35 case patients (94%) consumed ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough, compared with 4 of 36 controls (11%) (matched odds ratio = 41.3; P < .001); no other reported exposures were significantly associated with illness. Among case patients consuming cookie dough, 94% reported brand A. Three nonoutbreak STEC strains were isolated from brand A cookie dough. The investigation led to a recall of 3.6 million packages of brand A cookie dough and a product reformulation.  This is the first reported STEC outbreak associated with consuming ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough. Despite instructions to bake brand A cookie dough before eating, case patients consumed the product uncooked. Manufacturers should consider formulating ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough to be as safe as a ready-to-eat product. More effective consumer education about the risks of eating unbaked cookie dough is needed.

  15. Search for lepton-flavor violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to e μ final states in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Pieters, M.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Marchesini, I.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Beghin, D.; Bilin, B.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dorney, B.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Kalsi, A. K.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Seva, T.; Starling, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Trocino, D.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Vermassen, B.; Vit, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caputo, C.; Caudron, A.; David, P.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Saggio, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Zobec, J.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correia Silva, G.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Coelho, E.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Medina Jaime, M.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Sanchez Rosas, L. J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Thiel, M.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Yuan, L.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Segura Delgado, M. A.; Courbon, B.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Starodumov, A.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdalla, H.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Leloup, C.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Negro, G.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Amendola, C.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Charlot, C.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Kucher, I.; Lisniak, S.; Lobanov, A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Jansová, M.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Tonon, N.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Chanon, N.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lattaud, H.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Zhang, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Teroerde, M.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bermúdez Martínez, A.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Botta, V.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Danilov, V.; De Wit, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Damiani, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Grados Luyando, J. 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J.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Bloch, P.; Borg, J.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Elwood, A.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Komm, M.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Palladino, V.; Pesaresi, M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Strebler, T.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wardle, N.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Zahid, S.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Smith, C.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Hadley, M.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, J.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Pazzini, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Stolp, D.; Taylor, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, F.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Regnard, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Karapostoli, G.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Gilbert, D.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Citron, M.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Gouskos, L.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; MacDonald, E.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Cheng, Y.; Chu, J.; Datta, A.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Quach, D.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, W.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Joshi, B. M.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Shi, K.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Dittmer, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Rogan, C.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Modak, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Eno, S. C.; Feng, Y.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bauer, G.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Harris, P.; Hsu, D.; Hu, M.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhaozhong, S.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Wadud, M. A.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Golf, F.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Freer, C.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Wamorkar, T.; Wang, B.; Wisecarver, A.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Bucci, R.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Li, W.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Siddireddy, P.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wightman, A.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Gutay, L.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Qiu, H.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xiao, R.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Freed, S.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Shi, W.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Zhang, A.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Poudyal, N.; Sturdy, J.; Thapa, P.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Rekovic, V.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.

    2018-04-01

    A search is reported for heavy resonances decaying into e μ final states in proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at √{s}=13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb-1. The search focuses on resonance masses above 200 GeV. With no evidence found for physics beyond the standard model in the e μ mass spectrum, upper limits are set at 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction for this lepton-flavor violating signal. Based on these results, resonant τ sneutrino production in R-parity violating supersymmetric models is excluded for masses below 1.7 TeV, for couplings λ 132 = λ 231 = λ 311 ' = 0.01. Heavy Z' gauge bosons with lepton-flavor violating transitions are excluded for masses up to 4.4 TeV. The e μ mass spectrum is also interpreted in terms of non-resonant contributions from quantum black-hole production in models with one to six extra spatial dimensions, and lower mass limits are found between 3.6 and 5.6 TeV. In all interpretations used in this analysis, the results of this search improve previous limits by about 1 TeV. These limits correspond to the most sensitive values obtained at colliders. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Search for lepton-flavor violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to eμ final states in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=13 $$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.

    A search is reported for heavy resonances decaying into eμ final states in proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at √s=13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb –1. The search focuses on resonance masses above 200 GeV. With no evidence found for physics beyond the standard model in the eμ mass spectrum, upper limits are set at 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction for this lepton-flavor violating signal. Based on these results, resonant τ sneutrino production in R-parity violating supersymmetric models is excluded for massesmore » below 1.7 TeV, for couplings λ132 = λ231 = λ 311' = 0.01. Heavy Z' gauge bosons with lepton-flavor violating transitions are excluded for masses up to 4.4 TeV. The eμ mass spectrum is also interpreted in terms of non-resonant contributions from quantum black-hole production in models with one to six extra spatial dimensions, and lower mass limits are found between 3.6 and 5.6 TeV. In all interpretations used in this analysis, the results of this search improve previous limits by about 1 TeV. Furthermore, these limits correspond to the most sensitive values obtained at colliders.« less

  17. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Nutrient Application (Phosphorus and Nitrogen) for Fertilizer and Manure Applied to Crops (Cropsplit), 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the estimated amount of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilizers applied to selected crops for the year 2002, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is based on 2002 fertilizer data (Ruddy and others, 2006) and tabulated by crop type per county (Alexander and others, 2007). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for MRB_E2RF1 catchments for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  18. Search for lepton-flavor violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to eμ final states in proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=13 $$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2018-04-13

    A search is reported for heavy resonances decaying into eμ final states in proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at √s=13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb –1. The search focuses on resonance masses above 200 GeV. With no evidence found for physics beyond the standard model in the eμ mass spectrum, upper limits are set at 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction for this lepton-flavor violating signal. Based on these results, resonant τ sneutrino production in R-parity violating supersymmetric models is excluded for massesmore » below 1.7 TeV, for couplings λ132 = λ231 = λ 311' = 0.01. Heavy Z' gauge bosons with lepton-flavor violating transitions are excluded for masses up to 4.4 TeV. The eμ mass spectrum is also interpreted in terms of non-resonant contributions from quantum black-hole production in models with one to six extra spatial dimensions, and lower mass limits are found between 3.6 and 5.6 TeV. In all interpretations used in this analysis, the results of this search improve previous limits by about 1 TeV. Furthermore, these limits correspond to the most sensitive values obtained at colliders.« less

  19. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Basin Characteristics, 2002 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: tabular digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents basin characteristics for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). These characteristics are reach catchment shape index, stream density, sinuosity, mean elevation, mean slope and number of road-stream crossings. The source data sets are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) RF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011) and the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER/Line Files (U.S. Census Bureau,2006). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  20. iss055e023770

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-14

    iss055e023770 (April 14, 2018) --- The southeast geography of the state of Massachusetts including Cape Cod Bay, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket and the arm-shaped peninsula is clearly seen from the International Space Station as it orbited over the Atlantic coast of the United States.

  1. Molecular basis of maple syrup urine disease: Novel mutations at the E1[alpha] locus that impair E1([alpha][sub 2][beta][sub 2]) assembly or decrease steady-state E1[alpha] mRNA levels of branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.L.; Fisher, C.R.; Chuang, D.T.

    1994-08-01

    The authors report the occurrence of three novel mutations in the E1[alpha] (BCKDHA) locus of the branched-chain [alpha]-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD) complex that cause maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). An 8-bp deletion in exon 7 is present in one allele of a compound-heterozygous patient (GM-649). A single C nucleotide insertion in exon 2 occurs in one allele of an intermediate-MSUD patient (Lo). The second allele of patient Lo carries an A-to-G transition in exon 9 of the E1[alpha] gene. This missense mutation changes Tyr-368 to Cys (Y368C) in the E1[alpha] subunit. Both the 8-bp deletion and the single C insertionmore » generate a downstream nonsense codon. Both mutations appear to be associated with a low abundance of the mutant E1[alpha] mRNA, as determined by allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. Transfection studies strongly suggest that the Y368C substitution in the E1[alpha] subunit impairs its proper assembly with the normal E1[beta]. Unassembled as well as misassembled E1[alpha] and E1[beta] subunits are degraded in the cell. 32 refs., 8 figs.« less

  2. Analysis of Rotationally Resolved Spectra to Non-Degenerate (a''_1) Upper-State Vibronic Levels in the tilde{A} ^2E''-tilde{X}^2A^'_2 Electronic Transition of NO_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudjane, Mourad; Codd, Terrance Joseph; Chen, Ming-Wei; Tran, Henry; Melnik, Dmitry G.; Miller, Terry A.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-06-01

    The vibronic structure of the tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic spectrum of NO_3 has been observed using both room-temperature and jet-cooled samples. A recent analysis of this structure is consistent with the Jahn-Teller effect (JTE) in the e^' ν_3 vibrational mode (N-O stretch) being quite strong while the JTE in the e^' ν_4 mode (O-N-O) bend) is rather weak. Electronic structure calculations qualitatively predict these results but the calculated magnitude of the JTE is quantitatively inconsistent with the spectral analysis. Rotationally resolved spectra have been obtained for over a dozen vibronic bands of the tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic transition in NO_3. An analysis of these spectra should provide considerably more experimental information about the JTE in the tilde{A} state of NO_3 as the rotational structure should be quite sensitive to the geometric distortion of the molecule due to the JTE. This talk will focus upon the parallel bands, which terminate on tilde{A} state levels of a''_1 vibronic symmetry, which were the subject of a preliminary analysis reported at this meeting in 2014. We have now recorded the rotational structure of over a half-dozen parallel bands and have completed analysis on the 3^1_0 and 3^1_0 4^1_0 transitions with several other bands being reasonably well understood. Two general conclusions emerge from this work. (i) All the spectral bands show evidence of perturbations which can reasonably be assumed to result from interactions of the observed tilde{A} state levels with high vibrational levels of the tilde{X} state. The perturbations range from severe in some bands to quite modest in others. (ii) Analyses of observed spectra, insofar as the perturbations permit, have all been performed with an oblate symmetric top model including only additional spin-rotation effects. This result is, of course, consistent with an effective, undistorted geometry for NO_3 of D3h symmetry on the rotational timescale.

  3. SNAP E&T

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower-Basch, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This document provides an overview of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training (SNAP E&T). SNAP E&T is a funding source that allows states to provide employment and training and related supportive services to individuals receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps)…

  4. Most energetic passive states.

    PubMed

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Tura, Jordi; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Passive states are defined as those states that do not allow for work extraction in a cyclic (unitary) process. Within the set of passive states, thermal states are the most stable ones: they maximize the entropy for a given energy, and similarly they minimize the energy for a given entropy. Here we find the passive states lying in the other extreme, i.e., those that maximize the energy for a given entropy, which we show also minimize the entropy when the energy is fixed. These extremal properties make these states useful to obtain fundamental bounds for the thermodynamics of finite-dimensional quantum systems, which we show in several scenarios.

  5. Nanosecond lifetime measurements of Iπ=9/2- intrinsic excited states and low-lying B(E1) strengths in 183Re using combined HPGe-LaBr3 coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgi, L. A.; Regan, P. H.; Daniel, T.; Podolyák, Zs.; Bruce, A. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mǎrginean, R.; Werner, V.; Alharbi, T.; Alkhomashi, N.; Bajoga, A. D.; Britton, R.; Cǎta-Danil, I.; Carroll, R. J.; Deleanu, D.; Bucurescu, D.; Florea, N.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D. G.; Glodariu, T.; Lice, R.; Mihai, C.; Mulholland, K. F.; Negret, A.; Olacel, A.; Roberts, O. J.; Sava, T.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stroe, L.; Suvaila, R.; Toma, S.; Wilson, E.; Wood, R. T.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents precision measurements of electromagnetic decay probabilities associated with electric dipole transitions in the prolate-deformed nucleus 183Re. The nucleus of interest was formed using the fusion evaporation reaction 180Hf(7Li,4n)183Re at a beam energy of 30 MeV at the tandem accelerator at the HH-IFIN Institute, Bucharest Romania. Coincident decay gamma rays from near-yrast cascades were detected using the combined HPGe-LaBr3 detector array ROSPHERE. The time differences between cascade gamma rays were measured using the LaBr3 detectors to determine the half-lives of the two lowest lying spin-parity 9/2- states at excitation energies of 496 and 617 keV to be 5.65(5) and 2.08(3) ns respectively. The deduced E1 transition rates from these two states are discussed in terms of the K-hindrance between the low-lying structures in this prolate-deformed nucleus.

  6. E. coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerns about E. coli . E. coli and Raw Cookie Dough FDA Continues to Warn Against Eating Raw Dough ... Reminds consumers about the risks of eating raw cookie dough. Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections ...

  7. Search for lepton-flavor violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to e$$\\mu$$ final states in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=$$ 13 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2018-04-13

    A search is reported for heavy resonances decaying into emore » $$\\mu$$ final states in proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC at $$\\sqrt{s}=$$ 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$$^{-1}$$. The search focuses on resonance masses above 200 GeV. With no evidence found for physics beyond the standard model in the e$$\\mu$$ mass spectrum, upper limits are set at 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction for this lepton-flavor violating signal. Based on these results, resonant $$\\tau$$ sneutrino production in R-parity violating supersymmetric models is excluded for masses below 1.7 TeV, for couplings $$\\lambda_{132}=\\lambda_{231}=\\lambda'_{311}=0.01$$. Heavy Z$'$ gauge bosons with lepton-flavor violating transitions are excluded for masses up to 4.4 TeV. The e$$\\mu$$ mass spectrum is also interpreted in terms of non-resonant contributions from quantum black-hole production in models with one to six extra spatial dimensions, and lower mass limits are found between 3.6 and 5.6 TeV. In all interpretations used in this analysis, the results of this search improve previous limits by about 1 TeV. These limits correspond to the most sensitive values obtained at colliders.« less

  8. State DOT mission evolution.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    This paper highlights the challenges faced by six state departments of transportation (California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Missouri, Oregon) and the views of their respective chief executive officers within the context of national trends. E...

  9. Regional and State Trends

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page outlines how the ROE focuses on national-level indicators and also presents indicators at sub-national (e.g., regional and state) scales when sufficient data are available to depict a representative trend.

  10. Using Instructional Design, Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate, to Develop e-Learning Modules to Disseminate Supported Employment for Community Behavioral Health Treatment Programs in New York State.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapana R; Margolies, Paul J; Covell, Nancy H; Lipscomb, Cristine; Dixon, Lisa B

    2018-01-01

    Implementation science lacks a systematic approach to the development of learning strategies for online training in evidence-based practices (EBPs) that takes the context of real-world practice into account. The field of instructional design offers ecologically valid and systematic processes to develop learning strategies for workforce development and performance support. This report describes the application of an instructional design framework-Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate (ADDIE) model-in the development and evaluation of e-learning modules as one strategy among a multifaceted approach to the implementation of individual placement and support (IPS), a model of supported employment for community behavioral health treatment programs, in New York State. We applied quantitative and qualitative methods to develop and evaluate three IPS e-learning modules. Throughout the ADDIE process, we conducted formative and summative evaluations and identified determinants of implementation using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Formative evaluations consisted of qualitative feedback received from recipients and providers during early pilot work. The summative evaluation consisted of levels 1 and 2 (reaction to the training, self-reported knowledge, and practice change) quantitative and qualitative data and was guided by the Kirkpatrick model for training evaluation. Formative evaluation with key stakeholders identified a range of learning needs that informed the development of a pilot training program in IPS. Feedback on this pilot training program informed the design document of three e-learning modules on IPS: Introduction to IPS, IPS Job development, and Using the IPS Employment Resource Book . Each module was developed iteratively and provided an assessment of learning needs that informed successive modules. All modules were disseminated and evaluated through a learning management system. Summative evaluation revealed that

  11. New squeezed landau states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragone, C.

    1993-01-01

    We introduce a new set of squeezed states through the coupled two-mode squeezed operator. It is shown that their behavior is simpler than the correlated coherent states introduced by Dodonov, Kurmyshev, and Man'ko in order to quantum mechanically describe the Landau system, i.e., a planar charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. We compare results for both sets of squeezed states.

  12. Vitamin E

    MedlinePlus

    ... extra vitamin E. Vitamin E supplements may be harmful for people who take blood thinners and other medicines. Check with your health care provider before taking the supplements. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

  13. The use of carbon black-TiO2 composite prepared using solid state method as counter electrode and E. conferta as sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, Hidayani; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Ain, Mohd Fadzil

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, counter electrodes based on carbon black (CB)-TiO2 composite are proposed as a cost-effective alternative to conventional Pt counter electrodes used in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. CB-TiO2 composite counter electrodes with different weight percentages of CB were prepared using the solid state method and coated onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass using doctor blade method while Eleiodoxa conferta (E. conferta) and Nb-doped TiO2 were used as sensitizer and photoanode, respectively, with electrolyte containing I-/I-3 redox couple. The experimental results revealed that the CB-TiO2 composite influenced the photovoltaic performance by enhancing the electrocatalytic activity. As the amount of CB increased, the catalytic activity improved due to the increase in surface area which then led to low charge-transfer resistance (RCT) at the electrolyte/CB electrode interface. Due to the use of the modified photoanode together with natural dye sensitizers, the counter electrode based on 15 wt% CB-TiO2 composite was able to produce the highest energy conversion efficiency (2.5%) making it a viable alternative counter electrode.

  14. Search for rare and forbidden decays D+ --> h+/- e+/- e+.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Crede, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weaver, K M; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J

    2005-11-25

    Using 0.8 x 10(6) D+ D- pairs collected with the CLEO-c detector at the psi(3770) resonance, we have searched for flavor-changing neutral current and lepton-number-violating decays of D+ mesons to final states with dielectrons. We find no indication of either, obtaining 90% confidence level upper limits of B(D+ --> pi+ e+ e-) < 7.4 x 10(-6), B(D+ --> pi- e+ d+) < 3.6 x 10(-6), B(D+ --> K+ e+ e-) < 6.2 x 10(-6), and B(D+ --> K- e+ e+) < 4.5 x 10(-6).

  15. Making E-Working Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James; Belovics, Robert

    2006-01-01

    It is estimated that by 2010 there will be 20 million full- and part-time telecommuters working in the United States. The purpose of this article is to assist employment counselors in their work with organizations in implementing e-worker programs as well as in their counseling of e-workers. The authors define e-worker, summarize the growth of…

  16. E-960

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1953-04-27

    In the center foreground of this 1953 hanger photo is the YF-84A (NACA 134/Air Force 45-59490) used for vortex generator research. It arrived on November 28, 1949, and departed on April 21, 1954. Beside it is the third D-558-1 aircraft (NACA 142/Navy 37972). This aircraft was used for a total of 78 transonic research flights from April 1949 to June 1954. It replaced the second D-558-1, lost in the crash which killed Howard Lilly. Just visible on the left edge is the nose of the first D-558-2 (NACA 143/Navy 37973). Douglas turned the aircraft over to NACA on August 31, 1951, after the contractor had completed its initial test flights. NACA only made a single flight with the aircraft, on September 17, 1956, before the program was cancelled. In the center of the photo is the B-47A (NACA 150/Air Force 49-1900). The B-47 jet bomber, with its thin, swept-back wings, and six podded engines, represented the state of the art in aircraft design in the early 1950s. The aircraft undertook a number of research activities between May 1953 and its 78th and final research flight on November 22, 1957. The tests showed that the aircraft had a buffeting problem at speeds above Mach 0.8. Among the pilots who flew the B-47 were later X-15 pilots Joe Walker, A. Scott Crossfield, John B. McKay, and Neil A. Armstrong. On the right side of the B-47 is NACA's X-1 (Air Force 46-063). The second XS-1 aircraft built, it was fitted with a thicker wing than that on the first aircraft, which had exceeded Mach 1 on October 14, 1947. Flight research by NACA pilots indicated that this thicker wing produced 30 percent more drag at transonic speeds compared to the thinner wing on the first X-1. After a final flight on October 23, 1951, the aircraft was grounded due to the possibility of fatigue failure of the nitrogen spheres used to pressurize the fuel tanks. At the time of this photo, in 1953, the aircraft was in storage. In 1955, the aircraft was extensively modified, becoming the X-1E. In front o

  17. iss054e037647

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-02-08

    iss054e037647 (Feb. 8, 2018) --- NASA astronauts (from left) Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle talk to high school students and teachers who linked up to the International Space Station during a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) event from the Boise State University in Boise, Idaho.

  18. iss028e032136

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    ISS028-E-032136 (17 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, is pictured floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station while filming an installment of the ?The Orbital Station. Life on Orbit? video, intended for a documentary film to be prepared by the Roscosmos TV studio for the ?Kultura? State TV channel.

  19. iss028e032133

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    ISS028-E-032133 (17 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, is pictured in the Unity node of the International Space Station while filming an installment of the ?The Orbital Station. Life on Orbit? video, intended for a documentary film to be prepared by the Roscosmos TV studio for the ?Kultura? State TV channel.

  20. iss055e023899

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-15

    iss055e023899 (April 15, 2018) --- The United States island territory of Puerto Rico and the surrounding blue waters of the Caribbean Sea on its southern coast and the Atlantic Ocean on its northern coast were pictured by an Expedition 55 crew member aboard the International Space Station.

  1. iss042e254702

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-12

    ISS042E254702 (02/12/2015) --- US Astronaut Terry Virts took this picture of the United States Gulf Coast on Feb. 12, 2015 while he was on the International Space Station. Virts is a Flight Engineer with Expedition 42.

  2. iss050e038462

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-03

    iss050e038462 (02/03/2017) --- A Russian Soyuz spacecraft can be seen in this image from the International Space Station as it passes over the American state of Florida surrounded by the blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico on the west side and the Atlantic Ocean on the other.

  3. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... common type of bacteria that can get into food, like beef and vegetables. E. coli is short for the ... in fresh spinach in 2006 and some fast-food hamburgers in 1993. Beef can contain E. coli because the bacteria often ...

  4. Vitamin E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's MyPlate . Where can I find out more about ... food sources of vitamin E: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for vitamin ...

  5. 45 CFR 1356.65 - E).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... allotment (title IV PUBLIC WELFARE Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN... APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E Sec. 1356.65 State foster care allotment (title IV-E). The State allotment for... under title IV-E or IV-A during a period of three or more calendar months of Fiscal Year 1981 divided by...

  6. 45 CFR 1356.60 - E).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... (title IV PUBLIC WELFARE Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT... TO TITLE IV-E Sec. 1356.60 Fiscal requirements (title IV-E). (a) Federal matching funds for foster... participation (FFP) is available to States under an approved title IV-E State plan for allowable costs in...

  7. Absolute Integral Cross Sections for the State-selected Ion-Molecule Reaction N2+(X2Σg+ v+ = 0-2) + C2H2 in the Collision Energy Range of 0.03-10.00 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Xiong, Bo; Chung Chang, Yih; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Using the vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion source, together with the double-quadrupole-double-octopole mass spectrometer developed in our laboratory, we have investigated the state-selected ion-molecule reaction {{{{N}}}2}+({X}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+; v + = 0-2, N+ = 0-9) + C2H2, achieving high internal-state selectivity and high kinetic energy resolution for reactant {{{{N}}}2}+ ions. The charge transfer (CT) and hydrogen-atom transfer (HT) channels, which lead to the respective formation of product {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+ and N2H+ ions, are observed. The vibrationally selected absolute integral cross sections for the CT [σ CT(v +)] and HT [[σ HT(v +)] channels obtained in the center-of-mass collision energy (E cm) range of 0.03-10.00 eV reveal opposite E cm dependences. The σ CT(v +) is found to increase as E cm is decreased, and is consistent with the long-range exothermic CT mechanism, whereas the E cm enhancement observed for the σ HT(v +) suggests effective coupling of kinetic energy to internal energy, enhancing the formation of N2H+. The σ HT(v +) curve exhibits a step at E cm = 0.70-1.00 eV, suggesting the involvement of the excited {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+({A}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+) state in the HT reaction. Contrary to the strong E cm dependences for σ CT(v +) and σ HT(v +), the effect of vibrational excitation of {{{{N}}}2}+ on both the CT and HT channels is marginal. The branching ratios and cross sections for the CT and HT channels determined in the present study are useful for modeling the atmospheric compositions of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. These cross sections and branching ratios are also valuable for benchmarking theoretical calculations on chemical dynamics of the titled reaction.

  8. C.E.T.A. in Balance-of-State Areas. Workshop Report of the Rural Manpower Policy Research Consortium, June 6-7, 1974. Special Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Collette H., Comp.

    The workshop on the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) in Balance-of-State areas explored the implications for rural areas of various manpower policies. In a previous workshop, it was found that a close correlation existed between counties classified as Balance-of-State and those classified as "rural" by the U.S. Department…

  9. E-Learning 2010: E-Educators Evolving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushweller, Kevin, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This special report, the second in a three-part series on e-learning, aims to answer questions related to the growing role of e-educators in K-12 education. It provides perspectives and advice from state policymakers and virtual school providers navigating through the new and often murky policy waters of online-only education, and features…

  10. State of the States 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education Finance, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Presenters at the State of the States Roundtable session at the 2014 National Education Finance Conference in Louisville were invited to submit their papers for publication. These papers address the following topics: (1) State issues affecting P-12 and/or higher education funding; (2) Funding priorities/trends for P-12 and/or higher education; (3)…

  11. State of the States 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education Finance, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Presenters at the State of the States Roundtable session at the 2014 National Education Finance Conference in Louisville were invited to submit their papers for publication. These papers address the following topics: (1) State issues affecting P-12 and/or higher education funding; (2) Funding priorities/trends for P-12 and/or higher education; (3)…

  12. Hepatitis E

    MedlinePlus

    ... B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Regions » Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific WHO in countries » Overview Statistics Cooperation strategies ...

  13. Team Nutrition e-Newsletter, February 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Team Nutrition (TN) e-Newsletter is published periodically to share TN resources developed by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or by State agencies, and to share ideas for promoting healthy eating and physical activity through Team Nutrition at the State and local levels. This February 2009 issue includes: (1) State Developed…

  14. iss049e028067

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-03

    ISS049e028067 (10/03/2016) --- Hurricane Matthew, a huge category 4 level storm, as seen from the International Space Station Oct. 3, 2016. Packing winds of 140 miles an hour as a Category 4 hurricane, Matthew passed over western Haiti and eastern Cuba Oct. 4 before charging north over the Bahamas Oct. 5 and potentially threatening the east coast of the United States later in the week.

  15. Libert-E Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  16. jsc2017e067166

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-07

    jsc2017e067166 (06/07/2017) --- United States Vice President Mike Pence congratulates NASA's 12 new astronaut candidates at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston. The 2017 astronaut candidate class -- Kayla Barron, Zena Cardman, Raja Chari, Matthew Dominick, Bob Hines, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, Jonathan Kim, Robb Kulin, Jasmin Moghbeli, Loral O’Hara, Francisco Rubio and Jessica Watkins – were chosen from amid a record number of people applying. Photo Credit: (NASA/James Blair)

  17. About E-Enterprise for the Environment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    E-Enterprise for the Environment (E-Enterprise) is a U.S. EPA-state initiative to improve environmental performance and enhance services to the regulated community, environmental agencies, and the public.

  18. Remote state preparation through hyperentangled atomic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; ul-Islam, Rameez-; Ikram, Manzoor

    2018-04-01

    Hyperentangled states have enhanced channel capacity in quantum processing and have yielded` evident increased communication speed in quantum informatics as a consequence of excessively high information content coded over each quantum entity. In the present article, we intend to demonstrate this fact by utilizing atomic states simultaneously entangled both in internal as well as external degrees of freedom, i.e. the de Broglie motion for remote state preparation (RSP). The results clearly demonstrate that we can efficiently communicate two bit information while manipulating only a single quantum subsystem. The states are prepared and manipulated using atomic Bragg diffraction as well as Ramsey interferometry, both of which are now considered as standard, state of the art tools based on cavity quantum electrodynamics. Since atomic Bragg diffraction is a large interaction time regime and produces spatially well separated, decoherence resistant outputs, the schematics presented here for the RSP offer important perspectives on efficient detection as well as unambiguous information coding and readout. The article summarizes the experimental feasibility of the proposal, culminating with a brief discussion.

  19. partial E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Goetz

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear planetology [1] is a new research field, tightly constrained by a coupled 187Re-232Th-238U systematics [2-6], which by means of nuclear astrophysics aims also at understanding the thermal evolution of Earth-like planets after Mercury-like contraction and Fermi-pressure controlled gravitational collapse events towards the end of their cooling period. In nuclear planetology, Earth-like planets are regarded as old (redshift z >15), down-cooled and differentiated black dwarfs (Fe-C BLD's), so-called interlopers from the Galactic bulge [7], which are subjected to endoergic 56Fe(γ,α)52Cr (etc.) reactions (photodisintegration), (γ,n) or (γ,p) and fusion reactions like 12C(α,γ)16O. It is remarkable that, beside of its surface temperature Teff of its outer core surface, the Earth shows also striking similarity in volume V (radius rEarth ≈6.370 km) with an old white dwarf star (WD; rWD ≈6.300 km) like WD0346+246. This major boundary condition for nuclear planetology can be described in terms of V Earth = V WD = V const=4•π•r3/3 (rWD ≈ rEarth). However, in addition to the fact that Earth is habitable, the most obvious difference between a WD and the Earth is their density ρ (ρ=m/V; m mass, V volume): while a WD may contain 1MO(MO= solar mass) per V const, the mass of the Earth is only a tiny fraction of this, ≈3•10-6 MO per V const. Therefore, it is crucial to understand ∂ρ, or why mEarth«mWD for V const. Here I argue that the application of principles constrained by the theory of relativity [8] may offer a possible answer to this question: it is generally accepted that mass is directly related to energy, E=m•c2 (E energy; m mass; c velocity of light) or m=E/c2. From m˜E we derive that any mass change can be described in terms of energy change [8]. Instead of ρ=m/V we may thus write ρ=E/c2•V, and because of the special scenario V Earth = V WD = V const discussed here, the denominator of this equation becomes a constant term C=c2

  20. ‘GA 03564-12E6’: A high-yielding soft red winter wheat cultivar adapted to Georgia and the southeastern regions of the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soft red winter wheat (SRWW) (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major crop in the southeastern region of the United States and in Georgia. Although wheat acreages have been decreasing in Georgia and the SE region in recent years, more than 100,000 ha were grown to SRWW in 2015. Newly released cultivars mus...

  1. Experimental multilocation remote state preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rådmark, Magnus; Wieśniak, Marcin; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    Transmission of quantum states is a central task in quantum information science. Remote state preparation (RSP) has the same goal as teleportation, i.e., transferring quantum information without sending physically the information carrier, but in RSP the sender knows the state which is to be transmitted. We present experimental demonstrations of RSP for two and three locations. In our experimental scheme Alice (the preparer) and her three partners share four and six photon polarization entangled singlets. This allows us to perform RSP of two or three copies of a single-qubit state, a two-qubit Bell state, and a three-qubit W, or W¯ state. A possibility to prepare two-qubit nonmaximally entangled and GHZ states is also discussed. The ability to remotely prepare an entangled states by local projections at Alice is a distinguishing feature of our scheme.

  2. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supplementary payment (SSP). For individuals of any age who are receiving an SSP, the State of residence is the State paying the SSP. (g) Individuals receiving Title IV-E payments. For individuals of any age who are...

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Development of Facilities to Support Basing US Pacific Fleet F/A-18E/F Aircraft on the West Coast of the United States, Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    ROG reactive organic compound RONA Record of Non -applicability RTV rational threshold value RWQCB Regional Water Quality Control Board SARA...over water. The ranges are either scheduled via a designated military or civilian controlling agency (for restricted or warning areas) or are used...operations areas (MOAs), and air traffic control authorized airspace (ATCAA). Airspace designations throughout the United States are controlled by the Federal

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information

    Science.gov Websites

    Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center : State Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Delicious Rank

  5. Solid-state one-way photoisomerisation of Z,E,Z-1,6-(4,4'-diphenyl)hexa-1,3,5-triene dicarboxylate examined using higher-order derivative spectra and powder XRD patterns.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Yoriko; Goto, Midori; Ichimura, Kunihiro

    2018-03-14

    Higher order derivative spectra were applied at first to one-way ZEZ-to-EEE photoisomerisation of dimethyl ester (ZEZ-DPH1) of the titled compound in a methylcyclohexane solution. Many common crossing points emerged in UV-induced derivative-spectral changes to reveal the direct ZEZ-to-EEE photoisomerisation without the transient formation of an intermediate to suggest the bicycle-pedal mechanism. The solid-state photoisomerisation was subsequently monitored by tracing changes in the fourth-order derivatives of absorption spectra of a thin crystalline layer of ZEZ-DPH1 prepared by the drop-casting method, because the distortion of absorption spectra due to light scattering is cancelled. It was suggested that the solid-state photochemical event consists of three steps: fast ZEZ-to-EEE photoisomerisation, a subsequent slow ZEZ-to-EEE photoisomerisation and very slow disappearance of the EEE-isomer. Studies on powder XRD were also carried out for a drop-cast solid layer of ZEZ-DPH1 to disclose the coexistence of a crystal form other than the original one, and the former exhibited faster ZEZ-to-EEE photoisomerisation when compared with the original crystal form. The results revealed by XRD analysis are in line with those obtained by higher-order derivative spectra, confirming the solid-state one-way photoisomerisation to take place through the bicycle-pedal process.

  6. United States Navy DL Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-10

    United States Navy DL Perspective CAPT Hank Reeves Navy eLearning Project Director 10 August 2010 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...Marine Corps (USMC) Navy eLearning Ongoing Shared with USMC, Coast Guard 9 NeL Help Site https://ile-help.nko.navy.mil/ile/ https://s-ile

  7. Solid-State Quantum Refrigeration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    i n a l Te c h n... i c a l Re p o r t Name of Grantee: Northwestern University Grant Title: Solid-State Quantum Refrigeration Grant #: FA9550-09-1...200 -150 -100 -50 0 Anglewavelength b a c k c o u p lin g i n to th e w a v e g u id e l o s s ( d B ) Figure 8. results of a) percentage

  8. The artesian water supply of the Dakota sandstone in North Dakota, with special reference to the Edgeley quadrangle: Chapter E in Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1923-1924

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinzer, Oscar E.; Hard, Herbert A.

    1925-01-01

    The Dakota sandstone and the overlying dense plastic shales form the most remarkable artesian basin in the United States with respect to its great extent, the long distances through which its water has percolated from the outcrops of the sandstone in the western mountains to the areas of artesian flow, and especially the tremendous pressure under which the water in the sandstone was originally by thick and continuous cover of impermeable shales. In 1882 a well was drilled to the Dakota sandstone at Aberdeen, S. Dak., by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Co. This well was reported by Nettleton1 to have been "the first bore put down which reached the artesian basin of the Dakotas." In 1896 Darton2 estimated that about 400 artesian wells had been drilled to the Dakota sandstone, presumably in South Dakota and adjacent parts of the artesian basin in North Dakota which he investigated.3 The strongest of these wells had pressures ranging from 100 to more than 200 pounds to the square inch and flows ranging from 1,000 to more than 4,000 gallons a minute. The present brief paper is based chiefly on the data that have been obtained in the successive surveys in regard to about 230 artesian wells in or near the Edgeley quadrangle. A table of these well data is on file in the United States Geological Survey and is to be published in the detailed report on the geology and hydrology of the Edgeley and La Moure quadrangles that has been prepared by Mr. Hard. The well data obtained by Mr. Hard have already been published in a report prepared by him in his capacity as State flood-control engineer.

  9. iss031e146391

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    ISS031-E-146391 (27 June 2012) --- An Expedition 31 crew member aboard the International Space Station, flying approximately 240 miles above Earth, recorded a series of images of the current wild fires in the western and southwestern United States. These particular fires, of unknown cause, are burning at the south end of the Wyoming Range in southwestern Wyoming, and have affected 17,000 acres. The fires have produced two major smoke plumes, seen at center of the frame. Utah?s Great Salt Lake (bottom center) is about 120 miles away. Winds transport the smoke in a northeasterly direction.

  10. Citrulline directly modulates muscle protein synthesis via the PI3K/MAPK/4E-BP1 pathway in a malnourished state: evidence from in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Le Plénier, Servane; Goron, Arthur; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Archambault, Eliane; Guihenneuc, Chantal; Walrand, Stéphane; Salles, Jérome; Jourdan, Marion; Neveux, Nathalie; Cynober, Luc; Moinard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Citrulline (CIT) is an endogenous amino acid produced by the intestine. Recent literature has consistently shown CIT to be an activator of muscle protein synthesis (MPS). However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Our working hypothesis was that CIT might regulate muscle homeostasis directly through the mTORC1/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Because CIT undergoes both interorgan and intraorgan trafficking and metabolism, we combined three approaches: in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Using a model of malnourished aged rats, CIT supplementation activated the phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in muscle. Interestingly, the increase in S6K1 phosphorylation was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with plasma CIT concentration. In a model of isolated incubated skeletal muscle from malnourished rats, CIT enhanced MPS (from 30 to 80% CIT vs. Ctrl, P < 0.05), and the CIT effect was abolished in the presence of wortmannin, rapamycin, and PD-98059. In vitro, on myotubes in culture, CIT led to a 2.5-fold increase in S6K1 phosphorylation and a 1.5-fold increase in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Both rapamycin and PD-98059 inhibited the CIT effect on S6K1, whereas only LY-294002 inhibited the CIT effect on both S6K1 and 4E-BP1. These findings show that CIT is a signaling agent for muscle homeostasis, suggesting a new role of the intestine in muscle mass control. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Nonrigid band shift and nonmonotonic electronic structure changes upon doping in the normal state of the pnictide high-temperature superconductor Ba ( F e 1 - x C o x ) 2 A s 2

    DOE PAGES

    Vilmercati, Paolo; Mo, Sung -Kwan; Fedorov, Alexei; ...

    2016-11-28

    Here, we report systematic angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments using different photon polarizations and experimental geometries and find that the doping evolution of the normal state of Ba(Fe 1–xCo x) 2As 2 deviates significantly from the predictions of a rigid band model. The data reveal a nonmonotonic dependence upon doping of key quantities such as band filling, bandwidth of the electron pocket, and quasiparticle coherence. Our analysis suggests that the observed phenomenology and the inapplicability of the rigid band model in Co-doped Ba122 are due to electronic correlations, and not to the either the strength of the impurity potential, or self-energymore » effects due to impurity scattering. Our findings indicate that the effects of doping in pnictides are much more complicated than currently believed. More generally, they indicate that a deep understanding of the evolution of the electronic properties of the normal state, which requires an understanding of the doping process, remains elusive even for the 122 iron-pnictides, which are viewed as the least correlated of the high-T C unconventional superconductors.« less

  12. State Treasure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2013-01-01

    When a music teacher is named Teacher of the Year for an entire state, one just know a special story awaits. The narrative of Heidi Welch, director of music at Hillsboro-Deering High School in New Hampshire, does not disappoint. Welch, who grew up in abject poverty and was often homeless, developed her love of music through memorizing and singing…

  13. E Pluribus Unum: The Possible Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaros, Bonita Nahoum

    The United States has, since its inception, epitomized the themes of peace, freedom, and the pursuit of dignity in concept. Founded as a multicultural nation, the United States adopted the motto "E Pluribus Unum" (out of many, one) to affirm its inclusivity. Throughout its history, the United States has been a haven for peoples fleeing war,…

  14. Team Nutrition e-Newsletter, October 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Team Nutrition (TN) e-Newsletter is published periodically to share TN resources developed by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or by State agencies, and to share ideas for promoting healthy eating and physical activity through Team Nutrition at the State and local levels. This issue includes: (1) Materials Developed by…

  15. Smallest chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maistrenko, Yuri; Brezetsky, Serhiy; Jaros, Patrycja; Levchenko, Roman; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that chimera behavior can be observed in small networks consisting of three identical oscillators, with mutual all-to-all coupling. Three different types of chimeras, characterized by the coexistence of two coherent oscillators and one incoherent oscillator (i.e., rotating with another frequency) have been identified, where the oscillators show periodic (two types) and chaotic (one type) behaviors. Typical bifurcations at the transitions from full synchronization to chimera states and between different types of chimeras have been described. Parameter regions for the chimera states are obtained in the form of Arnold tongues, issued from a singular parameter point. Our analysis suggests that chimera states can be observed in small networks relevant to various real-world systems.

  16. Measurement of jet activity in top quark events using the eμ final state with two b-tagged jets in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-09-13

    Measurements of the jet activity in tt¯ events produced in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV are presented, using 20.3 fb –1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The events were selected in the dilepton eμ decay channel with two identified b-jets. The numbers of additional jets for various jet transverse momentum (p T) thresholds, and the normalised differential cross-sections as a function of p T for the five highest-p T additional jets, were measured in the jet pseudo-rapidity range |η| < 4.5. The gap fraction, the fraction of events which do not contain anmore » additional jet in a central rapidity region, was measured for several rapidity intervals as a function of the minimum p T of a single jet or the scalar sum of p T of all additional jets. These fractions were also measured in different intervals of the invariant mass of the eμbb¯ system. All measurements were corrected for detector effects, and found to be mostly well-described by predictions from next-to-leading-order and leading-order tt¯ event generators with appropriate parameter choices. Lastly, the results can be used to further optimise the parameters used in such generators.« less

  17. Measurement of jet activity in top quark events using the eμ final state with two b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of the jet activity in toverline{t} events produced in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV are presented, using 20.3 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The events were selected in the dilepton eμ decay channel with two identified b-jets. The numbers of additional jets for various jet transverse momentum ( p T) thresholds, and the normalised differential cross-sections as a function of p T for the five highest- p T additional jets, were measured in the jet pseudo-rapidity range | η| < 4 .5. The gap fraction, the fraction of events which do not contain an additional jet in a central rapidity region, was measured for several rapidity intervals as a function of the minimum p T of a single jet or the scalar sum of p T of all additional jets. These fractions were also measured in different intervals of the invariant mass of the eμ boverline{b} system. All measurements were corrected for detector effects, and found to be mostly well-described by predictions from next-to-leading-order and leading-order toverline{t} event generators with appropriate parameter choices. The results can be used to further optimise the parameters used in such generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Measurement of the $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}} $$ production cross section using events in the $$\\mathrm {e}\\mu $$ final state in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=13\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-03-20

    The cross section of top quark-antiquark pair production in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} = 13$$ TeV is measured by the CMS experiment at the LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analyzing events in which the final state includes one electron, one muon, and two or more jets, at least one of which is identified as originating from hadronization of a b quark. Furthermore, the measured cross section is 792 $$\\pm$$ 8 (stat) $$\\pm$$ 37 (syst) $$\\pm$$ 21 (lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectation from the standard model.« less

  19. Qudit hypergraph states and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei-Lei; Zhen, Yi-Zheng; Cao, Wen-Fei; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2018-01-01

    Hypergraph states, a generalization of graph states, constitute a large class of quantum states with intriguing nonlocal properties, and they have promising applications in quantum information science and technology. In this paper, we study some features of an independently proposed generalization of hypergraph states to qudit hypergraph states, i.e., each vertex in the generalized hypergraph (multi-hypergraph) represents a d -level system instead of a two-level one. It is shown that multi-hypergraphs and d -level hypergraph states have a one-to-one correspondence, and the structure of a multi-hypergraph exhibits the entanglement property of the corresponding quantum state. We discuss their relationship with some well-known state classes, e.g., real equally weighted states and stabilizer states. The Bell nonlocality, an important resource in fulfilling many quantum information tasks, is also investigated.

  20. 7 CFR 15e.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employment. 15e.140 Section 15e.140 Agriculture Office... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15e.140 Employment. No... employment under any program or activity conducted by the agency. The definitions, requirements, and...

  1. 7 CFR 15e.160 - Communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Communications. 15e.160 Section 15e.160 Agriculture... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15e.160 Communications. (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with applicants...

  2. 7 CFR 15e.160 - Communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communications. 15e.160 Section 15e.160 Agriculture... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15e.160 Communications. (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with applicants...

  3. Measurements of Excitation Functions and Line Polarizations for Electron Impact Excitation of the n = 2, 3 States of Atomic Hydrogen in the Energy Range 11 - 2000 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J.; Franklin, B.; Shemansky, D.

    1993-01-01

    The electron-atomic hydrogen scattering system is an important testing ground for theoretical models and has received a great deal of attention from experimentalists and theoreticians alike over the years. A complete description of the excitation process requires a knowledge of many different parameters, and experimental measurements of these parameters have been performed in various laboratories around the world. As far as total cross section data are concerned it has been noted that the discrepancy between the data of Long et al. and Williams for n = 2 excitations needs to be resolved in the interests of any further refinement of theory. We report new measurements of total cross sections and atomic line polarizations for both n=2 and n=3 excitations at energies from threshold to 2000 eV...

  4. 34 CFR 461.51 - What are the membership requirements of a State advisory council?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Representatives of— (A) The SEA; (B) The State job training agency; (C) The State human services agency; (D) The State public assistance agency; (E) The State library program; and (F) The State economic development...

  5. State of the States 2016: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The "State of the States 2016" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or administrative code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based on a comprehensive search of state education statute and codes on each state's relevant websites. Complete results from this review are available in…

  6. Dalitz plot analyses of J /ψ →π+π-π0, J /ψ →K+K-π0, and J /ψ →Ks0K±π∓ produced via e+e- annihilation with initial-state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Fritsch, M.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rotondo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Lacker, H. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cheaib, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We study the processes e+e- →γISRJ /ψ , where J /ψ →π+π-π0, J /ψ →K+K-π0, and J /ψ →KS0K±π∓ using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ (n S ) (n =2 ,3 ,4 ) resonances. We measure the ratio of branching fractions R1=B/(J /ψ →K+K-π0) B (J /ψ →π+π-π0) and R2=B/(J /ψ →KS0K±π∓) B (J /ψ →π+π-π0) . We perform Dalitz plot analyses of the three J /ψ decay modes and measure fractions for resonances contributing to the decays. We also analyze the J /ψ →π+π-π0 decay using the Veneziano model. We observe structures compatible with the presence of ρ (1450 ) in all three J /ψ decay modes and measure the relative branching fraction: R (ρ (1450 ))=B/(ρ (1450 )→K+K-) B (ρ (1450 )→π+π-) =0.307 ±0.084 (stat)±0.082 (sys).

  7. Michigan E85 Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Matthew M.

    2012-03-30

    This is the final report for a grant-funded project to financially assist and otherwise provide support to projects that increase E85 infrastructure in Michigan at retail fueling locations. Over the two-year project timeframe, nine E85 and/or flex-fuel pumps were installed around the State of Michigan at locations currently lacking E85 infrastructure. A total of five stations installed the nine pumps, all providing cost share toward the project. By using cost sharing by station partners, the $200,000 provided by the Department of Energy facilitated a total project worth $746,332.85. This project was completed over a two-year timetable (eight quarters). The firstmore » quarter of the project focused on project outreach to station owners about the incentive on the installation and/or conversion of E85 compatible fueling equipment including fueling pumps, tanks, and all necessary electrical and plumbing connections. Utilizing Clean Energy Coalition (CEC) extensive knowledge of gasoline/ethanol infrastructure throughout Michigan, CEC strategically placed these pumps in locations to strengthen the broad availability of E85 in Michigan. During the first and second quarters, CEC staff approved projects for funding and secured contracts with station owners; the second through eighth quarters were spent working with fueling station owners to complete projects; the third through eighth quarters included time spent promoting projects; and beginning in the second quarter and running for the duration of the project was spent performing project reporting and evaluation to the US DOE. A total of 9 pumps were installed (four in Elkton, two in Sebewaing, one in East Lansing, one in Howell, and one in Whitmore Lake). At these combined station locations, a total of 192,445 gallons of E85, 10,786 gallons of E50, and 19,159 gallons of E30 were sold in all reporting quarters for 2011. Overall, the project has successfully displaced 162,611 gallons (2,663 barrels) of petroleum, and

  8. Squeezed colour states in gluon jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilin, S. YA.; Kuvshinov, V. I.; Firago, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of the formation of squeezed states of gluon fields in quantum chromodynamics due to nonlinear nonperturbative self interaction during jet evolution in the process of e(+)e(-) annihilation into hadrons, which are analogous to the quantum photon squeezed states in quantum electrodynamics, is demonstrated. Additionally, the squeezing parameters are calculated.

  9. Search for heavy resonances decaying into WW in the eν μ ν final state in pp collisions at √{s}=13 {TeV} with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bauer, K. T.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Bergsten, L. J.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, Dr.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casha, A. F.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, K.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, Y. S.; Christodoulou, V.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Corradi, M.; Corrigan, E. E.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czekierda, S.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vasconcelos Corga, K.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delporte, C.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Devesa, M. R.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Bello, F. A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Petrillo, K. F.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Dickinson, J.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobre, M.; Dodsworth, D.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubinin, F.; Dubreuil, A.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducourthial, A.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dulsen, C.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Duvnjak, D.; Dyndal, M.; Dziedzic, B. S.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; El Kosseifi, R.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Ennis, J. S.; Epland, M. B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Estrada Pastor, O.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fabiani, V.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, M.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Freund, W. S.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; García Pascual, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geisen, J.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasner, J. M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearson, B.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Peri, F.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, F. H.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Podberezko, P.; Poettgen, R.; Poggi, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pohl, D.; Pokharel, I.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Ponomarenko, D.; Pontecorvo, L.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Portillo Quintero, D. M.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potti, H.; Poulsen, T.; Poveda, J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proklova, N.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puri, A.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rashid, T.; Raspopov, S.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravinovich, I.; Rawling, J. H.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rettie, S.; Reynolds, E.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ripellino, G.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocco, E.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Bosca, S.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Roy, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Rüttinger, E. M.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sampsonidou, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, C. O.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sano, Y.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schenck, F.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schildgen, L. K.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Sciandra, A.; Sciolla, G.; Scornajenghi, M.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Senkin, S.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Šfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherafati, N.; Sherman, A. D.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silva, M., Jr.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, L.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Søgaard, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, W.; Sopczak, A.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Sottocornola, S.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapf, B. S.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Stegler, M.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, T. J.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, DMS; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Tahirovic, E.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, A. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thais, S. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tian, Y.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakamiya, K.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2018-01-01

    A search for neutral heavy resonances is performed in the WW→ eν μ ν decay channel using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb^{-1}, collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 {TeV} by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of such heavy resonances is found. In the search for production via the quark-antiquark annihilation or gluon-gluon fusion process, upper limits on σ _X× B(X → WW) as a function of the resonance mass are obtained in the mass range between 200 {GeV} and up to 5 {TeV} for various benchmark models: a Higgs-like scalar in different width scenarios, a two-Higgs-doublet model, a heavy vector triplet model, and a warped extra dimensions model. In the vector-boson fusion process, constraints are also obtained on these resonances, as well as on a Higgs boson in the Georgi-Machacek model and a heavy tensor particle coupling only to gauge bosons.

  10. E-Learning in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, April

    2005-01-01

    This document presents some of the many ways schools are using online technologies. The report illustrates how Massachusetts educators are taking advantage of e-learning opportunities to improve student learning. Educators across the state are using online courses and resources, engaging in online events and projects, and showing interest in…

  11. Ordering relations for quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Ian

    2015-03-01

    It is often desirable to model physical states in an order-theoretic manner, e.g. as a partially ordered set. Classical states are known to possess a unique ordering relation corresponding to a neo-realist interpretation of these states. No such unique relation exists for quantum states. This lack of a unique ordering relation for quantum states turns out to be a manifestation of quantum contextuality vis-à-vis the Kochen-Specker theorem. It also turns out that this provides a link to certain large-scale thermodynamic processes. The suggestion that the ordering of quantum states leads to macroscopic thermodynamic processes is at least five decades old. The suggestion that the mechanism that drives the ordering is contextuality, is unique to this work. The argument is framed in the language of the theories of domains, categories, and topoi. Financial support provided by FQXi.

  12. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) recovered from a clinically healthy chicken in the United States and characterization of its pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free chickens.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Moo; LeRoith, Tanya; Pudupakam, R S; Pierson, F William; Huang, Yao-Wei; Dryman, Barbara A; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-01-27

    A genetically distinct strain of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV-VA strain) was isolated from a healthy chicken in Virginia, and thus it is important to characterize and compare its pathogenicity with the prototype strain (avian HEV-prototype) isolated from a diseased chicken. Here we first constructed an infectious clone of the avian HEV-VA strain. Capped RNA transcripts from the avian HEV-VA clone were replication-competent after transfection of LMH chicken liver cells. Chickens inoculated intrahepatically with RNA transcripts of avian HEV-VA clone developed active infection as evidenced by fecal virus shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. To characterize the pathogenicity, RNA transcripts of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype clones were intrahepatically inoculated into the livers of chickens. Avian HEV RNA was detected in feces, serum and bile samples from 10/10 avian HEV-VA-inoculated and 9/9 avian HEV-prototype-inoculated chickens although seroconversion occurred only in some chickens during the experimental period. The histopathological lesion scores were lower for avian HEV-VA group than avian HEV-prototype group in the liver at 3 and 5 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) and in the spleen at 3 wpi, although the differences were not statistically significant. The liver/body weight ratio, indicative of liver enlargement, of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype groups were significantly higher than that of the control group at 5 wpi. Overall, the avian HEV-VA strain still induces histological liver lesions even though it was isolated from a healthy chicken. The results also showed that intrahepatic inoculation of chickens with RNA transcripts of avian HEV infectious clone may serve as an alternative for live virus in animal pathogenicity studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. iss012e19051

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-03-04

    ISS012-E-19051 (4 March 2006) --- Newport, R.I., is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. Newport is well-known as a summer destination, but winter snow blankets the city in this image. One of the first settlements by Europeans in the Americas, the region was initially settled by colonists seeking religious freedom denied them in Europe, but over time some of them perceived a need to escape the strictures of the dominant Puritan faith. Newport, founded in 1639, became a bastion of the Baptist faith and exemplified one of the basic precepts of the United States Constitution – separation of church and state. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, Newport consolidated its position as one of the premier ports of the United States. The 19th and early 20th centuries saw a decline in commercial shipping at Newport and its rebirth as a recreational destination. Many of the leading industrialist families of the time, such as the Vanderbilts, built grand summer mansions in Newport that are now open to visitors. The United States Navy has also had a strong presence in the Newport area since 1869, exemplified by the establishment of the Naval War College in 1884 (image top center). The College still serves as an educational institution for naval officers. The gray-brown metropolitan area of Newport is thrown into sharp contrast by the surrounding snow-covered open fields and rural areas to the east and southwest. The Clairborne Pell (also known as Newport) Bridge connects Jamestown, R.I. on Conanicut Island to Newport at image top. The main span of this suspension bridge is 1600 feet (485 meters) long and crosses the East Passage of Narragansett Bay. The Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge (image lower right) supports over 200 bird species, including the largest winter harlequin duck population on the East Coast.

  14. State of the States, 2012: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arts Education Partnership (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "State of the States 2012" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based primarily on results from the AEP Arts Education State Policy Survey conducted in 2010-11, and updated in April 2012.

  15. Tocotrienols: Vitamin E Beyond Tocopherols

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati

    2007-01-01

    In nature, eight substances have been found to have vitamin E activity: α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol; and α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocotrienol. Yet, of all papers on vitamin E listed in PubMed less than 1% relate to tocotrienols. The abundance of α-tocopherol in the human body and the comparable efficiency of all vitamin E molecules as antioxidants, led biologists to neglect the non-tocopherol vitamin E molecules as topics for basic and clinical research. Recent developments warrant a serious reconsideration of this conventional wisdom. Tocotrienols possess powerful neuroprotective, anti-cancer and cholesterol lowering properties that are often not exhibited by tocopherols. Current developments in vitamin E research clearly indicate that members of the vitamin E family are not redundant with respect to their biological functions. α-Tocotrienol, γ-tocopherol, and δ-tocotrienol have emerged as vitamin E molecules with functions in health and disease that are clearly distinct from that of α-tocopherol. At nanomolar concentration, α-tocotrienol, not α-tocopherol, prevents neurodegeneration. On a concentration basis, this finding represents the most potent of all biological functions exhibited by any natural vitamin E molecule. An expanding body of evidence support that members of the vitamin E family are functionally unique. In recognition of this fact, title claims in manuscripts should be limited to the specific form of vitamin E studied. For example, evidence for toxicity of a specific form of tocopherol in excess may not be used to conclude that high-dosage “vitamin E” supplementation may increase all-cause mortality. Such conclusion incorrectly implies that tocotrienols are toxic as well under conditions where tocotrienols were not even considered. The current state of knowledge warrants strategic investment into the lesser known forms of vitamin E. This will enable prudent selection of the appropriate vitamin E molecule for studies addressing a specific

  16. Job Prospects for E/E Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1986-01-01

    Reviews job prospects for electrical/electronic E/E engineers, indicating that 1985 was not a banner year due to problems in the semiconductor manufacturing industries and in telecommunications. Also indicates that an upturn is expected for 1986 E/E graduates. (JN)

  17. Experimental test of the mechanism of reaction for (e,e'p) coincidence experiment. [/sup 12/C(e,e'p): DWIA

    SciTech Connect

    Bernheim, M.; Bussiere, A.; Frullani, S.

    1977-06-27

    In order to test the validity of the distorted wave impulse approximation to describe (e,e'p) reactions and/or the suitability of the available optical potential parameters to calculate the distortion, the spectral function was measured for /sub 12/C(e,e'p)/sub 11/B in different kinematical configurations. Experimental results are shown together with the distributions computed with several values of the optical potential parameters. Data seem to indicate the necessity of using different parameters for p hole states and s hole states.

  18. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  19. Solid State Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-23

    pumped at frequencies up to 5.5 kHz (with 10-W pumping). At high pulse repetition rates the radius of the beam waist decreases to ~60 jum, owing to...1998) A 1.3-GHz SOI CMOS Test Chip for R. Berger Low-Power High -Speed Pulse W. G. Lyons Processing A. M. Soares IEEE J. Solid-State Circuits...Goodhue D. E. Mull J. M. Rossler Y. Royter C.G.Fonstad* /. Vac. Sei. Technol. Modeling the Microwave Impedance of High -Tc Long Josephson

  20. jsc2017e067164

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-07

    jsc2017e067164 (06/07/2017) --- United States Vice President Mike Pence congratulates NASA's 12 new astronaut candidates at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas. The 2017 astronaut candidate class -- Kayla Barron, Zena Cardman, Raja Chari, Matthew Dominick, Bob Hines, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, Jonathan Kim, Robb Kulin, Jasmin Moghbeli, Loral O’Hara, Francisco Rubio and Jessica Watkins – were chosen from amid a record number of people applying. After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on NASA’s new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket. Photo Credit: (NASA/James Blair)

  1. jsc2017e067186

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-07

    jsc2017e067186 (06/07/2017) --- United States Vice President Mike Pence delivers remarks during an event where 12 new NASA astronaut candidates were introduced; Kayla Barron, Zena Cardman, Raja Chari, Matthew Dominick, Robert Hines, Warren Hoburg, Jonathan Kim, Robb Kulin, Jasmin Moghbeli, Loral O’Hara, Francisco Rubio and Jessica Watkins at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on NASA’s new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket. Photo Credit: (NASA/Robert Markowitz)

  2. jsc2017e067182

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-07

    jsc2017e067182 (06/07/2017) --- United States Vice President Mike Pence congratulates NASA's 12 new astronaut candidates at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas. The 2017 astronaut candidate class -- Kayla Barron, Zena Cardman, Raja Chari, Matthew Dominick, Bob Hines, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, Jonathan Kim, Robb Kulin, Jasmin Moghbeli, Loral O’Hara, Francisco Rubio and Jessica Watkins – were chosen from amid a record number of people applying. After completing two years of training, the new astronaut candidates could be assigned to missions performing research on the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft built by commercial companies, and launching on deep space missions on NASA’s new Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket. Photo Credit: (NASA/Robert Markowitz)

  3. iss031e146343

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    ISS031-E-146343 (27 June 2012) --- An Expedition 31 crew member aboard the International Space Station, flying approximately 240 miles above Earth, recorded a series of images of the current wild fires in the west and southwestern United States. For this particular image, taken from the station?s Cupola, he used a 16mm lens, which gives this view a ?fisheye? affect. The fires give rise to thick smoke plumes on the southernmost extremity of the Wyoming Range, which occupies the bottom left portion of the image. Three helicopters and more than 100 personnel are fighting the fire, which is being managed by the Bridger?Teton National Forest. Part of a docked Russian Soyuz spacecraft and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) are at lower right.

  4. iss031e146341

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    ISS031-E-146344 (27 June 2012) --- An Expedition 31 crew member aboard the International Space Station, flying approximately 240 miles above Earth, recorded a series of images of the current wild fires in the southwestern United States. For this particular image, taken from the station?s Cupola, he used a 16mm lens, which gives this view a ?fisheye? affect. The fires give rise to thick smoke plumes on the southernmost extremity of the Wyoming Range, which occupies the center of the image. Slopes of the central Salt River Range appear at left. Three helicopters and more than 100 personnel are fighting the fire, which is being managed by the Bridger?Teton National Forest.

  5. iss031e146397

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    ISS031-E-146397 (27 June 2012) --- An Expedition 31 crew member aboard the International Space Station, flying approximately 240 miles above Earth, recorded a series of images of the current wild fires in the western and southwestern United States. These particular fires, of unknown cause, are burning at the south end of the Wyoming Range in southwestern Wyoming, and have affected 17,000 acres. The fires have produced two major smoke plumes, seen at upper left of the 18mm frame. Winds transport the smoke in a northeasterly direction. Utah?s Great Salt Lake (center) is about 120 miles away. Bear Lake and Utah Lake (very light blue or gray) are also visible in the frame.

  6. Frequent Questions about e-Manifest

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about e-Manifest covering these areas: scope, generators, receivers, manifest preparation & brokers, federal and state implementation, fee obligations, record retention, data policy, data correction, and user registration.

  7. Cleaning Up Electronic Waste (E-Waste)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    While accurate data on the amount of e-waste being exported from the U.S. are not available, the United States government is concerned that these exports are being mismanaged abroad, causing serious public health and environmental hazards.

  8. The State perspective.

    PubMed

    Lipton, D S; Appel, P

    1984-01-01

    Our survey showed that State agencies make use of NIDA materials of all sorts, including NIDA treatment evaluation materials. A majority of the respondents indicated that NIDA treatment evaluation materials were among the most useful of its products; most frequently mentioned was DARP, then Nurco's and Robins' work, and TOPS. That DARP was most frequently mentioned is not a contradiction, since the responses were stated in a general sense, not in terms of a specific report or material. In the past 1 to 2 years, many State drug abuse agency budgets have been substantially reduced due to declines in Federal funding. As a result, treatment evaluation reports and related materials are viewed somewhat differently than they were in the past. The fiscal climate in various States may thus be another factor contributing to the greater familarity and reported use of reports such as DAWN, CODAP, and case management and monitoring manuals published by NIDA. A number of suggestions were made about the kinds of evaluation materials needed by States. It was generally agreed that attempts should be made to produce treatment evaluation findings/new knowledge in a format where it would be more accessible to administrators (e.g., "how-to" manuals, evaluation case studies, dissemination of treatment evaluation bibliographies) and should assist in making existing treatment evaluation results more accessible (divide results for modalities into subtypes, provide data on the effectiveness of specific interventions with specific conditions, diversify the settings of programs in which evaluations are done, etc.). The theme of these various suggestions is to make evaluations more available, usable, and specific, especially now in view of the reduced ability of many States to carry on their own evaluation activities. The general sense of the respondents regarding dissemination was that right now, in view of other problems such as the financial crunch, NIDA's system of distribution cannot be a

  9. 12 CFR 202.11 - Relation to state law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other interested party may request that the Board determine whether a state law is inconsistent with the.... (e) Exemption for state-regulated transactions—(1) Applications. A state may apply to the Board for... OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) § 202.11 Relation to state law. (a) Inconsistent state laws. Except as...

  10. State Correctional Education Programs. State Policy Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Michelle

    Secure state correctional facilities currently house more than 1.8 million adults, and nearly 4.4 million adults fall under state-administered community corrections. A state's approach to corrections and the communication between the state correctional components can have a large impact on the state's correctional education program. Decentralized…

  11. Generalized Steering Robustness of Bipartite Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunming; Guo, Zhihua; Cao, Huaixin

    2018-06-01

    EPR steering is a kind of quantum correlation that is intermediate between entanglement and Bell nonlocality. In this paper, by recalling the definitions of unsteerability and steerability, some properties of them are given, e.g, it is proved that a local quantum channel transforms every unsteerable state into an unsteerable state. Second, a way of quantifying quantum steering, which we called the generalized steering robustness (GSR), is introduced and some interesting properties are established, including: (1) GSR of a state vanishes if and only if the state is unsteerable; (2) a local quantum channel does not increase GSR of any state; (3) GSR is invariant under each local unitary operation; (4) as a function on the state space, GSR is convex and lower-semi continuous. Lastly, by using the majorization between the reduced states of two pure states, GSR of the two pure states are compared, and it is proved that every maximally entangled state has the maximal GSR.

  12. Directing Discipline: State Medical Board Responsiveness to State Legislatures.

    PubMed

    Lillvis, Denise F; McGrath, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    State medical boards are increasingly responsible for regulating medical and osteopathic licensure and professional conduct in the United States. Yet, there is great variation in the extent to which such boards take disciplinary action against physicians, indicating that some boards are more zealous regulators than others. We look to the political roots of such variation and seek to answer a simple, yet important, question: are nominally apolitical state medical boards responsive to political preferences? To address this question, we use panel data on disciplinary actions across sixty-four state medical boards from 1993 through 2006 and control for over-time changes in board characteristics (e.g., composition, independence, budgetary status), regulatory structure, and resources. We show that as state legislatures become more liberal [conservative], state boards increasingly [decreasingly] discipline physicians, especially during unified government and in the presence of highly professional legislatures. Our conclusions join others in emphasizing the importance of state medical boards and the contingent nature of political control of state regulation. In addition, we emphasize the roles that oversight capacity and strategy play in offsetting concerns regarding self-regulation of a powerful organized interest. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  13. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≥ 0, T ≥ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits themore » low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.« less

  14. Document-Oriented E-Learning Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation questions the common assumption that e-learning requires a "learning management system" (LMS) such as Moodle or Blackboard. Based on an analysis of the current state of the art in LMSs, we come to the conclusion that the functionality of conventional e-learning platforms consists of basic content management and…

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey E. H. Pickering, Photographer September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey E. H. Pickering, Photographer September 1936 SAID TO BE THE OLDEST ACADEMY IN THE UNITED STATES - Old Academy, Liberty Road (State Route 26), Libertytown, Frederick County, MD

  16. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September 1, 1936 STANDARD AND BRACKETS, P. J. LYONS HOME - 300 STATE STREET - Patrick Lyons House (Ironwork), 300 State Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September 1, 1936 FRONT ELEVATION, P. J. LYONS HOME - 300 STATE STREET - Patrick Lyons House (Ironwork), 300 State Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  18. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September 1, 1936 STEPS AND RAILINGS, LYONS HOME - 300 STATE STREET - Patrick Lyons House (Ironwork), 300 State Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  19. 40 CFR 60.39e - Compliance times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... date 3 years after approval of an amended State plan (but not later than October 6, 2014), for the... October 6, 2014), for the emissions guidelines as amended on October 6, 2009. (e) For approval, a State...

  20. 45 CFR 1355.21 - E and IV-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... requirements for titles IV PUBLIC WELFARE Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN.... 1355.21 State plan requirements for titles IV-E and IV-B. (a) The State plans for titles IV-E and IV-B... contained in section 471(a)(8) of the Act. (b) The State plans for titles IV-E and IV-B must provide for...

  1. Search for Long-Lived Particles in e+ e- Collisions.

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Lankford, A J; Dey, B; Gary, J W; Long, O; Campagnari, C; Franco Sevilla, M; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Lockman, W S; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Miyashita, T S; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Pushpawela, B G; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Martellotti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Prell, S; Ahmed, H; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Schubert, K R; Barlow, R J; Lafferty, G D; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Feltresi, E; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Chrzaszcz, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Dittrich, S; Grünberg, O; Hess, M; Leddig, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Vasseur, G; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Fulsom, B G; Graham, M T; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Lindemann, D; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wisniewski, W J; Wulsin, H W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; De Mori, F; Filippi, A; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, A; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Lueck, T; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2015-05-01

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+ e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+ e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+ e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1  fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the ϒ(4S), ϒ(3S), and ϒ(2S) resonances and just below the ϒ(4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B→XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  2. Search for Long-Lived Particles in e + e - Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2015-04-29

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e +e - collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e +e - interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e +e - data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb -1 collected by the BABAR detector at the γ (4S), γ (3S), and γ (2S) resonances and just below the γ (4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence levelmore » upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B→X sL), where X s is a strange hadronic system.« less

  3. Anomalous quartic couplings in W+W- gamma production at e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leil, G. A.; Stirling, W. J.

    1995-04-01

    We study the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow W^+W^- \\gamma$ at high-energy $e^+ e^-$ colliders to investigate the effect of genuine quartic $W^+W^-\\gamma\\gamma$ and $W^+W^- Z\\gamma$ anomalous couplings on the cross section. Deviations from the Standard Model predictions are quantified. We show how bounds on the anomalous couplings can be improved by choosing specific initial state helicity combinations. The dependence of the anomalous contributions on the collider energy is studied.

  4. Modeling lake trophic state: a random forest approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Productivity of lentic ecosystems has been well studied and it is widely accepted that as nutrient inputs increase, productivity increases and lakes transition from low trophic state (e.g. oligotrophic) to higher trophic states (e.g. eutrophic). These broad trophic state classi...

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, June 19, 1936 OLD MULE GIN HOUSE LOOKING S. E. - Cotton Gin & Well Sweep, Cliatt Plantation, State Route 165, Cottonton, Russell County, AL

  6. The in vitro comparative study of the effect of BPA, BPS, BPF and BPAF on human erythrocyte membrane; perturbations in membrane fluidity, alterations in conformational state and damage to proteins, changes in ATP level and Na+/K+ ATPase and AChE activities.

    PubMed

    Maćczak, Aneta; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Sicińska, Paulina; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir

    2017-12-01

    Bisphenols are massively used in the industry, and thus the exposure of biota including humans to these substances has been noted. In this study we have assessed the effect of BPA and its selected analogs, i.e. BPS, BPF and BPAF on membrane of human red blood cells, which is the first barrier that must be overcome by xenobiotics penetrating the cell, and is commonly utilized as a model in the investigation of the effect of different xenobiotics on various cell types. Red blood cells were incubated with BPA and its analogs in the concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 250 μg/ml for 4 h and 24 h. We have noted that the compounds studied altered membrane fluidity at its hydrophobic region, increased internal viscosity and osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes and altered conformational state of membrane proteins. Moreover, bisphenols examined increased thiol groups level, caused oxidative damage to membrane proteins, decreased ATP level, depleted the activity of Na+/K + ATPase and changed the activity of AChE in human red blood cells. It has been shown that the strongest changes were noted in cells treated with BPAF, while BPS caused the weakest (or none) alterations in the parameters studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biofuels E0, E15, E85 Neurophysiology Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Visual, auditory, somatosensory, and peripheral nerve evoked responses.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Herr , D., D. Freeborn , L. Degn , S.A. Martin, J. Ortenzio, L. Pantlin, C. Hamm , and W. Boyes. Neurophysiological Assessment of Auditory, Peripheral Nerve, Somatosensory, and Visual System Function After Developmental Exposure to Gasoline, E15 and E85 Vapors. NEUROTOXICOLOGY AND TERATOLOGY. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 54: 78-88, (2016).

  8. Optimal resource states for local state discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Halder, Saronath; Nathanson, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We study the problem of locally distinguishing pure quantum states using shared entanglement as a resource. For a given set of locally indistinguishable states, we define a resource state to be useful if it can enhance local distinguishability and optimal if it can distinguish the states as well as global measurements and is also minimal with respect to a partial ordering defined by entanglement and dimension. We present examples of useful resources and show that an entangled state need not be useful for distinguishing a given set of states. We obtain optimal resources with explicit local protocols to distinguish multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and graph states and also show that a maximally entangled state is an optimal resource under one-way local operations and classical communication to distinguish any bipartite orthonormal basis which contains at least one entangled state of full Schmidt rank.

  9. {gamma}-vibrational states in superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yang; Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000; Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556

    2008-04-15

    Recent experimental advances have made it possible to study excited structure in superheavy nuclei. The observed states have often been interpreted as quasiparticle excitations. We show that in superheavy nuclei collective vibrations systematically appear as low-energy excitation modes. By using the microscopic Triaxial Projected Shell Model, we make a detailed prediction on {gamma}-vibrational states and their E2 transition probabilities to the ground state band in fermium and nobelium isotopes where active structure research is going on, and in {sup 270}Ds, the heaviest isotope where decay data have been obtained for the ground-state and for an isomeric state.

  10. Orbital State Uncertainty Realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwood, J.; Poore, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to the success of the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is the rigorous inclusion of uncertainty in the space surveillance network. The *proper characterization of uncertainty* in the orbital state of a space object is a common requirement to many SSA functions including tracking and data association, resolution of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs), conjunction analysis and probability of collision, sensor resource management, and anomaly detection. While tracking environments, such as air and missile defense, make extensive use of Gaussian and local linearity assumptions within algorithms for uncertainty management, space surveillance is inherently different due to long time gaps between updates, high misdetection rates, nonlinear and non-conservative dynamics, and non-Gaussian phenomena. The latter implies that "covariance realism" is not always sufficient. SSA also requires "uncertainty realism"; the proper characterization of both the state and covariance and all non-zero higher-order cumulants. In other words, a proper characterization of a space object's full state *probability density function (PDF)* is required. In order to provide a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the space surveillance tracking environment and to better support the aforementioned SSA functions, a new class of multivariate PDFs are formulated which more accurately characterize the uncertainty of a space object's state or orbit. The new distribution contains a parameter set controlling the higher-order cumulants which gives the level sets a distinctive "banana" or "boomerang" shape and degenerates to a Gaussian in a suitable limit. Using the new class of PDFs within the general Bayesian nonlinear filter, the resulting filter prediction step (i.e., uncertainty propagation) is shown to have the *same computational cost as the traditional unscented Kalman filter* with the former able to maintain a proper characterization of the uncertainty for up to *ten

  11. PG&E and Silkwood

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The Supreme Court rendered its decision in PG&E in April 1983. The decision involved a challenge by a nuclear utility to a California state moratorium on the construction of new commercial nuclear power plants until the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission could determine that there is a demonstrated and federally approved solution for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The moratorium was based not on a state concern with the radiological hazards associated with new nuclear plants but, ostensibly on a state concern with the economics of new nuclear plants. In particular, the state had concluded thatmore » a new nuclear plant, in the absence of a solution for the permanent disposal of the high-level nuclear waste it would generate, would be an uneconomical and uncertain source of electric power. The nuclear utility that challenged the moratorium argued that its prohibition to new nuclear plant construction was in fact based on a state concern with radiation hazards. However, the Court accepted California`s {open_quotes}avowed economic purpose{close_quotes} and declined to second-guess the basis for the moratorium. The Court rendered its decision in Silkwood in January 1984. The decision involved an action brought by the administrator of the estate for a deceased employee of a nuclear fuel facility regulated by the NRC. Brought under Oklahoma state common law of torts, the action was for damages for radiological injuries suffered as a result of alleged plutonium contamination. A jury returned a verdict for the administrator as well as an award of actual and punitive damages.« less

  12. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  13. The State Agency--College-Mandated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capoor, Madan; Morante, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Describes two state-mandated programs for institutional accountability in New Jersey (i.e., Basic Skills Assessment Program and College Outcomes Evaluation Program), which function through cooperation between the state's higher education agency and its colleges and universities. Highlights research objectives, procedures, responsibilities,…

  14. Solid State Sciences Committee Forum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    3. REPOT TYPE AND CATES COVERED I Final Report 01 Mar 91-29 Feb 92 4. MrlLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNOG4 NUMBERS SOLID STATE SCIENCES COMMITTEE FORUM AFOSR...lON IU2EM , Appeved kv pub~e We=% I3. ABSTRACT (MaOimum 200 wovij The 1991 SSSC Forum was conductted under the auspices of the Board on Physics and...Astronomy’s Solid State Sciences Committe (SSSC) and cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). The Forum was the culmination of a

  15. E2E: A Summary of the e2e Learning Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Development Agency, London (England).

    This publication is a summary of the E2E (Entry to Employment) Learning Framework that provides guidance on program implementation. (E2E is a new learning program for young people not yet ready or able to enter Modern Apprenticeship programs, a Level 2 program, or employment directly.) Section 2 highlights core values to which all involved should…

  16. 33 CFR 125.23 - United States citizens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States citizens. 125.23... VESSELS § 125.23 United States citizens. Acceptable evidence of United States citizenship is described in... of birth. (e) United States passport. (f) A commission in one of the armed forces of the United...

  17. 33 CFR 125.23 - United States citizens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States citizens. 125.23... VESSELS § 125.23 United States citizens. Acceptable evidence of United States citizenship is described in... of birth. (e) United States passport. (f) A commission in one of the armed forces of the United...

  18. 33 CFR 125.23 - United States citizens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States citizens. 125.23... VESSELS § 125.23 United States citizens. Acceptable evidence of United States citizenship is described in... of birth. (e) United States passport. (f) A commission in one of the armed forces of the United...

  19. 33 CFR 125.23 - United States citizens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States citizens. 125.23... VESSELS § 125.23 United States citizens. Acceptable evidence of United States citizenship is described in... of birth. (e) United States passport. (f) A commission in one of the armed forces of the United...

  20. 33 CFR 125.23 - United States citizens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States citizens. 125.23... VESSELS § 125.23 United States citizens. Acceptable evidence of United States citizenship is described in... of birth. (e) United States passport. (f) A commission in one of the armed forces of the United...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives

    Science.gov Websites

    State Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark

  2. Solid State Research, 1980:1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-15

    ESD-TR-79-325 H 1 Solid State Research 1980 Prepared under Electronic Systems Division Contract FI%28-80-C-0002 by Lincoln Laboratory MASSkCHIISETTS...it is no longer needed. MASSACHUSETTS IN*STITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LINCOLN LABORATORY V SOLID STATE RESEARCH QUARTERLY TECHNICAL SUMMARY REPORT I NOVEMBER...January 1990. The topics covered a-e Solid State Device Research , Quantum Electronics, Materials Rese.rch, Microelec- tronics, and Analog Device

  3. Spin and chirality effects in antler-topology processes at high energy $$\\varvec{e^+e^-}$$ e + e - colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, S. Y.; Christensen, N. D.; Salmon, D.; ...

    2015-10-01

    We perform a model-independent investigation of spin and chirality correlation effects in the antler-topology processes e+e−→P+P−→(ℓ+D0)(ℓ−D¯0) at high-energy e+e− colliders with polarized beams. Generally the production process e+e−→P+P− can occur not only through the s-channel exchange of vector bosons, V0 , including the neutral Standard Model (SM) gauge bosons, γ and Z, but also through the s- and t-channel exchanges of new neutral states, S0 and T0 , and the u-channel exchange of new doubly charged states, U−− . The general set of (non-chiral) three-point couplings of the new particles and leptons allowed in a renormalizable quantum field theory ismore » considered. The general spin and chirality analysis is based on the threshold behavior of the excitation curves for P+P− pair production in e+e− collisions with longitudinal- and transverse-polarized beams, the angular distributions in the production process and also the production-decay angular correlations. In the first step, we present the observables in the helicity formalism. Subsequently, we show how a set of observables can be designed for determining the spins and chiral structures of the new particles without any model assumptions. Finally, taking into account a typical set of approximately chiral invariant scenarios, we demonstrate how the spin and chirality effects can be probed experimentally at a high-energy e+e− collider.« less

  4. Enzymatic Transition States, Transition-State Analogs, Dynamics, Thermodynamics, and Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Vern L.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental analysis of enzymatic transition-state structures uses kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) to report on bonding and geometry differences between reactants and the transition state. Computational correlation of experimental values with chemical models permits three-dimensional geometric and electrostatic assignment of transition states formed at enzymatic catalytic sites. The combination of experimental and computational access to transition-state information permits (a) the design of transition-state analogs as powerful enzymatic inhibitors, (b) exploration of protein features linked to transition-state structure, (c) analysis of ensemble atomic motions involved in achieving the transition state, (d) transition-state lifetimes, and (e) separation of ground-state (Michaelis complexes) from transition-state effects. Transition-state analogs with picomolar dissociation constants have been achieved for several enzymatic targets. Transition states of closely related isozymes indicate that the protein’s dynamic architecture is linked to transition-state structure. Fast dynamic motions in catalytic sites are linked to transition-state generation. Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of femtoseconds, the lifetime of bond vibrations. Binding isotope effects (BIEs) reveal relative reactant and transition-state analog binding distortion for comparison with actual transition states. PMID:21675920

  5. Benefits of State-by-State Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary W.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests that the National Assessment of Educational Progress's (NAEP) Trial State Assessment (TSA) will provide reliable and valid state-by-state comparisons of what students have learned and will assess their progress over time. The TSA will also provide information on home learning environments, instructional practices, educational resources,…

  6. State of the States in Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, David; Hemp, Richard; Rizzolo, Mary Kay

    2008-01-01

    This is the latest edition of the "State of the States in Developmental Disabilities" study--a thorough and the only one of its kind investigation on public spending, revenues, and programmatic trends of intellectual and developmental programs and services within the United States since 1977. Directed by leading researcher, Dr. David…

  7. Entangled states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruža, Jānis

    2010-01-01

    In some circles of quantum physicists, a view is maintained that the nonseparability of quantum systems-i.e., the entanglement-is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics. According to this view, the entanglement plays a crucial role in the solution of quantum measurement problem, the origin of the “classicality” from the quantum physics, the explanation of the EPR paradox by a nonlocal character of the quantum world. Besides, the entanglement is regarded as a cornerstone of such modern disciplines as quantum computation, quantum cryptography, quantum information, etc. At the same time, entangled states are well known and widely used in various physics areas. In particular, this notion is widely used in nuclear, atomic, molecular, solid state physics, in scattering and decay theories as well as in other disciplines, where one has to deal with many-body quantum systems. One of the methods, how to construct the basis states of a composite many-body quantum system, is the so-called genealogical decomposition method. Genealogical decomposition allows one to construct recurrently by particle number the basis states of a composite quantum system from the basis states of its forming subsystems. These coupled states have a structure typical for entangled states. If a composite system is stable, the internal structure of its forming basis states does not manifest itself in measurements. However, if a composite system is unstable and decays onto its forming subsystems, then the measurables are the quantum numbers, associated with these subsystems. In such a case, the entangled state has a dynamical origin, determined by the Hamiltonian of the corresponding decay process. Possible correlations between the quantum numbers of resulting subsystems are determined by the symmetries-conservation laws of corresponding dynamical variables, and not by the quantum entanglement feature.

  8. Occupancy estimation and modeling with multiple states and state uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; MacKenzie, D.I.; Seamans, M.E.; Gutierrez, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of a species over space is of central interest in ecology, but species occurrence does not provide all of the information needed to characterize either the well-being of a population or the suitability of occupied habitat. Recent methodological development has focused on drawing inferences about species occurrence in the face of imperfect detection. Here we extend those methods by characterizing occupied locations by some additional state variable ( e. g., as producing young or not). Our modeling approach deals with both detection probabilities,1 and uncertainty in state classification. We then use the approach with occupancy and reproductive rate data from California Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) collected in the central Sierra Nevada during the breeding season of 2004 to illustrate the utility of the modeling approach. Estimates of owl reproductive rate were larger than naive estimates, indicating the importance of appropriately accounting for uncertainty in detection and state classification.

  9. State Control of Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPorte, Diane H.; LaPorte, Ronald E.

    The research in this paper was designed to assess the role of the individual state in directing and supervising curriculum matters within the state. Fifty surveys were mailed to the State Education Departments in each of the 50 states. Questions 1-5 of the survey were designed to determine the number of districts in each state, the number of…

  10. Field-Effect Spectroscopy of Interface States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    ed.), Physics and Chemistry of Il-V Compound Semiconductor Interfaces, Plenum, New York, 1985, p. 327. HETEROJUNCTION AND DIELECTRICALLY INSULATED GATE...Electron Devices. voi. ED-29. pp. 1059-1064, 1982. chemistry , and physics from San Diego State Uni- 131 T. H. Mies, W. M. Paulson, and M. S...1982). 40. T. Y. Chang, R. F. Leheny, R. E. Nahory, E. Silberg , A. A. Ballman, E. A. Carid’ and C. J. Harrold, IEEE Electron. Dev. Lett. EDL- 3, 56

  11. 32. SPILLWAY CHANNEL WALLS REINF. DETAILS; MONOLITHS E22, E23, W22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SPILLWAY CHANNEL WALLS REINF. DETAILS; MONOLITHS E-22, E-23, W-22, AND W-23. Sheet S-46, May, 1940. File no. 342/59. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. Entanglement properties of boundary state and thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wu-zhong

    2018-06-01

    We discuss the regularized boundary state {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a on two aspects in both 2D CFT and higher dimensional free field theory. One is its entanglement and correlation properties, which exhibit exponential decay in 2D CFT, the parameter 1 /τ 0 works as a mass scale. The other concerns with its time evolution, i.e., {e}^{-itH}{e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a . We investigate the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition on correlation function of local operators to detect the thermal properties. Interestingly we find the correlation functions in the initial state {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a also partially satisfy the KMS condition. In the limit t → ∞, the correlators will exactly satisfy the KMS condition. We generally analyse quantum quench by a pure state and obtain some constraints on the possible form of 2-point correlation function in the initial state if assuming they satisfies KMS condition in the final state. As a byproduct we find in an large τ 0 limit the thermal property of 2-point function in {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a also appears.

  13. Photoionization of Cl+ from the 3s23p4 3P2,1,0 and the 3s23p4 1D2,1S0 states in the energy range 19-28 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Brendan M.

    2017-01-01

    Absolute photoionization cross-sections for the Cl+ ion in its ground and the metastable states, 3s23p4 3P2,1,0 and 3s23p4 1D2,1S0, were measured recently at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the merged beams photon-ion technique at a photon energy resolution of 15 meV in the energy range 19-28 eV. These measurements are compared with large-scale Dirac-Coulomb R-matrix calculations in the same energy range. Photoionization of this sulphur-like chlorine ion is characterized by multiple Rydberg series of auto-ionizing resonances superimposed on a direct photoionization continuum. A wealth of resonance features observed in the experimental spectra is spectroscopically assigned, and their resonance parameters are tabulated and compared with the recent measurements. Metastable fractions in the parent ion beam are determined from this study. Theoretical resonance energies and quantum defects of the prominent Rydberg series 3s23p3nd, identified in the spectra as 3p → nd transitions, are compared with the available measurements made on this element. Weaker Rydberg series 3s23p3ns, identified as 3p → ns transitions and window resonances 3s3p4(4P)np features, due to 3s → np transitions, are also found in the spectra.

  14. iss012e15035

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-01-12

    ISS012-E-15035 (12 Jan. 2006) --- The confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers at Cairo, Illinois is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. The Ohio River becomes a tributary of the Mississippi River directly to the south of Cairo, Illinois, a small city on the spit of land where the rivers converge (at center of image). Brown sediment-laden water flowing generally northeast to south from the Ohio River is distinct from the green and relatively sediment-poor water (northwest- to south-flowing) of the Mississippi River. The coloration of the rivers in this image is reversed from the usual condition of a green Ohio and a brown Mississippi. According to scientists, this suggests that recent precipitation in the Ohio River watershed, with very high rainfall over the Appalachians and the northeastern United States in December 2005, has led to a greater sediment load in the Ohio waters. The distinct boundary between the two river’s waters indicates that little to no mixing occurs even 3-4 miles (5-6 kilometers) downstream. The city of Cairo became a prosperous port following the Civil War due to increased riverboat and railroad commerce. Small features on the Ohio are river barges and indicate the continued importance of Cairo as a transport hub. Flooding of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers presents a continual danger to the city; this danger is lessened by the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway that begins directly to the south of the river confluence. The floodway lowers flood stages upstream (such as at Cairo) and adjacent to the floodway during major flood events. Part of the extensive levee system associated with flood control of the Mississippi River is visible in the image. Barlow Bottoms (image right), located in adjacent Kentucky, are a wetlands bird watching location that is replenished by periodic floods and releases of Ohio River water.

  15. Affective states and adaptation to parabolic flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Aurélie; Langlet, Cécile; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Hainaut, Jean-Philippe; Monfort, Vincent; Bolmont, Benoît

    2017-05-01

    This exploratory study investigates (i) inter-individual variations of affective states before a parabolic flight (i.e., PF) on the basis of quality of adaptation to physical demands, and (ii) intra-individual variations of affective states during a PF. Mood-states, state-anxiety and salivary cortisol were assessed in two groups with a different quality of adaptation (an Adaptive Group, i.e., AG, and a Maladaptive Group, i.e., MG) before and during a PF. Before PF, MG scored higher on mood states (Anger-Hostility, Fatigue-Inertia) than AG. During the flight, while AG seemed to present "normal" affective responses to the demanding environment (e.g., increase in salivary cortisol), MG presented increases in mood states such as Confusion-Bewilderment or Tension-Anxiety. The findings suggest that the psychological states of MG could have disturbed their ability to integrate sensory information from an unusual environment, which led to difficulties in coping with the physical demands of PF.

  16. Stats of the States

    MedlinePlus

    ... rates for fatal drug poisonings. Death Rates from Firearm Injuries: United States, 2013 - The latest state-based age-adjusted death rates for firearm-related fatalities. Death Rates from Homicide: United States, ...

  17. State Emergency Response Commissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Governor of each state has designated a State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) that is responsible for implementing the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) provisions within its state.

  18. State Transportation Statistics 2014

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-12-15

    The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) presents State Transportation Statistics 2014, a statistical profile of transportation in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. This is the 12th annual edition of State Transportation Statistics, a ...

  19. State transportation statistics 2004

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-12-01

    The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) presents State Transportation : Statistics 2004, a statistical profile of transportation in the 50 states and the : District of Columbia. This document is a successor to the BTS State : Transportation Pro...

  20. Minimally conscious state or cortically mediated state?

    PubMed

    Naccache, Lionel

    2018-04-01

    Durable impairments of consciousness are currently classified in three main neurological categories: comatose state, vegetative state (also recently coined unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) and minimally conscious state. While the introduction of minimally conscious state, in 2002, was a major progress to help clinicians recognize complex non-reflexive behaviours in the absence of functional communication, it raises several problems. The most important issue related to minimally conscious state lies in its criteria: while behavioural definition of minimally conscious state lacks any direct evidence of patient's conscious content or conscious state, it includes the adjective 'conscious'. I discuss this major problem in this review and propose a novel interpretation of minimally conscious state: its criteria do not inform us about the potential residual consciousness of patients, but they do inform us with certainty about the presence of a cortically mediated state. Based on this constructive criticism review, I suggest three proposals aiming at improving the way we describe the subjective and cognitive state of non-communicating patients. In particular, I present a tentative new classification of impairments of consciousness that combines behavioural evidence with functional brain imaging data, in order to probe directly and univocally residual conscious processes.

  1. Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Vande Pol, Scott B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses induce benign and malignant epithelial tumors, and the viral E6 oncoprotein is essential for full transformation. E6 contributes to transformation by associating with cellular proteins, docking on specific acidic LXXLL peptide motifs found on the associated cellular proteins. This review examines insights from recent studies of human and animal E6 proteins that determine the three-dimensional structure of E6 when bound to acidic LXXLL peptides. The structure of E6 is related to recent advances in the purification and identification of E6 associated protein complexes. These E6 protein-complexes, together with other proteins that bind to E6, alter a broad array of biological outcomes including modulation of cell survival, cellular transcription, host cell differentiation, growth factor dependence, DNA damage responses, and cell cycle progression. PMID:23711382

  2. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Escherichia coli (E. coli) Friday, 01 September 2017 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to E. coli may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  3. iss053e215867

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-11-20

    iss053e215867 (Nov. 20, 2017) --- The EcAMSat, short for E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite, is seen moments after being ejected from the NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer attached to the outside of Kibo laboratory module from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite (EcAMSat) mission will investigate space microgravity effects on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli, a bacterial pathogen responsible for urinary tract infection in humans and animals.

  4. iss053e215850

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-11-20

    iss053e215850 (Nov. 20, 2017) --- The EcAMSat, short for E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite, is seen moments after being ejected from the NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer attached to the outside of Kibo laboratory module from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite (EcAMSat) mission will investigate space microgravity effects on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli, a bacterial pathogen responsible for urinary tract infection in humans and animals.

  5. Electron affinity and excited states of methylglyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauletyarov, Yerbolat; Dixon, Andrew R.; Wallace, Adam A.; Sanov, Andrei

    2017-07-01

    Using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we characterized the anion of methylglyoxal (X2A″ electronic state) and three lowest electronic states of the neutral methylglyoxal molecule: the closed-shell singlet ground state (X1A'), the lowest triplet state (a3A″), and the open-shell singlet state (A1A″). The adiabatic electron affinity (EA) of the ground state, EA(X1A') = 0.87(1) eV, spectroscopically determined for the first time, compares to 1.10(2) eV for unsubstituted glyoxal. The EAs (adiabatic attachment energies) of two excited states of methylglyoxal were also determined: EA(a3A″) = 3.27(2) eV and EA(A1A″) = 3.614(9) eV. The photodetachment of the anion to each of these two states produces the neutral species near the respective structural equilibria; hence, the a3A″ ← X2A″ and A1A″ ← X2A″ photodetachment transitions are dominated by intense peaks at their respective origins. The lowest-energy photodetachment transition, on the other hand, involves significant geometry relaxation in the X1A' state, which corresponds to a 60° internal rotation of the methyl group, compared to the anion structure. Accordingly, the X1A' ← X2A″ transition is characterized as a broad, congested band, whose vertical detachment energy, VDE = 1.20(4) eV, significantly exceeds the adiabatic EA. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the ab initio predictions using several equation-of-motion methodologies, combined with coupled-cluster theory.

  6. Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID), eGRID2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive source of data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric power generated in the United States. These environmental characteristics include air emissions for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide; emissions rates; net generation; resource mix; and many other attributes. eGRID2012 Version 1.0 is the eighth edition of eGRID, which contains the complete release of year 2009 data, as well as year 2007, 2005, and 2004 data. For year 2009 data, all the data are contained in a single Microsoft Excel workbook, which contains boiler, generator, plant, state, power control area, eGRID subregion, NERC region, U.S. total and grid gross loss factor tabs. Full documentation, summary data, eGRID subregion and NERC region representational maps, and GHG emission factors are also released in this edition. The fourth edition of eGRID, eGRID2002 Version 2.01, containing year 1996 through 2000 data is located on the eGRID Archive page (http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid/archive.html). The current edition of eGRID and the archived edition of eGRID contain the following years of data: 1996 - 2000, 2004, 2005, and 2007. eGRID has no other years of data.

  7. E-Learning Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Dawn G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the advantages of using intelligent agents to facilitate the location and customization of appropriate e-learning resources and to foster collaboration in e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper proposes an e-learning environment that can be used to provide customized…

  8. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    E. coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you ... type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney ...

  9. Categorising E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Amy D.

    2012-01-01

    Categorising e-learning is almost as problematic as defining the term. In an attempt to quantify/qualify the level of e-learning use in the tertiary sector in New Zealand, the Ministry of Education (MoE) established a classification system for courses in the tertiary sector. The value of this tool was disputed, and a new system was proposed but…

  10. E-Enterprise for the Environment Conceptual Blueprint: Principles and Components

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The State-EPA E-Enterprise Working Group commissioned a Conceptual Blueprint document to define the principles and primary components of E-Enterprise. This Blueprint is the first step in defining E-Enterprise.

  11. On the formation of anions: frequency-, angle-, and time-resolved photoelectron imaging of the menadione radical anion† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A summary of the ground-state geometries and molecular orbitals from the ab initio calculations; fitted residuals from the FA-PI simulation; plots of all spectra included in the frequency-resolved two-dimensional figure; and example time-resolved PE spectra from the 3.10 + 1.55 eV pump-probe experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03491k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James N.; West, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-, angle-, and time-resolved photoelectron imaging of gas-phase menadione (vitamin K3) radical anions was used to show that quasi-bound resonances of the anion can act as efficient doorway states to produce metastable ground electronic state anions on a sub-picosecond timescale. Several anion resonances have been experimentally observed and identified with the assistance of ab initio calculations, and ground state anion recovery was observed across the first 3 eV above threshold. Time-resolved measurements revealed the mechanism of electronic ground state anion formation, which first involves a cascade of very fast internal conversion processes to a bound electronic state that, in turn, decays by slower internal conversion to the ground state. Autodetachment processes from populated resonances are inefficient compared with electronic relaxation through internal conversion. The mechanistic understanding gained provides insight into the formation of radical anions in biological and astrochemical systems. PMID:29560245

  12. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    1. Entanglement in solid states. Orbital entanglement and violation of bell inequalities in mesoscopic conductors / M. Büttiker, P. Samuelsson and E. V. Sukhoruk. Teleportation of electron spins with normal and superconducting dots / O. Sauret, D. Feinberg and T. Martin. Entangled state analysis for one-dimensional quantum spin system: singularity at critical point / A. Kawaguchi and K. Shimizu. Detecting crossed Andreev reflection by cross-current correlations / G. Bignon et al. Current correlations and transmission probabilities for a Y-shaped diffusive conductor / S. K. Yip -- 2. Mesoscopic electronics. Quantum bistability, structural transformation, and spontaneous persistent currents in mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm loops / I. O. Kulik. Many-body effects on tunneling of electrons in magnetic-field-induced quasi one-dimensional systems in quantum wells / T. Kubo and Y. Tokura. Electron transport in 2DEG narrow channel under gradient magnetic field / M. Hara et al. Transport properties of a quantum wire with a side-coupled quantum dot / M. Yamaguchi et al. Photoconductivity- and magneto-transport studies of single InAs quantum wires / A. Wirthmann et al. Thermoelectric transports in charge-density-wave systems / H. Yoshimoto and S. Kurihara -- 3. Mesoscopic superconductivity. Parity-restricted persistent currents in SNS nanorings / A. D. Zaikin and S. V. Sharov. Large energy dependence of current noise in superconductingh/normal metal junctions / F. Pistolesi and M. Houzet. Generation of photon number states and their superpositions using a superconducting qubit in a microcavity / Yu-Xi Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori. Andreev interferometry for pumped currents / F. Taddei, M. Governale and R. Fazio. Suppression of Cooper-pair breaking against high magnetic fields in carbon nanotubes / J. Haruyama et al. Impact of the transport supercurrent on the Josephson effect / S. N. Shevchenko. Josephson current through spin-polarized Luttinger liquid / N. Yokoshi and S. Kurihara

  13. 40 CFR 60.39e - Compliance times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance times. 60.39e Section 60.39e... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators § 60.39e Compliance times. (a) Each State in which a designated facility is...

  14. 40 CFR 60.39e - Compliance times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance times. 60.39e Section 60.39e... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators § 60.39e Compliance times. (a) Each State in which a designated facility is...

  15. A Holocaust Exhibit ePortfolio: Actively Engaging Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordine, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    California State University, Fresno is currently considering implementing an ePortfolio requirement for all undergraduate students. The ePortfolio requirement would be introduced primarily to engage students in a HIP (high impact practice) but would also be used for assessment purposes. As a faculty member and a member of the CSU Fresno ePortfolio…

  16. 7 CFR 15e.110 - Self-evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... handicaps or organizations representing individuals with handicaps, to participate in the self-evaluation... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Self-evaluation. 15e.110 Section 15e.110 Agriculture... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE § 15e.110 Self-evaluation...

  17. Matematicas: Nivel E (Mathematics: Level E).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duron, Dolores, Ed.; And Others

    A teacher's manual was developed for an elementary level mathematics course in Spanish as part of an immersion program for English speaking children. The Level E manual is designed for grade 4 pupils. Teaching procedures, conceptual and language objectives, vocabulary, structures, and learning activities are included. Activities are designed to…

  18. State Appropriations: Drought Warning.

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