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Sample records for e-cell spike volleys

  1. Automatic EEG spike detection.

    PubMed

    Harner, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Since the 1970s advances in science and technology during each succeeding decade have renewed the expectation of efficient, reliable automatic epileptiform spike detection (AESD). But even when reinforced with better, faster tools, clinically reliable unsupervised spike detection remains beyond our reach. Expert-selected spike parameters were the first and still most widely used for AESD. Thresholds for amplitude, duration, sharpness, rise-time, fall-time, after-coming slow waves, background frequency, and more have been used. It is still unclear which of these wave parameters are essential, beyond peak-peak amplitude and duration. Wavelet parameters are very appropriate to AESD but need to be combined with other parameters to achieve desired levels of spike detection efficiency. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and expert-system methods may have reached peak efficiency. Support Vector Machine (SVM) technology focuses on outliers rather than centroids of spike and nonspike data clusters and should improve AESD efficiency. An exemplary spike/nonspike database is suggested as a tool for assessing parameters and methods for AESD and is available in CSV or Matlab formats from the author at brainvue@gmail.com. Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is presented as a graphic method for finding better spike parameters and for the step-wise evaluation of the spike detection process.

  2. Reactivity of rolandic spikes.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L C; Tedrus, G M; Bastos, A; Bosco, A; Laloni, D T

    1996-07-01

    Factors influencing the frequency of rolandic spikes are rarely reported. We examined the influence of movement, tactile stimulation and cognitive test on the discharge rate of rolandic spikes. We studied 35 children with EEG rolandic spikes. Eighteen children had nonfebrile convulsions. Benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes was diagnosed in 12 cases. Testing during the EEG included hand and tongue movements, cognitive tasks and tactile stimulation of face and hands. Rolandic spikes were counted by visual analysis in each phase of the test and the frequency expressed as mean number per min. During tongue movements there was a significantly lower discharge rate when compared to previous and subsequent rest phases. For the left hemisphere there was reduction in discharge rate during right hand movements and looking at colored spots but only when compared with the previous rest phase. The reduction in mean number of spikes/min by tongue movements occurred in patients with and without epilepsy. For patients with cerebral lesion the decrease in discharge rate during tongue movements was not significant whereas for those without cerebral lesion a significant reduction was evident. A decrease in the mean number of spikes/min of 50% or more was significantly more frequent among 29 patients without than among 6 patients with cerebral lesion. Our study showed the inhibition of rolandic spikes by tongue movements confirming the hypothesis that the localization of discharges is an important factor in determining its reactivity. The presence or not of cerebral lesion may be an important factor in the degree of reactivity.

  3. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  4. SuperSpike: Supervised Learning in Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Friedemann; Ganguli, Surya

    2018-06-01

    A vast majority of computation in the brain is performed by spiking neural networks. Despite the ubiquity of such spiking, we currently lack an understanding of how biological spiking neural circuits learn and compute in vivo, as well as how we can instantiate such capabilities in artificial spiking circuits in silico. Here we revisit the problem of supervised learning in temporally coding multilayer spiking neural networks. First, by using a surrogate gradient approach, we derive SuperSpike, a nonlinear voltage-based three-factor learning rule capable of training multilayer networks of deterministic integrate-and-fire neurons to perform nonlinear computations on spatiotemporal spike patterns. Second, inspired by recent results on feedback alignment, we compare the performance of our learning rule under different credit assignment strategies for propagating output errors to hidden units. Specifically, we test uniform, symmetric, and random feedback, finding that simpler tasks can be solved with any type of feedback, while more complex tasks require symmetric feedback. In summary, our results open the door to obtaining a better scientific understanding of learning and computation in spiking neural networks by advancing our ability to train them to solve nonlinear problems involving transformations between different spatiotemporal spike time patterns.

  5. Radioxenon spiked air

    DOE PAGES

    Watrous, Matthew G.; Delmore, James E.; Hague, Robert K.; ...

    2015-08-27

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes ( 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. Themore » International Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This study focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities.« less

  6. Radioxenon spiked air

    SciT

    Watrous, Matthew G.; Delmore, James E.; Hague, Robert K.

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes ( 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. Themore » International Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This study focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities.« less

  7. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    SciT

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150more » {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.« less

  8. Spike-train communities: finding groups of similar spike trains.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Mark D

    2011-02-09

    Identifying similar spike-train patterns is a key element in understanding neural coding and computation. For single neurons, similar spike patterns evoked by stimuli are evidence of common coding. Across multiple neurons, similar spike trains indicate potential cell assemblies. As recording technology advances, so does the urgent need for grouping methods to make sense of large-scale datasets of spike trains. Existing methods require specifying the number of groups in advance, limiting their use in exploratory analyses. I derive a new method from network theory that solves this key difficulty: it self-determines the maximum number of groups in any set of spike trains, and groups them to maximize intragroup similarity. This method brings us revealing new insights into the encoding of aversive stimuli by dopaminergic neurons, and the organization of spontaneous neural activity in cortex. I show that the characteristic pause response of a rat's dopaminergic neuron depends on the state of the superior colliculus: when it is inactive, aversive stimuli invoke a single pattern of dopaminergic neuron spiking; when active, multiple patterns occur, yet the spike timing in each is reliable. In spontaneous multineuron activity from the cortex of anesthetized cat, I show the existence of neural ensembles that evolve in membership and characteristic timescale of organization during global slow oscillations. I validate these findings by showing that the method both is remarkably reliable at detecting known groups and can detect large-scale organization of dynamics in a model of the striatum.

  9. Scalable hybrid computation with spikes.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul; O'Halloran, Micah

    2002-09-01

    We outline a hybrid analog-digital scheme for computing with three important features that enable it to scale to systems of large complexity: First, like digital computation, which uses several one-bit precise logical units to collectively compute a precise answer to a computation, the hybrid scheme uses several moderate-precision analog units to collectively compute a precise answer to a computation. Second, frequent discrete signal restoration of the analog information prevents analog noise and offset from degrading the computation. And, third, a state machine enables complex computations to be created using a sequence of elementary computations. A natural choice for implementing this hybrid scheme is one based on spikes because spike-count codes are digital, while spike-time codes are analog. We illustrate how spikes afford easy ways to implement all three components of scalable hybrid computation. First, as an important example of distributed analog computation, we show how spikes can create a distributed modular representation of an analog number by implementing digital carry interactions between spiking analog neurons. Second, we show how signal restoration may be performed by recursive spike-count quantization of spike-time codes. And, third, we use spikes from an analog dynamical system to trigger state transitions in a digital dynamical system, which reconfigures the analog dynamical system using a binary control vector; such feedback interactions between analog and digital dynamical systems create a hybrid state machine (HSM). The HSM extends and expands the concept of a digital finite-state-machine to the hybrid domain. We present experimental data from a two-neuron HSM on a chip that implements error-correcting analog-to-digital conversion with the concurrent use of spike-time and spike-count codes. We also present experimental data from silicon circuits that implement HSM-based pattern recognition using spike-time synchrony. We outline how HSMs may be

  10. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  11. Learning Universal Computations with Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Uhlmann, Marvin; Kappen, Hilbert J.; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Providing the neurobiological basis of information processing in higher animals, spiking neural networks must be able to learn a variety of complicated computations, including the generation of appropriate, possibly delayed reactions to inputs and the self-sustained generation of complex activity patterns, e.g. for locomotion. Many such computations require previous building of intrinsic world models. Here we show how spiking neural networks may solve these different tasks. Firstly, we derive constraints under which classes of spiking neural networks lend themselves to substrates of powerful general purpose computing. The networks contain dendritic or synaptic nonlinearities and have a constrained connectivity. We then combine such networks with learning rules for outputs or recurrent connections. We show that this allows to learn even difficult benchmark tasks such as the self-sustained generation of desired low-dimensional chaotic dynamics or memory-dependent computations. Furthermore, we show how spiking networks can build models of external world systems and use the acquired knowledge to control them. PMID:27309381

  12. Automatic spike sorting using tuning information.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Valérie

    2009-09-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons' characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes' identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only.

  13. Uncovering Neuronal Networks Defined by Consistent Between-Neuron Spike Timing from Neuronal Spike Recordings

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Abstract It is widely assumed that distributed neuronal networks are fundamental to the functioning of the brain. Consistent spike timing between neurons is thought to be one of the key principles for the formation of these networks. This can involve synchronous spiking or spiking with time delays, forming spike sequences when the order of spiking is consistent. Finding networks defined by their sequence of time-shifted spikes, denoted here as spike timing networks, is a tremendous challenge. As neurons can participate in multiple spike sequences at multiple between-spike time delays, the possible complexity of networks is prohibitively large. We present a novel approach that is capable of (1) extracting spike timing networks regardless of their sequence complexity, and (2) that describes their spiking sequences with high temporal precision. We achieve this by decomposing frequency-transformed neuronal spiking into separate networks, characterizing each network’s spike sequence by a time delay per neuron, forming a spike sequence timeline. These networks provide a detailed template for an investigation of the experimental relevance of their spike sequences. Using simulated spike timing networks, we show network extraction is robust to spiking noise, spike timing jitter, and partial occurrences of the involved spike sequences. Using rat multineuron recordings, we demonstrate the approach is capable of revealing real spike timing networks with sub-millisecond temporal precision. By uncovering spike timing networks, the prevalence, structure, and function of complex spike sequences can be investigated in greater detail, allowing us to gain a better understanding of their role in neuronal functioning. PMID:29789811

  14. Automatic Spike Sorting Using Tuning Information

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons’ characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes’ identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only. PMID:19548802

  15. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  16. Measuring multiple spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Haas, Julie S; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2009-10-15

    Measures of multiple spike train synchrony are essential in order to study issues such as spike timing reliability, network synchronization, and neuronal coding. These measures can broadly be divided in multivariate measures and averages over bivariate measures. One of the most recent bivariate approaches, the ISI-distance, employs the ratio of instantaneous interspike intervals (ISIs). In this study we propose two extensions of the ISI-distance, the straightforward averaged bivariate ISI-distance and the multivariate ISI-diversity based on the coefficient of variation. Like the original measure these extensions combine many properties desirable in applications to real data. In particular, they are parameter-free, time scale independent, and easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner, as we illustrate with in vitro recordings from a cortical neuron. Using a simulated network of Hindemarsh-Rose neurons as a controlled configuration we compare the performance of our methods in distinguishing different levels of multi-neuron spike train synchrony to the performance of six other previously published measures. We show and explain why the averaged bivariate measures perform better than the multivariate ones and why the multivariate ISI-diversity is the best performer among the multivariate methods. Finally, in a comparison against standard methods that rely on moving window estimates, we use single-unit monkey data to demonstrate the advantages of the instantaneous nature of our methods.

  17. Electrophysiology of connection current spikes.

    PubMed

    Fish, Raymond M; Geddes, Leslie A

    2008-12-01

    Connection to a 60-Hz or other voltage source can result in cardiac dysrhythmias, a startle reaction, muscle contractions, and a variety of other physiological responses. Such responses can lead to injury, especially if significant ventricular cardiac dysrhythmias occur, or if a person is working at some height above ground and falls as a result of a musculoskeletal response. Physiological reactions are known to relate to intensity and duration of current exposure. The connection current that flows is a function of the applied voltage at the instant of connection, and the electrical impedance encountered by the voltage source in contact with the skin or other body tissues. In this article we describe a rarely investigated phenomenon, namely a contact, or connection, current spike that is many times higher than the steady-state current. This current spike occurs when an electrical connection is made at a non-zero voltage time in a sine wave or other waveform. Such current spikes may occur when electronic or manual switching or connecting of conductors occurs in electronic instrumentation connected to a patient. These findings are relevant to medical devices and instrumentation and to electrical safety in general.

  18. Feature Representations for Neuromorphic Audio Spike Streams.

    PubMed

    Anumula, Jithendar; Neil, Daniel; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii

    2018-01-01

    Event-driven neuromorphic spiking sensors such as the silicon retina and the silicon cochlea encode the external sensory stimuli as asynchronous streams of spikes across different channels or pixels. Combining state-of-art deep neural networks with the asynchronous outputs of these sensors has produced encouraging results on some datasets but remains challenging. While the lack of effective spiking networks to process the spike streams is one reason, the other reason is that the pre-processing methods required to convert the spike streams to frame-based features needed for the deep networks still require further investigation. This work investigates the effectiveness of synchronous and asynchronous frame-based features generated using spike count and constant event binning in combination with the use of a recurrent neural network for solving a classification task using N-TIDIGITS18 dataset. This spike-based dataset consists of recordings from the Dynamic Audio Sensor, a spiking silicon cochlea sensor, in response to the TIDIGITS audio dataset. We also propose a new pre-processing method which applies an exponential kernel on the output cochlea spikes so that the interspike timing information is better preserved. The results from the N-TIDIGITS18 dataset show that the exponential features perform better than the spike count features, with over 91% accuracy on the digit classification task. This accuracy corresponds to an improvement of at least 2.5% over the use of spike count features, establishing a new state of the art for this dataset.

  19. Feature Representations for Neuromorphic Audio Spike Streams

    PubMed Central

    Anumula, Jithendar; Neil, Daniel; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii

    2018-01-01

    Event-driven neuromorphic spiking sensors such as the silicon retina and the silicon cochlea encode the external sensory stimuli as asynchronous streams of spikes across different channels or pixels. Combining state-of-art deep neural networks with the asynchronous outputs of these sensors has produced encouraging results on some datasets but remains challenging. While the lack of effective spiking networks to process the spike streams is one reason, the other reason is that the pre-processing methods required to convert the spike streams to frame-based features needed for the deep networks still require further investigation. This work investigates the effectiveness of synchronous and asynchronous frame-based features generated using spike count and constant event binning in combination with the use of a recurrent neural network for solving a classification task using N-TIDIGITS18 dataset. This spike-based dataset consists of recordings from the Dynamic Audio Sensor, a spiking silicon cochlea sensor, in response to the TIDIGITS audio dataset. We also propose a new pre-processing method which applies an exponential kernel on the output cochlea spikes so that the interspike timing information is better preserved. The results from the N-TIDIGITS18 dataset show that the exponential features perform better than the spike count features, with over 91% accuracy on the digit classification task. This accuracy corresponds to an improvement of at least 2.5% over the use of spike count features, establishing a new state of the art for this dataset. PMID:29479300

  20. Simplify Volleying through Modified Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudet, Bob; Grube, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Volleyball, by its very nature, is a difficult game to play. Players at all ages have a hard time hitting the ball to their intended targets, resulting in rallies that rarely last more than one or two hits. The resulting game, then, is slow paced and boring, with a lot of standing around and little activity time. In an attempt to ease the…

  1. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y; Lang, Eric J; Apps, Richard; Cerminara, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets. The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear. We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number. This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake cats. In addition

  2. The dynamic relationship between cerebellar Purkinje cell simple spikes and the spikelet number of complex spikes

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K.; Xiao, Jianqiang; Houghton, Conor; Tang, Tianyu; Suh, Colleen Y.; Lang, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex and fire two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes.Previous studies have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events, even though the waveform is composed of varying numbers of spikelets.The extent to which differences in spikelet number affect simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains unclear.We found that complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets are preceded by higher simple spike firing rates but, following the complex spike, simple spikes are reduced in a manner that is graded with spikelet number.This dynamic interaction has important implications for cerebellar information processing, and suggests that complex spike spikelet number may maintain Purkinje cells within their operational range. Abstract Purkinje cells are central to cerebellar function because they form the sole output of the cerebellar cortex. They exhibit two distinct types of action potential: simple spikes and complex spikes. It is widely accepted that interaction between these two types of impulse is central to cerebellar cortical information processing. Previous investigations of the interactions between simple spikes and complex spikes have mainly considered complex spikes as unitary events. However, complex spikes are composed of an initial large spike followed by a number of secondary components, termed spikelets. The number of spikelets within individual complex spikes is highly variable and the extent to which differences in complex spike spikelet number affects simple spike activity (and vice versa) remains poorly understood. In anaesthetized adult rats, we have found that Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe vermis and hemisphere have high simple spike firing frequencies that precede complex spikes with greater numbers of spikelets. This finding was also evident in a small sample of Purkinje cells recorded from the posterior lobe hemisphere in awake

  3. A new approach to spike sorting for multi-neuronal activities recorded with a tetrode--how ICA can be practical.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Susumu; Anzai, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2003-07-01

    Multi-neuronal recording with a tetrode is a powerful technique to reveal neuronal interactions in local circuits. However, it is difficult to detect precise spike timings among closely neighboring neurons because the spike waveforms of individual neurons overlap on the electrode when more than two neurons fire simultaneously. In addition, the spike waveforms of single neurons, especially in the presence of complex spikes, are often non-stationary. These problems limit the ability of ordinary spike sorting to sort multi-neuronal activities recorded using tetrodes into their single-neuron components. Though sorting with independent component analysis (ICA) can solve these problems, it has one serious limitation that the number of separated neurons must be less than the number of electrodes. Using a combination of ICA and the efficiency of ordinary spike sorting technique (k-means clustering), we developed an automatic procedure to solve the spike-overlapping and the non-stationarity problems with no limitation on the number of separated neurons. The results for the procedure applied to real multi-neuronal data demonstrated that some outliers which may be assigned to distinct clusters if ordinary spike-sorting methods were used can be identified as overlapping spikes, and that there are functional connections between a putative pyramidal neuron and its putative dendrite. These findings suggest that the combination of ICA and k-means clustering can provide insights into the precise nature of functional circuits among neurons, i.e. cell assemblies.

  4. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine.

    PubMed

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal) probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm) can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule.

  6. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine

    PubMed Central

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal) probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm) can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule. PMID:25954191

  7. Functional Neuroimaging of Spike-Wave Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Generalized spike-wave seizures are typically brief events associated with dynamic changes in brain physiology, metabolism, and behavior. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a relatively high spatio-temporal resolution method for imaging cortical-subcortical network activity during spike-wave seizures. Patients with spike-wave seizures often have episodes of staring and unresponsiveness which interfere with normal behavior. Results from human fMRI studies suggest that spike-wave seizures disrupt specific networks in the thalamus and fronto-parietal association cortex which are critical for normal attentive consciousness. However, the neuronal activity underlying imaging changes seen during fMRI is not well understood, particularly in abnormal conditions such as seizures. Animal models have begun to provide important fundamental insights into the neuronal basis for fMRI changes during spike-wave activity. Work from these models including both fMRI and direct neuronal recordings suggest that, like in humans, specific cortical-subcortical networks are involved in spike-wave, while other regions are spared. Regions showing fMRI increases demonstrate correlated increases in neuronal activity in animal models. The mechanisms of fMRI decreases in spike-wave will require further investigation. A better understanding of the specific brain regions involved in generating spike-wave seizures may help guide efforts to develop targeted therapies aimed at preventing or reversing abnormal excitability in these brain regions, ultimately leading to a cure for this disorder. PMID:18839093

  8. Statistical properties of superimposed stationary spike trains.

    PubMed

    Deger, Moritz; Helias, Moritz; Boucsein, Clemens; Rotter, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The Poisson process is an often employed model for the activity of neuronal populations. It is known, though, that superpositions of realistic, non- Poisson spike trains are not in general Poisson processes, not even for large numbers of superimposed processes. Here we construct superimposed spike trains from intracellular in vivo recordings from rat neocortex neurons and compare their statistics to specific point process models. The constructed superimposed spike trains reveal strong deviations from the Poisson model. We find that superpositions of model spike trains that take the effective refractoriness of the neurons into account yield a much better description. A minimal model of this kind is the Poisson process with dead-time (PPD). For this process, and for superpositions thereof, we obtain analytical expressions for some second-order statistical quantities-like the count variability, inter-spike interval (ISI) variability and ISI correlations-and demonstrate the match with the in vivo data. We conclude that effective refractoriness is the key property that shapes the statistical properties of the superposition spike trains. We present new, efficient algorithms to generate superpositions of PPDs and of gamma processes that can be used to provide more realistic background input in simulations of networks of spiking neurons. Using these generators, we show in simulations that neurons which receive superimposed spike trains as input are highly sensitive for the statistical effects induced by neuronal refractoriness.

  9. A "Last Word" on Ice Spikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helene F.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts an explanation of how "ice spikes" are formed. The spikes are upward protrusions of ice that occur when water expands as it cools in a rigid container of low thermal conductivity. Describes the results of an investigation and includes color photos. (LZ)

  10. Mimickers of generalized spike and wave discharges.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Raed; Bhatt, Amar B

    2014-06-01

    Overinterpretation of benign EEG variants is a common problem that can lead to the misdiagnosis of epilepsy. We review four normal patterns that mimic generalized spike and wave discharges: phantom spike-and-wave, hyperventilation hypersynchrony, hypnagogic/ hypnopompic hypersynchrony, and mitten patterns.

  11. Bayesian population decoding of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerwinn, Sebastian; Macke, Jakob; Bethge, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The timing of action potentials in spiking neurons depends on the temporal dynamics of their inputs and contains information about temporal fluctuations in the stimulus. Leaky integrate-and-fire neurons constitute a popular class of encoding models, in which spike times depend directly on the temporal structure of the inputs. However, optimal decoding rules for these models have only been studied explicitly in the noiseless case. Here, we study decoding rules for probabilistic inference of a continuous stimulus from the spike times of a population of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with threshold noise. We derive three algorithms for approximating the posterior distribution over stimuli as a function of the observed spike trains. In addition to a reconstruction of the stimulus we thus obtain an estimate of the uncertainty as well. Furthermore, we derive a 'spike-by-spike' online decoding scheme that recursively updates the posterior with the arrival of each new spike. We use these decoding rules to reconstruct time-varying stimuli represented by a Gaussian process from spike trains of single neurons as well as neural populations.

  12. Spiking neural P systems with multiple channels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Yang, Jinyu; Wang, Jun; Wang, Tao; Sun, Zhang; Song, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Xiaohui; Huang, Xiangnian

    2017-11-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SNP systems, in short) are a class of distributed parallel computing systems inspired from the neurophysiological behavior of biological spiking neurons. In this paper, we investigate a new variant of SNP systems in which each neuron has one or more synaptic channels, called spiking neural P systems with multiple channels (SNP-MC systems, in short). The spiking rules with channel label are introduced to handle the firing mechanism of neurons, where the channel labels indicate synaptic channels of transmitting the generated spikes. The computation power of SNP-MC systems is investigated. Specifically, we prove that SNP-MC systems are Turing universal as both number generating and number accepting devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PySpike-A Python library for analyzing spike train synchrony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulansky, Mario; Kreuz, Thomas

    Understanding how the brain functions is one of the biggest challenges of our time. The analysis of experimentally recorded neural firing patterns (spike trains) plays a crucial role in addressing this problem. Here, the PySpike library is introduced, a Python package for spike train analysis providing parameter-free and time-scale independent measures of spike train synchrony. It allows to compute similarity and dissimilarity profiles, averaged values and distance matrices. Although mainly focusing on neuroscience, PySpike can also be applied in other contexts like climate research or social sciences. The package is available as Open Source on Github and PyPI.

  14. Multiscale analysis of neural spike trains.

    PubMed

    Ramezan, Reza; Marriott, Paul; Chenouri, Shojaeddin

    2014-01-30

    This paper studies the multiscale analysis of neural spike trains, through both graphical and Poisson process approaches. We introduce the interspike interval plot, which simultaneously visualizes characteristics of neural spiking activity at different time scales. Using an inhomogeneous Poisson process framework, we discuss multiscale estimates of the intensity functions of spike trains. We also introduce the windowing effect for two multiscale methods. Using quasi-likelihood, we develop bootstrap confidence intervals for the multiscale intensity function. We provide a cross-validation scheme, to choose the tuning parameters, and study its unbiasedness. Studying the relationship between the spike rate and the stimulus signal, we observe that adjusting for the first spike latency is important in cross-validation. We show, through examples, that the correlation between spike trains and spike count variability can be multiscale phenomena. Furthermore, we address the modeling of the periodicity of the spike trains caused by a stimulus signal or by brain rhythms. Within the multiscale framework, we introduce intensity functions for spike trains with multiplicative and additive periodic components. Analyzing a dataset from the retinogeniculate synapse, we compare the fit of these models with the Bayesian adaptive regression splines method and discuss the limitations of the methodology. Computational efficiency, which is usually a challenge in the analysis of spike trains, is one of the highlights of these new models. In an example, we show that the reconstruction quality of a complex intensity function demonstrates the ability of the multiscale methodology to crack the neural code. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Magnetoencephalographic Mapping of Epileptic Spike Population Using Distributed Source Analysis: Comparison With Intracranial Electroencephalographic Spikes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Papadelis, Christos; Tamilia, Eleonora; Madsen, Joseph R; Pearl, Phillip L; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2018-04-27

    This study evaluates magnetoencephalographic (MEG) spike population as compared with intracranial electroencephalographic (IEEG) spikes using a quantitative method based on distributed source analysis. We retrospectively studied eight patients with medically intractable epilepsy who had an MEG and subsequent IEEG monitoring. Fifty MEG spikes were analyzed in each patient using minimum norm estimate. For individual spikes, each vertex in the source space was considered activated when its source amplitude at the peak latency was higher than a threshold, which was set at 50% of the maximum amplitude over all vertices. We mapped the total count of activation at each vertex. We also analyzed 50 IEEG spikes in the same manner over the intracranial electrodes and created the activation count map. The location of the electrodes was obtained in the MEG source space by coregistering postimplantation computed tomography to MRI. We estimated the MEG- and IEEG-active regions associated with the spike populations using the vertices/electrodes with a count over 25. The activation count maps of MEG spikes demonstrated the localization associated with the spike population by variable count values at each vertex. The MEG-active region overlapped with 65 to 85% of the IEEG-active region in our patient group. Mapping the MEG spike population is valid for demonstrating the trend of spikes clustering in patients with epilepsy. In addition, comparison of MEG and IEEG spikes quantitatively may be informative for understanding their relationship.

  16. Serial Spike Time Correlations Affect Probability Distribution of Joint Spike Events.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Mina; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Pipa, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the existence of temporally coordinated spiking activity, and its role in information processing in the cortex, has remained a major challenge for neuroscience research. Different methods and approaches have been suggested to test whether the observed synchronized events are significantly different from those expected by chance. To analyze the simultaneous spike trains for precise spike correlation, these methods typically model the spike trains as a Poisson process implying that the generation of each spike is independent of all the other spikes. However, studies have shown that neural spike trains exhibit dependence among spike sequences, such as the absolute and relative refractory periods which govern the spike probability of the oncoming action potential based on the time of the last spike, or the bursting behavior, which is characterized by short epochs of rapid action potentials, followed by longer episodes of silence. Here we investigate non-renewal processes with the inter-spike interval distribution model that incorporates spike-history dependence of individual neurons. For that, we use the Monte Carlo method to estimate the full shape of the coincidence count distribution and to generate false positives for coincidence detection. The results show that compared to the distributions based on homogeneous Poisson processes, and also non-Poisson processes, the width of the distribution of joint spike events changes. Non-renewal processes can lead to both heavy tailed or narrow coincidence distribution. We conclude that small differences in the exact autostructure of the point process can cause large differences in the width of a coincidence distribution. Therefore, manipulations of the autostructure for the estimation of significance of joint spike events seem to be inadequate.

  17. Serial Spike Time Correlations Affect Probability Distribution of Joint Spike Events

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mina; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Pipa, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the existence of temporally coordinated spiking activity, and its role in information processing in the cortex, has remained a major challenge for neuroscience research. Different methods and approaches have been suggested to test whether the observed synchronized events are significantly different from those expected by chance. To analyze the simultaneous spike trains for precise spike correlation, these methods typically model the spike trains as a Poisson process implying that the generation of each spike is independent of all the other spikes. However, studies have shown that neural spike trains exhibit dependence among spike sequences, such as the absolute and relative refractory periods which govern the spike probability of the oncoming action potential based on the time of the last spike, or the bursting behavior, which is characterized by short epochs of rapid action potentials, followed by longer episodes of silence. Here we investigate non-renewal processes with the inter-spike interval distribution model that incorporates spike-history dependence of individual neurons. For that, we use the Monte Carlo method to estimate the full shape of the coincidence count distribution and to generate false positives for coincidence detection. The results show that compared to the distributions based on homogeneous Poisson processes, and also non-Poisson processes, the width of the distribution of joint spike events changes. Non-renewal processes can lead to both heavy tailed or narrow coincidence distribution. We conclude that small differences in the exact autostructure of the point process can cause large differences in the width of a coincidence distribution. Therefore, manipulations of the autostructure for the estimation of significance of joint spike events seem to be inadequate. PMID:28066225

  18. Reliability of MEG source imaging of anterior temporal spikes: analysis of an intracranially characterized spike focus.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, Richard; Cheyne, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    To assess the reliability of MEG source imaging (MSI) of anterior temporal spikes through detailed analysis of the localization and orientation of source solutions obtained for a large number of spikes that were separately confirmed by intracranial EEG to be focally generated within a single, well-characterized spike focus. MSI was performed on 64 identical right anterior temporal spikes from an anterolateral temporal neocortical spike focus. The effects of different volume conductors (sphere and realistic head model), removal of noise with low frequency filters (LFFs) and averaging multiple spikes were assessed in terms of the reliability of the source solutions. MSI of single spikes resulted in scattered dipole source solutions that showed reasonable reliability for localization at the lobar level, but only for solutions with a goodness-of-fit exceeding 80% using a LFF of 3 Hz. Reliability at a finer level of intralobar localization was limited. Spike averaging significantly improved the reliability of source solutions and averaging 8 or more spikes reduced dependency on goodness-of-fit and data filtering. MSI performed on topographically identical individual spikes from an intracranially defined classical anterior temporal lobe spike focus was limited by low reliability (i.e., scattered source solutions) in terms of fine, sublobar localization within the ipsilateral temporal lobe. Spike averaging significantly improved reliability. MSI performed on individual anterior temporal spikes is limited by low reliability. Reduction of background noise through spike averaging significantly improves the reliability of MSI solutions. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Global Spike: Conserved Dendritic Properties Enable Unique Ca2+ Spike Generation in Low-Threshold Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Connelly, William M; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Errington, Adam C

    2015-11-25

    Low-threshold Ca(2+) spikes (LTS) are an indispensible signaling mechanism for neurons in areas including the cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia, and thalamus. They have critical physiological roles and have been strongly associated with disorders including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. However, although dendritic T-type Ca(2+) channels have been implicated in LTS generation, because the properties of low-threshold spiking neuron dendrites are unknown, the precise mechanism has remained elusive. Here, combining data from fluorescence-targeted dendritic recordings and Ca(2+) imaging from low-threshold spiking cells in rat brain slices with computational modeling, the cellular mechanism responsible for LTS generation is established. Our data demonstrate that key somatodendritic electrical conduction properties are highly conserved between glutamatergic thalamocortical neurons and GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus neurons and that these properties are critical for LTS generation. In particular, the efficiency of soma to dendrite voltage transfer is highly asymmetric in low-threshold spiking cells, and in the somatofugal direction, these neurons are particularly electrotonically compact. Our data demonstrate that LTS have remarkably similar amplitudes and occur synchronously throughout the dendritic tree. In fact, these Ca(2+) spikes cannot occur locally in any part of the cell, and hence we reveal that LTS are generated by a unique whole-cell mechanism that means they always occur as spatially global spikes. This all-or-none, global electrical and biochemical signaling mechanism clearly distinguishes LTS from other signals, including backpropagating action potentials and dendritic Ca(2+)/NMDA spikes, and has important consequences for dendritic function in low-threshold spiking neurons. Low-threshold Ca(2+) spikes (LTS) are critical for important physiological processes, including generation of sleep-related oscillations, and are implicated in

  20. Vectorized algorithms for spiking neural network simulation.

    PubMed

    Brette, Romain; Goodman, Dan F M

    2011-06-01

    High-level languages (Matlab, Python) are popular in neuroscience because they are flexible and accelerate development. However, for simulating spiking neural networks, the cost of interpretation is a bottleneck. We describe a set of algorithms to simulate large spiking neural networks efficiently with high-level languages using vector-based operations. These algorithms constitute the core of Brian, a spiking neural network simulator written in the Python language. Vectorized simulation makes it possible to combine the flexibility of high-level languages with the computational efficiency usually associated with compiled languages.

  1. Vibration (?) spikes during natural rain events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Limited analysis of optical rain gauge (ORG) data from shipboard and ground based sensors has shown the existence of spikes, possibly attributable to sensor vibration, while rain is occurring. An extreme example of this behavior was noted aboard the PRC#5 on the evening of December 24, 1992 as the ship began repositioning during a rain event in the TOGA/COARE IFA. The spikes are readily evident in the one-second resolution data, but may be indistinguishable from natural rain rate fluctuations in subsampled or averaged data. Such spikes result in increased rainfall totals.

  2. The Second Spiking Threshold: Dynamics of Laminar Network Spiking in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars E.; Bonde, Lars H.; Harvey, Michael A.; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Most neurons have a threshold separating the silent non-spiking state and the state of producing temporal sequences of spikes. But neurons in vivo also have a second threshold, found recently in granular layer neurons of the primary visual cortex, separating spontaneous ongoing spiking from visually evoked spiking driven by sharp transients. Here we examine whether this second threshold exists outside the granular layer and examine details of transitions between spiking states in ferrets exposed to moving objects. We found the second threshold, separating spiking states evoked by stationary and moving visual stimuli from the spontaneous ongoing spiking state, in all layers and zones of areas 17 and 18 indicating that the second threshold is a property of the network. Spontaneous and evoked spiking, thus can easily be distinguished. In addition, the trajectories of spontaneous ongoing states were slow, frequently changing direction. In single trials, sharp as well as smooth and slow transients transform the trajectories to be outward directed, fast and crossing the threshold to become evoked. Although the speeds of the evolution of the evoked states differ, the same domain of the state space is explored indicating uniformity of the evoked states. All evoked states return to the spontaneous evoked spiking state as in a typical mono-stable dynamical system. In single trials, neither the original spiking rates, nor the temporal evolution in state space could distinguish simple visual scenes. PMID:27582693

  3. Spike persistence and normalization in benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes - Implications for management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hunmin; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Dlugos, Dennis J

    2018-05-10

    This study was performed 1) to determine the timing of spike normalization in patients with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS); 2) to identify relationships between age of seizure onset, age of spike normalization, years of spike persistence and treatment; and 3) to assess final outcomes between groups of patients with or without spikes at the time of medication tapering. Retrospective analysis of BECTS patients confirmed by clinical data, including age of onset, seizure semiology and serial electroencephalography (EEG) from diagnosis to remission. Age at spike normalization, years of spike persistence, and time of treatment onset to spike normalization were assessed. Final seizure and EEG outcome were compared between the groups with or without spikes at the time of AED tapering. One hundred and thirty-four patients were included. Mean age at seizure onset was 7.52 ± 2.11 years. Mean age at spike normalization was 11.89 ± 2.11 (range: 6.3-16.8) years. Mean time of treatment onset to spike normalization was 4.11 ± 2.13 (range: 0.24-10.08) years. Younger age of seizure onset was correlated with longer duration of spike persistence (r = -0.41, p < 0.001). In treated patients, spikes persisted for 4.1 ± 1.95 years, compared with 2.9 ± 1.97 years in untreated patients. No patients had recurrent seizures after AED was discontinued, regardless of the presence/absence of spikes at time of AED tapering. Years of spike persistence was longer in early onset BECTS patients. Treatment with AEDs did not shorten years of spike persistence. Persistence of spikes at time of treatment withdrawal was not associated with seizure recurrence. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fitting neuron models to spike trains.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F M; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input-output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model.

  5. Fitting Neuron Models to Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K.; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input–output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model. PMID:21415925

  6. Inferring oscillatory modulation in neural spike trains

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Kensuke; Kass, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Oscillations are observed at various frequency bands in continuous-valued neural recordings like the electroencephalogram (EEG) and local field potential (LFP) in bulk brain matter, and analysis of spike-field coherence reveals that spiking of single neurons often occurs at certain phases of the global oscillation. Oscillatory modulation has been examined in relation to continuous-valued oscillatory signals, and independently from the spike train alone, but behavior or stimulus triggered firing-rate modulation, spiking sparseness, presence of slow modulation not locked to stimuli and irregular oscillations with large variability in oscillatory periods, present challenges to searching for temporal structures present in the spike train. In order to study oscillatory modulation in real data collected under a variety of experimental conditions, we describe a flexible point-process framework we call the Latent Oscillatory Spike Train (LOST) model to decompose the instantaneous firing rate in biologically and behaviorally relevant factors: spiking refractoriness, event-locked firing rate non-stationarity, and trial-to-trial variability accounted for by baseline offset and a stochastic oscillatory modulation. We also extend the LOST model to accommodate changes in the modulatory structure over the duration of the experiment, and thereby discover trial-to-trial variability in the spike-field coherence of a rat primary motor cortical neuron to the LFP theta rhythm. Because LOST incorporates a latent stochastic auto-regressive term, LOST is able to detect oscillations when the firing rate is low, the modulation is weak, and when the modulating oscillation has a broad spectral peak. PMID:28985231

  7. Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kyle H.; Holmes, Caroline M.; Vellema, Michiel; Pack, Andrea R.; Elemans, Coen P. H.; Nemenman, Ilya; Sober, Samuel J.

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials (“spikes”) encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time interval (spike rate), recent studies have shown that additional information is carried by the millisecond-scale timing patterns of action potentials (spike timing). However, it is unknown whether or how subtle differences in spike timing drive differences in perception or behavior, leaving it unclear whether the information in spike timing actually plays a role in brain function. By examining the activity of individual motor units (the muscle fibers innervated by a single motor neuron) and manipulating patterns of activation of these neurons, we provide both correlative and causal evidence that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior—namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision. PMID:28100491

  8. Training Deep Spiking Neural Networks Using Backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Delbruck, Tobi; Pfeiffer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Deep spiking neural networks (SNNs) hold the potential for improving the latency and energy efficiency of deep neural networks through data-driven event-based computation. However, training such networks is difficult due to the non-differentiable nature of spike events. In this paper, we introduce a novel technique, which treats the membrane potentials of spiking neurons as differentiable signals, where discontinuities at spike times are considered as noise. This enables an error backpropagation mechanism for deep SNNs that follows the same principles as in conventional deep networks, but works directly on spike signals and membrane potentials. Compared with previous methods relying on indirect training and conversion, our technique has the potential to capture the statistics of spikes more precisely. We evaluate the proposed framework on artificially generated events from the original MNIST handwritten digit benchmark, and also on the N-MNIST benchmark recorded with an event-based dynamic vision sensor, in which the proposed method reduces the error rate by a factor of more than three compared to the best previous SNN, and also achieves a higher accuracy than a conventional convolutional neural network (CNN) trained and tested on the same data. We demonstrate in the context of the MNIST task that thanks to their event-driven operation, deep SNNs (both fully connected and convolutional) trained with our method achieve accuracy equivalent with conventional neural networks. In the N-MNIST example, equivalent accuracy is achieved with about five times fewer computational operations.

  9. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  10. Spiking Neural Networks Based on OxRAM Synapses for Real-Time Unsupervised Spike Sorting.

    PubMed

    Werner, Thilo; Vianello, Elisa; Bichler, Olivier; Garbin, Daniele; Cattaert, Daniel; Yvert, Blaise; De Salvo, Barbara; Perniola, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an alternative approach to perform spike sorting of complex brain signals based on spiking neural networks (SNN). The proposed architecture is suitable for hardware implementation by using resistive random access memory (RRAM) technology for the implementation of synapses whose low latency (<1μs) enables real-time spike sorting. This offers promising advantages to conventional spike sorting techniques for brain-computer interfaces (BCI) and neural prosthesis applications. Moreover, the ultra-low power consumption of the RRAM synapses of the spiking neural network (nW range) may enable the design of autonomous implantable devices for rehabilitation purposes. We demonstrate an original methodology to use Oxide based RRAM (OxRAM) as easy to program and low energy (<75 pJ) synapses. Synaptic weights are modulated through the application of an online learning strategy inspired by biological Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity. Real spiking data have been recorded both intra- and extracellularly from an in-vitro preparation of the Crayfish sensory-motor system and used for validation of the proposed OxRAM based SNN. This artificial SNN is able to identify, learn, recognize and distinguish between different spike shapes in the input signal with a recognition rate about 90% without any supervision.

  11. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  12. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network.

  13. Spiking Models for Level-Invariant Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Levels of ecological sounds vary over several orders of magnitude, but the firing rate and membrane potential of a neuron are much more limited in range. In binaural neurons of the barn owl, tuning to interaural delays is independent of level differences. Yet a monaural neuron with a fixed threshold should fire earlier in response to louder sounds, which would disrupt the tuning of these neurons. How could spike timing be independent of input level? Here I derive theoretical conditions for a spiking model to be insensitive to input level. The key property is a dynamic change in spike threshold. I then show how level invariance can be physiologically implemented, with specific ionic channel properties. It appears that these ingredients are indeed present in monaural neurons of the sound localization pathway of birds and mammals. PMID:22291634

  14. A Novel and Simple Spike Sorting Implementation.

    PubMed

    Petrantonakis, Panagiotis C; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring the activity of multiple, individual neurons that fire spikes in the vicinity of an electrode, namely perform a Spike Sorting (SS) procedure, comprises one of the most important tools for contemporary neuroscience in order to reverse-engineer the brain. As recording electrodes' technology rabidly evolves by integrating thousands of electrodes in a confined spatial setting, the algorithms that are used to monitor individual neurons from recorded signals have to become even more reliable and computationally efficient. In this work, we propose a novel framework of the SS approach in which a single-step processing of the raw (unfiltered) extracellular signal is sufficient for both the detection and sorting of the activity of individual neurons. Despite its simplicity, the proposed approach exhibits comparable performance with state-of-the-art approaches, especially for spike detection in noisy signals, and paves the way for a new family of SS algorithms with the potential for multi-recording, fast, on-chip implementations.

  15. Spike timing precision of neuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Deniz; Demir, Alper

    2018-06-01

    Spike timing is believed to be a key factor in sensory information encoding and computations performed by the neurons and neuronal circuits. However, the considerable noise and variability, arising from the inherently stochastic mechanisms that exist in the neurons and the synapses, degrade spike timing precision. Computational modeling can help decipher the mechanisms utilized by the neuronal circuits in order to regulate timing precision. In this paper, we utilize semi-analytical techniques, which were adapted from previously developed methods for electronic circuits, for the stochastic characterization of neuronal circuits. These techniques, which are orders of magnitude faster than traditional Monte Carlo type simulations, can be used to directly compute the spike timing jitter variance, power spectral densities, correlation functions, and other stochastic characterizations of neuronal circuit operation. We consider three distinct neuronal circuit motifs: Feedback inhibition, synaptic integration, and synaptic coupling. First, we show that both the spike timing precision and the energy efficiency of a spiking neuron are improved with feedback inhibition. We unveil the underlying mechanism through which this is achieved. Then, we demonstrate that a neuron can improve on the timing precision of its synaptic inputs, coming from multiple sources, via synaptic integration: The phase of the output spikes of the integrator neuron has the same variance as that of the sample average of the phases of its inputs. Finally, we reveal that weak synaptic coupling among neurons, in a fully connected network, enables them to behave like a single neuron with a larger membrane area, resulting in an improvement in the timing precision through cooperation.

  16. Implementing Signature Neural Networks with Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Medina, José Luis; Latorre, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spiking Neural Networks constitute the most promising approach to develop realistic Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Unlike traditional firing rate-based paradigms, information coding in spiking models is based on the precise timing of individual spikes. It has been demonstrated that spiking ANNs can be successfully and efficiently applied to multiple realistic problems solvable with traditional strategies (e.g., data classification or pattern recognition). In recent years, major breakthroughs in neuroscience research have discovered new relevant computational principles in different living neural systems. Could ANNs benefit from some of these recent findings providing novel elements of inspiration? This is an intriguing question for the research community and the development of spiking ANNs including novel bio-inspired information coding and processing strategies is gaining attention. From this perspective, in this work, we adapt the core concepts of the recently proposed Signature Neural Network paradigm-i.e., neural signatures to identify each unit in the network, local information contextualization during the processing, and multicoding strategies for information propagation regarding the origin and the content of the data-to be employed in a spiking neural network. To the best of our knowledge, none of these mechanisms have been used yet in the context of ANNs of spiking neurons. This paper provides a proof-of-concept for their applicability in such networks. Computer simulations show that a simple network model like the discussed here exhibits complex self-organizing properties. The combination of multiple simultaneous encoding schemes allows the network to generate coexisting spatio-temporal patterns of activity encoding information in different spatio-temporal spaces. As a function of the network and/or intra-unit parameters shaping the corresponding encoding modality, different forms of competition among the evoked patterns can emerge even in the absence

  17. Implementing Signature Neural Networks with Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Medina, José Luis; Latorre, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spiking Neural Networks constitute the most promising approach to develop realistic Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). Unlike traditional firing rate-based paradigms, information coding in spiking models is based on the precise timing of individual spikes. It has been demonstrated that spiking ANNs can be successfully and efficiently applied to multiple realistic problems solvable with traditional strategies (e.g., data classification or pattern recognition). In recent years, major breakthroughs in neuroscience research have discovered new relevant computational principles in different living neural systems. Could ANNs benefit from some of these recent findings providing novel elements of inspiration? This is an intriguing question for the research community and the development of spiking ANNs including novel bio-inspired information coding and processing strategies is gaining attention. From this perspective, in this work, we adapt the core concepts of the recently proposed Signature Neural Network paradigm—i.e., neural signatures to identify each unit in the network, local information contextualization during the processing, and multicoding strategies for information propagation regarding the origin and the content of the data—to be employed in a spiking neural network. To the best of our knowledge, none of these mechanisms have been used yet in the context of ANNs of spiking neurons. This paper provides a proof-of-concept for their applicability in such networks. Computer simulations show that a simple network model like the discussed here exhibits complex self-organizing properties. The combination of multiple simultaneous encoding schemes allows the network to generate coexisting spatio-temporal patterns of activity encoding information in different spatio-temporal spaces. As a function of the network and/or intra-unit parameters shaping the corresponding encoding modality, different forms of competition among the evoked patterns can emerge even in the

  18. Temporal Correlations and Neural Spike Train Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Simon R.; Panzeri, Stefano

    2001-06-01

    Sampling considerations limit the experimental conditions under which information theoretic analyses of neurophysiological data yield reliable results. We develop a procedure for computing the full temporal entropy and information of ensembles of neural spike trains, which performs reliably for limited samples of data. This approach also yields insight to the role of correlations between spikes in temporal coding mechanisms. The method, when applied to recordings from complex cells of the monkey primary visual cortex, results in lower rms error information estimates in comparison to a ``brute force'' approach.

  19. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  20. Kv1 channels control spike threshold dynamics and spike timing in cortical pyramidal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies showed that cortical pyramidal neurones (PNs) have a dynamic spike threshold that functions as a high-pass filter, enhancing spike timing in response to high-frequency input. While it is commonly assumed that Na+ channel inactivation is the primary mechanism of threshold accommodation, the possible role of K+ channel activation in fast threshold changes has not been well characterized. The present study tested the hypothesis that low-voltage activated Kv1 channels affect threshold dynamics in layer 2–3 PNs, using α-dendrotoxin (DTX) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to block these conductances. We found that Kv1 blockade reduced the dynamic changes of spike threshold in response to a variety of stimuli, including stimulus-evoked synaptic input, current steps and ramps of varied duration, and noise. Analysis of the responses to noise showed that Kv1 channels increased the coherence of spike output with high-frequency components of the stimulus. A simple model demonstrates that a dynamic spike threshold can account for this effect. Our results show that the Kv1 conductance is a major mechanism that contributes to the dynamic spike threshold and precise spike timing of cortical PNs. PMID:21911608

  1. JFK in Blackface: Spike Lee's "Malcolm X."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Clarence E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the failure of filmmaker Spike Lee to grapple with the real politics of Malcolm X before and after he left the Nation of Islam. Acknowledging the complexity of the man and his context would avoid creating a mythical figure similar to Oliver Stone's movie "JFK." (SLD)

  2. Physics of volleyball: Spiking with a purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, F.

    1998-05-01

    A few weeks ago our volleyball coach telephoned me with a problem: How high should a player jump to "spike" a "set" ball so it would clear the net and land at a known distance on the other side of the net?

  3. An Unsupervised Online Spike-Sorting Framework.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Simeon; Sridharan, Kousik S; Belardinelli, Paolo; Naros, Georgios; Weiss, Daniel; Mormann, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular neuronal microelectrode recordings can include action potentials from multiple neurons. To separate spikes from different neurons, they can be sorted according to their shape, a procedure referred to as spike-sorting. Several algorithms have been reported to solve this task. However, when clustering outcomes are unsatisfactory, most of them are difficult to adjust to achieve the desired results. We present an online spike-sorting framework that uses feature normalization and weighting to maximize the distinctiveness between different spike shapes. Furthermore, multiple criteria are applied to either facilitate or prevent cluster fusion, thereby enabling experimenters to fine-tune the sorting process. We compare our method to established unsupervised offline (Wave_Clus (WC)) and online (OSort (OS)) algorithms by examining their performance in sorting various test datasets using two different scoring systems (AMI and the Adamos metric). Furthermore, we evaluate sorting capabilities on intra-operative recordings using established quality metrics. Compared to WC and OS, our algorithm achieved comparable or higher scores on average and produced more convincing sorting results for intra-operative datasets. Thus, the presented framework is suitable for both online and offline analysis and could substantially improve the quality of microelectrode-based data evaluation for research and clinical application.

  4. Spiking Neural P Systems with Communication on Request.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linqiang; Păun, Gheorghe; Zhang, Gexiang; Neri, Ferrante

    2017-12-01

    Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] Systems are Neural System models characterized by the fact that each neuron mimics a biological cell and the communication between neurons is based on spikes. In the Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] systems investigated so far, the application of evolution rules depends on the contents of a neuron (checked by means of a regular expression). In these [Formula: see text] systems, a specified number of spikes are consumed and a specified number of spikes are produced, and then sent to each of the neurons linked by a synapse to the evolving neuron. [Formula: see text]In the present work, a novel communication strategy among neurons of Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] Systems is proposed. In the resulting models, called Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] Systems with Communication on Request, the spikes are requested from neighboring neurons, depending on the contents of the neuron (still checked by means of a regular expression). Unlike the traditional Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] systems, no spikes are consumed or created: the spikes are only moved along synapses and replicated (when two or more neurons request the contents of the same neuron). [Formula: see text]The Spiking Neural [Formula: see text] Systems with Communication on Request are proved to be computationally universal, that is, equivalent with Turing machines as long as two types of spikes are used. Following this work, further research questions are listed to be open problems.

  5. The relationship between seizures, interictal spikes and antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Irina I; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Gaspard, Nicolas; Duckrow, Robert B; Spencer, Dennis D; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Susan S; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2016-09-01

    A considerable decrease in spike rate accompanies antiepileptic drug (AED) taper during intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring. Since spike rate during icEEG monitoring can be influenced by surgery to place intracranial electrodes, we studied spike rate during long-term scalp EEG monitoring to further test this observation. We analyzed spike rate, seizure occurrence and AED taper in 130 consecutive patients over an average of 8.9days (range 5-17days). We observed a significant relationship between time to the first seizure, spike rate, AED taper and seizure occurrence (F (3,126)=19.77, p<0.0001). A high spike rate was related to a longer time to the first seizure. Further, in a subset of 79 patients who experienced seizures on or after day 4 of monitoring, spike rate decreased initially from an on- to off-AEDs epoch (from 505.0 to 382.3 spikes per hour, p<0.00001), and increased thereafter with the occurrence of seizures. There is an interplay between seizures, spikes and AEDs such that spike rate decreases with AED taper and increases after seizure occurrence. The direct relationship between spike rate and AEDs and between spike rate and time to the first seizure suggests that spikes are a marker of inhibition rather than excitation. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Information recall using relative spike timing in a spiking neural network.

    PubMed

    Sterne, Philip

    2012-08-01

    We present a neural network that is capable of completing and correcting a spiking pattern given only a partial, noisy version. It operates in continuous time and represents information using the relative timing of individual spikes. The network is capable of correcting and recalling multiple patterns simultaneously. We analyze the network's performance in terms of information recall. We explore two measures of the capacity of the network: one that values the accurate recall of individual spike times and another that values only the presence or absence of complete patterns. Both measures of information are found to scale linearly in both the number of neurons and the period of the patterns, suggesting these are natural measures of network information. We show a smooth transition from encodings that provide precise spike times to flexible encodings that can encode many scenes. This makes it plausible that many diverse tasks could be learned with such an encoding.

  7. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device and...

  8. NASA F-15B #836 landing with Quiet Spike attached

    2006-10-03

    NASA F-15B #836 landing with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  9. SPIKE: AI scheduling techniques for Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1991-09-01

    AI (Artificial Intelligence) scheduling techniques for HST are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: domain; HST constraint timescales; HTS scheduling; SPIKE overview; SPIKE architecture; constraint representation and reasoning; use of suitability functions by scheduling agent; SPIKE screen example; advantages of suitability function framework; limiting search and constraint propagation; scheduling search; stochastic search; repair methods; implementation; and status.

  10. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; themore » remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. As a result, the sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  11. Parameter Estimation of a Spiking Silicon Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Alexander; Mazurek, Kevin; Mihalaş, Stefan; Niebur, Ernst; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Spiking neuron models are used in a multitude of tasks ranging from understanding neural behavior at its most basic level to neuroprosthetics. Parameter estimation of a single neuron model, such that the model’s output matches that of a biological neuron is an extremely important task. Hand tuning of parameters to obtain such behaviors is a difficult and time consuming process. This is further complicated when the neuron is instantiated in silicon (an attractive medium in which to implement these models) as fabrication imperfections make the task of parameter configuration more complex. In this paper we show two methods to automate the configuration of a silicon (hardware) neuron’s parameters. First, we show how a Maximum Likelihood method can be applied to a leaky integrate and fire silicon neuron with spike induced currents to fit the neuron’s output to desired spike times. We then show how a distance based method which approximates the negative log likelihood of the lognormal distribution can also be used to tune the neuron’s parameters. We conclude that the distance based method is better suited for parameter configuration of silicon neurons due to its superior optimization speed. PMID:23852978

  12. The transfer function of neuron spike.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Igor; Monteiro, Luiz H A; Miranda, Maria D

    2015-08-01

    The mathematical modeling of neuronal signals is a relevant problem in neuroscience. The complexity of the neuron behavior, however, makes this problem a particularly difficult task. Here, we propose a discrete-time linear time-invariant (LTI) model with a rational function in order to represent the neuronal spike detected by an electrode located in the surroundings of the nerve cell. The model is presented as a cascade association of two subsystems: one that generates an action potential from an input stimulus, and one that represents the medium between the cell and the electrode. The suggested approach employs system identification and signal processing concepts, and is dissociated from any considerations about the biophysical processes of the neuronal cell, providing a low-complexity alternative to model the neuronal spike. The model is validated by using in vivo experimental readings of intracellular and extracellular signals. A computational simulation of the model is presented in order to assess its proximity to the neuronal signal and to observe the variability of the estimated parameters. The implications of the results are discussed in the context of spike sorting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  14. Analysis of Neuronal Spike Trains, Deconstructed

    PubMed Central

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Lansdell, Benjamin J.; Fairhall, Adrienne L.; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-01-01

    As information flows through the brain, neuronal firing progresses from encoding the world as sensed by the animal to driving the motor output of subsequent behavior. One of the more tractable goals of quantitative neuroscience is to develop predictive models that relate the sensory or motor streams with neuronal firing. Here we review and contrast analytical tools used to accomplish this task. We focus on classes of models in which the external variable is compared with one or more feature vectors to extract a low-dimensional representation, the history of spiking and other variables are potentially incorporated, and these factors are nonlinearly transformed to predict the occurrences of spikes. We illustrate these techniques in application to datasets of different degrees of complexity. In particular, we address the fitting of models in the presence of strong correlations in the external variable, as occurs in natural sensory stimuli and in movement. Spectral correlation between predicted and measured spike trains is introduced to contrast the relative success of different methods. PMID:27477016

  15. A Fully Automated Approach to Spike Sorting.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jason E; Magland, Jeremy F; Barnett, Alex H; Tolosa, Vanessa M; Tooker, Angela C; Lee, Kye Y; Shah, Kedar G; Felix, Sarah H; Frank, Loren M; Greengard, Leslie F

    2017-09-13

    Understanding the detailed dynamics of neuronal networks will require the simultaneous measurement of spike trains from hundreds of neurons (or more). Currently, approaches to extracting spike times and labels from raw data are time consuming, lack standardization, and involve manual intervention, making it difficult to maintain data provenance and assess the quality of scientific results. Here, we describe an automated clustering approach and associated software package that addresses these problems and provides novel cluster quality metrics. We show that our approach has accuracy comparable to or exceeding that achieved using manual or semi-manual techniques with desktop central processing unit (CPU) runtimes faster than acquisition time for up to hundreds of electrodes. Moreover, a single choice of parameters in the algorithm is effective for a variety of electrode geometries and across multiple brain regions. This algorithm has the potential to enable reproducible and automated spike sorting of larger scale recordings than is currently possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Precise-spike-driven synaptic plasticity: learning hetero-association of spatiotemporal spike patterns.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Tang, Huajin; Tan, Kay Chen; Li, Haizhou

    2013-01-01

    A new learning rule (Precise-Spike-Driven (PSD) Synaptic Plasticity) is proposed for processing and memorizing spatiotemporal patterns. PSD is a supervised learning rule that is analytically derived from the traditional Widrow-Hoff rule and can be used to train neurons to associate an input spatiotemporal spike pattern with a desired spike train. Synaptic adaptation is driven by the error between the desired and the actual output spikes, with positive errors causing long-term potentiation and negative errors causing long-term depression. The amount of modification is proportional to an eligibility trace that is triggered by afferent spikes. The PSD rule is both computationally efficient and biologically plausible. The properties of this learning rule are investigated extensively through experimental simulations, including its learning performance, its generality to different neuron models, its robustness against noisy conditions, its memory capacity, and the effects of its learning parameters. Experimental results show that the PSD rule is capable of spatiotemporal pattern classification, and can even outperform a well studied benchmark algorithm with the proposed relative confidence criterion. The PSD rule is further validated on a practical example of an optical character recognition problem. The results again show that it can achieve a good recognition performance with a proper encoding. Finally, a detailed discussion is provided about the PSD rule and several related algorithms including tempotron, SPAN, Chronotron and ReSuMe.

  17. Precise-Spike-Driven Synaptic Plasticity: Learning Hetero-Association of Spatiotemporal Spike Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Tang, Huajin; Tan, Kay Chen; Li, Haizhou

    2013-01-01

    A new learning rule (Precise-Spike-Driven (PSD) Synaptic Plasticity) is proposed for processing and memorizing spatiotemporal patterns. PSD is a supervised learning rule that is analytically derived from the traditional Widrow-Hoff rule and can be used to train neurons to associate an input spatiotemporal spike pattern with a desired spike train. Synaptic adaptation is driven by the error between the desired and the actual output spikes, with positive errors causing long-term potentiation and negative errors causing long-term depression. The amount of modification is proportional to an eligibility trace that is triggered by afferent spikes. The PSD rule is both computationally efficient and biologically plausible. The properties of this learning rule are investigated extensively through experimental simulations, including its learning performance, its generality to different neuron models, its robustness against noisy conditions, its memory capacity, and the effects of its learning parameters. Experimental results show that the PSD rule is capable of spatiotemporal pattern classification, and can even outperform a well studied benchmark algorithm with the proposed relative confidence criterion. The PSD rule is further validated on a practical example of an optical character recognition problem. The results again show that it can achieve a good recognition performance with a proper encoding. Finally, a detailed discussion is provided about the PSD rule and several related algorithms including tempotron, SPAN, Chronotron and ReSuMe. PMID:24223789

  18. Spiking Neural P Systems With Rules on Synapses Working in Maximum Spiking Strategy.

    PubMed

    Tao Song; Linqiang Pan

    2015-06-01

    Spiking neural P systems (called SN P systems for short) are a class of parallel and distributed neural-like computation models inspired by the way the neurons process information and communicate with each other by means of impulses or spikes. In this work, we introduce a new variant of SN P systems, called SN P systems with rules on synapses working in maximum spiking strategy, and investigate the computation power of the systems as both number and vector generators. Specifically, we prove that i) if no limit is imposed on the number of spikes in any neuron during any computation, such systems can generate the sets of Turing computable natural numbers and the sets of vectors of positive integers computed by k-output register machine; ii) if an upper bound is imposed on the number of spikes in each neuron during any computation, such systems can characterize semi-linear sets of natural numbers as number generating devices; as vector generating devices, such systems can only characterize the family of sets of vectors computed by sequential monotonic counter machine, which is strictly included in family of semi-linear sets of vectors. This gives a positive answer to the problem formulated in Song et al., Theor. Comput. Sci., vol. 529, pp. 82-95, 2014.

  19. Supervised Learning Based on Temporal Coding in Spiking Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Hesham

    2017-08-01

    Gradient descent training techniques are remarkably successful in training analog-valued artificial neural networks (ANNs). Such training techniques, however, do not transfer easily to spiking networks due to the spike generation hard nonlinearity and the discrete nature of spike communication. We show that in a feedforward spiking network that uses a temporal coding scheme where information is encoded in spike times instead of spike rates, the network input-output relation is differentiable almost everywhere. Moreover, this relation is piecewise linear after a transformation of variables. Methods for training ANNs thus carry directly to the training of such spiking networks as we show when training on the permutation invariant MNIST task. In contrast to rate-based spiking networks that are often used to approximate the behavior of ANNs, the networks we present spike much more sparsely and their behavior cannot be directly approximated by conventional ANNs. Our results highlight a new approach for controlling the behavior of spiking networks with realistic temporal dynamics, opening up the potential for using these networks to process spike patterns with complex temporal information.

  20. Spikes and matter inhomogeneities in massless scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Lim, W. C.

    2016-01-01

    We shall discuss the general relativistic generation of spikes in a massless scalar field or stiff perfect fluid model. We first investigate orthogonally transitive (OT) G 2 stiff fluid spike models both heuristically and numerically, and give a new exact OT G 2 stiff fluid spike solution. We then present a new two-parameter family of non-OT G 2 stiff fluid spike solutions, obtained by the generalization of non-OT G 2 vacuum spike solutions to the stiff fluid case by applying Geroch's transformation on a Jacobs seed. The dynamics of these new stiff fluid spike solutions is qualitatively different from that of the vacuum spike solutions in that the matter (stiff fluid) feels the spike directly and the stiff fluid spike solution can end up with a permanent spike. We then derive the evolution equations of non-OT G 2 stiff fluid models, including a second perfect fluid, in full generality, and briefly discuss some of their qualitative properties and their potential numerical analysis. Finally, we discuss how a fluid, and especially a stiff fluid or massless scalar field, affects the physics of the generation of spikes.

  1. SpikeTemp: An Enhanced Rank-Order-Based Learning Approach for Spiking Neural Networks With Adaptive Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Belatreche, Ammar; Maguire, Liam P; McGinnity, Thomas Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an enhanced rank-order-based learning algorithm, called SpikeTemp, for spiking neural networks (SNNs) with a dynamically adaptive structure. The trained feed-forward SNN consists of two layers of spiking neurons: 1) an encoding layer which temporally encodes real-valued features into spatio-temporal spike patterns and 2) an output layer of dynamically grown neurons which perform spatio-temporal classification. Both Gaussian receptive fields and square cosine population encoding schemes are employed to encode real-valued features into spatio-temporal spike patterns. Unlike the rank-order-based learning approach, SpikeTemp uses the precise times of the incoming spikes for adjusting the synaptic weights such that early spikes result in a large weight change and late spikes lead to a smaller weight change. This removes the need to rank all the incoming spikes and, thus, reduces the computational cost of SpikeTemp. The proposed SpikeTemp algorithm is demonstrated on several benchmark data sets and on an image recognition task. The results show that SpikeTemp can achieve better classification performance and is much faster than the existing rank-order-based learning approach. In addition, the number of output neurons is much smaller when the square cosine encoding scheme is employed. Furthermore, SpikeTemp is benchmarked against a selection of existing machine learning algorithms, and the results demonstrate the ability of SpikeTemp to classify different data sets after just one presentation of the training samples with comparable classification performance.

  2. Behavior related pauses in simple spike activity of mouse Purkinje cells are linked to spike rate modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ying; Maran, Selva K.; Dhamala, Mukesh; Jaeger, Dieter; Heck, Detlef H.

    2012-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) in the mammalian cerebellum express high frequency spontaneous activity with average spike rates between 30 and 200 Hz. Cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons receive converging input from many PCs resulting in a continuous barrage of inhibitory inputs. It has been hypothesized that pauses in PC activity trigger increases in CN spiking activity. A prediction derived from this hypothesis is that pauses in PC simple spike activity represent relevant behavioral or sensory events. Here we asked whether pauses in the simple spike activity of PCs related to either fluid licking or respiration, play a special role in representing information about behavior. Both behaviors are widely represented in cerebellar PC simple spike activity. We recorded PC activity in the vermis and lobus simplex of head fixed mice while monitoring licking and respiratory behavior. Using cross correlation and Granger causality analysis we examined whether short ISIs had a different temporal relation to behavior than long ISIs or pauses. Behavior related simple spike pauses occurred during low-rate simple spike activity in both licking and breathing related PCs. Granger causality analysis revealed causal relationships between simple spike pauses and behavior. However, the same results were obtained from an analysis of surrogate spike trains with gamma ISI distributions constructed to match rate modulations of behavior related Purkinje cells. Our results therefore suggest that the occurrence of pauses in simple spike activity does not represent additional information about behavioral or sensory events that goes beyond the simple spike rate modulations. PMID:22723707

  3. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M.; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained “ground truth” data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data. PMID:27536990

  4. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained "ground truth" data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data.

  5. Spike count, spike timing and temporal information in the cortex of awake, freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Alessandro; Foffani, Guglielmo; Moxon, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sensory processing of peripheral information is not stationary but is, in general, a dynamic process related to the behavioral state of the animal. Yet the link between the state of the behavior and the encoding properties of neurons is unclear. This report investigates the impact of the behavioral state on the encoding mechanisms used by cortical neurons for both detection and discrimination of somatosensory stimuli in awake, freely moving, rats. Approach Neuronal activity was recorded from the primary somatosensory cortex of five rats under two different behavioral states (quiet vs. whisking) while electrical stimulation of increasing stimulus strength was delivered to the mystacial pad. Information theoretical measures were then used to measure the contribution of different encoding mechanisms to the information carried by neurons in response to the whisker stimulation. Main Results We found that the behavioral state of the animal modulated the total amount of information conveyed by neurons and that the timing of individual spikes increased the information compared to the total count of spikes alone. However, the temporal information, i.e. information exclusively related to when the spikes occur, was not modulated by behavioral state. Significance We conclude that information about somatosensory stimuli is modulated by the behavior of the animal and this modulation is mainly expressed in the spike count while the temporal information is more robust to changes in behavioral state. PMID:25024291

  6. Standardized Methods to Generate Mock (Spiked) Clinical Specimens by Spiking Blood or Plasma with Cultured Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ming; Fisher, Carolyn; Añez, Germán; Rios, Maria; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Hobson, J. Peyton; Beanan, Maureen; Hockman, Donna; Grigorenko, Elena; Duncan, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Aims To demonstrate standardized methods for spiking pathogens into human matrices for evaluation and comparison among diagnostic platforms. Methods and Results This study presents detailed methods for spiking bacteria or protozoan parasites into whole blood and virus into plasma. Proper methods must start with a documented, reproducible pathogen source followed by steps that include standardized culture, preparation of cryopreserved aliquots, quantification of the aliquots by molecular methods, production of sufficient numbers of individual specimens and testing of the platform with multiple mock specimens. Results are presented following the described procedures that showed acceptable reproducibility comparing in-house real-time PCR assays to a commercially available multiplex molecular assay. Conclusions A step by step procedure has been described that can be followed by assay developers who are targeting low prevalence pathogens. Significance and Impact of Study The development of diagnostic platforms for detection of low prevalence pathogens such as biothreat or emerging agents is challenged by the lack of clinical specimens for performance evaluation. This deficit can be overcome using mock clinical specimens made by spiking cultured pathogens into human matrices. To facilitate evaluation and comparison among platforms, standardized methods must be followed in the preparation and application of spiked specimens. PMID:26835651

  7. Optimization Methods for Spiking Neurons and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Alexander; Orchard, Garrick; Dong, Yi; Mihalaş, Ştefan; Niebur, Ernst; Tapson, Jonathan; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Spiking neurons and spiking neural circuits are finding uses in a multitude of tasks such as robotic locomotion control, neuroprosthetics, visual sensory processing, and audition. The desired neural output is achieved through the use of complex neuron models, or by combining multiple simple neurons into a network. In either case, a means for configuring the neuron or neural circuit is required. Manual manipulation of parameters is both time consuming and non-intuitive due to the nonlinear relationship between parameters and the neuron’s output. The complexity rises even further as the neurons are networked and the systems often become mathematically intractable. In large circuits, the desired behavior and timing of action potential trains may be known but the timing of the individual action potentials is unknown and unimportant, whereas in single neuron systems the timing of individual action potentials is critical. In this paper, we automate the process of finding parameters. To configure a single neuron we derive a maximum likelihood method for configuring a neuron model, specifically the Mihalas–Niebur Neuron. Similarly, to configure neural circuits, we show how we use genetic algorithms (GAs) to configure parameters for a network of simple integrate and fire with adaptation neurons. The GA approach is demonstrated both in software simulation and hardware implementation on a reconfigurable custom very large scale integration chip. PMID:20959265

  8. Geomagnetic spikes on the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Christopher; Constable, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Extreme variations of Earth's magnetic field occurred in the Levant region around 1000 BC, when the field intensity rapidly rose and fell by a factor of 2. No coherent link currently exists between this intensity spike and the global field produced by the core geodynamo. Here we show that the Levantine spike must span >60° longitude at Earth's surface if it originates from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Several low intensity data are incompatible with this geometric bound, though age uncertainties suggest these data could have sampled the field before the spike emerged. Models that best satisfy energetic and geometric constraints produce CMB spikes 8-22° wide, peaking at O(100) mT. We suggest that the Levantine spike reflects an intense CMB flux patch that grew in place before migrating northwest, contributing to growth of the dipole field. Estimates of Ohmic heating suggest that diffusive processes likely govern the ultimate decay of geomagnetic spikes.

  9. A new supervised learning algorithm for spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zeng, Xiaoqin; Zhong, Shuiming

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of supervised learning with temporal encoding for spiking neurons is to make the neurons emit a specific spike train encoded by the precise firing times of spikes. If only running time is considered, the supervised learning for a spiking neuron is equivalent to distinguishing the times of desired output spikes and the other time during the running process of the neuron through adjusting synaptic weights, which can be regarded as a classification problem. Based on this idea, this letter proposes a new supervised learning method for spiking neurons with temporal encoding; it first transforms the supervised learning into a classification problem and then solves the problem by using the perceptron learning rule. The experiment results show that the proposed method has higher learning accuracy and efficiency over the existing learning methods, so it is more powerful for solving complex and real-time problems.

  10. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    de Santos-Sierra, Daniel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Garcia-Vellisca, Mariano A.; Navas, Adrian; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though, the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions (Pyragiene and Pyragas, 2013), where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behavior of the master one. In this paper, we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI), one of the main features of the neural response associated with the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh–Rose neurons. PMID:26648863

  11. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    de Santos-Sierra, Daniel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Garcia-Vellisca, Mariano A; Navas, Adrian; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though, the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions (Pyragiene and Pyragas, 2013), where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behavior of the master one. In this paper, we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI), one of the main features of the neural response associated with the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons.

  12. Multimodal imaging of spike propagation: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Grant, P E; Suzuki, N; Madsen, J R; Bergin, A M; Hämäläinen, M S; Stufflebeam, S M

    2012-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy, who had cortical dysplasia in the right superior frontal gyrus. Spatiotemporal source analysis of MEG and EEG spikes demonstrated a similar time course of spike propagation from the superior to inferior frontal gyri, as observed on intracranial EEG. The tractography reconstructed from DTI showed a fiber connection between these areas. Our multimodal approach demonstrates spike propagation and a white matter tract guiding the propagation.

  13. Generalized activity equations for spiking neural network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buice, Michael A; Chow, Carson C

    2013-01-01

    Much progress has been made in uncovering the computational capabilities of spiking neural networks. However, spiking neurons will always be more expensive to simulate compared to rate neurons because of the inherent disparity in time scales-the spike duration time is much shorter than the inter-spike time, which is much shorter than any learning time scale. In numerical analysis, this is a classic stiff problem. Spiking neurons are also much more difficult to study analytically. One possible approach to making spiking networks more tractable is to augment mean field activity models with some information about spiking correlations. For example, such a generalized activity model could carry information about spiking rates and correlations between spikes self-consistently. Here, we will show how this can be accomplished by constructing a complete formal probabilistic description of the network and then expanding around a small parameter such as the inverse of the number of neurons in the network. The mean field theory of the system gives a rate-like description. The first order terms in the perturbation expansion keep track of covariances.

  14. Surfing a spike wave down the ventral stream.

    PubMed

    VanRullen, Rufin; Thorpe, Simon J

    2002-10-01

    Numerous theories of neural processing, often motivated by experimental observations, have explored the computational properties of neural codes based on the absolute or relative timing of spikes in spike trains. Spiking neuron models and theories however, as well as their experimental counterparts, have generally been limited to the simulation or observation of isolated neurons, isolated spike trains, or reduced neural populations. Such theories would therefore seem inappropriate to capture the properties of a neural code relying on temporal spike patterns distributed across large neuronal populations. Here we report a range of computer simulations and theoretical considerations that were designed to explore the possibilities of one such code and its relevance for visual processing. In a unified framework where the relation between stimulus saliency and spike relative timing plays the central role, we describe how the ventral stream of the visual system could process natural input scenes and extract meaningful information, both rapidly and reliably. The first wave of spikes generated in the retina in response to a visual stimulation carries information explicitly in its spatio-temporal structure: the most salient information is represented by the first spikes over the population. This spike wave, propagating through a hierarchy of visual areas, is regenerated at each processing stage, where its temporal structure can be modified by (i). the selectivity of the cortical neurons, (ii). lateral interactions and (iii). top-down attentional influences from higher order cortical areas. The resulting model could account for the remarkable efficiency and rapidity of processing observed in the primate visual system.

  15. Millisecond Microwave Spikes: Statistical Study and Application for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Fleishman, G. D.; Huang, G.-L.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze a dense cluster of solar radio spikes registered at 4.5-6 GHz by the Purple Mountain Observatory spectrometer (Nanjing, China), operating in the 4.5-7.5 GHz range with 5 ms temporal resolution. To handle the data from the spectrometer, we developed a new technique that uses a nonlinear multi-Gaussian spectral fit based on χ2 criteria to extract individual spikes from the originally recorded spectra. Applying this method to the experimental raw data, we eventually identified about 3000 spikes for this event, which allows us to make a detailed statistical analysis. Various statistical characteristics of the spikes have been evaluated, including the intensity distributions, the spectral bandwidth distributions, and the distribution of the spike mean frequencies. The most striking finding of this analysis is the distributions of the spike bandwidth, which are remarkably asymmetric. To reveal the underlaying microphysics, we explore the local-trap model with the renormalized theory of spectral profiles of the electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission peak in a source with random magnetic irregularities. The distribution of the solar spike relative bandwidths calculated within the local-trap model represents an excellent fit to the experimental data. Accordingly, the developed technique may offer a new tool with which to study very low levels of magnetic turbulence in the spike sources, when the ECM mechanism of the spike cluster is confirmed.

  16. Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems with Networks of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jonke, Zeno; Habenschuss, Stefan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Network of neurons in the brain apply—unlike processors in our current generation of computer hardware—an event-based processing strategy, where short pulses (spikes) are emitted sparsely by neurons to signal the occurrence of an event at a particular point in time. Such spike-based computations promise to be substantially more power-efficient than traditional clocked processing schemes. However, it turns out to be surprisingly difficult to design networks of spiking neurons that can solve difficult computational problems on the level of single spikes, rather than rates of spikes. We present here a new method for designing networks of spiking neurons via an energy function. Furthermore, we show how the energy function of a network of stochastically firing neurons can be shaped in a transparent manner by composing the networks of simple stereotypical network motifs. We show that this design approach enables networks of spiking neurons to produce approximate solutions to difficult (NP-hard) constraint satisfaction problems from the domains of planning/optimization and verification/logical inference. The resulting networks employ noise as a computational resource. Nevertheless, the timing of spikes plays an essential role in their computations. Furthermore, networks of spiking neurons carry out for the Traveling Salesman Problem a more efficient stochastic search for good solutions compared with stochastic artificial neural networks (Boltzmann machines) and Gibbs sampling. PMID:27065785

  17. Self-control with spiking and non-spiking neural networks playing games.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Chris; Banfield, Gaye; Cleanthous, Aristodemos

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as choosing a large delayed reward over a small immediate reward, while precommitment is the making of a choice with the specific aim of denying oneself future choices. Humans recognise that they have self-control problems and attempt to overcome them by applying precommitment. Problems in exercising self-control, suggest a conflict between cognition and motivation, which has been linked to competition between higher and lower brain functions (representing the frontal lobes and the limbic system respectively). This premise of an internal process conflict, lead to a behavioural model being proposed, based on which, we implemented a computational model for studying and explaining self-control through precommitment behaviour. Our model consists of two neural networks, initially non-spiking and then spiking ones, representing the higher and lower brain systems viewed as cooperating for the benefit of the organism. The non-spiking neural networks are of simple feed forward multilayer type with reinforcement learning, one with selective bootstrap weight update rule, which is seen as myopic, representing the lower brain and the other with the temporal difference weight update rule, which is seen as far-sighted, representing the higher brain. The spiking neural networks are implemented with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with learning based on stochastic synaptic transmission. The differentiating element between the two brain centres in this implementation is based on the memory of past actions determined by an eligibility trace time constant. As the structure of the self-control problem can be likened to the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD) game in that cooperation is to defection what self-control is to impulsiveness or what compromising is to insisting, we implemented the neural networks as two players, learning simultaneously but independently, competing in the IPD game. With a technique resembling the precommitment effect, whereby the

  18. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Accelerated spike resampling for accurate multiple testing controls.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Matthew T

    2013-02-01

    Controlling for multiple hypothesis tests using standard spike resampling techniques often requires prohibitive amounts of computation. Importance sampling techniques can be used to accelerate the computation. The general theory is presented, along with specific examples for testing differences across conditions using permutation tests and for testing pairwise synchrony and precise lagged-correlation between many simultaneously recorded spike trains using interval jitter.

  20. SPIKY: a graphical user interface for monitoring spike train synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Mulansky, Mario; Bozanic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for recording large-scale neuronal spiking activity are developing very fast. This leads to an increasing demand for algorithms capable of analyzing large amounts of experimental spike train data. One of the most crucial and demanding tasks is the identification of similarity patterns with a very high temporal resolution and across different spatial scales. To address this task, in recent years three time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony have been proposed, the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and event synchronization. The Matlab source codes for calculating and visualizing these measures have been made publicly available. However, due to the many different possible representations of the results the use of these codes is rather complicated and their application requires some basic knowledge of Matlab. Thus it became desirable to provide a more user-friendly and interactive interface. Here we address this need and present SPIKY, a graphical user interface that facilitates the application of time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony to both simulated and real data. SPIKY includes implementations of the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and the SPIKE-synchronization (an improved and simplified extension of event synchronization) that have been optimized with respect to computation speed and memory demand. It also comprises a spike train generator and an event detector that makes it capable of analyzing continuous data. Finally, the SPIKY package includes additional complementary programs aimed at the analysis of large numbers of datasets and the estimation of significance levels. PMID:25744888

  1. Causal Inference and Explaining Away in a Spiking Network

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Drugowitsch, Jan

    2015-01-01

    While the brain uses spiking neurons for communication, theoretical research on brain computations has mostly focused on non-spiking networks. The nature of spike-based algorithms that achieve complex computations, such as object probabilistic inference, is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that a family of high-dimensional quadratic optimization problems with non-negativity constraints can be solved exactly and efficiently by a network of spiking neurons. The network naturally imposes the non-negativity of causal contributions that is fundamental to causal inference, and uses simple operations, such as linear synapses with realistic time constants, and neural spike generation and reset non-linearities. The network infers the set of most likely causes from an observation using explaining away, which is dynamically implemented by spike-based, tuned inhibition. The algorithm performs remarkably well even when the network intrinsically generates variable spike trains, the timing of spikes is scrambled by external sources of noise, or the network is mistuned. This type of network might underlie tasks such as odor identification and classification. PMID:26621426

  2. Causal Inference and Explaining Away in a Spiking Network.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Drugowitsch, Jan

    2015-12-01

    While the brain uses spiking neurons for communication, theoretical research on brain computations has mostly focused on non-spiking networks. The nature of spike-based algorithms that achieve complex computations, such as object probabilistic inference, is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that a family of high-dimensional quadratic optimization problems with non-negativity constraints can be solved exactly and efficiently by a network of spiking neurons. The network naturally imposes the non-negativity of causal contributions that is fundamental to causal inference, and uses simple operations, such as linear synapses with realistic time constants, and neural spike generation and reset non-linearities. The network infers the set of most likely causes from an observation using explaining away, which is dynamically implemented by spike-based, tuned inhibition. The algorithm performs remarkably well even when the network intrinsically generates variable spike trains, the timing of spikes is scrambled by external sources of noise, or the network is mistuned. This type of network might underlie tasks such as odor identification and classification.

  3. Motor fuels : gasoline price spikes in Oregon in 1999

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-02-23

    As requested, we are providing you with information on the extent to which retail gasoline prices in Oregon spiked from January through August 1999 and the factors that accounted for spikes. We used the attached material to brief you and your staff o...

  4. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30 percent...

  5. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30 percent...

  6. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30 percent...

  7. Spiking and bursting patterns of fractional-order Izhikevich model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teka, Wondimu W.; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha

    2018-03-01

    Bursting and spiking oscillations play major roles in processing and transmitting information in the brain through cortical neurons that respond differently to the same signal. These oscillations display complex dynamics that might be produced by using neuronal models and varying many model parameters. Recent studies have shown that models with fractional order can produce several types of history-dependent neuronal activities without the adjustment of several parameters. We studied the fractional-order Izhikevich model and analyzed different kinds of oscillations that emerge from the fractional dynamics. The model produces a wide range of neuronal spike responses, including regular spiking, fast spiking, intrinsic bursting, mixed mode oscillations, regular bursting and chattering, by adjusting only the fractional order. Both the active and silent phase of the burst increase when the fractional-order model further deviates from the classical model. For smaller fractional order, the model produces memory dependent spiking activity after the pulse signal turned off. This special spiking activity and other properties of the fractional-order model are caused by the memory trace that emerges from the fractional-order dynamics and integrates all the past activities of the neuron. On the network level, the response of the neuronal network shifts from random to scale-free spiking. Our results suggest that the complex dynamics of spiking and bursting can be the result of the long-term dependence and interaction of intracellular and extracellular ionic currents.

  8. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30 percent...

  9. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30 percent...

  10. Gamma Oscillations of Spiking Neural Populations Enhance Signal Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki; Doiron, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Selective attention is an important filter for complex environments where distractions compete with signals. Attention increases both the gamma-band power of cortical local field potentials and the spike-field coherence within the receptive field of an attended object. However, the mechanisms by which gamma-band activity enhances, if at all, the encoding of input signals are not well understood. We propose that gamma oscillations induce binomial-like spike-count statistics across noisy neural populations. Using simplified models of spiking neurons, we show how the discrimination of static signals based on the population spike-count response is improved with gamma induced binomial statistics. These results give an important mechanistic link between the neural correlates of attention and the discrimination tasks where attention is known to enhance performance. Further, they show how a rhythmicity of spike responses can enhance coding schemes that are not temporally sensitive. PMID:18052541

  11. A supervised learning rule for classification of spatiotemporal spike patterns.

    PubMed

    Lilin Guo; Zhenzhong Wang; Adjouadi, Malek

    2016-08-01

    This study introduces a novel supervised algorithm for spiking neurons that take into consideration synapse delays and axonal delays associated with weights. It can be utilized for both classification and association and uses several biologically influenced properties, such as axonal and synaptic delays. This algorithm also takes into consideration spike-timing-dependent plasticity as in Remote Supervised Method (ReSuMe). This paper focuses on the classification aspect alone. Spiked neurons trained according to this proposed learning rule are capable of classifying different categories by the associated sequences of precisely timed spikes. Simulation results have shown that the proposed learning method greatly improves classification accuracy when compared to the Spike Pattern Association Neuron (SPAN) and the Tempotron learning rule.

  12. Recent progress in multi-electrode spike sorting methods

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Baptiste; Yger, Pierre; Marre, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, arrays of extracellular electrodes have been developed and manufactured to record simultaneously from hundreds of electrodes packed with a high density. These recordings should allow neuroscientists to reconstruct the individual activity of the neurons spiking in the vicinity of these electrodes, with the help of signal processing algorithms. Algorithms need to solve a source separation problem, also known as spike sorting. However, these new devices challenge the classical way to do spike sorting. Here we review different methods that have been developed to sort spikes from these large-scale recordings. We describe the common properties of these algorithms, as well as their main differences. Finally, we outline the issues that remain to be solved by future spike sorting algorithms. PMID:28263793

  13. Recent progress in multi-electrode spike sorting methods.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Baptiste; Yger, Pierre; Marre, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, arrays of extracellular electrodes have been developed and manufactured to record simultaneously from hundreds of electrodes packed with a high density. These recordings should allow neuroscientists to reconstruct the individual activity of the neurons spiking in the vicinity of these electrodes, with the help of signal processing algorithms. Algorithms need to solve a source separation problem, also known as spike sorting. However, these new devices challenge the classical way to do spike sorting. Here we review different methods that have been developed to sort spikes from these large-scale recordings. We describe the common properties of these algorithms, as well as their main differences. Finally, we outline the issues that remain to be solved by future spike sorting algorithms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unsupervised spike sorting based on discriminative subspace learning.

    PubMed

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Spike sorting is a fundamental preprocessing step for many neuroscience studies which rely on the analysis of spike trains. In this paper, we present two unsupervised spike sorting algorithms based on discriminative subspace learning. The first algorithm simultaneously learns the discriminative feature subspace and performs clustering. It uses histogram of features in the most discriminative projection to detect the number of neurons. The second algorithm performs hierarchical divisive clustering that learns a discriminative 1-dimensional subspace for clustering in each level of the hierarchy until achieving almost unimodal distribution in the subspace. The algorithms are tested on synthetic and in-vivo data, and are compared against two widely used spike sorting methods. The comparative results demonstrate that our spike sorting methods can achieve substantially higher accuracy in lower dimensional feature space, and they are highly robust to noise. Moreover, they provide significantly better cluster separability in the learned subspace than in the subspace obtained by principal component analysis or wavelet transform.

  15. Regular Patterns in Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Simple Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon-Lim; Hoebeek, Freek E.; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Aertsen, Ad; De Schutter, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Background Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC) in vivo are commonly reported to generate irregular spike trains, documented by high coefficients of variation of interspike-intervals (ISI). In strong contrast, they fire very regularly in the in vitro slice preparation. We studied the nature of this difference in firing properties by focusing on short-term variability and its dependence on behavioral state. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an analysis based on CV2 values, we could isolate precise regular spiking patterns, lasting up to hundreds of milliseconds, in PC simple spike trains recorded in both anesthetized and awake rodents. Regular spike patterns, defined by low variability of successive ISIs, comprised over half of the spikes, showed a wide range of mean ISIs, and were affected by behavioral state and tactile stimulation. Interestingly, regular patterns often coincided in nearby Purkinje cells without precise synchronization of individual spikes. Regular patterns exclusively appeared during the up state of the PC membrane potential, while single ISIs occurred both during up and down states. Possible functional consequences of regular spike patterns were investigated by modeling the synaptic conductance in neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). Simulations showed that these regular patterns caused epochs of relatively constant synaptic conductance in DCN neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the apparent irregularity in cerebellar PC simple spike trains in vivo is most likely caused by mixing of different regular spike patterns, separated by single long intervals, over time. We propose that PCs may signal information, at least in part, in regular spike patterns to downstream DCN neurons. PMID:17534435

  16. Noisy Spiking in Visual Area V2 of Amblyopic Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Zhang, Bin; Tao, Xiaofeng; Wensveen, Janice M; Smith, Earl L; Chino, Yuzo M

    2017-01-25

    Interocular decorrelation of input signals in developing visual cortex can cause impaired binocular vision and amblyopia. Although increased intrinsic noise is thought to be responsible for a range of perceptual deficits in amblyopic humans, the neural basis for the elevated perceptual noise in amblyopic primates is not known. Here, we tested the idea that perceptual noise is linked to the neuronal spiking noise (variability) resulting from developmental alterations in cortical circuitry. To assess spiking noise, we analyzed the contrast-dependent dynamics of spike counts and spiking irregularity by calculating the square of the coefficient of variation in interspike intervals (CV 2 ) and the trial-to-trial fluctuations in spiking, or mean matched Fano factor (m-FF) in visual area V2 of monkeys reared with chronic monocular defocus. In amblyopic neurons, the contrast versus response functions and the spike count dynamics exhibited significant deviations from comparable data for normal monkeys. The CV 2 was pronounced in amblyopic neurons for high-contrast stimuli and the m-FF was abnormally high in amblyopic neurons for low-contrast gratings. The spike count, CV 2 , and m-FF of spontaneous activity were also elevated in amblyopic neurons. These contrast-dependent spiking irregularities were correlated with the level of binocular suppression in these V2 neurons and with the severity of perceptual loss for individual monkeys. Our results suggest that the developmental alterations in normalization mechanisms resulting from early binocular suppression can explain much of these contrast-dependent spiking abnormalities in V2 neurons and the perceptual performance of our amblyopic monkeys. Amblyopia is a common developmental vision disorder in humans. Despite the extensive animal studies on how amblyopia emerges, we know surprisingly little about the neural basis of amblyopia in humans and nonhuman primates. Although the vision of amblyopic humans is often described as

  17. Spiking irregularity and frequency modulate the behavioral report of single-neuron stimulation.

    PubMed

    Doron, Guy; von Heimendahl, Moritz; Schlattmann, Peter; Houweling, Arthur R; Brecht, Michael

    2014-02-05

    The action potential activity of single cortical neurons can evoke measurable sensory effects, but it is not known how spiking parameters and neuronal subtypes affect the evoked sensations. Here, we examined the effects of spike train irregularity, spike frequency, and spike number on the detectability of single-neuron stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex. For regular-spiking, putative excitatory neurons, detectability increased with spike train irregularity and decreasing spike frequencies but was not affected by spike number. Stimulation of single, fast-spiking, putative inhibitory neurons led to a larger sensory effect compared to regular-spiking neurons, and the effect size depended only on spike irregularity. An ideal-observer analysis suggests that, under our experimental conditions, rats were using integration windows of a few hundred milliseconds or more. Our data imply that the behaving animal is sensitive to single neurons' spikes and even to their temporal patterning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-01-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  19. Memory recall and spike-frequency adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, James P.; Sander, Leonard M.; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-05-01

    The brain can reproduce memories from partial data; this ability is critical for memory recall. The process of memory recall has been studied using autoassociative networks such as the Hopfield model. This kind of model reliably converges to stored patterns that contain the memory. However, it is unclear how the behavior is controlled by the brain so that after convergence to one configuration, it can proceed with recognition of another one. In the Hopfield model, this happens only through unrealistic changes of an effective global temperature that destabilizes all stored configurations. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation (SFA), a common mechanism affecting neuron activation in the brain, can provide state-dependent control of pattern retrieval. We demonstrate this in a Hopfield network modified to include SFA, and also in a model network of biophysical neurons. In both cases, SFA allows for selective stabilization of attractors with different basins of attraction, and also for temporal dynamics of attractor switching that is not possible in standard autoassociative schemes. The dynamics of our models give a plausible account of different sorts of memory retrieval.

  20. Geomagnetic spikes on the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. J.; Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme variations of Earth's magnetic field occurred in the Levantine region around 1000 BC, where the field intensity rose and fell by a factor of 2-3 over a short time and confined spatial region. There is presently no coherent link between this intensity spike and the generating processes in Earth's liquid core. Here we test the attribution of a surface spike to a flux patch visible on the core-mantle boundary (CMB), calculating geometric and energetic bounds on resulting surface geomagnetic features. We show that the Levantine intensity high must span at least 60 degrees in longitude. Models providing the best trade-off between matching surface spike intensity, minimizing L1 and L2 misfit to the available data and satisfying core energy constraints produce CMB spikes 8-22 degrees wide with peak values of O(100) mT. We propose that the Levantine spike grew in place before migrating northward and westward, contributing to the growth of the axial dipole field seen in Holocene field models. Estimates of Ohmic dissipation suggest that diffusive processes, which are often neglected, likely govern the ultimate decay of geomagnetic spikes. Using these results, we search for the presence of spike-like features in geodynamo simulations.

  1. Predictive Coding of Dynamical Variables in Balanced Spiking Networks

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, Martin; Machens, Christian K.; Denève, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Two observations about the cortex have puzzled neuroscientists for a long time. First, neural responses are highly variable. Second, the level of excitation and inhibition received by each neuron is tightly balanced at all times. Here, we demonstrate that both properties are necessary consequences of neural networks that represent information efficiently in their spikes. We illustrate this insight with spiking networks that represent dynamical variables. Our approach is based on two assumptions: We assume that information about dynamical variables can be read out linearly from neural spike trains, and we assume that neurons only fire a spike if that improves the representation of the dynamical variables. Based on these assumptions, we derive a network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons that is able to implement arbitrary linear dynamical systems. We show that the membrane voltage of the neurons is equivalent to a prediction error about a common population-level signal. Among other things, our approach allows us to construct an integrator network of spiking neurons that is robust against many perturbations. Most importantly, neural variability in our networks cannot be equated to noise. Despite exhibiting the same single unit properties as widely used population code models (e.g. tuning curves, Poisson distributed spike trains), balanced networks are orders of magnitudes more reliable. Our approach suggests that spikes do matter when considering how the brain computes, and that the reliability of cortical representations could have been strongly underestimated. PMID:24244113

  2. A Simple Deep Learning Method for Neuronal Spike Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Wu, Haifeng; Zeng, Yu

    2017-10-01

    Spike sorting is one of key technique to understand brain activity. With the development of modern electrophysiology technology, some recent multi-electrode technologies have been able to record the activity of thousands of neuronal spikes simultaneously. The spike sorting in this case will increase the computational complexity of conventional sorting algorithms. In this paper, we will focus spike sorting on how to reduce the complexity, and introduce a deep learning algorithm, principal component analysis network (PCANet) to spike sorting. The introduced method starts from a conventional model and establish a Toeplitz matrix. Through the column vectors in the matrix, we trains a PCANet, where some eigenvalue vectors of spikes could be extracted. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) is used to sort spikes. In experiments, we choose two groups of simulated data from public databases availably and compare this introduced method with conventional methods. The results indicate that the introduced method indeed has lower complexity with the same sorting errors as the conventional methods.

  3. Statistical technique for analysing functional connectivity of multiple spike trains.

    PubMed

    Masud, Mohammad Shahed; Borisyuk, Roman

    2011-03-15

    A new statistical technique, the Cox method, used for analysing functional connectivity of simultaneously recorded multiple spike trains is presented. This method is based on the theory of modulated renewal processes and it estimates a vector of influence strengths from multiple spike trains (called reference trains) to the selected (target) spike train. Selecting another target spike train and repeating the calculation of the influence strengths from the reference spike trains enables researchers to find all functional connections among multiple spike trains. In order to study functional connectivity an "influence function" is identified. This function recognises the specificity of neuronal interactions and reflects the dynamics of postsynaptic potential. In comparison to existing techniques, the Cox method has the following advantages: it does not use bins (binless method); it is applicable to cases where the sample size is small; it is sufficiently sensitive such that it estimates weak influences; it supports the simultaneous analysis of multiple influences; it is able to identify a correct connectivity scheme in difficult cases of "common source" or "indirect" connectivity. The Cox method has been thoroughly tested using multiple sets of data generated by the neural network model of the leaky integrate and fire neurons with a prescribed architecture of connections. The results suggest that this method is highly successful for analysing functional connectivity of simultaneously recorded multiple spike trains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Generalized analog thresholding for spike acquisition at ultralow sampling rates

    PubMed Central

    He, Bryan D.; Wein, Alex; Varshney, Lav R.; Kusuma, Julius; Richardson, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient spike acquisition techniques are needed to bridge the divide from creating large multielectrode arrays (MEA) to achieving whole-cortex electrophysiology. In this paper, we introduce generalized analog thresholding (gAT), which achieves millisecond temporal resolution with sampling rates as low as 10 Hz. Consider the torrent of data from a single 1,000-channel MEA, which would generate more than 3 GB/min using standard 30-kHz Nyquist sampling. Recent neural signal processing methods based on compressive sensing still require Nyquist sampling as a first step and use iterative methods to reconstruct spikes. Analog thresholding (AT) remains the best existing alternative, where spike waveforms are passed through an analog comparator and sampled at 1 kHz, with instant spike reconstruction. By generalizing AT, the new method reduces sampling rates another order of magnitude, detects more than one spike per interval, and reconstructs spike width. Unlike compressive sensing, the new method reveals a simple closed-form solution to achieve instant (noniterative) spike reconstruction. The base method is already robust to hardware nonidealities, including realistic quantization error and integration noise. Because it achieves these considerable specifications using hardware-friendly components like integrators and comparators, generalized AT could translate large-scale MEAs into implantable devices for scientific investigation and medical technology. PMID:25904712

  5. A method for decoding the neurophysiological spike-response transform.

    PubMed

    Stern, Estee; García-Crescioni, Keyla; Miller, Mark W; Peskin, Charles S; Brezina, Vladimir

    2009-11-15

    Many physiological responses elicited by neuronal spikes-intracellular calcium transients, synaptic potentials, muscle contractions-are built up of discrete, elementary responses to each spike. However, the spikes occur in trains of arbitrary temporal complexity, and each elementary response not only sums with previous ones, but can itself be modified by the previous history of the activity. A basic goal in system identification is to characterize the spike-response transform in terms of a small number of functions-the elementary response kernel and additional kernels or functions that describe the dependence on previous history-that will predict the response to any arbitrary spike train. Here we do this by developing further and generalizing the "synaptic decoding" approach of Sen et al. (1996). Given the spike times in a train and the observed overall response, we use least-squares minimization to construct the best estimated response and at the same time best estimates of the elementary response kernel and the other functions that characterize the spike-response transform. We avoid the need for any specific initial assumptions about these functions by using techniques of mathematical analysis and linear algebra that allow us to solve simultaneously for all of the numerical function values treated as independent parameters. The functions are such that they may be interpreted mechanistically. We examine the performance of the method as applied to synthetic data. We then use the method to decode real synaptic and muscle contraction transforms.

  6. Data-Driven Significance Estimation for Precise Spike Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Grün, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying neuronal coding and, in particular, the role of temporal spike coordination are hotly debated. However, this debate is often confounded by an implicit discussion about the use of appropriate analysis methods. To avoid incorrect interpretation of data, the analysis of simultaneous spike trains for precise spike correlation needs to be properly adjusted to the features of the experimental spike trains. In particular, nonstationarity of the firing of individual neurons in time or across trials, a spike train structure deviating from Poisson, or a co-occurrence of such features in parallel spike trains are potent generators of false positives. Problems can be avoided by including these features in the null hypothesis of the significance test. In this context, the use of surrogate data becomes increasingly important, because the complexity of the data typically prevents analytical solutions. This review provides an overview of the potential obstacles in the correlation analysis of parallel spike data and possible routes to overcome them. The discussion is illustrated at every stage of the argument by referring to a specific analysis tool (the Unitary Events method). The conclusions, however, are of a general nature and hold for other analysis techniques. Thorough testing and calibration of analysis tools and the impact of potentially erroneous preprocessing stages are emphasized. PMID:19129298

  7. Robust spike classification based on frequency domain neural waveform features.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenhui; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features of the spike snippets. The goal for the algorithm is to provide high classification accuracy, low false misclassification, ease of implementation, robustness to signal degradation, and objectivity in classification outcomes. In this paper, we propose a spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features (CFDF). It makes use of frequency domain contents of the recorded neural waveforms for spike classification. The self-organizing map (SOM) is used as a tool to determine the cluster number intuitively and directly by viewing the SOM output map. After that, spike classification can be easily performed using clustering algorithms such as the k-Means. In conjunction with our previously developed multiscale correlation of wavelet coefficient (MCWC) spike detection algorithm, we show that the MCWC and CFDF detection and classification system is robust when tested on several sets of artificial and real neural waveforms. The CFDF is comparable to or outperforms some popular automatic spike classification algorithms with artificial and real neural data. The detection and classification of neural action potentials or neural spikes is an important step in single-unit-based neuroscientific studies and applications. After the detection of neural snippets potentially containing neural spikes, a robust classification algorithm is applied for the analysis of the snippets to (1) extract similar waveforms into one class for them to be considered coming from one unit, and to (2) remove noise snippets if they do not contain any features of an action potential. Usually, a snippet is a small 2 or 3 ms segment of the recorded waveform, and differences in neural action potentials can be subtle from one unit to another. Therefore, a robust, high performance classification system like the CFDF is necessary. In addition, the proposed algorithm does not require any assumptions on statistical

  8. Spike Timing and Reliability in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons: Effects of EPSC Kinetics, Input Synchronization and Background Noise on Spike Timing

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Molina, Victor M.; Aertsen, Ad; Heck, Detlef H.

    2007-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that neurons in the neocortex can generate action potentials at high temporal precision. The mechanisms controlling timing and reliability of action potential generation in neocortical neurons, however, are still poorly understood. Here we investigated the temporal precision and reliability of spike firing in cortical layer V pyramidal cells at near-threshold membrane potentials. Timing and reliability of spike responses were a function of EPSC kinetics, temporal jitter of population excitatory inputs, and of background synaptic noise. We used somatic current injection to mimic population synaptic input events and measured spike probability and spike time precision (STP), the latter defined as the time window (Δt) holding 80% of response spikes. EPSC rise and decay times were varied over the known physiological spectrum. At spike threshold level, EPSC decay time had a stronger influence on STP than rise time. Generally, STP was highest (≤2.45 ms) in response to synchronous compounds of EPSCs with fast rise and decay kinetics. Compounds with slow EPSC kinetics (decay time constants>6 ms) triggered spikes at lower temporal precision (≥6.58 ms). We found an overall linear relationship between STP and spike delay. The difference in STP between fast and slow compound EPSCs could be reduced by incrementing the amplitude of slow compound EPSCs. The introduction of a temporal jitter to compound EPSCs had a comparatively small effect on STP, with a tenfold increase in jitter resulting in only a five fold decrease in STP. In the presence of simulated synaptic background activity, precisely timed spikes could still be induced by fast EPSCs, but not by slow EPSCs. PMID:17389910

  9. Integrated workflows for spiking neuronal network simulations.

    PubMed

    Antolík, Ján; Davison, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of computational resources is enabling more detailed, realistic modeling in computational neuroscience, resulting in a shift toward more heterogeneous models of neuronal circuits, and employment of complex experimental protocols. This poses a challenge for existing tool chains, as the set of tools involved in a typical modeler's workflow is expanding concomitantly, with growing complexity in the metadata flowing between them. For many parts of the workflow, a range of tools is available; however, numerous areas lack dedicated tools, while integration of existing tools is limited. This forces modelers to either handle the workflow manually, leading to errors, or to write substantial amounts of code to automate parts of the workflow, in both cases reducing their productivity. To address these issues, we have developed Mozaik: a workflow system for spiking neuronal network simulations written in Python. Mozaik integrates model, experiment and stimulation specification, simulation execution, data storage, data analysis and visualization into a single automated workflow, ensuring that all relevant metadata are available to all workflow components. It is based on several existing tools, including PyNN, Neo, and Matplotlib. It offers a declarative way to specify models and recording configurations using hierarchically organized configuration files. Mozaik automatically records all data together with all relevant metadata about the experimental context, allowing automation of the analysis and visualization stages. Mozaik has a modular architecture, and the existing modules are designed to be extensible with minimal programming effort. Mozaik increases the productivity of running virtual experiments on highly structured neuronal networks by automating the entire experimental cycle, while increasing the reliability of modeling studies by relieving the user from manual handling of the flow of metadata between the individual workflow stages.

  10. Integrated workflows for spiking neuronal network simulations

    PubMed Central

    Antolík, Ján; Davison, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of computational resources is enabling more detailed, realistic modeling in computational neuroscience, resulting in a shift toward more heterogeneous models of neuronal circuits, and employment of complex experimental protocols. This poses a challenge for existing tool chains, as the set of tools involved in a typical modeler's workflow is expanding concomitantly, with growing complexity in the metadata flowing between them. For many parts of the workflow, a range of tools is available; however, numerous areas lack dedicated tools, while integration of existing tools is limited. This forces modelers to either handle the workflow manually, leading to errors, or to write substantial amounts of code to automate parts of the workflow, in both cases reducing their productivity. To address these issues, we have developed Mozaik: a workflow system for spiking neuronal network simulations written in Python. Mozaik integrates model, experiment and stimulation specification, simulation execution, data storage, data analysis and visualization into a single automated workflow, ensuring that all relevant metadata are available to all workflow components. It is based on several existing tools, including PyNN, Neo, and Matplotlib. It offers a declarative way to specify models and recording configurations using hierarchically organized configuration files. Mozaik automatically records all data together with all relevant metadata about the experimental context, allowing automation of the analysis and visualization stages. Mozaik has a modular architecture, and the existing modules are designed to be extensible with minimal programming effort. Mozaik increases the productivity of running virtual experiments on highly structured neuronal networks by automating the entire experimental cycle, while increasing the reliability of modeling studies by relieving the user from manual handling of the flow of metadata between the individual workflow stages. PMID

  11. Heterogeneity of Purkinje cell simple spike-complex spike interactions: zebrin- and non-zebrin-related variations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tianyu; Xiao, Jianqiang; Suh, Colleen Y; Burroughs, Amelia; Cerminara, Nadia L; Jia, Linjia; Marshall, Sarah P; Wise, Andrew K; Apps, Richard; Sugihara, Izumi; Lang, Eric J

    2017-08-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, simple and complex spikes. Although they are generated by distinct mechanisms, interactions between the two spike types exist. Zebrin staining produces alternating positive and negative stripes of PCs across most of the cerebellar cortex. Thus, here we compared simple spike-complex spike interactions both within and across zebrin populations. Simple spike activity undergoes a complex modulation preceding and following a complex spike. The amplitudes of the pre- and post-complex spike modulation phases were correlated across PCs. On average, the modulation was larger for PCs in zebrin positive regions. Correlations between aspects of the complex spike waveform and simple spike activity were found, some of which varied between zebrin positive and negative PCs. The implications of the results are discussed with regard to hypotheses that complex spikes are triggered by rises in simple spike activity for either motor learning or homeostatic functions. Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, called simple and complex spikes (SSs and CSs). We first investigated the CS-associated modulation of SS activity and its relationship to the zebrin status of the PC. The modulation pattern consisted of a pre-CS rise in SS activity, and then, following the CS, a pause, a rebound, and finally a late inhibition of SS activity for both zebrin positive (Z+) and negative (Z-) cells, though the amplitudes of the phases were larger in Z+ cells. Moreover, the amplitudes of the pre-CS rise with the late inhibitory phase of the modulation were correlated across PCs. In contrast, correlations between modulation phases across CSs of individual PCs were generally weak. Next, the relationship between CS spikelets and SS activity was investigated. The number of spikelets/CS correlated with the average SS firing rate only for Z+ cells. In contrast, correlations across CSs between spikelet numbers and the

  12. Real-time computing platform for spiking neurons (RT-spike).

    PubMed

    Ros, Eduardo; Ortigosa, Eva M; Agís, Rodrigo; Carrillo, Richard; Arnold, Michael

    2006-07-01

    A computing platform is described for simulating arbitrary networks of spiking neurons in real time. A hybrid computing scheme is adopted that uses both software and hardware components to manage the tradeoff between flexibility and computational power; the neuron model is implemented in hardware and the network model and the learning are implemented in software. The incremental transition of the software components into hardware is supported. We focus on a spike response model (SRM) for a neuron where the synapses are modeled as input-driven conductances. The temporal dynamics of the synaptic integration process are modeled with a synaptic time constant that results in a gradual injection of charge. This type of model is computationally expensive and is not easily amenable to existing software-based event-driven approaches. As an alternative we have designed an efficient time-based computing architecture in hardware, where the different stages of the neuron model are processed in parallel. Further improvements occur by computing multiple neurons in parallel using multiple processing units. This design is tested using reconfigurable hardware and its scalability and performance evaluated. Our overall goal is to investigate biologically realistic models for the real-time control of robots operating within closed action-perception loops, and so we evaluate the performance of the system on simulating a model of the cerebellum where the emulation of the temporal dynamics of the synaptic integration process is important.

  13. Efficiently passing messages in distributed spiking neural network simulation.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Corey M; Minkovich, Kirill; O'Brien, Michael J; Harris, Frederick C; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Efficiently passing spiking messages in a neural model is an important aspect of high-performance simulation. As the scale of networks has increased so has the size of the computing systems required to simulate them. In addition, the information exchange of these resources has become more of an impediment to performance. In this paper we explore spike message passing using different mechanisms provided by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A specific implementation, MVAPICH, designed for high-performance clusters with Infiniband hardware is employed. The focus is on providing information about these mechanisms for users of commodity high-performance spiking simulators. In addition, a novel hybrid method for spike exchange was implemented and benchmarked.

  14. Emergent dynamics of spiking neurons with fluctuating threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Anindita; Das, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    Role of fluctuating threshold on neuronal dynamics is investigated. The threshold function is assumed to follow a normal probability distribution. Standard deviation of inter-spike interval of the response is computed as an indicator of irregularity in spike emission. It has been observed that, the irregularity in spiking is more if the threshold variation is more. A significant change in modal characteristics of Inter Spike Intervals (ISI) is seen to occur as a function of fluctuation parameter. Investigation is further carried out for coupled system of neurons. Cooperative dynamics of coupled neurons are discussed in view of synchronization. Total and partial synchronization regimes are depicted with the help of contour plots of synchrony measure under various conditions. Results of this investigation may provide a basis for exploring the complexities of neural communication and brain functioning.

  15. Balanced Synaptic Input Shapes the Correlation between Neural Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.; Urban, Nathaniel N.; Doiron, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus properties, attention, and behavioral context influence correlations between the spike times produced by a pair of neurons. However, the biophysical mechanisms that modulate these correlations are poorly understood. With a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we show that the rate of balanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input modulates the magnitude and timescale of pairwise spike train correlation. High rate synaptic inputs promote spike time synchrony rather than long timescale spike rate correlations, while low rate synaptic inputs produce opposite results. This correlation shaping is due to a combination of enhanced high frequency input transfer and reduced firing rate gain in the high input rate state compared to the low state. Our study extends neural modulation from single neuron responses to population activity, a necessary step in understanding how the dynamics and processing of neural activity change across distinct brain states. PMID:22215995

  16. Generation of Synthetic Spike Trains with Defined Pairwise Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Niebur, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological advances as well as progress in theoretical understanding of neural systems have created a need for synthetic spike trains with controlled mean rate and pairwise cross-correlation. This report introduces and analyzes a novel algorithm for the generation of discretized spike trains with arbitrary mean rates and controlled cross correlation. Pairs of spike trains with any pairwise correlation can be generated, and higher-order correlations are compatible with common synaptic input. Relations between allowable mean rates and correlations within a population are discussed. The algorithm is highly efficient, its complexity increasing linearly with the number of spike trains generated and therefore inversely with the number of cross-correlated pairs. PMID:17521277

  17. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Millisecond solar radio spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Mel'nikov, V. F.

    1998-12-01

    Currently available models of one of the most intriguing types of unsteady rf solar emission, millisecond solar radio spikes, are discussed. A comparative analysis of the models' implications and of the body of existing data yields an outline of the most realistic radio spike model possible. The spikes are produced by the cyclotron maser mechanism. The cyclotron cone instability is caused by fast electrons distributed over energies according to a (piecewise) power law. The angular part of the distribution function (whose exact form is, as yet, undetermined) suffers fluctuations due to the magnetic field inhomogeneities that arise in the burst loop as a consequence of the original energy release. In some portions of the loop the distribution is not anisotropic enough to secure the development of a cyclotron instability; it is in these 'microtraps' where individual spikes form. Key areas of future theoretical and experimental research are suggested with a view to verifying the adequacy and realizing the diagnostic potential of the model.

  18. A novel unsupervised spike sorting algorithm for intracranial EEG.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R; Shah, A K; Loeb, J A; Swamy, M N S; Agarwal, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unsupervised spike classification algorithm for intracranial EEG. The method combines template matching and principal component analysis (PCA) for building a dynamic patient-specific codebook without a priori knowledge of the spike waveforms. The problem of misclassification due to overlapping classes is resolved by identifying similar classes in the codebook using hierarchical clustering. Cluster quality is visually assessed by projecting inter- and intra-clusters onto a 3D plot. Intracranial EEG from 5 patients was utilized to optimize the algorithm. The resulting codebook retains 82.1% of the detected spikes in non-overlapping and disjoint clusters. Initial results suggest a definite role of this method for both rapid review and quantitation of interictal spikes that could enhance both clinical treatment and research studies on epileptic patients.

  19. Asymptotic Linear Spectral Statistics for Spiked Hermitian Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passemier, Damien; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Using the Coulomb Fluid method, this paper derives central limit theorems (CLTs) for linear spectral statistics of three "spiked" Hermitian random matrix ensembles. These include Johnstone's spiked model (i.e., central Wishart with spiked correlation), non-central Wishart with rank-one non-centrality, and a related class of non-central matrices. For a generic linear statistic, we derive simple and explicit CLT expressions as the matrix dimensions grow large. For all three ensembles under consideration, we find that the primary effect of the spike is to introduce an correction term to the asymptotic mean of the linear spectral statistic, which we characterize with simple formulas. The utility of our proposed framework is demonstrated through application to three different linear statistics problems: the classical likelihood ratio test for a population covariance, the capacity analysis of multi-antenna wireless communication systems with a line-of-sight transmission path, and a classical multiple sample significance testing problem.

  20. Dense Array of Spikes on HIV-1 Virion Particles.

    PubMed

    Stano, Armando; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Zhang, Lei; Autin, Ludovic; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Gift, Syna K; Truong, Jared; Wyatt, Richard T; Olson, Arthur J; Zwick, Michael B

    2017-07-15

    HIV-1 is rare among viruses for having a low number of envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes per virion, i.e., ∼7 to 14. This exceptional feature has been associated with avoidance of humoral immunity, i.e., B cell activation and antibody neutralization. Virus-like particles (VLPs) with increased density of Env are being pursued for vaccine development; however, these typically require protein engineering that alters Env structure. Here, we used instead a strategy that targets the producer cell. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort for cells that are recognized by trimer cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) and not by nonneutralizing antibodies. Following multiple iterations of FACS, cells and progeny virions were shown to display higher levels of antigenically correct Env in a manner that correlated between cells and cognate virions ( P = 0.027). High-Env VLPs, or hVLPs, were shown to be monodisperse and to display more than a 10-fold increase in spikes per particle by electron microscopy (average, 127 spikes; range, 90 to 214 spikes). Sequencing revealed a partial truncation in the C-terminal tail of Env that had emerged in the sort; however, iterative rounds of "cell factory" selection were required for the high-Env phenotype. hVLPs showed greater infectivity than standard pseudovirions but largely similar neutralization sensitivity. Importantly, hVLPs also showed superior activation of Env-specific B cells. Hence, high-Env HIV-1 virions, obtained through selection of producer cells, represent an adaptable platform for vaccine design and should aid in the study of native Env. IMPORTANCE The paucity of spikes on HIV is a unique feature that has been associated with evasion of the immune system, while increasing spike density has been a goal of vaccine design. Increasing the density of Env by modifying it in various ways has met with limited success. Here, we focused instead on the producer cell. Cells that stably express

  1. Constructing Precisely Computing Networks with Biophysical Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Schwemmer, Michael A; Fairhall, Adrienne L; Denéve, Sophie; Shea-Brown, Eric T

    2015-07-15

    While spike timing has been shown to carry detailed stimulus information at the sensory periphery, its possible role in network computation is less clear. Most models of computation by neural networks are based on population firing rates. In equivalent spiking implementations, firing is assumed to be random such that averaging across populations of neurons recovers the rate-based approach. Recently, however, Denéve and colleagues have suggested that the spiking behavior of neurons may be fundamental to how neuronal networks compute, with precise spike timing determined by each neuron's contribution to producing the desired output (Boerlin and Denéve, 2011; Boerlin et al., 2013). By postulating that each neuron fires to reduce the error in the network's output, it was demonstrated that linear computations can be performed by networks of integrate-and-fire neurons that communicate through instantaneous synapses. This left open, however, the possibility that realistic networks, with conductance-based neurons with subthreshold nonlinearity and the slower timescales of biophysical synapses, may not fit into this framework. Here, we show how the spike-based approach can be extended to biophysically plausible networks. We then show that our network reproduces a number of key features of cortical networks including irregular and Poisson-like spike times and a tight balance between excitation and inhibition. Lastly, we discuss how the behavior of our model scales with network size or with the number of neurons "recorded" from a larger computing network. These results significantly increase the biological plausibility of the spike-based approach to network computation. We derive a network of neurons with standard spike-generating currents and synapses with realistic timescales that computes based upon the principle that the precise timing of each spike is important for the computation. We then show that our network reproduces a number of key features of cortical networks

  2. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Reliable Computations in Recurrent Spiking Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Randomly connected networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons provide a parsimonious model of neural variability, but are notoriously unreliable for performing computations. We show that this difficulty is overcome by incorporating the well-documented dependence of connection probability on distance. Spatially extended spiking networks exhibit symmetry-breaking bifurcations and generate spatiotemporal patterns that can be trained to perform dynamical computations under a reservoir computing framework.

  3. SPIKY: a graphical user interface for monitoring spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Mulansky, Mario; Bozanic, Nebojsa

    2015-05-01

    Techniques for recording large-scale neuronal spiking activity are developing very fast. This leads to an increasing demand for algorithms capable of analyzing large amounts of experimental spike train data. One of the most crucial and demanding tasks is the identification of similarity patterns with a very high temporal resolution and across different spatial scales. To address this task, in recent years three time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony have been proposed, the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and event synchronization. The Matlab source codes for calculating and visualizing these measures have been made publicly available. However, due to the many different possible representations of the results the use of these codes is rather complicated and their application requires some basic knowledge of Matlab. Thus it became desirable to provide a more user-friendly and interactive interface. Here we address this need and present SPIKY, a graphical user interface that facilitates the application of time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony to both simulated and real data. SPIKY includes implementations of the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and the SPIKE-synchronization (an improved and simplified extension of event synchronization) that have been optimized with respect to computation speed and memory demand. It also comprises a spike train generator and an event detector that makes it capable of analyzing continuous data. Finally, the SPIKY package includes additional complementary programs aimed at the analysis of large numbers of datasets and the estimation of significance levels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. A novel automated spike sorting algorithm with adaptable feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Bestel, Robert; Daus, Andreas W; Thielemann, Christiane

    2012-10-15

    To study the electrophysiological properties of neuronal networks, in vitro studies based on microelectrode arrays have become a viable tool for analysis. Although in constant progress, a challenging task still remains in this area: the development of an efficient spike sorting algorithm that allows an accurate signal analysis at the single-cell level. Most sorting algorithms currently available only extract a specific feature type, such as the principal components or Wavelet coefficients of the measured spike signals in order to separate different spike shapes generated by different neurons. However, due to the great variety in the obtained spike shapes, the derivation of an optimal feature set is still a very complex issue that current algorithms struggle with. To address this problem, we propose a novel algorithm that (i) extracts a variety of geometric, Wavelet and principal component-based features and (ii) automatically derives a feature subset, most suitable for sorting an individual set of spike signals. Thus, there is a new approach that evaluates the probability distribution of the obtained spike features and consequently determines the candidates most suitable for the actual spike sorting. These candidates can be formed into an individually adjusted set of spike features, allowing a separation of the various shapes present in the obtained neuronal signal by a subsequent expectation maximisation clustering algorithm. Test results with simulated data files and data obtained from chick embryonic neurons cultured on microelectrode arrays showed an excellent classification result, indicating the superior performance of the described algorithm approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Spiking Neural Network System for Robust Sequence Recognition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Yan, Rui; Tang, Huajin; Tan, Kay Chen; Li, Haizhou

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a biologically plausible network architecture with spiking neurons for sequence recognition. This architecture is a unified and consistent system with functional parts of sensory encoding, learning, and decoding. This is the first systematic model attempting to reveal the neural mechanisms considering both the upstream and the downstream neurons together. The whole system is a consistent temporal framework, where the precise timing of spikes is employed for information processing and cognitive computing. Experimental results show that the system is competent to perform the sequence recognition, being robust to noisy sensory inputs and invariant to changes in the intervals between input stimuli within a certain range. The classification ability of the temporal learning rule used in the system is investigated through two benchmark tasks that outperform the other two widely used learning rules for classification. The results also demonstrate the computational power of spiking neurons over perceptrons for processing spatiotemporal patterns. In summary, the system provides a general way with spiking neurons to encode external stimuli into spatiotemporal spikes, to learn the encoded spike patterns with temporal learning rules, and to decode the sequence order with downstream neurons. The system structure would be beneficial for developments in both hardware and software.

  6. A method for decoding the neurophysiological spike-response transform

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Estee; García-Crescioni, Keyla; Miller, Mark W.; Peskin, Charles S.; Brezina, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Many physiological responses elicited by neuronal spikes—intracellular calcium transients, synaptic potentials, muscle contractions—are built up of discrete, elementary responses to each spike. However, the spikes occur in trains of arbitrary temporal complexity, and each elementary response not only sums with previous ones, but can itself be modified by the previous history of the activity. A basic goal in system identification is to characterize the spike-response transform in terms of a small number of functions—the elementary response kernel and additional kernels or functions that describe the dependence on previous history—that will predict the response to any arbitrary spike train. Here we do this by developing further and generalizing the “synaptic decoding” approach of Sen et al. (J Neurosci 16:6307-6318, 1996). Given the spike times in a train and the observed overall response, we use least-squares minimization to construct the best estimated response and at the same time best estimates of the elementary response kernel and the other functions that characterize the spike-response transform. We avoid the need for any specific initial assumptions about these functions by using techniques of mathematical analysis and linear algebra that allow us to solve simultaneously for all of the numerical function values treated as independent parameters. The functions are such that they may be interpreted mechanistically. We examine the performance of the method as applied to synthetic data. We then use the method to decode real synaptic and muscle contraction transforms. PMID:19695289

  7. Comparison of Classifier Architectures for Online Neural Spike Sorting.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maryam; Khan, Amir Ali; Kamboh, Awais Mehmood

    2017-04-01

    High-density, intracranial recordings from micro-electrode arrays need to undergo Spike Sorting in order to associate the recorded neuronal spikes to particular neurons. This involves spike detection, feature extraction, and classification. To reduce the data transmission and power requirements, on-chip real-time processing is becoming very popular. However, high computational resources are required for classifiers in on-chip spike-sorters, making scalability a great challenge. In this review paper, we analyze several popular classifiers to propose five new hardware architectures using the off-chip training with on-chip classification approach. These include support vector classification, fuzzy C-means classification, self-organizing maps classification, moving-centroid K-means classification, and Cosine distance classification. The performance of these architectures is analyzed in terms of accuracy and resource requirement. We establish that the neural networks based Self-Organizing Maps classifier offers the most viable solution. A spike sorter based on the Self-Organizing Maps classifier, requires only 7.83% of computational resources of the best-reported spike sorter, hierarchical adaptive means, while offering a 3% better accuracy at 7 dB SNR.

  8. Automatic Fitting of Spiking Neuron Models to Electrophysiological Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spiking models can accurately predict the spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents. Since the specific characteristics of the model depend on the neuron, a computational method is required to fit models to electrophysiological recordings. The fitting procedure can be very time consuming both in terms of computer simulations and in terms of code writing. We present algorithms to fit spiking models to electrophysiological data (time-varying input and spike trains) that can run in parallel on graphics processing units (GPUs). The model fitting library is interfaced with Brian, a neural network simulator in Python. If a GPU is present it uses just-in-time compilation to translate model equations into optimized code. Arbitrary models can then be defined at script level and run on the graphics card. This tool can be used to obtain empirically validated spiking models of neurons in various systems. We demonstrate its use on public data from the INCF Quantitative Single-Neuron Modeling 2009 competition by comparing the performance of a number of neuron spiking models. PMID:20224819

  9. Designing optimal stimuli to control neuronal spike timing

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Adam M.; Yuste, Rafael; Paninski, Liam

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental stimulation methods have raised the following important computational question: how can we choose a stimulus that will drive a neuron to output a target spike train with optimal precision, given physiological constraints? Here we adopt an approach based on models that describe how a stimulating agent (such as an injected electrical current or a laser light interacting with caged neurotransmitters or photosensitive ion channels) affects the spiking activity of neurons. Based on these models, we solve the reverse problem of finding the best time-dependent modulation of the input, subject to hardware limitations as well as physiologically inspired safety measures, that causes the neuron to emit a spike train that with highest probability will be close to a target spike train. We adopt fast convex constrained optimization methods to solve this problem. Our methods can potentially be implemented in real time and may also be generalized to the case of many cells, suitable for neural prosthesis applications. With the use of biologically sensible parameters and constraints, our method finds stimulation patterns that generate very precise spike trains in simulated experiments. We also tested the intracellular current injection method on pyramidal cells in mouse cortical slices, quantifying the dependence of spiking reliability and timing precision on constraints imposed on the applied currents. PMID:21511704

  10. On the continuous differentiability of inter-spike intervals of synaptically connected cortical spiking neurons in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gautam; Kothare, Mayuresh V

    2013-12-01

    We derive conditions for continuous differentiability of inter-spike intervals (ISIs) of spiking neurons with respect to parameters (decision variables) of an external stimulating input current that drives a recurrent network of synaptically connected neurons. The dynamical behavior of individual neurons is represented by a class of discontinuous single-neuron models. We report here that ISIs of neurons in the network are continuously differentiable with respect to decision variables if (1) a continuously differentiable trajectory of the membrane potential exists between consecutive action potentials with respect to time and decision variables and (2) the partial derivative of the membrane potential of spiking neurons with respect to time is not equal to the partial derivative of their firing threshold with respect to time at the time of action potentials. Our theoretical results are supported by showing fulfillment of these conditions for a class of known bidimensional spiking neuron models.

  11. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. II: Spike Shuffling Methods on LIF Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Synapses may undergo variable changes during plasticity because of the variability of spike patterns such as temporal stochasticity and spatial randomness. Here, we call the variability of synaptic weight changes during plasticity to be efficacy variability. In this paper, we investigate how four aspects of spike pattern statistics (i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations) influence the efficacy variability under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and synaptic homeostasis (the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded), by implementing spike shuffling methods onto spike patterns self-organized by a network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. With the increase of the decay time scale of the inhibitory synaptic currents, the LIF network undergoes a transition from asynchronous state to weak synchronous state and then to synchronous bursting state. We first shuffle these spike patterns using a variety of methods, each designed to evidently change a specific pattern statistics; and then investigate the change of efficacy variability of the synapses under STDP and synaptic homeostasis, when the neurons in the network fire according to the spike patterns before and after being treated by a shuffling method. In this way, we can understand how the change of pattern statistics may cause the change of efficacy variability. Our results are consistent with those of our previous study which implements spike-generating models on converging motifs. We also find that burstiness/regularity is important to determine the efficacy variability under asynchronous states, while heterogeneity of cross-correlations is the main factor to cause efficacy variability when the network moves into synchronous bursting states (the states observed in epilepsy). PMID:27555816

  12. Spike-Interval Triggered Averaging Reveals a Quasi-Periodic Spiking Alternative for Stochastic Resonance in Catfish Electroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lankheet, Martin J. M.; Klink, P. Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G.; Noest, André J.

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 38 control samples (spikes) from 18 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of dust, food, beverages, blood, urine, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples we...

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Metabolites in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 pesticide metabolites in 3 control samples (spikes) from 3 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of urine. Spiked samples were used to assess recovery o...

  15. Dual Roles for Spike Signaling in Cortical Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Dana H.; Jehee, Janneke F. M.

    2011-01-01

    A prominent feature of signaling in cortical neurons is that of randomness in the action potential. The output of a typical pyramidal cell can be well fit with a Poisson model, and variations in the Poisson rate repeatedly have been shown to be correlated with stimuli. However while the rate provides a very useful characterization of neural spike data, it may not be the most fundamental description of the signaling code. Recent data showing γ frequency range multi-cell action potential correlations, together with spike timing dependent plasticity, are spurring a re-examination of the classical model, since precise timing codes imply that the generation of spikes is essentially deterministic. Could the observed Poisson randomness and timing determinism reflect two separate modes of communication, or do they somehow derive from a single process? We investigate in a timing-based model whether the apparent incompatibility between these probabilistic and deterministic observations may be resolved by examining how spikes could be used in the underlying neural circuits. The crucial component of this model draws on dual roles for spike signaling. In learning receptive fields from ensembles of inputs, spikes need to behave probabilistically, whereas for fast signaling of individual stimuli, the spikes need to behave deterministically. Our simulations show that this combination is possible if deterministic signals using γ latency coding are probabilistically routed through different members of a cortical cell population at different times. This model exhibits standard features characteristic of Poisson models such as orientation tuning and exponential interval histograms. In addition, it makes testable predictions that follow from the γ latency coding. PMID:21687798

  16. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper. PMID:27044001

  17. Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Anders; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Hesslow, Germund

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or “Purkinje cell CRs” to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI), which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive. PMID:25140129

  18. Benchmarking Spike-Based Visual Recognition: A Dataset and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Pineda-García, Garibaldi; Stromatias, Evangelos; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Furber, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    Today, increasing attention is being paid to research into spike-based neural computation both to gain a better understanding of the brain and to explore biologically-inspired computation. Within this field, the primate visual pathway and its hierarchical organization have been extensively studied. Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs), inspired by the understanding of observed biological structure and function, have been successfully applied to visual recognition and classification tasks. In addition, implementations on neuromorphic hardware have enabled large-scale networks to run in (or even faster than) real time, making spike-based neural vision processing accessible on mobile robots. Neuromorphic sensors such as silicon retinas are able to feed such mobile systems with real-time visual stimuli. A new set of vision benchmarks for spike-based neural processing are now needed to measure progress quantitatively within this rapidly advancing field. We propose that a large dataset of spike-based visual stimuli is needed to provide meaningful comparisons between different systems, and a corresponding evaluation methodology is also required to measure the performance of SNN models and their hardware implementations. In this paper we first propose an initial NE (Neuromorphic Engineering) dataset based on standard computer vision benchmarksand that uses digits from the MNIST database. This dataset is compatible with the state of current research on spike-based image recognition. The corresponding spike trains are produced using a range of techniques: rate-based Poisson spike generation, rank order encoding, and recorded output from a silicon retina with both flashing and oscillating input stimuli. In addition, a complementary evaluation methodology is presented to assess both model-level and hardware-level performance. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the dataset and the evaluation methodology using two SNN models to validate the performance of the models and their hardware

  19. Benchmarking Spike-Based Visual Recognition: A Dataset and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Pineda-García, Garibaldi; Stromatias, Evangelos; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Furber, Steve B.

    2016-01-01

    Today, increasing attention is being paid to research into spike-based neural computation both to gain a better understanding of the brain and to explore biologically-inspired computation. Within this field, the primate visual pathway and its hierarchical organization have been extensively studied. Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs), inspired by the understanding of observed biological structure and function, have been successfully applied to visual recognition and classification tasks. In addition, implementations on neuromorphic hardware have enabled large-scale networks to run in (or even faster than) real time, making spike-based neural vision processing accessible on mobile robots. Neuromorphic sensors such as silicon retinas are able to feed such mobile systems with real-time visual stimuli. A new set of vision benchmarks for spike-based neural processing are now needed to measure progress quantitatively within this rapidly advancing field. We propose that a large dataset of spike-based visual stimuli is needed to provide meaningful comparisons between different systems, and a corresponding evaluation methodology is also required to measure the performance of SNN models and their hardware implementations. In this paper we first propose an initial NE (Neuromorphic Engineering) dataset based on standard computer vision benchmarksand that uses digits from the MNIST database. This dataset is compatible with the state of current research on spike-based image recognition. The corresponding spike trains are produced using a range of techniques: rate-based Poisson spike generation, rank order encoding, and recorded output from a silicon retina with both flashing and oscillating input stimuli. In addition, a complementary evaluation methodology is presented to assess both model-level and hardware-level performance. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the dataset and the evaluation methodology using two SNN models to validate the performance of the models and their hardware

  20. Noise-enhanced coding in phasic neuron spike trains.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Doiron, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The stochastic nature of neuronal response has lead to conjectures about the impact of input fluctuations on the neural coding. For the most part, low pass membrane integration and spike threshold dynamics have been the primary features assumed in the transfer from synaptic input to output spiking. Phasic neurons are a common, but understudied, neuron class that are characterized by a subthreshold negative feedback that suppresses spike train responses to low frequency signals. Past work has shown that when a low frequency signal is accompanied by moderate intensity broadband noise, phasic neurons spike trains are well locked to the signal. We extend these results with a simple, reduced model of phasic activity that demonstrates that a non-Markovian spike train structure caused by the negative feedback produces a noise-enhanced coding. Further, this enhancement is sensitive to the timescales, as opposed to the intensity, of a driving signal. Reduced hazard function models show that noise-enhanced phasic codes are both novel and separate from classical stochastic resonance reported in non-phasic neurons. The general features of our theory suggest that noise-enhanced codes in excitable systems with subthreshold negative feedback are a particularly rich framework to study.

  1. Functional identification of spike-processing neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2014-02-01

    We introduce a novel approach for a complete functional identification of biophysical spike-processing neural circuits. The circuits considered accept multidimensional spike trains as their input and comprise a multitude of temporal receptive fields and conductance-based models of action potential generation. Each temporal receptive field describes the spatiotemporal contribution of all synapses between any two neurons and incorporates the (passive) processing carried out by the dendritic tree. The aggregate dendritic current produced by a multitude of temporal receptive fields is encoded into a sequence of action potentials by a spike generator modeled as a nonlinear dynamical system. Our approach builds on the observation that during any experiment, an entire neural circuit, including its receptive fields and biophysical spike generators, is projected onto the space of stimuli used to identify the circuit. Employing the reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) of trigonometric polynomials to describe input stimuli, we quantitatively describe the relationship between underlying circuit parameters and their projections. We also derive experimental conditions under which these projections converge to the true parameters. In doing so, we achieve the mathematical tractability needed to characterize the biophysical spike generator and identify the multitude of receptive fields. The algorithms obviate the need to repeat experiments in order to compute the neurons' rate of response, rendering our methodology of interest to both experimental and theoretical neuroscientists.

  2. A proteomic study of spike development inhibition in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Sheng; Guo, Jun-Xian; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Gao, Ai-Nong; Yang, Xin-Ming; Li, Xiu-Quan; Liu, Wei-Hua; Li, Li-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Spike development in wheat is a complicated development process and determines the wheat propagation and survival. We report herein a proteomic study on the bread wheat mutant strain 5660M underlying spike development inhibition. A total of 121 differentially expressed proteins, which were involved in cold stress response, protein folding and assembly, cell-cycle regulation, scavenging of ROS, and the autonomous pathway were identified using MS/MS and database searching. We found that cold responsive proteins were highly expressed in the mutant in contrast to those expressed in the wild-type line. Particularly, the autonomous pathway protein FVE, which modulates flowering, was dramatically downregulated and closely related to the spike development inhibition phenotype of 5660M. A quantitative RT-PCR study demonstrated that the transcription of the FVE and other six genes in the autonomous pathway and downstream flowering regulators were all markedly downregulated. The results indicate that spike development of 5660M cannot complete the floral transition. FVE might play an important role in the spikes development of the wheat. Our results provide the theory basis for studying floral development and transition in the reproductive growth period, and further analysis of wheat yield formation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Neural Spike Train Synchronisation Indices: Definitions, Interpretations and Applications.

    PubMed

    Halliday, D M; Rosenberg, J R

    2017-04-24

    A comparison of previously defined spike train syncrhonization indices is undertaken within a stochastic point process framework. The second order cumulant density (covariance density) is shown to be common to all the indices. Simulation studies were used to investigate the sampling variability of a single index based on the second order cumulant. The simulations used a paired motoneurone model and a paired regular spiking cortical neurone model. The sampling variability of spike trains generated under identical conditions from the paired motoneurone model varied from 50% { 160% of the estimated value. On theoretical grounds, and on the basis of simulated data a rate dependence is present in all synchronization indices. The application of coherence and pooled coherence estimates to the issue of synchronization indices is considered. This alternative frequency domain approach allows an arbitrary number of spike train pairs to be evaluated for statistically significant differences, and combined into a single population measure. The pooled coherence framework allows pooled time domain measures to be derived, application of this to the simulated data is illustrated. Data from the cortical neurone model is generated over a wide range of firing rates (1 - 250 spikes/sec). The pooled coherence framework correctly characterizes the sampling variability as not significant over this wide operating range. The broader applicability of this approach to multi electrode array data is briefly discussed.

  4. Financial time series prediction using spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two "traditional", rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments.

  5. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two “traditional”, rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments. PMID:25170618

  6. Bifurcation and Spike Adding Transition in Chay-Keizer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Jiang, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaohui

    Electrical bursting is an activity which is universal in excitable cells such as neurons and various endocrine cells, and it encodes rich physiological information. As burst delay identifies that the signal integration has reached the threshold at which it can generate an action potential, the number of spikes in a burst may have essential physiological implications, and the transition of bursting in excitable cells is associated with the bifurcation phenomenon closely. In this paper, we focus on the transition of the spike count per burst of the pancreatic β-cells within a mathematical model and bifurcation phenomenon in the Chay-Keizer model, which is utilized to simulate the pancreatic β-cells. By the fast-slow dynamical bifurcation analysis and the bi-parameter bifurcation analysis, the local dynamics of the Chay-Keizer system around the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation is illustrated. Then the variety of the number of spikes per burst is discussed by changing the settings of a single parameter and bi-parameter. Moreover, results on the number of spikes within a burst are summarized in ISIs (interspike intervals) sequence diagrams, maximum and minimum, and the number of spikes under bi-parameter value changes.

  7. Bayesian decoding using unsorted spikes in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Stuart P.; Chen, Zhe; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental task in neuroscience is to understand how neural ensembles represent information. Population decoding is a useful tool to extract information from neuronal populations based on the ensemble spiking activity. We propose a novel Bayesian decoding paradigm to decode unsorted spikes in the rat hippocampus. Our approach uses a direct mapping between spike waveform features and covariates of interest and avoids accumulation of spike sorting errors. Our decoding paradigm is nonparametric, encoding model-free for representing stimuli, and extracts information from all available spikes and their waveform features. We apply the proposed Bayesian decoding algorithm to a position reconstruction task for freely behaving rats based on tetrode recordings of rat hippocampal neuronal activity. Our detailed decoding analyses demonstrate that our approach is efficient and better utilizes the available information in the nonsortable hash than the standard sorting-based decoding algorithm. Our approach can be adapted to an online encoding/decoding framework for applications that require real-time decoding, such as brain-machine interfaces. PMID:24089403

  8. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information. PMID:27304526

  9. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information.

  10. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis). Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons). Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron) in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV) induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV) induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1) synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2) heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3) heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our work

  11. Extremely rapid radio spikes in flares: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.

    1986-01-01

    Radio spikes of a few to tens of milliseconds of the solar radio emission have recently seen a surge of interest of theoreticians who are fascinated by their high brightness temperature of up to 10 to the 15th power K, their association with hard X-ray bursts, and a possibly very intimate relation to electron acceleration. Their bandwidth and global distribution in frequency were quantitatively measured only recently. This review is intended to emphasize the considerable extend of old and new observational knowledge which is hardly touched upon by theory. The wide range of spike observations is summarized and brought into perspective of recent models. It is concluded that spikes yield a considerable potential for the diagnostics of energetic particles, their origin, and history in astrophysical plasmas.

  12. Character recognition from trajectory by recurrent spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Jiangrong Shen; Kang Lin; Yueming Wang; Gang Pan

    2017-07-01

    Spiking neural networks are biologically plausible and power-efficient on neuromorphic hardware, while recurrent neural networks have been proven to be efficient on time series data. However, how to use the recurrent property to improve the performance of spiking neural networks is still a problem. This paper proposes a recurrent spiking neural network for character recognition using trajectories. In the network, a new encoding method is designed, in which varying time ranges of input streams are used in different recurrent layers. This is able to improve the generalization ability of our model compared with general encoding methods. The experiments are conducted on four groups of the character data set from University of Edinburgh. The results show that our method can achieve a higher average recognition accuracy than existing methods.

  13. Comparison of spike-sorting algorithms for future hardware implementation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sarah; Judy, Jack W; Markovic, Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Applications such as brain-machine interfaces require hardware spike sorting in order to (1) obtain single-unit activity and (2) perform data reduction for wireless transmission of data. Such systems must be low-power, low-area, high-accuracy, automatic, and able to operate in real time. Several detection and feature extraction algorithms for spike sorting are described briefly and evaluated in terms of accuracy versus computational complexity. The nonlinear energy operator method is chosen as the optimal spike detection algorithm, being most robust over noise and relatively simple. The discrete derivatives method [1] is chosen as the optimal feature extraction method, maintaining high accuracy across SNRs with a complexity orders of magnitude less than that of traditional methods such as PCA.

  14. Spike shape analysis of electromyography for parkinsonian tremor evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marusiak, Jarosław; Andrzejewska, Renata; Świercz, Dominika; Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Jaskólska, Anna; Jaskólski, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Standard electromyography (EMG) parameters have limited utility for evaluation of Parkinson disease (PD) tremor. Spike shape analysis (SSA) EMG parameters are more sensitive than standard EMG parameters for studying motor control mechanisms in healthy subjects. SSA of EMG has not been used to assess parkinsonian tremor. This study assessed the utility of SSA and standard time and frequency analysis for electromyographic evaluation of PD-related resting tremor. We analyzed 1-s periods of EMG recordings to detect nontremor and tremor signals in relaxed biceps brachii muscle of seven mild to moderate PD patients. SSA revealed higher mean spike amplitude, duration, and slope and lower mean spike frequency in tremor signals than in nontremor signals. Standard EMG parameters (root mean square, median, and mean frequency) did not show differences between the tremor and nontremor signals. SSA of EMG data is a sensitive method for parkinsonian tremor evaluation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Cross-Correlated Delay Shift Supervised Learning Method for Spiking Neurons with Application to Interictal Spike Detection in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lilin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Adjouadi, Malek

    2017-05-01

    This study introduces a novel learning algorithm for spiking neurons, called CCDS, which is able to learn and reproduce arbitrary spike patterns in a supervised fashion allowing the processing of spatiotemporal information encoded in the precise timing of spikes. Unlike the Remote Supervised Method (ReSuMe), synapse delays and axonal delays in CCDS are variants which are modulated together with weights during learning. The CCDS rule is both biologically plausible and computationally efficient. The properties of this learning rule are investigated extensively through experimental evaluations in terms of reliability, adaptive learning performance, generality to different neuron models, learning in the presence of noise, effects of its learning parameters and classification performance. Results presented show that the CCDS learning method achieves learning accuracy and learning speed comparable with ReSuMe, but improves classification accuracy when compared to both the Spike Pattern Association Neuron (SPAN) learning rule and the Tempotron learning rule. The merit of CCDS rule is further validated on a practical example involving the automated detection of interictal spikes in EEG records of patients with epilepsy. Results again show that with proper encoding, the CCDS rule achieves good recognition performance.

  16. Local Variation of Hashtag Spike Trains and Popularity in Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    We draw a parallel between hashtag time series and neuron spike trains. In each case, the process presents complex dynamic patterns including temporal correlations, burstiness, and all other types of nonstationarity. We propose the adoption of the so-called local variation in order to uncover salient dynamical properties, while properly detrending for the time-dependent features of a signal. The methodology is tested on both real and randomized hashtag spike trains, and identifies that popular hashtags present regular and so less bursty behavior, suggesting its potential use for predicting online popularity in social media. PMID:26161650

  17. A Spiking Neural Network in sEMG Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Lobov, Sergey; Mironov, Vasiliy; Kastalskiy, Innokentiy; Kazantsev, Victor

    2015-11-03

    We have developed a novel algorithm for sEMG feature extraction and classification. It is based on a hybrid network composed of spiking and artificial neurons. The spiking neuron layer with mutual inhibition was assigned as feature extractor. We demonstrate that the classification accuracy of the proposed model could reach high values comparable with existing sEMG interface systems. Moreover, the algorithm sensibility for different sEMG collecting systems characteristics was estimated. Results showed rather equal accuracy, despite a significant sampling rate difference. The proposed algorithm was successfully tested for mobile robot control.

  18. Inter-cellular spike coincidences in visual detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Roman; Heinze, Sabine

    2002-06-01

    Synchronized spike activity is discussed as a possible representational code for object integration and as a neuronal basis of attention, perception and awareness. As a byproduct of experiments in which monkeys were trained to detect simple figures composed of single Gabor patches in a noisy background of similar elements, we found in special cases increased spike synchrony above chance level specifically related to figure detection. The long latency of this effect is difficult to interpret. It may be a sign of the cognitive state of an animal when it perceives the figure.

  19. SPIKE: Application for ASTRO-D mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, T.; Johnston, M.; Morgan, E.; Clark, G.

    1992-01-01

    SPIKE is a mission planning software system developed by a team of programmers at the STScI for use with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). SPIKE has been developed for the purpose of automating observatory scheduling to increase the effective utilization and ultimately, scientific return from orbiting telescopes. High-level scheduling strategies using both rule-based and neural network approaches have been incorporated. Graphical displays of activities, constraints, and schedules are an important feature of the system. Although SPIKE was originally developed for the HST, it can be used for other astronomy missions including ground-based observatories. One of the missions that has decided to use SPIKE is ASTRO-D, a Japanese X-ray satellite for which the U.S. is providing a part of the scientific payload. Scheduled to fly in Feb. 1993, its four telescopes will focus X-rays over a wide energy range onto CCD's and imaging gas proportional counters. ASTRO-D will be the first X-ray imaging mission operating over the 0.5-12 keV band with high energy resolution. This combination of capabilities will enable a varied and exciting program of astronomical research to be carried out. ASTRO-D is expected to observe 5 to 20 objects per day and a total of several thousands per year. This requires the implementation of an efficient planning and scheduling system which SPIKE can provide. Although the version of SPIKE that will be used for ASTRO-D mission is almost identical to that used for the HST, there are a few differences. For example, ASTRO-D will use two ground stations for data downlinks, instead of the TDRSS system for data transmission. As a consequence ASTRO-D is constrained by limited on-board data storage capacity to schedule high data-rate observations during periods of frequent high bit rate observations accordingly. We will demonstrate the ASTRO-D version of SPIKE to show what SPIKE can provide and how efficiently it creates an observational schedule.

  20. Hippocampal Spike-Timing Correlations Lead to Hexagonal Grid Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve-Mercado, Mauro M.; Leibold, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Space is represented in the mammalian brain by the activity of hippocampal place cells, as well as in their spike-timing correlations. Here, we propose a theory for how this temporal code is transformed to spatial firing rate patterns via spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity. The resulting dynamics of synaptic weights resembles well-known pattern formation models in which a lateral inhibition mechanism gives rise to a Turing instability. We identify parameter regimes in which hexagonal firing patterns develop as they have been found in medial entorhinal cortex.

  1. SpikingLab: modelling agents controlled by Spiking Neural Networks in Netlogo.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Romero, Cristian; Johnson, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    The scientific interest attracted by Spiking Neural Networks (SNN) has lead to the development of tools for the simulation and study of neuronal dynamics ranging from phenomenological models to the more sophisticated and biologically accurate Hodgkin-and-Huxley-based and multi-compartmental models. However, despite the multiple features offered by neural modelling tools, their integration with environments for the simulation of robots and agents can be challenging and time consuming. The implementation of artificial neural circuits to control robots generally involves the following tasks: (1) understanding the simulation tools, (2) creating the neural circuit in the neural simulator, (3) linking the simulated neural circuit with the environment of the agent and (4) programming the appropriate interface in the robot or agent to use the neural controller. The accomplishment of the above-mentioned tasks can be challenging, especially for undergraduate students or novice researchers. This paper presents an alternative tool which facilitates the simulation of simple SNN circuits using the multi-agent simulation and the programming environment Netlogo (educational software that simplifies the study and experimentation of complex systems). The engine proposed and implemented in Netlogo for the simulation of a functional model of SNN is a simplification of integrate and fire (I&F) models. The characteristics of the engine (including neuronal dynamics, STDP learning and synaptic delay) are demonstrated through the implementation of an agent representing an artificial insect controlled by a simple neural circuit. The setup of the experiment and its outcomes are described in this work.

  2. A model-based spike sorting algorithm for removing correlation artifacts in multi-neuron recordings.

    PubMed

    Pillow, Jonathan W; Shlens, Jonathon; Chichilnisky, E J; Simoncelli, Eero P

    2013-01-01

    We examine the problem of estimating the spike trains of multiple neurons from voltage traces recorded on one or more extracellular electrodes. Traditional spike-sorting methods rely on thresholding or clustering of recorded signals to identify spikes. While these methods can detect a large fraction of the spikes from a recording, they generally fail to identify synchronous or near-synchronous spikes: cases in which multiple spikes overlap. Here we investigate the geometry of failures in traditional sorting algorithms, and document the prevalence of such errors in multi-electrode recordings from primate retina. We then develop a method for multi-neuron spike sorting using a model that explicitly accounts for the superposition of spike waveforms. We model the recorded voltage traces as a linear combination of spike waveforms plus a stochastic background component of correlated Gaussian noise. Combining this measurement model with a Bernoulli prior over binary spike trains yields a posterior distribution for spikes given the recorded data. We introduce a greedy algorithm to maximize this posterior that we call "binary pursuit". The algorithm allows modest variability in spike waveforms and recovers spike times with higher precision than the voltage sampling rate. This method substantially corrects cross-correlation artifacts that arise with conventional methods, and substantially outperforms clustering methods on both real and simulated data. Finally, we develop diagnostic tools that can be used to assess errors in spike sorting in the absence of ground truth.

  3. A Model-Based Spike Sorting Algorithm for Removing Correlation Artifacts in Multi-Neuron Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Chichilnisky, E. J.; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the problem of estimating the spike trains of multiple neurons from voltage traces recorded on one or more extracellular electrodes. Traditional spike-sorting methods rely on thresholding or clustering of recorded signals to identify spikes. While these methods can detect a large fraction of the spikes from a recording, they generally fail to identify synchronous or near-synchronous spikes: cases in which multiple spikes overlap. Here we investigate the geometry of failures in traditional sorting algorithms, and document the prevalence of such errors in multi-electrode recordings from primate retina. We then develop a method for multi-neuron spike sorting using a model that explicitly accounts for the superposition of spike waveforms. We model the recorded voltage traces as a linear combination of spike waveforms plus a stochastic background component of correlated Gaussian noise. Combining this measurement model with a Bernoulli prior over binary spike trains yields a posterior distribution for spikes given the recorded data. We introduce a greedy algorithm to maximize this posterior that we call “binary pursuit”. The algorithm allows modest variability in spike waveforms and recovers spike times with higher precision than the voltage sampling rate. This method substantially corrects cross-correlation artifacts that arise with conventional methods, and substantially outperforms clustering methods on both real and simulated data. Finally, we develop diagnostic tools that can be used to assess errors in spike sorting in the absence of ground truth. PMID:23671583

  4. Toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates-Spiking methodology, species sensitivity, and nickel bioavailability

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Rudel, David

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes data from studies of the toxicity and bioavailability of nickel in nickel-spiked freshwater sediments. The goal of these studies was to generate toxicity and chemistry data to support development of broadly applicable sediment quality guidelines for nickel. The studies were conducted as three tasks, which are presented here as three chapters: Task 1, Development of methods for preparation and toxicity testing of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; Task 2, Sensitivity of benthic invertebrates to toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; and Task 3, Effect of sediment characteristics on nickel bioavailability. Appendices with additional methodological details and raw chemistry and toxicity data for the three tasks are available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5225/downloads/.

  5. Analysis of the effects of periodic forcing in the spike rate and spike correlation's in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero-Quiroz, C.; Sorrentino, Taciano; Torrent, M. C.; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of semiconductor lasers with optical feedback and direct current modulation, operating in the regime of low frequency fluctuations (LFFs). In the LFF regime the laser intensity displays abrupt spikes: the intensity drops to zero and then gradually recovers. We focus on the inter-spike-intervals (ISIs) and use a method of symbolic time-series analysis, which is based on computing the probabilities of symbolic patterns. We show that the variation of the probabilities of the symbols with the modulation frequency and with the intrinsic spike rate of the laser allows to identify different regimes of noisy locking. Simulations of the Lang-Kobayashi model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  6. Google Searches for "Cheap Cigarettes" Spike at Tax Increases: Evidence from an Algorithm to Detect Spikes in Time Series Data.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Theodore L

    2018-05-03

    Online cigarette dealers have lower prices than brick-and-mortar retailers and advertise tax-free status.1-8 Previous studies show smokers search out these online alternatives at the time of a cigarette tax increase.9,10 However, these studies rely upon researchers' decision to consider a specific date and preclude the possibility that researchers focus on the wrong date. The purpose of this study is to introduce an unbiased methodology to the field of observing search patterns and to use this methodology to determine whether smokers search Google for "cheap cigarettes" at cigarette tax increases and, if so, whether the increased level of searches persists. Publicly available data from Google Trends is used to observe standardized search volumes for the term, "cheap cigarettes". Seasonal Hybrid Extreme Studentized Deviate and E-Divisive with Means tests were performed to observe spikes and mean level shifts in search volume. Of the twelve cigarette tax increases studied, ten showed spikes in searches for "cheap cigarettes" within two weeks of the tax increase. However, the mean level shifts did not occur for any cigarette tax increase. Searches for "cheap cigarettes" spike around the time of a cigarette tax increase, but the mean level of searches does not shift in response to a tax increase. The SHESD and EDM tests are unbiased methodologies that can be used to identify spikes and mean level shifts in time series data without an a priori date to be studied. SHESD and EDM affirm spikes in interest are related to tax increases. • Applies improved statistical techniques (SHESD and EDM) to Google search data related to cigarettes, reducing bias and increasing power • Contributes to the body of evidence that state and federal tax increases are associated with spikes in searches for cheap cigarettes and may be good dates for increased online health messaging related to tobacco.

  7. Detection and Evaluation of Spatio-Temporal Spike Patterns in Massively Parallel Spike Train Data with SPADE.

    PubMed

    Quaglio, Pietro; Yegenoglu, Alper; Torre, Emiliano; Endres, Dominik M; Grün, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Repeated, precise sequences of spikes are largely considered a signature of activation of cell assemblies. These repeated sequences are commonly known under the name of spatio-temporal patterns (STPs). STPs are hypothesized to play a role in the communication of information in the computational process operated by the cerebral cortex. A variety of statistical methods for the detection of STPs have been developed and applied to electrophysiological recordings, but such methods scale poorly with the current size of available parallel spike train recordings (more than 100 neurons). In this work, we introduce a novel method capable of overcoming the computational and statistical limits of existing analysis techniques in detecting repeating STPs within massively parallel spike trains (MPST). We employ advanced data mining techniques to efficiently extract repeating sequences of spikes from the data. Then, we introduce and compare two alternative approaches to distinguish statistically significant patterns from chance sequences. The first approach uses a measure known as conceptual stability, of which we investigate a computationally cheap approximation for applications to such large data sets. The second approach is based on the evaluation of pattern statistical significance. In particular, we provide an extension to STPs of a method we recently introduced for the evaluation of statistical significance of synchronous spike patterns. The performance of the two approaches is evaluated in terms of computational load and statistical power on a variety of artificial data sets that replicate specific features of experimental data. Both methods provide an effective and robust procedure for detection of STPs in MPST data. The method based on significance evaluation shows the best overall performance, although at a higher computational cost. We name the novel procedure the spatio-temporal Spike PAttern Detection and Evaluation (SPADE) analysis.

  8. Detection and Evaluation of Spatio-Temporal Spike Patterns in Massively Parallel Spike Train Data with SPADE

    PubMed Central

    Quaglio, Pietro; Yegenoglu, Alper; Torre, Emiliano; Endres, Dominik M.; Grün, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Repeated, precise sequences of spikes are largely considered a signature of activation of cell assemblies. These repeated sequences are commonly known under the name of spatio-temporal patterns (STPs). STPs are hypothesized to play a role in the communication of information in the computational process operated by the cerebral cortex. A variety of statistical methods for the detection of STPs have been developed and applied to electrophysiological recordings, but such methods scale poorly with the current size of available parallel spike train recordings (more than 100 neurons). In this work, we introduce a novel method capable of overcoming the computational and statistical limits of existing analysis techniques in detecting repeating STPs within massively parallel spike trains (MPST). We employ advanced data mining techniques to efficiently extract repeating sequences of spikes from the data. Then, we introduce and compare two alternative approaches to distinguish statistically significant patterns from chance sequences. The first approach uses a measure known as conceptual stability, of which we investigate a computationally cheap approximation for applications to such large data sets. The second approach is based on the evaluation of pattern statistical significance. In particular, we provide an extension to STPs of a method we recently introduced for the evaluation of statistical significance of synchronous spike patterns. The performance of the two approaches is evaluated in terms of computational load and statistical power on a variety of artificial data sets that replicate specific features of experimental data. Both methods provide an effective and robust procedure for detection of STPs in MPST data. The method based on significance evaluation shows the best overall performance, although at a higher computational cost. We name the novel procedure the spatio-temporal Spike PAttern Detection and Evaluation (SPADE) analysis. PMID:28596729

  9. Solar microwave millisecond spike at 2.84 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi-Jun; Jin, Sheng-Zhen; Zhao, Ren-Yang; Zheng, Le-Ping; Liu, Yu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Cong; Wang, Shu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Hu, Chu-Min

    1986-01-01

    Using the high time resolution of 1 ms, the data of solar microwave millisecond spike (MMS) event was recorded more than two hundred times at the frequency of 2.84 GHz at Beijing (Peking) Observatory since May 1981. A preliminary analysis was made. It can be seen from the data that the MMS-events have a variety of the fast activities such as the dispersed and isolated spikes, the clusters of the crowded spikes, the weak spikes superimposed on the noise background, and the phenomena of absorption. The marked differences from that observed with lower time resolution are presented. Using the data, a valuable statistical analysis was made. There are close correlations between MMS-events and hard X-ray bursts, and fast drifting bursts. The MMS events are highly dependent on the type of active regions and the magnetic field configuration. It seems to be crucial to find out the accurate positions on the active region where the MMS-events happen and to make co-operative observations at different bands during the special period when specific active regions appear on the solar disk.

  10. Trestle #1, detail of connecting bolts and spikes on upper ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of connecting bolts and spikes on upper northeast abutment. View to east - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  11. Trestle #1, detail of connecting bolts and spikes on northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of connecting bolts and spikes on northeast abutment vertical support timbers. View to east - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  12. Trestle #1, detail of spacer, bolt, and spikes on northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of spacer, bolt, and spikes on northeast end of deck. View to southwest - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  13. Ultra-fast Object Recognition from Few Spikes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-06

    Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Ultra-fast Object Recognition from Few Spikes Chou Hung, Gabriel Kreiman , Tomaso Poggio...neural code for different kinds of object-related information. *The authors, Chou Hung and Gabriel Kreiman , contributed equally to this work...Supplementary Material is available at http://ramonycajal.mit.edu/ kreiman /resources/ultrafast

  14. Ultra-FDst Object Recognition from Few Spikes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Ultra-fast Object Recognition from Few Spikes Chou Hung, Gabriel Kreiman , Tomaso Poggio & James J. DiCarlo AI Memo 2005-022 July 2005 CBCL Memo 253...authors, Chou Hung and Gabriel Kreiman , contributed equally to this work. Supplementary Material is available at http://ramonycajal.mit.edu... kreiman /resources/ultrafast/. _____________________________________________________________________________ This report describes research done at

  15. No WIMP mini-spikes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciT

    Wanders, Mark; Bertone, Gianfranco; Weniger, Christoph

    The formation of black holes inevitably affects the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in their vicinity, leading to an enhancement of the dark matter density, called spike, and if dark matter is made of WIMPs, to a strong enhancement of the dark matter annihilation rate. Spikes at the center of galaxies like the Milky Way are efficiently disrupted by baryonic processes, but mini-spikes can form and survive undisturbed at the center of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We show that Fermi LAT satellite data allow to set very stringent limits on the existence of mini-spikes in dwarf galaxies: for thermal WIMPsmore » with mass between 100 GeV and 1 TeV, we obtain a maximum black hole mass between 100 and 1000 M{sub ⊙}, ruling out black holes masses extrapolated from the M-σ relationship in a large region of the parameter space. We also performed Monte Carlo simulations of merger histories of black holes in dwarf spheroidals in a scenario where black holes form from the direct collapse of primordial gas in early halos, and found that this specific formation scenario is incompatible at the 84% CL with dark matter being in the form of thermal WIMPs.« less

  16. Orientation-selective aVLSI spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, S C; Kramer, J; Indiveri, G; Delbrück, T; Burg, T; Douglas, R

    2001-01-01

    We describe a programmable multi-chip VLSI neuronal system that can be used for exploring spike-based information processing models. The system consists of a silicon retina, a PIC microcontroller, and a transceiver chip whose integrate-and-fire neurons are connected in a soft winner-take-all architecture. The circuit on this multi-neuron chip approximates a cortical microcircuit. The neurons can be configured for different computational properties by the virtual connections of a selected set of pixels on the silicon retina. The virtual wiring between the different chips is effected by an event-driven communication protocol that uses asynchronous digital pulses, similar to spikes in a neuronal system. We used the multi-chip spike-based system to synthesize orientation-tuned neurons using both a feedforward model and a feedback model. The performance of our analog hardware spiking model matched the experimental observations and digital simulations of continuous-valued neurons. The multi-chip VLSI system has advantages over computer neuronal models in that it is real-time, and the computational time does not scale with the size of the neuronal network.

  17. Detection of Bursts and Pauses in Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Ko, D.; Wilson, C. J.; Lobb, C. J.; Paladini, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vivo exhibit a wide range of firing patterns. They normally fire constantly at a low rate, and speed up, firing a phasic burst when reward exceeds prediction, or pause when an expected reward does not occur. Therefore, the detection of bursts and pauses from spike train data is a critical problem when studying the role of phasic dopamine (DA) in reward related learning, and other DA dependent behaviors. However, few statistical methods have been developed that can identify bursts and pauses simultaneously. We propose a new statistical method, the Robust Gaussian Surprise (RGS) method, which performs an exhaustive search of bursts and pauses in spike trains simultaneously. We found that the RGS method is adaptable to various patterns of spike trains recorded in vivo, and is not influenced by baseline firing rate, making it applicable to all in vivo spike trains where baseline firing rates vary over time. We compare the performance of the RGS method to other methods of detecting bursts, such as the Poisson Surprise (PS), Rank Surprise (RS), and Template methods. Analysis of data using the RGS method reveals potential mechanisms underlying how bursts and pauses are controlled in DA neurons. PMID:22939922

  18. Cochlear spike synchronization and neuron coincidence detection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Rolf

    2018-02-01

    Coincidence detection of a spike pattern fed from the cochlea into a single neuron is investigated using a physical Finite-Difference model of the cochlea and a physiologically motivated neuron model. Previous studies have shown experimental evidence of increased spike synchronization in the nucleus cochlearis and the trapezoid body [Joris et al., J. Neurophysiol. 71(3), 1022-1036 and 1037-1051 (1994)] and models show tone partial phase synchronization at the transition from mechanical waves on the basilar membrane into spike patterns [Ch. F. Babbs, J. Biophys. 2011, 435135]. Still the traveling speed of waves on the basilar membrane cause a frequency-dependent time delay of simultaneously incoming sound wavefronts up to 10 ms. The present model shows nearly perfect synchronization of multiple spike inputs as neuron outputs with interspike intervals (ISI) at the periodicity of the incoming sound for frequencies from about 30 to 300 Hz for two different amounts of afferent nerve fiber neuron inputs. Coincidence detection serves here as a fusion of multiple inputs into one single event enhancing pitch periodicity detection for low frequencies, impulse detection, or increased sound or speech intelligibility due to dereverberation.

  19. Emergence of spike correlations in periodically forced excitable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinoso, José A.; Torrent, M. C.; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    In sensory neurons the presence of noise can facilitate the detection of weak information-carrying signals, which are encoded and transmitted via correlated sequences of spikes. Here we investigate the relative temporal order in spike sequences induced by a subthreshold periodic input in the presence of white Gaussian noise. To simulate the spikes, we use the FitzHugh-Nagumo model and to investigate the output sequence of interspike intervals (ISIs), we use the symbolic method of ordinal analysis. We find different types of relative temporal order in the form of preferred ordinal patterns that depend on both the strength of the noise and the period of the input signal. We also demonstrate a resonancelike behavior, as certain periods and noise levels enhance temporal ordering in the ISI sequence, maximizing the probability of the preferred patterns. Our findings could be relevant for understanding the mechanisms underlying temporal coding, by which single sensory neurons represent in spike sequences the information about weak periodic stimuli.

  20. Nano-spike Catalysts Convert Carbon Dioxide Directly into Ethanol

    Rondinone, Adam

    2018-06-12

    In a new twist to waste-to-fuel technology, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into ethanol. Their finding, which involves nanofabrication and catalysis science, was serendipitous.

  1. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality.

  2. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems

    PubMed Central

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality. PMID:24574952

  3. Nano-spike Catalysts Convert Carbon Dioxide Directly into Ethanol

    SciT

    Rondinone, Adam

    2016-10-12

    In a new twist to waste-to-fuel technology, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed an electrochemical process that uses tiny spikes of carbon and copper to turn carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, into ethanol. Their finding, which involves nanofabrication and catalysis science, was serendipitous.

  4. Uncovering representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Grosmark, Andres D.; Penagos, Hector; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2016-08-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus exhibit spatial tuning during spatial navigation, and they are reactivated in specific temporal order during sharp-wave ripples observed in quiet wakefulness or slow wave sleep. However, analyzing representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity remains a great challenge. In contrast to wake, during sleep there is a complete absence of animal behavior, and the ensemble spike activity is sparse (low occurrence) and fragmental in time. To examine important issues encountered in sleep data analysis, we constructed synthetic sleep-like hippocampal spike data (short epochs, sparse and sporadic firing, compressed timescale) for detailed investigations. Based upon two Bayesian population-decoding methods (one receptive field-based, and the other not), we systematically investigated their representation power and detection reliability. Notably, the receptive-field-free decoding method was found to be well-tuned for hippocampal ensemble spike data in slow wave sleep (SWS), even in the absence of prior behavioral measure or ground truth. Our results showed that in addition to the sample length, bin size, and firing rate, number of active hippocampal pyramidal neurons are critical for reliable representation of the space as well as for detection of spatiotemporal reactivated patterns in SWS or quiet wakefulness.

  5. PREDICTING THE TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS SPIKED WITH SILVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experiments conducted with freshwater sediments spiked with silver have shown that, when expressed on a dry weight basis, the toxicity of silver is sediment-specific and dependent on the form of silver added (e.g., AgNO3, Ag2S). This study was conducted to assess the use...

  6. Spike sorting based upon machine learning algorithms (SOMA).

    PubMed

    Horton, P M; Nicol, A U; Kendrick, K M; Feng, J F

    2007-02-15

    We have developed a spike sorting method, using a combination of various machine learning algorithms, to analyse electrophysiological data and automatically determine the number of sampled neurons from an individual electrode, and discriminate their activities. We discuss extensions to a standard unsupervised learning algorithm (Kohonen), as using a simple application of this technique would only identify a known number of clusters. Our extra techniques automatically identify the number of clusters within the dataset, and their sizes, thereby reducing the chance of misclassification. We also discuss a new pre-processing technique, which transforms the data into a higher dimensional feature space revealing separable clusters. Using principal component analysis (PCA) alone may not achieve this. Our new approach appends the features acquired using PCA with features describing the geometric shapes that constitute a spike waveform. To validate our new spike sorting approach, we have applied it to multi-electrode array datasets acquired from the rat olfactory bulb, and from the sheep infero-temporal cortex, and using simulated data. The SOMA sofware is available at http://www.sussex.ac.uk/Users/pmh20/spikes.

  7. Photospheric Current Spikes as Possible Predictors of Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Flares involve generation of the largest current densities in the solar atmosphere. This suggests the hypothesis that prior to a large (M,X) flare there are related time dependent changes in the photospheric current distribution, and hence in the resistive heating rate in neutral line regions (NLRs). If this is true, these changes might be useful predictors of flares. Preliminary evidence supporting this hypothesis is presented. Results from a data driven, near photospheric, 3D magnetohydrodynamic type model suggest the model might be useful for predicting M and X flares several hours to several days in advance. The model takes as input the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. The model computes quantities in every active region (AR) pixel for 14 ARs, with spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion filtered out of the time series of the magnetic field for each pixel. Spikes in the NLR resistive heating rate Q, appearing as increases by orders of magnitude above background values in the time series of Q are found to occur, and appear to be correlated with the occurrence of M or X flares a few hours to a few days later. The subset of spikes analyzed at the pixel level are found to occur on HMI and granulation scales of 1 arcsec and 12 minutes. Spikes are found in NLRs with and without M or X flares, and outside as well as inside NLRs, but the largest spikes are localized in the NLRs of ARs with M or X flares, and associated with horizontal magnetic field strengths approximately several hG, and vertical magnetic field strengths several orders of magnitude smaller. The spikes may be signatures of horizontal current sheets associated with emerging magnetic flux.

  8. Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks for Precise Temporal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brian; Grüning, André

    2016-01-01

    Precise spike timing as a means to encode information in neural networks is biologically supported, and is advantageous over frequency-based codes by processing input features on a much shorter time-scale. For these reasons, much recent attention has been focused on the development of supervised learning rules for spiking neural networks that utilise a temporal coding scheme. However, despite significant progress in this area, there still lack rules that have a theoretical basis, and yet can be considered biologically relevant. Here we examine the general conditions under which synaptic plasticity most effectively takes place to support the supervised learning of a precise temporal code. As part of our analysis we examine two spike-based learning methods: one of which relies on an instantaneous error signal to modify synaptic weights in a network (INST rule), and the other one relying on a filtered error signal for smoother synaptic weight modifications (FILT rule). We test the accuracy of the solutions provided by each rule with respect to their temporal encoding precision, and then measure the maximum number of input patterns they can learn to memorise using the precise timings of individual spikes as an indication of their storage capacity. Our results demonstrate the high performance of the FILT rule in most cases, underpinned by the rule’s error-filtering mechanism, which is predicted to provide smooth convergence towards a desired solution during learning. We also find the FILT rule to be most efficient at performing input pattern memorisations, and most noticeably when patterns are identified using spikes with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In comparison with existing work, we determine the performance of the FILT rule to be consistent with that of the highly efficient E-learning Chronotron rule, but with the distinct advantage that our FILT rule is also implementable as an online method for increased biological realism. PMID:27532262

  9. Critical Slowing Down Governs the Transition to Neuron Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian; Klaus, Andreas; Kuehn, Christian; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems have been found to exhibit critical transitions, or so-called tipping points, which are sudden changes to a qualitatively different system state. These changes can profoundly impact the functioning of a system ranging from controlled state switching to a catastrophic break-down; signals that predict critical transitions are therefore highly desirable. To this end, research efforts have focused on utilizing qualitative changes in markers related to a system’s tendency to recover more slowly from a perturbation the closer it gets to the transition—a phenomenon called critical slowing down. The recently studied scaling of critical slowing down offers a refined path to understand critical transitions: to identify the transition mechanism and improve transition prediction using scaling laws. Here, we outline and apply this strategy for the first time in a real-world system by studying the transition to spiking in neurons of the mammalian cortex. The dynamical system approach has identified two robust mechanisms for the transition from subthreshold activity to spiking, saddle-node and Hopf bifurcation. Although theory provides precise predictions on signatures of critical slowing down near the bifurcation to spiking, quantitative experimental evidence has been lacking. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from pyramidal neurons and fast-spiking interneurons, we show that 1) the transition to spiking dynamically corresponds to a critical transition exhibiting slowing down, 2) the scaling laws suggest a saddle-node bifurcation governing slowing down, and 3) these precise scaling laws can be used to predict the bifurcation point from a limited window of observation. To our knowledge this is the first report of scaling laws of critical slowing down in an experiment. They present a missing link for a broad class of neuroscience modeling and suggest improved estimation of tipping points by incorporating scaling laws of critical slowing down as a

  10. Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks for Precise Temporal Encoding.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Brian; Grüning, André

    2016-01-01

    Precise spike timing as a means to encode information in neural networks is biologically supported, and is advantageous over frequency-based codes by processing input features on a much shorter time-scale. For these reasons, much recent attention has been focused on the development of supervised learning rules for spiking neural networks that utilise a temporal coding scheme. However, despite significant progress in this area, there still lack rules that have a theoretical basis, and yet can be considered biologically relevant. Here we examine the general conditions under which synaptic plasticity most effectively takes place to support the supervised learning of a precise temporal code. As part of our analysis we examine two spike-based learning methods: one of which relies on an instantaneous error signal to modify synaptic weights in a network (INST rule), and the other one relying on a filtered error signal for smoother synaptic weight modifications (FILT rule). We test the accuracy of the solutions provided by each rule with respect to their temporal encoding precision, and then measure the maximum number of input patterns they can learn to memorise using the precise timings of individual spikes as an indication of their storage capacity. Our results demonstrate the high performance of the FILT rule in most cases, underpinned by the rule's error-filtering mechanism, which is predicted to provide smooth convergence towards a desired solution during learning. We also find the FILT rule to be most efficient at performing input pattern memorisations, and most noticeably when patterns are identified using spikes with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In comparison with existing work, we determine the performance of the FILT rule to be consistent with that of the highly efficient E-learning Chronotron rule, but with the distinct advantage that our FILT rule is also implementable as an online method for increased biological realism.

  11. Photospheric Current Spikes as Possible Predictors of Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Flares involve generation of the largest current densities in the solar atmosphere. This suggests the hypothesis that prior to a large (M,X) flare there are related time dependent changes in the photospheric current distribution, and hence in the resistive heating rate in neutral line regions (NLRs). If this is true, these changes might be useful predictors of flares. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is presented. Results from a data driven, near photospheric, 3D magnetohydrodynamic type model suggest the model might be useful for predicting M and X flares several hours to several days in advance. The model takes as input the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic & Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. The model computes quantities in every active region (AR) pixel for 14 ARs, with spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion filtered out of the time series of the magnetic field for each pixel. Spikes in the NLR resistive heating rate Q, appearing as increases by orders of magnitude above background values in the time series of Q are found to occur, and appear to be correlated with the occurrence of M or X flares a few hours to a few days later. The subset of spikes analyzed at the pixel level are found to occur on HMI and granulation scales of 1 arcsec and 12 minutes. Spikes are found in NLRs with and without M or X flares, and outside as well as inside NLRs, but the largest spikes are localized in the NLRs of ARs with M or X flares, and associated with horizontal magnetic field strengths several hG, and vertical magnetic field strengths several orders of magnitude smaller, suggesting that the spikes are associated with current sheets.

  12. Modeling continuous covariates with a "spike" at zero: Bivariate approaches.

    PubMed

    Jenkner, Carolin; Lorenz, Eva; Becher, Heiko; Sauerbrei, Willi

    2016-07-01

    In epidemiology and clinical research, predictors often take value zero for a large amount of observations while the distribution of the remaining observations is continuous. These predictors are called variables with a spike at zero. Examples include smoking or alcohol consumption. Recently, an extension of the fractional polynomial (FP) procedure, a technique for modeling nonlinear relationships, was proposed to deal with such situations. To indicate whether or not a value is zero, a binary variable is added to the model. In a two stage procedure, called FP-spike, the necessity of the binary variable and/or the continuous FP function for the positive part are assessed for a suitable fit. In univariate analyses, the FP-spike procedure usually leads to functional relationships that are easy to interpret. This paper introduces four approaches for dealing with two variables with a spike at zero (SAZ). The methods depend on the bivariate distribution of zero and nonzero values. Bi-Sep is the simplest of the four bivariate approaches. It uses the univariate FP-spike procedure separately for the two SAZ variables. In Bi-D3, Bi-D1, and Bi-Sub, proportions of zeros in both variables are considered simultaneously in the binary indicators. Therefore, these strategies can account for correlated variables. The methods can be used for arbitrary distributions of the covariates. For illustration and comparison of results, data from a case-control study on laryngeal cancer, with smoking and alcohol intake as two SAZ variables, is considered. In addition, a possible extension to three or more SAZ variables is outlined. A combination of log-linear models for the analysis of the correlation in combination with the bivariate approaches is proposed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Solar Flare Hard X-ray Spikes Observed by RHESSI: a Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Qiu, J.; Ding, M.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes refer to fine time structures on timescales of seconds to milliseconds in high-energy HXR emission profiles during solar flare eruptions. We present a preliminary statistical investigation of temporal and spectral properties of HXR spikes. Using a three-sigma spike selection rule, we detected 184 spikes in 94 out of 322 flares with significant counts at given photon energies, which were detected from demodulated HXR light curves obtained by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). About one fifth of these spikes are also detected at photon energies higher than 100 keV. The statistical properties of the spikes are as follows. (1) HXR spikes are produced in both impulsive flares and long-duration flares with nearly the same occurrence rates. Ninety percent of the spikes occur during the rise phase of the flares, and about 70% occur around the peak times of the flares. (2) The time durations of the spikes vary from 0.2 to 2 s, with the mean being 1.0 s, which is not dependent on photon energies. The spikes exhibit symmetric time profiles with no significant difference between rise and decay times.(3) Among the most energetic spikes, nearly all of them have harder count spectra than their underlying slow-varying components. There is also a weak indication that spikes exhibiting time lags in high-energy emissions tend to have harder spectra than spikes with time lags in low-energy emissions.

  14. Large‐scale analysis reveals populational contributions of cortical spike rate and synchrony to behavioural functions

    PubMed Central

    Saiki, Akiko; Fujiwara‐Tsukamoto, Yoko; Sakai, Yutaka; Isomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Key points There have been few systematic population‐wide analyses of relationships between spike synchrony within a period of several milliseconds and behavioural functions.In this study, we obtained a large amount of spike data from > 23,000 neuron pairs by multiple single‐unit recording from deep layer neurons in motor cortical areas in rats performing a forelimb movement task.The temporal changes of spike synchrony in the whole neuron pairs were statistically independent of behavioural changes during the task performance, although some neuron pairs exhibited correlated changes in spike synchrony.Mutual information analyses revealed that spike synchrony made a smaller contribution than spike rate to behavioural functions.The strength of spike synchrony between two neurons was statistically independent of the spike rate‐based preferences of the pair for behavioural functions. Abstract Spike synchrony within a period of several milliseconds in presynaptic neurons enables effective integration of functional information in the postsynaptic neuron. However, few studies have systematically analysed the population‐wide relationships between spike synchrony and behavioural functions. Here we obtained a sufficiently large amount of spike data among regular‐spiking (putatively excitatory) and fast‐spiking (putatively inhibitory) neuron subtypes (> 23,000 pairs) by multiple single‐unit recording from deep layers in motor cortical areas (caudal forelimb area, rostral forelimb area) in rats performing a forelimb movement task. After holding a lever, rats pulled the lever either in response to a cue tone (external‐trigger trials) or spontaneously without any cue (internal‐trigger trials). Many neurons exhibited functional spike activity in association with forelimb movements, and the preference of regular‐spiking neurons in the rostral forelimb area was more biased toward externally triggered movement than that in the caudal forelimb area. We found that

  15. Large-scale analysis reveals populational contributions of cortical spike rate and synchrony to behavioural functions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Rie; Saiki, Akiko; Fujiwara-Tsukamoto, Yoko; Sakai, Yutaka; Isomura, Yoshikazu

    2017-01-01

    There have been few systematic population-wide analyses of relationships between spike synchrony within a period of several milliseconds and behavioural functions. In this study, we obtained a large amount of spike data from > 23,000 neuron pairs by multiple single-unit recording from deep layer neurons in motor cortical areas in rats performing a forelimb movement task. The temporal changes of spike synchrony in the whole neuron pairs were statistically independent of behavioural changes during the task performance, although some neuron pairs exhibited correlated changes in spike synchrony. Mutual information analyses revealed that spike synchrony made a smaller contribution than spike rate to behavioural functions. The strength of spike synchrony between two neurons was statistically independent of the spike rate-based preferences of the pair for behavioural functions. Spike synchrony within a period of several milliseconds in presynaptic neurons enables effective integration of functional information in the postsynaptic neuron. However, few studies have systematically analysed the population-wide relationships between spike synchrony and behavioural functions. Here we obtained a sufficiently large amount of spike data among regular-spiking (putatively excitatory) and fast-spiking (putatively inhibitory) neuron subtypes (> 23,000 pairs) by multiple single-unit recording from deep layers in motor cortical areas (caudal forelimb area, rostral forelimb area) in rats performing a forelimb movement task. After holding a lever, rats pulled the lever either in response to a cue tone (external-trigger trials) or spontaneously without any cue (internal-trigger trials). Many neurons exhibited functional spike activity in association with forelimb movements, and the preference of regular-spiking neurons in the rostral forelimb area was more biased toward externally triggered movement than that in the caudal forelimb area. We found that a population of neuron pairs with

  16. Gulfstream's Quiet Spike sonic boom mitigator being installed on NASA DFRC's F-15B testbed aircraft

    2006-04-17

    Gulfstream's Quiet Spike sonic boom mitigator being installed on NASA DFRC's F-15B testbed aircraft. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  17. On the Universality and Non-Universality of Spiking Neural P Systems With Rules on Synapses.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Xu, Jinbang; Pan, Linqiang

    2015-12-01

    Spiking neural P systems with rules on synapses are a new variant of spiking neural P systems. In the systems, the neuron contains only spikes, while the spiking/forgetting rules are moved on the synapses. It was obtained that such system with 30 neurons (using extended spiking rules) or with 39 neurons (using standard spiking rules) is Turing universal. In this work, this number is improved to 6. Specifically, we construct a Turing universal spiking neural P system with rules on synapses having 6 neurons, which can generate any set of Turing computable natural numbers. As well, it is obtained that spiking neural P system with rules on synapses having less than two neurons are not Turing universal: i) such systems having one neuron can characterize the family of finite sets of natural numbers; ii) the family of sets of numbers generated by the systems having two neurons is included in the family of semi-linear sets of natural numbers.

  18. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    2006-09-27

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  19. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    2006-10-03

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  20. NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached

    2006-09-25

    NASA F-15B #836 in flight with Quiet Spike attached. The project seeks to verify the structural integrity of the multi-segmented, articulating spike attachment designed to reduce and control a sonic boom.

  1. Investigation of Current Spike Phenomena During Heavy Ion Irradiation of NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Berg, Melanie; Friendlich, Mark; Wilcox, Ted; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Irom, Farokh; Buchner, Steven P.; McMorrow, Dale; Mavis, David G.; hide

    2011-01-01

    A series of heavy ion and laser irradiations were performed to investigate previously reported current spikes in flash memories. High current events were observed, however, none matches the previously reported spikes. Plausible mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Spike threshold dynamics in spinal motoneurons during scratching and swimming.

    PubMed

    Grigonis, Ramunas; Alaburda, Aidas

    2017-09-01

    Action potential threshold can vary depending on firing history and synaptic inputs. We used an ex vivo carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles to study spike threshold dynamics in motoneurons during two distinct types of functional motor behaviour - fictive scratching and fictive swimming. The threshold potential depolarizes by about 10 mV within each burst of spikes generated during scratch and swim network activity and recovers between bursts to a slightly depolarized level. Slow synaptic integration resulting in a wave of membrane potential depolarization is the factor influencing the threshold potential within firing bursts during motor behaviours. Depolarization of the threshold potential decreases the excitability of motoneurons and may provide a mechanism for stabilization of the response of a motoneuron to intense synaptic inputs to maintain the motor commands within an optimal range for muscle activation. During functional spinal neural network activity motoneurons receive intense synaptic input, and this could modulate the threshold for action potential generation, providing the ability to dynamically adjust the excitability and recruitment order for functional needs. In the present study we investigated the dynamics of action potential threshold during motor network activity. Intracellular recordings from spinal motoneurons in an ex vivo carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles were performed during two distinct types of motor behaviour - fictive scratching and fictive swimming. We found that the threshold of the first spike in episodes of scratching and swimming was the lowest. The threshold potential depolarizes by about 10 mV within each burst of spikes generated during scratch and swim network activity and recovers between bursts to a slightly depolarized level. Depolarization of the threshold potential results in decreased excitability of motoneurons. Synaptic inputs do not modulate the threshold of the first action

  3. A Theory of Material Spike Formation in Flow Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Mattia; Haller, George

    2017-11-01

    We develop a frame-invariant theory of material spike formation during flow separation over a no-slip boundary in two-dimensional flows with arbitrary time dependence. This theory identifies both fixed and moving separation, is effective also over short-time intervals, and admits a rigorous instantaneous limit. Our theory is based on topological properties of material lines, combining objectively stretching- and rotation-based kinematic quantities. The separation profile identified here serves as the theoretical backbone for the material spike from its birth to its fully developed shape, and remains hidden to existing approaches. Finally, our theory can be used to rigorously explain the perception of off-wall separation in unsteady flows, and more importantly, provide the conditions under which such a perception is justified. We illustrate our results in several examples including steady, time-periodic and unsteady analytic velocity fields with flat and curved boundaries, and an experimental dataset.

  4. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors

    PubMed Central

    Ročková, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout. PMID:25419004

  5. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors.

    PubMed

    Ročková, Veronika; George, Edward I

    2014-08-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout.

  6. Asymptotics of empirical eigenstructure for high dimensional spiked covariance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weichen; Fan, Jianqing

    2017-06-01

    We derive the asymptotic distributions of the spiked eigenvalues and eigenvectors under a generalized and unified asymptotic regime, which takes into account the magnitude of spiked eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality. This regime allows high dimensionality and diverging eigenvalues and provides new insights into the roles that the leading eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality play in principal component analysis. Our results are a natural extension of those in Paul (2007) to a more general setting and solve the rates of convergence problems in Shen et al. (2013). They also reveal the biases of estimating leading eigenvalues and eigenvectors by using principal component analysis, and lead to a new covariance estimator for the approximate factor model, called shrinkage principal orthogonal complement thresholding (S-POET), that corrects the biases. Our results are successfully applied to outstanding problems in estimation of risks of large portfolios and false discovery proportions for dependent test statistics and are illustrated by simulation studies.

  7. Asymptotics of empirical eigenstructure for high dimensional spiked covariance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weichen

    2017-01-01

    We derive the asymptotic distributions of the spiked eigenvalues and eigenvectors under a generalized and unified asymptotic regime, which takes into account the magnitude of spiked eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality. This regime allows high dimensionality and diverging eigenvalues and provides new insights into the roles that the leading eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality play in principal component analysis. Our results are a natural extension of those in Paul (2007) to a more general setting and solve the rates of convergence problems in Shen et al. (2013). They also reveal the biases of estimating leading eigenvalues and eigenvectors by using principal component analysis, and lead to a new covariance estimator for the approximate factor model, called shrinkage principal orthogonal complement thresholding (S-POET), that corrects the biases. Our results are successfully applied to outstanding problems in estimation of risks of large portfolios and false discovery proportions for dependent test statistics and are illustrated by simulation studies. PMID:28835726

  8. Dynamics of Monoterpene Formation in Spike Lavender Plants.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Arrillaga, Isabel; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2017-12-19

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways was analyzed in spike lavender ( Lavandula latifolia Med) on the basis of 13 CO₂-labelling experiments using wildtype and transgenic plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first and key enzyme of the MVA pathway. The plants were labelled in the presence of 13 CO₂ in a gas chamber for controlled pulse and chase periods of time. GC/MS and NMR analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor, the major monoterpenes present in their essential oil, indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the MEP pathway. Surprisingly, overexpression of HMGR did not have significant impact upon the crosstalk between the MVA and MEP pathways indicating that the MEP route is the preferred pathway for the synthesis of C5 monoterpene precursors in spike lavender.

  9. Decoding spike timing: the differential reverse correlation method

    PubMed Central

    Tkačik, Gašper; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that detailed timing of action potentials is used to encode information, for example in auditory pathways; however the computational tools required to analyze encoding through timing are still in their infancy. We present a simple example of encoding, based on a recent model of time-frequency analysis, in which units fire action potentials when a certain condition is met, but the timing of the action potential depends also on other features of the stimulus. We show that, as a result, spike-triggered averages are smoothed so much they do not represent the true features of the encoding. Inspired by this example, we present a simple method, differential reverse correlations, that can separate an analysis of what causes a neuron to spike, and what controls its timing. We analyze with this method the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron and show the method accurately reconstructs the model's kernel. PMID:18597928

  10. Note on the coefficient of variations of neuronal spike trains.

    PubMed

    Lengler, Johannes; Steger, Angelika

    2017-08-01

    It is known that many neurons in the brain show spike trains with a coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike times of approximately 1, thus resembling the properties of Poisson spike trains. Computational studies have been able to reproduce this phenomenon. However, the underlying models were too complex to be examined analytically. In this paper, we offer a simple model that shows the same effect but is accessible to an analytic treatment. The model is a random walk model with a reflecting barrier; we give explicit formulas for the CV in the regime of excess inhibition. We also analyze the effect of probabilistic synapses in our model and show that it resembles previous findings that were obtained by simulation.

  11. Supervised learning with decision margins in pools of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Le Mouel, Charlotte; Harris, Kenneth D; Yger, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Learning to categorise sensory inputs by generalising from a few examples whose category is precisely known is a crucial step for the brain to produce appropriate behavioural responses. At the neuronal level, this may be performed by adaptation of synaptic weights under the influence of a training signal, in order to group spiking patterns impinging on the neuron. Here we describe a framework that allows spiking neurons to perform such "supervised learning", using principles similar to the Support Vector Machine, a well-established and robust classifier. Using a hinge-loss error function, we show that requesting a margin similar to that of the SVM improves performance on linearly non-separable problems. Moreover, we show that using pools of neurons to discriminate categories can also increase the performance by sharing the load among neurons.

  12. Reflex reading epilepsy: effect of linguistic characteristics on spike frequency.

    PubMed

    Safi, Dima; Lassonde, Maryse; Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Denault, Carole; Macoir, Joël; Rouleau, Isabelle; Béland, Renée

    2011-04-01

    Reading epilepsy is a rare reflex epilepsy in which seizures are provoked by reading. Several cases have been described in the literature, but the pathophysiological processes vary widely and remain unclear. We describe a 42-year-old male patient with reading epilepsy evaluated using clinical assessments and continuous video/EEG recordings. We administered verbal, nonverbal, and reading tasks to determine factors precipitating seizures. Linguistic characteristics of the words were manipulated. Results indicated that reading-induced seizures were significantly more numerous than those observed during verbal and nonverbal tasks. In reading tasks, spike frequency significantly increased with involvement of the phonological reading route. Spikes were recorded predominantly in left parasagittal regions. Future cerebral imaging studies will enable us to visualize the spatial localization and temporal course of reading-induced seizures and brain activity involved in reading. A better understanding of reading epilepsy is crucial for reading rehabilitation in these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic spiking studies using the DNPH sampling train

    SciT

    Steger, J.L.; Knoll, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed aldehyde and ketone sampling method using aqueous 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was evaluated in the laboratory and in the field. The sampling trains studied were based on the train described in SW 846 Method 0011. Nine compounds were evaluated: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, quinone, acrolein, propionaldeyde, methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl ethyl ketone, acetophenone, and isophorone. In the laboratory, the trains were spiked both statistically and dynamically. Laboratory studies also investigated potential interferences to the method. Based on their potential to hydrolyze in acid solution to form formaldehyde, dimethylolurea, saligenin, s-trioxane, hexamethylenetetramine, and paraformaldehyde were investigated. Ten runs were performed using quadruplicate samplingmore » trains. Two of the four trains were dynamically spiked with the nine aldehydes and ketones. The test results were evaluated using the EPA method 301 criteria for method precision (< + pr - 50% relative standard deviation) and bias (correction factor of 1.00 + or - 0.30).« less

  14. Elimination of current spikes in buck power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Current spikes in a buck power converter due to commutating diode turn-off time are eliminated by using a tapped inductor in the converter with the tap connected to the switching transistor. The commutating diode is not in the usual place, but is instead connected to conduct current from one end of the tapped inductor remote from the load during the interval in which the transistor is not conducting. In the case of a converter having a center-tapped (primary and secondary) transformer between two switching power transistors operated in a push-pull mode and two rectifying diodes in the secondary circuit, current spikes due to transformer saturation are also eliminated by using a tapped inductor in the converter with the tap connected to the rectifying diodes and a diode connected to conduct current from one end of the tapped inductor remote from the load during the interval in which the transistors are not conducting.

  15. Binary Associative Memories as a Benchmark for Spiking Neuromorphic Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Andreas; Jenzen, Christoph; Thies, Michael; Rückert, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale neuromorphic hardware platforms, specialized computer systems for energy efficient simulation of spiking neural networks, are being developed around the world, for example as part of the European Human Brain Project (HBP). Due to conceptual differences, a universal performance analysis of these systems in terms of runtime, accuracy and energy efficiency is non-trivial, yet indispensable for further hard- and software development. In this paper we describe a scalable benchmark based on a spiking neural network implementation of the binary neural associative memory. We treat neuromorphic hardware and software simulators as black-boxes and execute exactly the same network description across all devices. Experiments on the HBP platforms under varying configurations of the associative memory show that the presented method allows to test the quality of the neuron model implementation, and to explain significant deviations from the expected reference output. PMID:28878642

  16. Modeling for Visual Feature Extraction Using Spiking Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ichiro; Kuroe, Yasuaki; Kotera, Hiromichi; Murata, Tomoya

    This paper develops models for “visual feature extraction” in biological systems by using “spiking neural network (SNN)”. The SNN is promising for developing the models because the information is encoded and processed by spike trains similar to biological neural networks. Two architectures of SNN are proposed for modeling the directionally selective and the motion parallax cell in neuro-sensory systems and they are trained so as to possess actual biological responses of each cell. To validate the developed models, their representation ability is investigated and their visual feature extraction mechanisms are discussed from the neurophysiological viewpoint. It is expected that this study can be the first step to developing a sensor system similar to the biological systems and also a complementary approach to investigating the function of the brain.

  17. Origin of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won; Choi, M. Y.

    2016-08-01

    A biological synapse changes its efficacy depending on the difference between pre- and post-synaptic spike timings. Formulating spike-timing-dependent interactions in terms of the path integral, we establish a neural-network model, which makes it possible to predict relevant quantities rigorously by means of standard methods in statistical mechanics and field theory. In particular, the biological synaptic plasticity rule is shown to emerge as the optimal form for minimizing the free energy. It is further revealed that maximization of the entropy of neural activities gives rise to the competitive behavior of biological learning. This demonstrates that statistical mechanics helps to understand rigorously key characteristic behaviors of a neural network, thus providing the possibility of physics serving as a useful and relevant framework for probing life.

  18. Adrenalectomy eliminates the extinction spike in autoshaping with rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, B L; Papini, M R

    2001-03-01

    Experiment 1, using rats, investigated the effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) on the invigoration of lever-contact performance that occurs in the autoshaping situation after a shift from acquisition to extinction (called the extinction spike). Groups of rats with ADX or sham operations were trained under spaced and massed conditions [average intertrial intervals (ITI) of either 15 or 90 s] for 10 sessions and then shifted to extinction. ADX did not affect acquisition training but it eliminated the extinction spike. Plasma corticosterone levels during acquisition were shown in Experiment 2 to be similar in rats trained under spaced or massed conditions. Adrenal participation in the emotional arousal induced by conditions of surprising nonreward (e.g., extinction) is discussed.

  19. Past, present and future of spike sorting techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Hernan Gonzalo; Pedreira, Carlos; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Spike sorting is a crucial step to extract information from extracellular recordings. With new recording opportunities provided by the development of new electrodes that allow monitoring hundreds of neurons simultaneously, the scenario for the new generation of algorithms is both exciting and challenging. However, this will require a new approach to the problem and the development of a common reference framework to quickly assess the performance of new algorithms. In this work, we review the basic concepts of spike sorting, including the requirements for different applications, together with the problems faced by presently available algorithms. We conclude by proposing a roadmap stressing the crucial points to be addressed to support the neuroscientific research of the near future. PMID:25931392

  20. Past, present and future of spike sorting techniques.

    PubMed

    Rey, Hernan Gonzalo; Pedreira, Carlos; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-10-01

    Spike sorting is a crucial step to extract information from extracellular recordings. With new recording opportunities provided by the development of new electrodes that allow monitoring hundreds of neurons simultaneously, the scenario for the new generation of algorithms is both exciting and challenging. However, this will require a new approach to the problem and the development of a common reference framework to quickly assess the performance of new algorithms. In this work, we review the basic concepts of spike sorting, including the requirements for different applications, together with the problems faced by presently available algorithms. We conclude by proposing a roadmap stressing the crucial points to be addressed to support the neuroscientific research of the near future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamical spike solutions in a nonlocal model of pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Härting, Steffen; Karch, Grzegorz; Suzuki, Kanako

    2018-05-01

    Coupling a reaction-diffusion equation with ordinary differential equa- tions (ODE) may lead to diffusion-driven instability (DDI) which, in contrast to the classical reaction-diffusion models, causes destabilization of both, constant solutions and Turing patterns. Using a shadow-type limit of a reaction-diffusion-ODE model, we show that in such cases the instability driven by nonlocal terms (a counterpart of DDI) may lead to formation of unbounded spike patterns.

  2. Archeomagnetic intensity spikes: global or regional geomagnetic field features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Monika; Constable, Catherine G.

    2018-03-01

    Variations of the geomagnetic field prior to direct observations are inferred from archeo- and paleomagnetic experiments. Seemingly unusual variations not seen in the present day and historical field are of particular interest to constrain the full range of core dynamics. Recently, archeomagnetic intensity spikes, characterised by very high field values that appear to be associated with rapid secular variation rates, have been reported from several parts of the world. They were first noted in data from the Levant at around 900 BCE. A recent re-assessment of previous and new Levantine data, involving a rigorous quality assessment, interprets the observations as an extreme local geomagnetic high with at least two intensity spikes between the 11^{th} and 8^{th} centuries BCE. Subsequent reports of similar features from Asia, the Canary Islands and Texas raise the question of whether such features might be common occurrences, or whether they might even be part of a global magnetic field feature. Here we use spherical harmonic modelling to test two hypotheses: firstly, whether the Levantine and other potential spikes might be associated with higher dipole field intensity than shown by existing global field models around 1000 BCE, and secondly, whether the observations from different parts of the world are compatible with a westward drifting intense flux patch. Our results suggest that the spikes originate from intense flux patches growing and decaying mostly in situ, combined with stronger and more variable dipole moment than shown by previous global field models. Axial dipole variations no more than 60% higher than observed in the present field, probably within the range of normal geodynamo behaviour, seem sufficient to explain the observations.

  3. The Stereo Electron Spikes and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Wang, Y. M.; Giacalone, J.

    2016-12-01

    A recent paper (Klassen etal, 2015) discussed observations of a spike event of 55-65 keV electrons which occurred very nearly simultaneously at STEREO A and STEREO B, which at the time were separated in longitude by 38 degrees. The authors associated the spikes with a flare at the Sun near the footpoint of the nominal Archimedean spiral magnetic field line passing through STEREO A. The spike at STEREO A was delayed by 2.2 minutes from that at STEREOB. We discuss the observations in terms of a model in which the electrons, accelerated at the flare, propagate without significant scattering along magnetic field lines which separate or diverge as a function of radial distance from the Sun. The near simultaneity of the spikes at the two spacecraft is a natural consequence of this model. We interpret the divergence of the magnetic field lines as a consequence of field-line random walk and flux-tube expansion. We show that the field-line random walk in the absence of flux-tube expansion produces an rms spread of field lines significantly less than that which is required to produce to observed divergence. We find that observations of the solar wind and its source region at the time of the event can account for the observations in terms of propagation along interplanetary magnetic field-lines. Klassen, A., Dresing, N., Gomez-Herrero, R, and Heber, B., A&A 580, A115 (2015) Financial support for NS and YMW was provided by NASA and CNR.

  4. Discriminating Sea Spikes in Incoherent Radar Measurements of Sea Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    het detecteren echter niet te verwachten dat bet gebruik van sea spikes te onderzoeken. Een van deze modellen zal leiden tot een Auteur (s) dergelijk...report I TNO-DV 2008 A067 6/33 Abbreviations CFAR Constant False-Alarm Rate CST Composite Surface Theory FFT Fast Fourier Transform PDF Probability Density...described by the composite surface theory (CST). This theory describes the sea surface as small Bragg-resonant capillary waves riding on top of

  5. Spiking neural network simulation: memory-optimal synaptic event scheduling.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert D; Gurney, Kevin N

    2011-06-01

    Spiking neural network simulations incorporating variable transmission delays require synaptic events to be scheduled prior to delivery. Conventional methods have memory requirements that scale with the total number of synapses in a network. We introduce novel scheduling algorithms for both discrete and continuous event delivery, where the memory requirement scales instead with the number of neurons. Superior algorithmic performance is demonstrated using large-scale, benchmarking network simulations.

  6. Enhanced polychronization in a spiking network with metaplasticity.

    PubMed

    Guise, Mira; Knott, Alistair; Benuskova, Lubica

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of metaplasticity have usually focused on the modeling of single synapses (Shouval et al., 2002). In this paper we study the effect of metaplasticity on network behavior. Our guiding assumption is that the primary purpose of metaplasticity is to regulate synaptic plasticity, by increasing it when input is low and decreasing it when input is high. For our experiments we adopt a model of metaplasticity that demonstrably has this effect for a single synapse; our primary interest is in how metaplasticity thus defined affects network-level phenomena. We focus on a network-level phenomenon called polychronicity, that has a potential role in representation and memory. A network with polychronicity has the ability to produce non-synchronous but precisely timed sequences of neural firing events that can arise from strongly connected groups of neurons called polychronous neural groups (Izhikevich et al., 2004). Polychronous groups (PNGs) develop readily when spiking networks are exposed to repeated spatio-temporal stimuli under the influence of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), but are sensitive to changes in synaptic weight distribution. We use a technique we have recently developed called Response Fingerprinting to show that PNGs formed in the presence of metaplasticity are significantly larger than those with no metaplasticity. A potential mechanism for this enhancement is proposed that links an inherent property of integrator type neurons called spike latency to an increase in the tolerance of PNG neurons to jitter in their inputs.

  7. Automatic threshold optimization in nonlinear energy operator based spike detection.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad H; Saeed, Maryam; Kamboh, Awais M

    2016-08-01

    In neural spike sorting systems, the performance of the spike detector has to be maximized because it affects the performance of all subsequent blocks. Non-linear energy operator (NEO), is a popular spike detector due to its detection accuracy and its hardware friendly architecture. However, it involves a thresholding stage, whose value is usually approximated and is thus not optimal. This approximation deteriorates the performance in real-time systems where signal to noise ratio (SNR) estimation is a challenge, especially at lower SNRs. In this paper, we propose an automatic and robust threshold calculation method using an empirical gradient technique. The method is tested on two different datasets. The results show that our optimized threshold improves the detection accuracy in both high SNR and low SNR signals. Boxplots are presented that provide a statistical analysis of improvements in accuracy, for instance, the 75th percentile was at 98.7% and 93.5% for the optimized NEO threshold and traditional NEO threshold, respectively.

  8. Analyzing large-scale spiking neural data with HRLAnalysis™

    PubMed Central

    Thibeault, Corey M.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    The additional capabilities provided by high-performance neural simulation environments and modern computing hardware has allowed for the modeling of increasingly larger spiking neural networks. This is important for exploring more anatomically detailed networks but the corresponding accumulation in data can make analyzing the results of these simulations difficult. This is further compounded by the fact that many existing analysis packages were not developed with large spiking data sets in mind. Presented here is a software suite developed to not only process the increased amount of spike-train data in a reasonable amount of time, but also provide a user friendly Python interface. We describe the design considerations, implementation and features of the HRLAnalysis™ suite. In addition, performance benchmarks demonstrating the speedup of this design compared to a published Python implementation are also presented. The result is a high-performance analysis toolkit that is not only usable and readily extensible, but also straightforward to interface with existing Python modules. PMID:24634655

  9. Emergent properties of interacting populations of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic neuronal networks are a key paradigm of increasing importance in brain research, concerned with the functional analysis of biological neuronal networks and, at the same time, with the synthesis of artificial brain-like systems. In this context, neuronal network models serve as mathematical tools to understand the function of brains, but they might as well develop into future tools for enhancing certain functions of our nervous system. Here, we present and discuss our recent achievements in developing multiplicative point processes into a viable mathematical framework for spiking network modeling. The perspective is that the dynamic behavior of these neuronal networks is faithfully reflected by a set of non-linear rate equations, describing all interactions on the population level. These equations are similar in structure to Lotka-Volterra equations, well known by their use in modeling predator-prey relations in population biology, but abundant applications to economic theory have also been described. We present a number of biologically relevant examples for spiking network function, which can be studied with the help of the aforementioned correspondence between spike trains and specific systems of non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations. We claim that, enabled by the use of multiplicative point processes, we can make essential contributions to a more thorough understanding of the dynamical properties of interacting neuronal populations.

  10. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A.; Kass, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing-rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC, and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4, in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates, and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  11. A Spike Cocktail Approach to Improve Microbial Performance ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Water reuse, via either centralized treatment of traditional wastewater or decentralized treatment and on-site reuse, is becoming an increasingly important element of sustainable water management. Despite advances in waterborne pathogen detection methods, low and highly variable pathogen levels limit their utility for routine evaluation of health risks in water reuse systems. Therefore, there is a need to improve our understanding of the linkage between pathogens and more readily measured process indicators during treatment. This paper describes an approach for constructing spiking experiments to relate the behavior of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens with relevant process indicators. General issues are reviewed, and the spiking protocol is applied as a case study example to improve microbial performance monitoring and health risk evaluation in a water reuse system. This approach provides a foundation for the development of novel approaches to improve real or near-real time performance monitoring of water recycling systems. This manuscrupt details an approach for developing "spike cocktail", a mixture of microorganisms that can be used to evaluate the performance of engineered and natural systems.

  12. Conjunctive coding in an evolved spiking model of retrosplenial cortex.

    PubMed

    Rounds, Emily L; Alexander, Andrew S; Nitz, Douglas A; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2018-06-04

    Retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is an association cortex supporting spatial navigation and memory. However, critical issues remain concerning the forms by which its ensemble spiking patterns register spatial relationships that are difficult for experimental techniques to fully address. We therefore applied an evolutionary algorithmic optimization technique to create spiking neural network models that matched electrophysiologically observed spiking dynamics in rat RSC neuronal ensembles. Virtual experiments conducted on the evolved networks revealed a mixed selectivity coding capability that was not built into the optimization method, but instead emerged as a consequence of replicating biological firing patterns. The experiments reveal several important outcomes of mixed selectivity that may subserve flexible navigation and spatial representation: (a) robustness to loss of specific inputs, (b) immediate and stable encoding of novel routes and route locations, (c) automatic resolution of input variable conflicts, and (d) dynamic coding that allows rapid adaptation to changing task demands without retraining. These findings suggest that biological retrosplenial cortex can generate unique, first-trial, conjunctive encodings of spatial positions and actions that can be used by downstream brain regions for navigation and path integration. Moreover, these results are consistent with the proposed role for the RSC in the transformation of representations between reference frames and navigation strategy deployment. Finally, the specific modeling framework used for evolving synthetic retrosplenial networks represents an important advance for computational modeling by which synthetic neural networks can encapsulate, describe, and predict the behavior of neural circuits at multiple levels of function. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Emergent Oscillations in Networks of Stochastic Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    van Drongelen, Wim; Cowan, Jack D.

    2011-01-01

    Networks of neurons produce diverse patterns of oscillations, arising from the network's global properties, the propensity of individual neurons to oscillate, or a mixture of the two. Here we describe noisy limit cycles and quasi-cycles, two related mechanisms underlying emergent oscillations in neuronal networks whose individual components, stochastic spiking neurons, do not themselves oscillate. Both mechanisms are shown to produce gamma band oscillations at the population level while individual neurons fire at a rate much lower than the population frequency. Spike trains in a network undergoing noisy limit cycles display a preferred period which is not found in the case of quasi-cycles, due to the even faster decay of phase information in quasi-cycles. These oscillations persist in sparsely connected networks, and variation of the network's connectivity results in variation of the oscillation frequency. A network of such neurons behaves as a stochastic perturbation of the deterministic Wilson-Cowan equations, and the network undergoes noisy limit cycles or quasi-cycles depending on whether these have limit cycles or a weakly stable focus. These mechanisms provide a new perspective on the emergence of rhythmic firing in neural networks, showing the coexistence of population-level oscillations with very irregular individual spike trains in a simple and general framework. PMID:21573105

  14. Emergent Properties of Interacting Populations of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic neuronal networks are a key paradigm of increasing importance in brain research, concerned with the functional analysis of biological neuronal networks and, at the same time, with the synthesis of artificial brain-like systems. In this context, neuronal network models serve as mathematical tools to understand the function of brains, but they might as well develop into future tools for enhancing certain functions of our nervous system. Here, we present and discuss our recent achievements in developing multiplicative point processes into a viable mathematical framework for spiking network modeling. The perspective is that the dynamic behavior of these neuronal networks is faithfully reflected by a set of non-linear rate equations, describing all interactions on the population level. These equations are similar in structure to Lotka-Volterra equations, well known by their use in modeling predator-prey relations in population biology, but abundant applications to economic theory have also been described. We present a number of biologically relevant examples for spiking network function, which can be studied with the help of the aforementioned correspondence between spike trains and specific systems of non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations. We claim that, enabled by the use of multiplicative point processes, we can make essential contributions to a more thorough understanding of the dynamical properties of interacting neuronal populations. PMID:22207844

  15. On the Mathematical Consequences of Binning Spike Trains.

    PubMed

    Cessac, Bruno; Le Ny, Arnaud; Löcherbach, Eva

    2017-01-01

    We initiate a mathematical analysis of hidden effects induced by binning spike trains of neurons. Assuming that the original spike train has been generated by a discrete Markov process, we show that binning generates a stochastic process that is no longer Markov but is instead a variable-length Markov chain (VLMC) with unbounded memory. We also show that the law of the binned raster is a Gibbs measure in the DLR (Dobrushin-Lanford-Ruelle) sense coined in mathematical statistical mechanics. This allows the derivation of several important consequences on statistical properties of binned spike trains. In particular, we introduce the DLR framework as a natural setting to mathematically formalize anticipation, that is, to tell "how good" our nervous system is at making predictions. In a probabilistic sense, this corresponds to condition a process by its future, and we discuss how binning may affect our conclusions on this ability. We finally comment on the possible consequences of binning in the detection of spurious phase transitions or in the detection of incorrect evidence of criticality.

  16. An interactive tool for visualization of spike train synchronization.

    PubMed

    Terry, Kevin

    2010-08-15

    A number of studies have examined the synchronization of central and peripheral spike trains by applying signal analysis techniques in the time and frequency domains. These analyses can reveal the presence of one or more common neural inputs that produce synchronization. However, synchronization measurements can fluctuate significantly due to the inherent variability of neural discharges and a finite data record length. Moreover, the effect of these natural variations is further compounded by the number of parameters available for calculating coherence in the frequency domain and the number of indices used to quantify short-term synchronization (STS) in the time domain. The computational tool presented here provides the user with an interactive environment that dynamically calculates and displays spike train properties along with STS and coherence indices to show how these factors interact. It is intended for a broad range of users, from those who are new to synchronization to experienced researchers who want to develop more meaningful and effective computational and experimental studies. To ensure this freely available tool meets the needs of all users, there are two versions. The first is a stand-alone version for educational use that can run on any computer. The second version can be modified and expanded by researchers who want to explore more in-depth questions about synchronization. Therefore, the distribution and use of this tool should both improve the understanding of fundamental spike train synchronization dynamics and produce more efficient and meaningful synchronization studies. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient architecture for spike sorting in reconfigurable hardware.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Lee, Wei-Hao; Lin, Shiow-Jyu; Lai, Sheng-Ying

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel hardware architecture for fast spike sorting. The architecture is able to perform both the feature extraction and clustering in hardware. The generalized Hebbian algorithm (GHA) and fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm are used for feature extraction and clustering, respectively. The employment of GHA allows efficient computation of principal components for subsequent clustering operations. The FCM is able to achieve near optimal clustering for spike sorting. Its performance is insensitive to the selection of initial cluster centers. The hardware implementations of GHA and FCM feature low area costs and high throughput. In the GHA architecture, the computation of different weight vectors share the same circuit for lowering the area costs. Moreover, in the FCM hardware implementation, the usual iterative operations for updating the membership matrix and cluster centroid are merged into one single updating process to evade the large storage requirement. To show the effectiveness of the circuit, the proposed architecture is physically implemented by field programmable gate array (FPGA). It is embedded in a System-on-Chip (SOC) platform for performance measurement. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture is an efficient spike sorting design for attaining high classification correct rate and high speed computation.

  18. Linking structure and activity in nonlinear spiking networks

    PubMed Central

    Josić, Krešimir; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recent experimental advances are producing an avalanche of data on both neural connectivity and neural activity. To take full advantage of these two emerging datasets we need a framework that links them, revealing how collective neural activity arises from the structure of neural connectivity and intrinsic neural dynamics. This problem of structure-driven activity has drawn major interest in computational neuroscience. Existing methods for relating activity and architecture in spiking networks rely on linearizing activity around a central operating point and thus fail to capture the nonlinear responses of individual neurons that are the hallmark of neural information processing. Here, we overcome this limitation and present a new relationship between connectivity and activity in networks of nonlinear spiking neurons by developing a diagrammatic fluctuation expansion based on statistical field theory. We explicitly show how recurrent network structure produces pairwise and higher-order correlated activity, and how nonlinearities impact the networks’ spiking activity. Our findings open new avenues to investigating how single-neuron nonlinearities—including those of different cell types—combine with connectivity to shape population activity and function. PMID:28644840

  19. Spike: Artificial intelligence scheduling for Hubble space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark; Miller, Glenn; Sponsler, Jeff; Vick, Shon; Jackson, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Efficient utilization of spacecraft resources is essential, but the accompanying scheduling problems are often computationally intractable and are difficult to approximate because of the presence of numerous interacting constraints. Artificial intelligence techniques were applied to the scheduling of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This presents a particularly challenging problem since a yearlong observing program can contain some tens of thousands of exposures which are subject to a large number of scientific, operational, spacecraft, and environmental constraints. New techniques were developed for machine reasoning about scheduling constraints and goals, especially in cases where uncertainty is an important scheduling consideration and where resolving conflicts among conflicting preferences is essential. These technique were utilized in a set of workstation based scheduling tools (Spike) for HST. Graphical displays of activities, constraints, and schedules are an important feature of the system. High level scheduling strategies using both rule based and neural network approaches were developed. While the specific constraints implemented are those most relevant to HST, the framework developed is far more general and could easily handle other kinds of scheduling problems. The concept and implementation of the Spike system are described along with some experiments in adapting Spike to other spacecraft scheduling domains.

  20. Poisson-Like Spiking in Circuits with Probabilistic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activity in cortex is variable both spontaneously and during stimulation, and it has the remarkable property that it is Poisson-like over broad ranges of firing rates covering from virtually zero to hundreds of spikes per second. The mechanisms underlying cortical-like spiking variability over such a broad continuum of rates are currently unknown. We show that neuronal networks endowed with probabilistic synaptic transmission, a well-documented source of variability in cortex, robustly generate Poisson-like variability over several orders of magnitude in their firing rate without fine-tuning of the network parameters. Other sources of variability, such as random synaptic delays or spike generation jittering, do not lead to Poisson-like variability at high rates because they cannot be sufficiently amplified by recurrent neuronal networks. We also show that probabilistic synapses predict Fano factor constancy of synaptic conductances. Our results suggest that synaptic noise is a robust and sufficient mechanism for the type of variability found in cortex. PMID:25032705

  1. Correlations Decrease with Propagation of Spiking Activity in the Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Gayathri Nattar; Koester, Helmut Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex. PMID:21629764

  2. CLUSTERING OF INTERICTAL SPIKES BY DYNAMIC TIME WARPING AND AFFINITY PROPAGATION

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jin, Jing; Dauwels, Justin; Cash, Sydney S.; Westover, M. Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is often associated with the presence of spikes in electroencephalograms (EEGs). The spike waveforms vary vastly among epilepsy patients, and also for the same patient across time. In order to develop semi-automated and automated methods for detecting spikes, it is crucial to obtain a better understanding of the various spike shapes. In this paper, we develop several approaches to extract exemplars of spikes. We generate spike exemplars by applying clustering algorithms to a database of spikes from 12 patients. As similarity measures for clustering, we consider the Euclidean distance and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). We assess two clustering algorithms, namely, K-means clustering and affinity propagation. The clustering methods are compared based on the mean squared error, and the similarity measures are assessed based on the number of generated spike clusters. Affinity propagation with DTW is shown to be the best combination for clustering epileptic spikes, since it generates fewer spike templates and does not require to pre-specify the number of spike templates. PMID:29527130

  3. Transient reduction in theta power caused by interictal spikes in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Manling Ge; Jundan Guo; Yangyang Xing; Zhiguo Feng; Weide Lu; Xinxin Ma; Yuehua Geng; Xin Zhang

    2017-07-01

    The inhibitory impacts of spikes on LFP theta rhythms(4-8Hz) are investigated around sporadic spikes(SSs) based on intracerebral EEG of 4 REM sleep patients with temporal lobe epilepsy(TLE) under the pre-surgical monitoring. Sequential interictal spikes in both genesis area and extended propagation pathway are collected, that, SSs genesis only in anterior hippocampus(aH)(possible propagation pathway in Entorhinal cortex(EC)), only in EC(possible propagation pathway in aH), and in both aH and EC synchronously. Instantaneous theta power was estimated by using Gabor wavelet transform, and theta power level was estimated by averaged over time and frequency before SSs(350ms pre-spike) and after SSs(350ms post-spike). The inhibitory effect around spikes was evaluated by the ratio of theta power level difference between pre-spike and post-spike to pre-spike theta power level. The findings were that theta power level was reduced across SSs, and the effects were more sever in the case of SSs in both aH and EC synchronously than either SSs only in EC or SSs only in aH. It is concluded that interictal spikes impair LFP theta rhythms transiently and directly. The work suggests that the reduction of theta power after the interictal spike might be an evaluation indicator of damage of epilepsy to human cognitive rhythms.

  4. Adaptive coupling optimized spiking coherence and synchronization in Newman-Watts neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo; Wu, Ya'nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we have numerically studied the effect of adaptive coupling on the temporal coherence and synchronization of spiking activity in Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks. It is found that random shortcuts can enhance the spiking synchronization more rapidly when the increment speed of adaptive coupling is increased and can optimize the temporal coherence of spikes only when the increment speed of adaptive coupling is appropriate. It is also found that adaptive coupling strength can enhance the synchronization of spikes and can optimize the temporal coherence of spikes when random shortcuts are appropriate. These results show that adaptive coupling has a big influence on random shortcuts related spiking activity and can enhance and optimize the temporal coherence and synchronization of spiking activity of the network. These findings can help better understand the roles of adaptive coupling for improving the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  5. To sort or not to sort: the impact of spike-sorting on neural decoding performance.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Sonia; Sadtler, Patrick; Batista, Aaron; Chase, Steven; Ventura, Valérie

    2014-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising technology for restoring motor ability to paralyzed patients. Spiking-based BCIs have successfully been used in clinical trials to control multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices. Current implementations of these devices require a lengthy spike-sorting step, which is an obstacle to moving this technology from the lab to the clinic. A viable alternative is to avoid spike-sorting, treating all threshold crossings of the voltage waveform on an electrode as coming from one putative neuron. It is not known, however, how much decoding information might be lost by ignoring spike identity. We present a full analysis of the effects of spike-sorting schemes on decoding performance. Specifically, we compare how well two common decoders, the optimal linear estimator and the Kalman filter, reconstruct the arm movements of non-human primates performing reaching tasks, when receiving input from various sorting schemes. The schemes we tested included: using threshold crossings without spike-sorting; expert-sorting discarding the noise; expert-sorting, including the noise as if it were another neuron; and automatic spike-sorting using waveform features. We also decoded from a joint statistical model for the waveforms and tuning curves, which does not involve an explicit spike-sorting step. Discarding the threshold crossings that cannot be assigned to neurons degrades decoding: no spikes should be discarded. Decoding based on spike-sorted units outperforms decoding based on electrodes voltage crossings: spike-sorting is useful. The four waveform based spike-sorting methods tested here yield similar decoding efficiencies: a fast and simple method is competitive. Decoding using the joint waveform and tuning model shows promise but is not consistently superior. Our results indicate that simple automated spike-sorting performs as well as the more computationally or manually intensive methods used here. Even basic spike-sorting adds value

  6. A stimulus-dependent spike threshold is an optimal neural coder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Douglas L.; Johnson, Erik C.; Ratnam, Rama

    2015-01-01

    A neural code based on sequences of spikes can consume a significant portion of the brain's energy budget. Thus, energy considerations would dictate that spiking activity be kept as low as possible. However, a high spike-rate improves the coding and representation of signals in spike trains, particularly in sensory systems. These are competing demands, and selective pressure has presumably worked to optimize coding by apportioning a minimum number of spikes so as to maximize coding fidelity. The mechanisms by which a neuron generates spikes while maintaining a fidelity criterion are not known. Here, we show that a signal-dependent neural threshold, similar to a dynamic or adapting threshold, optimizes the trade-off between spike generation (encoding) and fidelity (decoding). The threshold mimics a post-synaptic membrane (a low-pass filter) and serves as an internal decoder. Further, it sets the average firing rate (the energy constraint). The decoding process provides an internal copy of the coding error to the spike-generator which emits a spike when the error equals or exceeds a spike threshold. When optimized, the trade-off leads to a deterministic spike firing-rule that generates optimally timed spikes so as to maximize fidelity. The optimal coder is derived in closed-form in the limit of high spike-rates, when the signal can be approximated as a piece-wise constant signal. The predicted spike-times are close to those obtained experimentally in the primary electrosensory afferent neurons of weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus) and pyramidal neurons from the somatosensory cortex of the rat. We suggest that KCNQ/Kv7 channels (underlying the M-current) are good candidates for the decoder. They are widely coupled to metabolic processes and do not inactivate. We conclude that the neural threshold is optimized to generate an energy-efficient and high-fidelity neural code. PMID:26082710

  7. Glutamine synthetase gene knockout-human embryonic kidney 293E cells for stable production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da Young; Lee, Sang Yoon; Lee, Gyun Min

    2018-05-01

    Previously, it was inferred that a high glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293E cells results in elevated resistance to methionine sulfoximine (MSX) and consequently hampers GS-mediated gene amplification and selection by MSX. To overcome this MSX resistance in HEK293E cells, a GS-knockout HEK293E cell line was generated using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target the endogenous human GS gene. The GS-knockout in the HEK293E cell line (RK8) was confirmed by Western blot analysis of GS and by observation of glutamine-dependent growth. Unlike the wild type HEK293E cells, the RK8 cells were successfully used as host cells to generate a recombinant HEK293E cell line (rHEK293E) producing a monoclonal antibody (mAb). When the RK8 cells were transfected with the GS expression vector containing the mAb gene, rHEK293E cells producing the mAb could be selected in the absence as well as in the presence of MSX. The gene copies and mRNA expression levels of the mAb in rHEK293E cells were also quantified using qRT-PCR. Taken together, the GS-knockout HEK293E cell line can be used as host cells to generate stable rHEK293E cells producing a mAb through GS-mediated gene selection in the absence as well as in the presence of MSX. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. "I Told You I Was Ill" (Spike's Preferred Epitaph): In Honour and in Memory of (Terence Alan) Spike Milligan, 1918-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijke, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Presents a personal tribute in memory of the work of eccentric writer and performer Spike Milligan. Celebrates and examines Spike's absurdist poetry and sketches for children in the context of both British nonsense traditions and the poetry of American writer Ogden Nash and Dr. Seuss. (SG)

  9. From Spiking Neuron Models to Linear-Nonlinear Models

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Brunel, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Neurons transform time-varying inputs into action potentials emitted stochastically at a time dependent rate. The mapping from current input to output firing rate is often represented with the help of phenomenological models such as the linear-nonlinear (LN) cascade, in which the output firing rate is estimated by applying to the input successively a linear temporal filter and a static non-linear transformation. These simplified models leave out the biophysical details of action potential generation. It is not a priori clear to which extent the input-output mapping of biophysically more realistic, spiking neuron models can be reduced to a simple linear-nonlinear cascade. Here we investigate this question for the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF), exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) and conductance-based Wang-Buzsáki models in presence of background synaptic activity. We exploit available analytic results for these models to determine the corresponding linear filter and static non-linearity in a parameter-free form. We show that the obtained functions are identical to the linear filter and static non-linearity determined using standard reverse correlation analysis. We then quantitatively compare the output of the corresponding linear-nonlinear cascade with numerical simulations of spiking neurons, systematically varying the parameters of input signal and background noise. We find that the LN cascade provides accurate estimates of the firing rates of spiking neurons in most of parameter space. For the EIF and Wang-Buzsáki models, we show that the LN cascade can be reduced to a firing rate model, the timescale of which we determine analytically. Finally we introduce an adaptive timescale rate model in which the timescale of the linear filter depends on the instantaneous firing rate. This model leads to highly accurate estimates of instantaneous firing rates. PMID:21283777

  10. From spiking neuron models to linear-nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Brunel, Nicolas

    2011-01-20

    Neurons transform time-varying inputs into action potentials emitted stochastically at a time dependent rate. The mapping from current input to output firing rate is often represented with the help of phenomenological models such as the linear-nonlinear (LN) cascade, in which the output firing rate is estimated by applying to the input successively a linear temporal filter and a static non-linear transformation. These simplified models leave out the biophysical details of action potential generation. It is not a priori clear to which extent the input-output mapping of biophysically more realistic, spiking neuron models can be reduced to a simple linear-nonlinear cascade. Here we investigate this question for the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF), exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) and conductance-based Wang-Buzsáki models in presence of background synaptic activity. We exploit available analytic results for these models to determine the corresponding linear filter and static non-linearity in a parameter-free form. We show that the obtained functions are identical to the linear filter and static non-linearity determined using standard reverse correlation analysis. We then quantitatively compare the output of the corresponding linear-nonlinear cascade with numerical simulations of spiking neurons, systematically varying the parameters of input signal and background noise. We find that the LN cascade provides accurate estimates of the firing rates of spiking neurons in most of parameter space. For the EIF and Wang-Buzsáki models, we show that the LN cascade can be reduced to a firing rate model, the timescale of which we determine analytically. Finally we introduce an adaptive timescale rate model in which the timescale of the linear filter depends on the instantaneous firing rate. This model leads to highly accurate estimates of instantaneous firing rates.

  11. Bio-inspired spiking neural network for nonlinear systems control.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Cabrera, Juan A; Castillo, Juan J; Velasco, Juan M

    2018-08-01

    Spiking neural networks (SNN) are the third generation of artificial neural networks. SNN are the closest approximation to biological neural networks. SNNs make use of temporal spike trains to command inputs and outputs, allowing a faster and more complex computation. As demonstrated by biological organisms, they are a potentially good approach to designing controllers for highly nonlinear dynamic systems in which the performance of controllers developed by conventional techniques is not satisfactory or difficult to implement. SNN-based controllers exploit their ability for online learning and self-adaptation to evolve when transferred from simulations to the real world. SNN's inherent binary and temporary way of information codification facilitates their hardware implementation compared to analog neurons. Biological neural networks often require a lower number of neurons compared to other controllers based on artificial neural networks. In this work, these neuronal systems are imitated to perform the control of non-linear dynamic systems. For this purpose, a control structure based on spiking neural networks has been designed. Particular attention has been paid to optimizing the structure and size of the neural network. The proposed structure is able to control dynamic systems with a reduced number of neurons and connections. A supervised learning process using evolutionary algorithms has been carried out to perform controller training. The efficiency of the proposed network has been verified in two examples of dynamic systems control. Simulations show that the proposed control based on SNN exhibits superior performance compared to other approaches based on Neural Networks and SNNs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic Regional Variations in Purkinje Cell Spiking Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianqiang; Cerminara, Nadia L.; Kotsurovskyy, Yuriy; Aoki, Hanako; Burroughs, Amelia; Wise, Andrew K.; Luo, Yuanjun; Marshall, Sarah P.; Sugihara, Izumi; Apps, Richard; Lang, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the uniform anatomy of the cerebellar cortex, molecular and physiological studies indicate that significant differences exist between cortical regions, suggesting that the spiking activity of Purkinje cells (PCs) in different regions could also show distinct characteristics. To investigate this possibility we obtained extracellular recordings from PCs in different zebrin bands in crus IIa and vermis lobules VIII and IX in anesthetized rats in order to compare PC firing characteristics between zebrin positive (Z+) and negative (Z−) bands. In addition, we analyzed recordings from PCs in the A2 and C1 zones of several lobules in the posterior lobe, which largely contain Z+ and Z− PCs, respectively. In both datasets significant differences in simple spike (SS) activity were observed between cortical regions. Specifically, Z− and C1 PCs had higher SS firing rates than Z+ and A2 PCs, respectively. The irregularity of SS firing (as assessed by measures of interspike interval distribution) was greater in Z+ bands in both absolute and relative terms. The results regarding systematic variations in complex spike (CS) activity were less consistent, suggesting that while real differences can exist, they may be sensitive to other factors than the cortical location of the PC. However, differences in the interactions between SSs and CSs, including the post-CS pause in SSs and post-pause modulation of SSs, were also consistently observed between bands. Similar, though less strong trends were observed in the zonal recordings. These systematic variations in spontaneous firing characteristics of PCs between zebrin bands in vivo, raises the possibility that fundamental differences in information encoding exist between cerebellar cortical regions. PMID:25144311

  13. Mechanisms of Firing Patterns in Fast-Spiking Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, David; Donner, Karnit; Shacham, Liron; Shlosberg, Dan; Amitai, Yael; Hansel, David

    2007-01-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) interneurons display highly variable electrophysiological properties. Their spike responses to step currents occur almost immediately following the step onset or after a substantial delay, during which subthreshold oscillations are frequently observed. Their firing patterns include high-frequency tonic firing and rhythmic or irregular bursting (stuttering). What is the origin of this variability? In the present paper, we hypothesize that it emerges naturally if one assumes a continuous distribution of properties in a small set of active channels. To test this hypothesis, we construct a minimal, single-compartment conductance-based model of FS cells that includes transient Na+, delayed-rectifier K+, and slowly inactivating d-type K+ conductances. The model is analyzed using nonlinear dynamical system theory. For small Na+ window current, the neuron exhibits high-frequency tonic firing. At current threshold, the spike response is almost instantaneous for small d-current conductance, g d, and it is delayed for larger g d. As g d further increases, the neuron stutters. Noise substantially reduces the delay duration and induces subthreshold oscillations. In contrast, when the Na+ window current is large, the neuron always fires tonically. Near threshold, the firing rates are low, and the delay to firing is only weakly sensitive to noise; subthreshold oscillations are not observed. We propose that the variability in the response of cortical FS neurons is a consequence of heterogeneities in their g d and in the strength of their Na+ window current. We predict the existence of two types of firing patterns in FS neurons, differing in the sensitivity of the delay duration to noise, in the minimal firing rate of the tonic discharge, and in the existence of subthreshold oscillations. We report experimental results from intracellular recordings supporting this prediction. PMID:17696606

  14. Mechanisms of firing patterns in fast-spiking cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Golomb, David; Donner, Karnit; Shacham, Liron; Shlosberg, Dan; Amitai, Yael; Hansel, David

    2007-08-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) interneurons display highly variable electrophysiological properties. Their spike responses to step currents occur almost immediately following the step onset or after a substantial delay, during which subthreshold oscillations are frequently observed. Their firing patterns include high-frequency tonic firing and rhythmic or irregular bursting (stuttering). What is the origin of this variability? In the present paper, we hypothesize that it emerges naturally if one assumes a continuous distribution of properties in a small set of active channels. To test this hypothesis, we construct a minimal, single-compartment conductance-based model of FS cells that includes transient Na(+), delayed-rectifier K(+), and slowly inactivating d-type K(+) conductances. The model is analyzed using nonlinear dynamical system theory. For small Na(+) window current, the neuron exhibits high-frequency tonic firing. At current threshold, the spike response is almost instantaneous for small d-current conductance, gd, and it is delayed for larger gd. As gd further increases, the neuron stutters. Noise substantially reduces the delay duration and induces subthreshold oscillations. In contrast, when the Na(+) window current is large, the neuron always fires tonically. Near threshold, the firing rates are low, and the delay to firing is only weakly sensitive to noise; subthreshold oscillations are not observed. We propose that the variability in the response of cortical FS neurons is a consequence of heterogeneities in their gd and in the strength of their Na(+) window current. We predict the existence of two types of firing patterns in FS neurons, differing in the sensitivity of the delay duration to noise, in the minimal firing rate of the tonic discharge, and in the existence of subthreshold oscillations. We report experimental results from intracellular recordings supporting this prediction.

  15. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 15 control samples (spikes) from 11 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of dust, food, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples were used to assess recover...

  16. Genes with a spike expression are clustered in chromosome (sub)bands and spike (sub)bands have a powerful prognostic value in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Hose, Dirk; Moreaux, Jérôme; Walker, Brian A.; Protopopov, Alexei; Reme, Thierry; Pellestor, Franck; Pantesco, Véronique; Jauch, Anna; Morgan, Gareth; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic abnormalities are common in patients with multiple myeloma, and may deregulate gene products involved in tumor survival, proliferation, metabolism and drug resistance. In particular, translocations may result in a high expression of targeted genes (termed spike expression) in tumor cells. We identified spike genes in multiple myeloma cells of patients with newly-diagnosed myeloma and investigated their prognostic value. Design and Methods Genes with a spike expression in multiple myeloma cells were picked up using box plot probe set signal distribution and two selection filters. Results In a cohort of 206 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, 2587 genes/expressed sequence tags with a spike expression were identified. Some spike genes were associated with some transcription factors such as MAF or MMSET and with known recurrent translocations as expected. Spike genes were not associated with increased DNA copy number and for a majority of them, involved unknown mechanisms. Of spiked genes, 36.7% clustered significantly in 149 out of 862 documented chromosome (sub)bands, of which 53 had prognostic value (35 bad, 18 good). Their prognostic value was summarized with a spike band score that delineated 23.8% of patients with a poor median overall survival (27.4 months versus not reached, P<0.001) using the training cohort of 206 patients. The spike band score was independent of other gene expression profiling-based risk scores, t(4;14), or del17p in an independent validation cohort of 345 patients. Conclusions We present a new approach to identify spike genes and their relationship to patients’ survival. PMID:22102711

  17. Spatio-temporal conditional inference and hypothesis tests for neural ensemble spiking precision

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Matthew T.; Amarasingham, Asohan; Truccolo, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The collective dynamics of neural ensembles create complex spike patterns with many spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the statistical structure of these patterns can help resolve fundamental questions about neural computation and neural dynamics. Spatio-temporal conditional inference (STCI) is introduced here as a semiparametric statistical framework for investigating the nature of precise spiking patterns from collections of neurons that is robust to arbitrarily complex and nonstationary coarse spiking dynamics. The main idea is to focus statistical modeling and inference, not on the full distribution of the data, but rather on families of conditional distributions of precise spiking given different types of coarse spiking. The framework is then used to develop families of hypothesis tests for probing the spatio-temporal precision of spiking patterns. Relationships among different conditional distributions are used to improve multiple hypothesis testing adjustments and to design novel Monte Carlo spike resampling algorithms. Of special note are algorithms that can locally jitter spike times while still preserving the instantaneous peri-stimulus time histogram (PSTH) or the instantaneous total spike count from a group of recorded neurons. The framework can also be used to test whether first-order maximum entropy models with possibly random and time-varying parameters can account for observed patterns of spiking. STCI provides a detailed example of the generic principle of conditional inference, which may be applicable in other areas of neurostatistical analysis. PMID:25380339

  18. Unbiased and robust quantification of synchronization between spikes and local field potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Cui, Dong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-08-30

    In neuroscience, relating the spiking activity of individual neurons to the local field potential (LFP) of neural ensembles is an increasingly useful approach for studying rhythmic neuronal synchronization. Many methods have been proposed to measure the strength of the association between spikes and rhythms in the LFP recordings, and most existing measures are dependent upon the total number of spikes. In the present work, we introduce a robust approach for quantifying spike-LFP synchronization which performs reliably for limited samples of data. The measure is termed as spike-triggered correlation matrix synchronization (SCMS), which takes LFP segments centered on each spike as multi-channel signals and calculates the index of spike-LFP synchronization by constructing a correlation matrix. The simulation based on artificial data shows that the SCMS output almost does not change with the sample size. This property is of crucial importance when making comparisons between different experimental conditions. When applied to actual neuronal data recorded from the monkey primary visual cortex, it is found that the spike-LFP synchronization strength shows orientation selectivity to drifting gratings. In comparison to another unbiased method, pairwise phase consistency (PPC), the proposed SCMS behaves better for noisy spike trains by means of numerical simulations. This study demonstrates the basic idea and calculating process of the SCMS method. Considering its unbiasedness and robustness, the measure is of great advantage to characterize the synchronization between spike trains and rhythms present in LFP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simplified and Yet Turing Universal Spiking Neural P Systems with Communication on Request.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingfang; Bîlbîe, Florin-Daniel; Păun, Andrei; Pan, Linqiang; Neri, Ferrante

    2018-04-02

    Spiking neural P systems are a class of third generation neural networks belonging to the framework of membrane computing. Spiking neural P systems with communication on request (SNQ P systems) are a type of spiking neural P system where the spikes are requested from neighboring neurons. SNQ P systems have previously been proved to be universal (computationally equivalent to Turing machines) when two types of spikes are considered. This paper studies a simplified version of SNQ P systems, i.e. SNQ P systems with one type of spike. It is proved that one type of spike is enough to guarantee the Turing universality of SNQ P systems. Theoretical results are shown in the cases of the SNQ P system used in both generating and accepting modes. Furthermore, the influence of the number of unbounded neurons (the number of spikes in a neuron is not bounded) on the computation power of SNQ P systems with one type of spike is investigated. It is found that SNQ P systems functioning as number generating devices with one type of spike and four unbounded neurons are Turing universal.

  20. An online supervised learning method based on gradient descent for spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Yang, Jing; Zhong, Shuiming

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of supervised learning with temporal encoding for spiking neurons is to make the neurons emit a specific spike train encoded by precise firing times of spikes. The gradient-descent-based (GDB) learning methods are widely used and verified in the current research. Although the existing GDB multi-spike learning (or spike sequence learning) methods have good performance, they work in an offline manner and still have some limitations. This paper proposes an online GDB spike sequence learning method for spiking neurons that is based on the online adjustment mechanism of real biological neuron synapses. The method constructs error function and calculates the adjustment of synaptic weights as soon as the neurons emit a spike during their running process. We analyze and synthesize desired and actual output spikes to select appropriate input spikes in the calculation of weight adjustment in this paper. The experimental results show that our method obviously improves learning performance compared with the offline learning manner and has certain advantage on learning accuracy compared with other learning methods. Stronger learning ability determines that the method has large pattern storage capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Independent component analysis separates spikes of different origin in the EEG.

    PubMed

    Urrestarazu, Elena; Iriarte, Jorge; Artieda, Julio; Alegre, Manuel; Valencia, Miguel; Viteri, César

    2006-02-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a novel system that finds independent sources in recorded signals. Its usefulness in separating epileptiform activity of different origin has not been determined. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that ICA is useful for separating different spikes using samples of EEG of patients with focal epilepsy. Digital EEG samples from four patients with focal epilepsy were included. The patients had temporal (n = 2), centrotemporal (n = 1) or frontal spikes (n = 1). Twenty-six samples with two (or more) spikes from two different patients were created. The selection of the two spikes for each mixed EEG was performed randomly, trying to have all the different combinations and rejecting the mixture of two spikes from the same patient. Two different examiners studied the EEGs using ICA with JADE paradigm in Matlab platform, trying to separate and to identify the spikes. They agreed in the correct separation of the spikes in 24 of the 26 samples, classifying the spikes as frontal, temporal or centrotemporal, left or right sided. The demonstration of the possibility of detecting different artificially mixed spikes confirms that ICA may be useful in separating spikes or other elements in real EEGs.

  2. Changes in Purkinje Cell Simple Spike Encoding of Reach Kinematics during Adaption to a Mechanical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Angela L.; Popa, Laurentiu S.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is essential in motor learning. At the cellular level, changes occur in both the simple spike and complex spike firing of Purkinje cells. Because simple spike discharge reflects the main output of the cerebellar cortex, changes in simple spike firing likely reflect the contribution of the cerebellum to the adapted behavior. Therefore, we investigated in Rhesus monkeys how the representation of arm kinematics in Purkinje cell simple spike discharge changed during adaptation to mechanical perturbations of reach movements. Monkeys rapidly adapted to a novel assistive or resistive perturbation along the direction of the reach. Adaptation consisted of matching the amplitude and timing of the perturbation to minimize its effect on the reach. In a majority of Purkinje cells, simple spike firing recorded before and during adaptation demonstrated significant changes in position, velocity, and acceleration sensitivity. The timing of the simple spike representations change within individual cells, including shifts in predictive versus feedback signals. At the population level, feedback-based encoding of position increases early in learning and velocity decreases. Both timing changes reverse later in learning. The complex spike discharge was only weakly modulated by the perturbations, demonstrating that the changes in simple spike firing can be independent of climbing fiber input. In summary, we observed extensive alterations in individual Purkinje cell encoding of reach kinematics, although the movements were nearly identical in the baseline and adapted states. Therefore, adaption to mechanical perturbation of a reaching movement is accompanied by widespread modifications in the simple spike encoding. PMID:25609626

  3. Distribution of extant populations of Quadrula mitchelli (false spike)

    Randklev, Charles R.; Tsakiris, Eric; Howells, Robert G.; Groce, Julie; Johnson, Matthew S.; Bergmann, Joseph; Robertson, Clint; Blair, Andy; Littrell, Brad; Johnson, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The False Spike, Quadrula mitchelli (Simpson 1896), is a rare species of mussel endemic to Central Texas and the Rio Grande drainage (Howells 2010). This species was thought to have been extinct until the discovery of several live individuals in the Guadalupe River and a fresh dead individual in the San Saba River in 2011 (Randklev et al. 2012; Randklev et al. in press). Since then, this species has been reported at several other locations within its historic range (Sowards et al. in press; Tsakiris and Randklev 2013; Mabe and Kennedy 2013). Here, we report on the current known distribution of this species.

  4. Stimulus Sensitivity of a Spiking Neural Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Julien

    2018-02-01

    Some recent papers relate the criticality of complex systems to their maximal capacity of information processing. In the present paper, we consider high dimensional point processes, known as age-dependent Hawkes processes, which have been used to model spiking neural networks. Using mean-field approximation, the response of the network to a stimulus is computed and we provide a notion of stimulus sensitivity. It appears that the maximal sensitivity is achieved in the sub-critical regime, yet almost critical for a range of biologically relevant parameters.

  5. Pulse Shaped 8-PSK Bandwidth Efficiency and Spectral Spike Elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Jian-Ping

    1998-01-01

    The most bandwidth-efficient communication methods are imperative to cope with the congested frequency bands. Pulse shaping methods have excellent effects on narrowing bandwidth and increasing band utilization. The position of the baseband filters for the pulse shaping is crucial. Post-modulation pulse shaping (a low pass filter is located after the modulator) can change signals from constant envelope to non-constant envelope, and non-constant envelope signals through non-linear device (a SSPA or TWT) can further spread the power spectra. Pre-modulation pulse shaping (a filter is located before the modulator) will have constant envelope. These two pulse shaping methods have different effects on narrowing the bandwidth and producing bit errors. This report studied the effect of various pre-modulation pulse shaping filters with respect to bandwidth, spectral spikes and bit error rate. A pre-modulation pulse shaped 8-ary Phase Shift Keying (8PSK) modulation was used throughout the simulations. In addition to traditional pulse shaping filters, such as Bessel, Butterworth and Square Root Raised Cosine (SRRC), other kinds of filters or pulse waveforms were also studied in the pre-modulation pulse shaping method. Simulations were conducted by using the Signal Processing Worksystem (SPW) software package on HP workstations which simulated the power spectral density of pulse shaped 8-PSK signals, end to end system performance and bit error rates (BERS) as a function of Eb/No using pulse shaping in an AWGN channel. These results are compared with the post-modulation pulse shaped 8-PSK results. The simulations indicate traditional pulse shaping filters used in pre-modulation pulse shaping may produce narrower bandwidth, but with worse BER than those in post-modulation pulse shaping. Theory and simulations show pre- modulation pulse shaping could also produce discrete line power spectra (spikes) at regular frequency intervals. These spikes may cause interference with adjacent

  6. Estimating Extracellular Spike Waveforms from CA1 Pyramidal Cells with Multichannel Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Molden, Sturla; Moldestad, Olve; Storm, Johan F.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular (EC) recordings of action potentials from the intact brain are embedded in background voltage fluctuations known as the “local field potential” (LFP). In order to use EC spike recordings for studying biophysical properties of neurons, the spike waveforms must be separated from the LFP. Linear low-pass and high-pass filters are usually insufficient to separate spike waveforms from LFP, because they have overlapping frequency bands. Broad-band recordings of LFP and spikes were obtained with a 16-channel laminar electrode array (silicone probe). We developed an algorithm whereby local LFP signals from spike-containing channel were modeled using locally weighted polynomial regression analysis of adjoining channels without spikes. The modeled LFP signal was subtracted from the recording to estimate the embedded spike waveforms. We tested the method both on defined spike waveforms added to LFP recordings, and on in vivo-recorded extracellular spikes from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in anaesthetized mice. We show that the algorithm can correctly extract the spike waveforms embedded in the LFP. In contrast, traditional high-pass filters failed to recover correct spike shapes, albeit produceing smaller standard errors. We found that high-pass RC or 2-pole Butterworth filters with cut-off frequencies below 12.5 Hz, are required to retrieve waveforms comparable to our method. The method was also compared to spike-triggered averages of the broad-band signal, and yielded waveforms with smaller standard errors and less distortion before and after the spike. PMID:24391714

  7. Solar flare hard X-ray spikes observed by RHESSI: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.; Ding, M. D.; Wang, H.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes refer to fine time structures on timescales of seconds to milliseconds in high-energy HXR emission profiles during solar flare eruptions. Aims: We present a preliminary statistical investigation of temporal and spectral properties of HXR spikes. Methods: Using a three-sigma spike selection rule, we detected 184 spikes in 94 out of 322 flares with significant counts at given photon energies, which were detected from demodulated HXR light curves obtained by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). About one fifth of these spikes are also detected at photon energies higher than 100 keV. Results: The statistical properties of the spikes are as follows. (1) HXR spikes are produced in both impulsive flares and long-duration flares with nearly the same occurrence rates. Ninety percent of the spikes occur during the rise phase of the flares, and about 70% occur around the peak times of the flares. (2) The time durations of the spikes vary from 0.2 to 2 s, with the mean being 1.0 s, which is not dependent on photon energies. The spikes exhibit symmetric time profiles with no significant difference between rise and decay times. (3) Among the most energetic spikes, nearly all of them have harder count spectra than their underlying slow-varying components. There is also a weak indication that spikes exhibiting time lags in high-energy emissions tend to have harder spectra than spikes with time lags in low-energy emissions.

  8. Effect of heavy metals on pH buffering capacity and solubility of Ca, Mg, K, and P in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soils.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    In many parts of the world, soil acidification and heavy metal contamination has become a serious concern due to the adverse effects on chemical properties of soil and crop yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pH (in the range of 1 to 3 units above and below the native pH of soils) on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P) solubility in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soil samples. Spiked samples were prepared by cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) as chloride salts and incubating soils for 40 days. The pH buffering capacity (pHBC) of each sample was determined by plotting the amount of H(+) or OH(-) added (mmol kg(-1)) versus the related pH value. The pHBC of soils ranged from 47.1 to 1302.5 mmol kg(-1) for non-spiked samples and from 45.0 to 1187.4 mmol kg(-1) for spiked soil samples. The pHBC values were higher in soil 2 (non-spiked and spiked) which had higher calcium carbonate content. The results indicated the presence of heavy metals in soils generally decreased the solution pH and pHBC values in spiked samples. In general, solubility of Ca, Mg, and K decreased with increasing equilibrium pH of non-spiked and spiked soil samples. In the case of P, increasing the pH to about 7, decreased the solubility in all soils but further increase of pH from 7, enhanced P solubility. The solubility trends and values for Ca, Mg, and K did not differed significantly in non-spiked and spiked samples. But in the case of P, a reduction in solubility was observed in heavy metal-spiked soils. The information obtained in this study can be useful to make better estimation of the effects of soil pollutants on anion and cation solubility from agricultural and environmental viewpoints.

  9. Spike timing analysis in neural networks with unsupervised synaptic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, B. E. P.; Agnes, E. J.; Brunnet, L. G.; Erichsen, R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The synaptic plasticity rules that sculpt a neural network architecture are key elements to understand cortical processing, as they may explain the emergence of stable, functional activity, while avoiding runaway excitation. For an associative memory framework, they should be built in a way as to enable the network to reproduce a robust spatio-temporal trajectory in response to an external stimulus. Still, how these rules may be implemented in recurrent networks and the way they relate to their capacity of pattern recognition remains unclear. We studied the effects of three phenomenological unsupervised rules in sparsely connected recurrent networks for associative memory: spike-timing-dependent-plasticity, short-term-plasticity and an homeostatic scaling. The system stability is monitored during the learning process of the network, as the mean firing rate converges to a value determined by the homeostatic scaling. Afterwards, it is possible to measure the recovery efficiency of the activity following each initial stimulus. This is evaluated by a measure of the correlation between spike fire timings, and we analysed the full memory separation capacity and limitations of this system.

  10. Approximate, computationally efficient online learning in Bayesian spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Hauser-Raspe, Michael; Manton, Jonathan H; Grayden, David B; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André

    2014-03-01

    Bayesian spiking neurons (BSNs) provide a probabilistic interpretation of how neurons perform inference and learning. Online learning in BSNs typically involves parameter estimation based on maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) which is computationally slow and limits the potential of studying networks of BSNs. An online learning algorithm, fast learning (FL), is presented that is more computationally efficient than the benchmark ML-EM for a fixed number of time steps as the number of inputs to a BSN increases (e.g., 16.5 times faster run times for 20 inputs). Although ML-EM appears to converge 2.0 to 3.6 times faster than FL, the computational cost of ML-EM means that ML-EM takes longer to simulate to convergence than FL. FL also provides reasonable convergence performance that is robust to initialization of parameter estimates that are far from the true parameter values. However, parameter estimation depends on the range of true parameter values. Nevertheless, for a physiologically meaningful range of parameter values, FL gives very good average estimation accuracy, despite its approximate nature. The FL algorithm therefore provides an efficient tool, complementary to ML-EM, for exploring BSN networks in more detail in order to better understand their biological relevance. Moreover, the simplicity of the FL algorithm means it can be easily implemented in neuromorphic VLSI such that one can take advantage of the energy-efficient spike coding of BSNs.

  11. Crystal structure of the human astrovirus capsid spike.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhui; Dong, Liping; Méndez, Ernesto; Tao, Yizhi

    2011-08-02

    Astroviruses are single-stranded, plus-sense RNA viruses that infect both mammals and birds, causing gastroenteritis and other extraintestinal diseases. Clinical studies have established astroviruses as the second leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children. Here we report the crystal structure of the human astrovirus dimeric surface spike determined to 1.8-Å resolution. The overall structure of each spike/projection domain has a unique three-layered β-sandwiches fold, with a core, six-stranded β-barrel structure that is also found in the hepatitis E virus capsid protrusions, suggesting a closer phylogenetic relationship between these two viruses than previously acknowledged. Based on a hepatitis E virus capsid model, we performed homology modeling and produced a complete, T = 3 astrovirus capsid model with features remarkably similar to those observed in a cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction image of a human astrovirus. Mapping conserved residues onto the astrovirus projection domain revealed a putative receptor binding site with amino acid compositions characteristic for polysaccharide recognition. Our results will have an important impact on future characterization of astrovirus structure and function, and will likely have practical applications in the development of vaccines and antivirals.

  12. Spike-Based Bayesian-Hebbian Learning of Temporal Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Henrik; Lansner, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Many cognitive and motor functions are enabled by the temporal representation and processing of stimuli, but it remains an open issue how neocortical microcircuits can reliably encode and replay such sequences of information. To better understand this, a modular attractor memory network is proposed in which meta-stable sequential attractor transitions are learned through changes to synaptic weights and intrinsic excitabilities via the spike-based Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network (BCPNN) learning rule. We find that the formation of distributed memories, embodied by increased periods of firing in pools of excitatory neurons, together with asymmetrical associations between these distinct network states, can be acquired through plasticity. The model’s feasibility is demonstrated using simulations of adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model neurons (AdEx). We show that the learning and speed of sequence replay depends on a confluence of biophysically relevant parameters including stimulus duration, level of background noise, ratio of synaptic currents, and strengths of short-term depression and adaptation. Moreover, sequence elements are shown to flexibly participate multiple times in the sequence, suggesting that spiking attractor networks of this type can support an efficient combinatorial code. The model provides a principled approach towards understanding how multiple interacting plasticity mechanisms can coordinate hetero-associative learning in unison. PMID:27213810

  13. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  14. A Stochastic Spiking Neural Network for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Morro, A; Canals, V; Oliver, A; Alomar, M L; Galan-Prado, F; Ballester, P J; Rossello, J L

    2018-04-01

    Virtual screening (VS) has become a key computational tool in early drug design and screening performance is of high relevance due to the large volume of data that must be processed to identify molecules with the sought activity-related pattern. At the same time, the hardware implementations of spiking neural networks (SNNs) arise as an emerging computing technique that can be applied to parallelize processes that normally present a high cost in terms of computing time and power. Consequently, SNN represents an attractive alternative to perform time-consuming processing tasks, such as VS. In this brief, we present a smart stochastic spiking neural architecture that implements the ultrafast shape recognition (USR) algorithm achieving two order of magnitude of speed improvement with respect to USR software implementations. The neural system is implemented in hardware using field-programmable gate arrays allowing a highly parallelized USR implementation. The results show that, due to the high parallelization of the system, millions of compounds can be checked in reasonable times. From these results, we can state that the proposed architecture arises as a feasible methodology to efficiently enhance time-consuming data-mining processes such as 3-D molecular similarity search.

  15. SPANNER: A Self-Repairing Spiking Neural Network Hardware Architecture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junxiu; Harkin, Jim; Maguire, Liam P; McDaid, Liam J; Wade, John J

    2018-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a glial cell of astrocyte underpins a self-repair mechanism in the human brain, where spiking neurons provide direct and indirect feedbacks to presynaptic terminals. These feedbacks modulate the synaptic transmission probability of release (PR). When synaptic faults occur, the neuron becomes silent or near silent due to the low PR of synapses; whereby the PRs of remaining healthy synapses are then increased by the indirect feedback from the astrocyte cell. In this paper, a novel hardware architecture of Self-rePAiring spiking Neural NEtwoRk (SPANNER) is proposed, which mimics this self-repairing capability in the human brain. This paper demonstrates that the hardware can self-detect and self-repair synaptic faults without the conventional components for the fault detection and fault repairing. Experimental results show that SPANNER can maintain the system performance with fault densities of up to 40%, and more importantly SPANNER has only a 20% performance degradation when the self-repairing architecture is significantly damaged at a fault density of 80%.

  16. Evolving Spiking Neural Networks for Recognition of Aged Voices.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marco; Vellasco, Marley M B R; Cataldo, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The aging of the voice, known as presbyphonia, is a natural process that can cause great change in vocal quality of the individual. This is a relevant problem to those people who use their voices professionally, and its early identification can help determine a suitable treatment to avoid its progress or even to eliminate the problem. This work focuses on the development of a new model for the identification of aging voices (independently of their chronological age), using as input attributes parameters extracted from the voice and glottal signals. The proposed model, named Quantum binary-real evolving Spiking Neural Network (QbrSNN), is based on spiking neural networks (SNNs), with an unsupervised training algorithm, and a Quantum-Inspired Evolutionary Algorithm that automatically determines the most relevant attributes and the optimal parameters that configure the SNN. The QbrSNN model was evaluated in a database composed of 120 records, containing samples from three groups of speakers. The results obtained indicate that the proposed model provides better accuracy than other approaches, with fewer input attributes. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Unifying Mechanistic Model of Selective Attention in Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bobier, Bruce; Stewart, Terrence C.; Eliasmith, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Visuospatial attention produces myriad effects on the activity and selectivity of cortical neurons. Spiking neuron models capable of reproducing a wide variety of these effects remain elusive. We present a model called the Attentional Routing Circuit (ARC) that provides a mechanistic description of selective attentional processing in cortex. The model is described mathematically and implemented at the level of individual spiking neurons, with the computations for performing selective attentional processing being mapped to specific neuron types and laminar circuitry. The model is used to simulate three studies of attention in macaque, and is shown to quantitatively match several observed forms of attentional modulation. Specifically, ARC demonstrates that with shifts of spatial attention, neurons may exhibit shifting and shrinking of receptive fields; increases in responses without changes in selectivity for non-spatial features (i.e. response gain), and; that the effect on contrast-response functions is better explained as a response-gain effect than as contrast-gain. Unlike past models, ARC embodies a single mechanism that unifies the above forms of attentional modulation, is consistent with a wide array of available data, and makes several specific and quantifiable predictions. PMID:24921249

  18. Recurrent Coupling Improves Discrimination of Temporal Spike Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Wei; Leibold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous presence of recurrent synaptic connections in sensory neuronal systems, their general functional purpose is not well understood. A recent conceptual advance has been achieved by theories of reservoir computing in which recurrent networks have been proposed to generate short-term memory as well as to improve neuronal representation of the sensory input for subsequent computations. Here, we present a numerical study on the distinct effects of inhibitory and excitatory recurrence in a canonical linear classification task. It is found that both types of coupling improve the ability to discriminate temporal spike patterns as compared to a purely feed-forward system, although in different ways. For a large class of inhibitory networks, the network’s performance is optimal as long as a fraction of roughly 50% of neurons per stimulus is active in the resulting population code. Thereby the contribution of inactive neurons to the neural code is found to be even more informative than that of the active neurons, generating an inherent robustness of classification performance against temporal jitter of the input spikes. Excitatory couplings are found to not only produce a short-term memory buffer but also to improve linear separability of the population patterns by evoking more irregular firing as compared to the purely inhibitory case. As the excitatory connectivity becomes more sparse, firing becomes more variable, and pattern separability improves. We argue that the proposed paradigm is particularly well-suited as a conceptual framework for processing of sensory information in the auditory pathway. PMID:22586392

  19. Failure tolerance of spike phase synchronization in coupled neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Mahdi

    2011-09-01

    Neuronal synchronization plays an important role in the various functionality of nervous system such as binding, cognition, information processing, and computation. In this paper, we investigated how random and intentional failures in the nodes of a network influence its phase synchronization properties. We considered both artificially constructed networks using models such as preferential attachment, Watts-Strogatz, and Erdős-Rényi as well as a number of real neuronal networks. The failure strategy was either random or intentional based on properties of the nodes such as degree, clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality, and vulnerability. Hindmarsh-Rose model was considered as the mathematical model for the individual neurons, and the phase synchronization of the spike trains was monitored as a function of the percentage/number of removed nodes. The numerical simulations were supplemented by considering coupled non-identical Kuramoto oscillators. Failures based on the clustering coefficient, i.e., removing the nodes with high values of the clustering coefficient, had the least effect on the spike synchrony in all of the networks. This was followed by errors where the nodes were removed randomly. However, the behavior of the other three attack strategies was not uniform across the networks, and different strategies were the most influential in different network structure.

  20. Training Spiking Neural Models Using Artificial Bee Colony

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Roberto A.; Garro, Beatriz A.

    2015-01-01

    Spiking neurons are models designed to simulate, in a realistic manner, the behavior of biological neurons. Recently, it has been proven that this type of neurons can be applied to solve pattern recognition problems with great efficiency. However, the lack of learning strategies for training these models do not allow to use them in several pattern recognition problems. On the other hand, several bioinspired algorithms have been proposed in the last years for solving a broad range of optimization problems, including those related to the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs). Artificial bee colony (ABC) is a novel algorithm based on the behavior of bees in the task of exploring their environment to find a food source. In this paper, we describe how the ABC algorithm can be used as a learning strategy to train a spiking neuron aiming to solve pattern recognition problems. Finally, the proposed approach is tested on several pattern recognition problems. It is important to remark that to realize the powerfulness of this type of model only one neuron will be used. In addition, we analyze how the performance of these models is improved using this kind of learning strategy. PMID:25709644

  1. Converting Static Image Datasets to Spiking Neuromorphic Datasets Using Saccades.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Garrick; Jayawant, Ajinkya; Cohen, Gregory K; Thakor, Nitish

    2015-01-01

    Creating datasets for Neuromorphic Vision is a challenging task. A lack of available recordings from Neuromorphic Vision sensors means that data must typically be recorded specifically for dataset creation rather than collecting and labeling existing data. The task is further complicated by a desire to simultaneously provide traditional frame-based recordings to allow for direct comparison with traditional Computer Vision algorithms. Here we propose a method for converting existing Computer Vision static image datasets into Neuromorphic Vision datasets using an actuated pan-tilt camera platform. Moving the sensor rather than the scene or image is a more biologically realistic approach to sensing and eliminates timing artifacts introduced by monitor updates when simulating motion on a computer monitor. We present conversion of two popular image datasets (MNIST and Caltech101) which have played important roles in the development of Computer Vision, and we provide performance metrics on these datasets using spike-based recognition algorithms. This work contributes datasets for future use in the field, as well as results from spike-based algorithms against which future works can compare. Furthermore, by converting datasets already popular in Computer Vision, we enable more direct comparison with frame-based approaches.

  2. Dynamics of Monoterpene Formation in Spike Lavender Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways was analyzed in spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) on the basis of 13CO2-labelling experiments using wildtype and transgenic plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first and key enzyme of the MVA pathway. The plants were labelled in the presence of 13CO2 in a gas chamber for controlled pulse and chase periods of time. GC/MS and NMR analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor, the major monoterpenes present in their essential oil, indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the MEP pathway. Surprisingly, overexpression of HMGR did not have significant impact upon the crosstalk between the MVA and MEP pathways indicating that the MEP route is the preferred pathway for the synthesis of C5 monoterpene precursors in spike lavender. PMID:29257083

  3. Performance evaluation of PCA-based spike sorting algorithms.

    PubMed

    Adamos, Dimitrios A; Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Theophilidis, George

    2008-09-01

    Deciphering the electrical activity of individual neurons from multi-unit noisy recordings is critical for understanding complex neural systems. A widely used spike sorting algorithm is being evaluated for single-electrode nerve trunk recordings. The algorithm is based on principal component analysis (PCA) for spike feature extraction. In the neuroscience literature it is generally assumed that the use of the first two or most commonly three principal components is sufficient. We estimate the optimum PCA-based feature space by evaluating the algorithm's performance on simulated series of action potentials. A number of modifications are made to the open source nev2lkit software to enable systematic investigation of the parameter space. We introduce a new metric to define clustering error considering over-clustering more favorable than under-clustering as proposed by experimentalists for our data. Both the program patch and the metric are available online. Correlated and white Gaussian noise processes are superimposed to account for biological and artificial jitter in the recordings. We report that the employment of more than three principal components is in general beneficial for all noise cases considered. Finally, we apply our results to experimental data and verify that the sorting process with four principal components is in agreement with a panel of electrophysiology experts.

  4. Transfer of Timing Information from RGC to LGN Spike Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Malvin C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Kaplan, Ehud

    1998-03-01

    We have studied the firing patterns of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their target lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) cells. We find that clusters of spikes in the RGC neural firing pattern appear at the LGN output essentially unchanged, while isolated RGC firing events are more likely to be eliminated; thus the LGN action-potential sequence is therefore not merely a randomly deleted version of the RGC spike train. Employing information-theoretic techniques we developed for point processes,(B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 58, 2656--2659 (1987). we are able to estimate the information efficiency of the LGN neuronal output --- the proportion of the variation in the LGN firing pattern that carries information about its associated RGC input. A suitably modified integrate-and-fire neural model reproduces both the enhanced clustering in the LGN data (which accounts for the increased coefficient of variation) and the measured value of information efficiency, as well as mimicking the results of other observed statistical measures. Reliable information transmission therefore coexists with fractal fluctuations, which appear in RGC and LGN firing patterns.(M. C. Teich, C. Heneghan, S. B. Lowen, T. Ozaki, and E. Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A) 14, 529--546 (1997).

  5. Bistability induces episodic spike communication by inhibitory neurons in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, V B; Asatryan, S Yu

    2011-09-01

    Bistability is one of the important features of nonlinear dynamical systems. In neurodynamics, bistability has been found in basic Hodgkin-Huxley equations describing the cell membrane dynamics. When the neuron is clamped near its threshold, the stable rest potential may coexist with the stable limit cycle describing periodic spiking. However, this effect is often neglected in network computations where the neurons are typically reduced to threshold firing units (e.g., integrate-and-fire models). We found that the bistability may induce spike communication by inhibitory coupled neurons in the spiking network. The communication is realized in the form of episodic discharges with synchronous (correlated) spikes during the episodes. A spiking phase map is constructed to describe the synchronization and to estimate basic spike phase locking modes.

  6. Upregulation of transmitter release probability improves a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into neuronal digital spikes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Action potentials at the neurons and graded signals at the synapses are primary codes in the brain. In terms of their functional interaction, the studies were focused on the influence of presynaptic spike patterns on synaptic activities. How the synapse dynamics quantitatively regulates the encoding of postsynaptic digital spikes remains unclear. We investigated this question at unitary glutamatergic synapses on cortical GABAergic neurons, especially the quantitative influences of release probability on synapse dynamics and neuronal encoding. Glutamate release probability and synaptic strength are proportionally upregulated by presynaptic sequential spikes. The upregulation of release probability and the efficiency of probability-driven synaptic facilitation are strengthened by elevating presynaptic spike frequency and Ca2+. The upregulation of release probability improves spike capacity and timing precision at postsynaptic neuron. These results suggest that the upregulation of presynaptic glutamate release facilitates a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into digital spikes in postsynaptic neurons, i.e., a functional compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. PMID:22852823

  7. Controlling self-sustained spiking activity by adding or removing one network link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kesheng; Huang, Wenwen; Li, Baowen; Dhamala, Mukesh; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-06-01

    Being able to control the neuronal spiking activity in specific brain regions is central to a treatment scheme in several brain disorders such as epileptic seizures, mental depression, and Parkinson's diseases. Here, we present an approach for controlling self-sustained oscillations by adding or removing one directed network link in coupled neuronal oscillators, in contrast to previous approaches of adding stimuli or noise. We find that such networks can exhibit a variety of activity patterns such as on-off switch, sustained spikes, and short-term spikes. We derive the condition for a specific link to be the controller of the on-off effect. A qualitative analysis is provided to facilitate the understanding of the mechanism for spiking activity by adding one link. Our findings represent the first report on generating spike activity with the addition of only one directed link to a network and provide a deeper understanding of the microscopic roots of self-sustained spiking.

  8. On the Spike Train Variability Characterized by Variance-to-Mean Power Relationship.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke

    2015-07-01

    We propose a statistical method for modeling the non-Poisson variability of spike trains observed in a wide range of brain regions. Central to our approach is the assumption that the variance and the mean of interspike intervals are related by a power function characterized by two parameters: the scale factor and exponent. It is shown that this single assumption allows the variability of spike trains to have an arbitrary scale and various dependencies on the firing rate in the spike count statistics, as well as in the interval statistics, depending on the two parameters of the power function. We also propose a statistical model for spike trains that exhibits the variance-to-mean power relationship. Based on this, a maximum likelihood method is developed for inferring the parameters from rate-modulated spike trains. The proposed method is illustrated on simulated and experimental spike trains.

  9. The mechanisms of repetitive spike generation in an axonless retinal interneuron

    PubMed Central

    Cembrowski, Mark S.; Logan, Stephen M.; Tian, Miao; Jia, Li; Li, Wei; Kath, William L.; Riecke, Hermann; Singer, Joshua H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Several types of retinal interneurons exhibit spikes but lack axons. One such neuron is the AII amacrine cell, in which spikes recorded at the soma exhibit small amplitudes (<10 mV) and broad time courses (>5 ms). Here, we used electrophysiological recordings and computational analysis to examine the mechanisms underlying this atypical spiking. We found that somatic spikes likely represent large, brief action potential-like events initiated in a single, electrotonically-distal dendritic compartment. In this same compartment, spiking undergoes slow modulation, likely by an M-type K conductance. The structural correlate of this compartment is a thin neurite that extends from the primary dendritic tree: local application of TTX to this neurite, or excision of it, eliminates spiking. Thus, the physiology of the axonless AII is much more complex than would be anticipated from morphological descriptions and somatic recordings; in particular, the AII possesses a single dendritic structure that controls its firing pattern. PMID:22832164

  10. Did the Cross-spiked Star Appear in Art Due to Telescope Optics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Daniel B.; Hensley, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    Most of early art that still survives shows stars as amorphous blobs or with spikes of no particular geometry. We are investigating the possibility that more recent artistic renditions of stars having dominant crossed spikes originated with the advent of reflecting telescopes with a secondary mirror support spider that causes diffraction spikes, particularly in photographic images. We will report on the conclusions reached so far.

  11. [A wavelet neural network algorithm of EEG signals data compression and spikes recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Liu, A; Yu, K

    1999-06-01

    A novel method of EEG signals compression representation and epileptiform spikes recognition based on wavelet neural network and its algorithm is presented. The wavelet network not only can compress data effectively but also can recover original signal. In addition, the characters of the spikes and the spike-slow rhythm are auto-detected from the time-frequency isoline of EEG signal. This method is well worth using in the field of the electrophysiological signal processing and time-frequency analyzing.

  12. HRLSim: a high performance spiking neural network simulator for GPGPU clusters.

    PubMed

    Minkovich, Kirill; Thibeault, Corey M; O'Brien, Michael John; Nogin, Aleksey; Cho, Youngkwan; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2014-02-01

    Modeling of large-scale spiking neural models is an important tool in the quest to understand brain function and subsequently create real-world applications. This paper describes a spiking neural network simulator environment called HRL Spiking Simulator (HRLSim). This simulator is suitable for implementation on a cluster of general purpose graphical processing units (GPGPUs). Novel aspects of HRLSim are described and an analysis of its performance is provided for various configurations of the cluster. With the advent of inexpensive GPGPU cards and compute power, HRLSim offers an affordable and scalable tool for design, real-time simulation, and analysis of large-scale spiking neural networks.

  13. Exact computation of the maximum-entropy potential of spiking neural-network models.

    PubMed

    Cofré, R; Cessac, B

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how stimuli and synaptic connectivity influence the statistics of spike patterns in neural networks is a central question in computational neuroscience. The maximum-entropy approach has been successfully used to characterize the statistical response of simultaneously recorded spiking neurons responding to stimuli. However, in spite of good performance in terms of prediction, the fitting parameters do not explain the underlying mechanistic causes of the observed correlations. On the other hand, mathematical models of spiking neurons (neuromimetic models) provide a probabilistic mapping between the stimulus, network architecture, and spike patterns in terms of conditional probabilities. In this paper we build an exact analytical mapping between neuromimetic and maximum-entropy models.

  14. Incorporating spike-rate adaptation into a rate code in mathematical and biological neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Bridget N.; Flagg, Lucas Q.; Faggin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    For a slowly varying stimulus, the simplest relationship between a neuron's input and output is a rate code, in which the spike rate is a unique function of the stimulus at that instant. In the case of spike-rate adaptation, there is no unique relationship between input and output, because the spike rate at any time depends both on the instantaneous stimulus and on prior spiking (the “history”). To improve the decoding of spike trains produced by neurons that show spike-rate adaptation, we developed a simple scheme that incorporates “history” into a rate code. We utilized this rate-history code successfully to decode spike trains produced by 1) mathematical models of a neuron in which the mechanism for adaptation (IAHP) is specified, and 2) the gastropyloric receptor (GPR2), a stretch-sensitive neuron in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis, that exhibits long-lasting adaptation of unknown origin. Moreover, when we modified the spike rate either mathematically in a model system or by applying neuromodulatory agents to the experimental system, we found that changes in the rate-history code could be related to the biophysical mechanisms responsible for altering the spiking. PMID:26888106

  15. Multichannel interictal spike activity detection using time-frequency entropy measure.

    PubMed

    Thanaraj, Palani; Parvathavarthini, B

    2017-06-01

    Localization of interictal spikes is an important clinical step in the pre-surgical assessment of pharmacoresistant epileptic patients. The manual selection of interictal spike periods is cumbersome and involves a considerable amount of analysis workload for the physician. The primary focus of this paper is to automate the detection of interictal spikes for clinical applications in epilepsy localization. The epilepsy localization procedure involves detection of spikes in a multichannel EEG epoch. Therefore, a multichannel Time-Frequency (T-F) entropy measure is proposed to extract features related to the interictal spike activity. Least squares support vector machine is used to train the proposed feature to classify the EEG epochs as either normal or interictal spike period. The proposed T-F entropy measure, when validated with epilepsy dataset of 15 patients, shows an interictal spike classification accuracy of 91.20%, sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 84.23%. Moreover, the area under the curve of Receiver Operating Characteristics plot of 0.9339 shows the superior classification performance of the proposed T-F entropy measure. The results of this paper show a good spike detection accuracy without any prior information about the spike morphology.

  16. Multineuron spike train analysis with R-convolution linear combination kernel.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Taro

    2018-06-01

    A spike train kernel provides an effective way of decoding information represented by a spike train. Some spike train kernels have been extended to multineuron spike trains, which are simultaneously recorded spike trains obtained from multiple neurons. However, most of these multineuron extensions were carried out in a kernel-specific manner. In this paper, a general framework is proposed for extending any single-neuron spike train kernel to multineuron spike trains, based on the R-convolution kernel. Special subclasses of the proposed R-convolution linear combination kernel are explored. These subclasses have a smaller number of parameters and make optimization tractable when the size of data is limited. The proposed kernel was evaluated using Gaussian process regression for multineuron spike trains recorded from an animal brain. It was compared with the sum kernel and the population Spikernel, which are existing ways of decoding multineuron spike trains using kernels. The results showed that the proposed approach performs better than these kernels and also other commonly used neural decoding methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Voltage-spike analysis for a free-running parallel inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C. Y.; Wilson, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    Unwanted and sometimes damaging high-amplitude voltage spikes occur during each half cycle in many transistor saturable-core inverters at the moment when the core saturates and the transistors switch. The analysis shows that spikes are an intrinsic characteristic of certain types of inverters even with negligible leakage inductance and purely resistive load. The small but unavoidable after-saturation inductance of the saturable-core transformer plays an essential role in creating these undesired thigh-voltage spikes. State-plane analysis provides insight into the complex interaction between core and transistors, and shows the circuit parameters upon which the magnitude of these spikes depends.

  18. A Spiking Neural Network Model of the Medial Superior Olive Using Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity for Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Glackin, Brendan; Wall, Julie A.; McGinnity, Thomas M.; Maguire, Liam P.; McDaid, Liam J.

    2010-01-01

    Sound localization can be defined as the ability to identify the position of an input sound source and is considered a powerful aspect of mammalian perception. For low frequency sounds, i.e., in the range 270 Hz–1.5 KHz, the mammalian auditory pathway achieves this by extracting the Interaural Time Difference between sound signals being received by the left and right ear. This processing is performed in a region of the brain known as the Medial Superior Olive (MSO). This paper presents a Spiking Neural Network (SNN) based model of the MSO. The network model is trained using the Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity learning rule using experimentally observed Head Related Transfer Function data in an adult domestic cat. The results presented demonstrate how the proposed SNN model is able to perform sound localization with an accuracy of 91.82% when an error tolerance of ±10° is used. For angular resolutions down to 2.5°, it will be demonstrated how software based simulations of the model incur significant computation times. The paper thus also addresses preliminary implementation on a Field Programmable Gate Array based hardware platform to accelerate system performance. PMID:20802855

  19. Streptozotocin-Induced Autophagy Reduces Intracellular Insulin in Insulinoma INS-1E Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Park, Yung Chul

    2018-03-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ), a glucose analog, induces diabetes in experimental animals by inducing preferential cytotoxicity in pancreatic beta cells. We investigated whether STZ reduced the production of intracellular insulin through autophagy in insulinoma INS-1E cells. Typically, 2 mM STZ treatment for 24 h significantly decreased cell survival. STZ treatment led to significant decrease in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) level; reduction in levels of phospho-protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α); significant reduction in levels of p85α, p110, phospho-serine and threonine kinase/protein kinase B (p-Akt/PKB) (Ser473), phospho-extracellular-regulated kinase (p-ERK), and phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR); increase in levels of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), Mn-SOD, and catalase; decrease in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression; increase in Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) expression; increase in levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and Beclin 1; and reduction in production of intracellular insulin. These results suggest that insulin synthesis during STZ treatment involves autophagy in INS-1E cells and, subsequently, results in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin.

  20. Quiet Spike Build-Up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center uses a modified F-15B (836) aircraft as a testbed for a variety of flight research:experiments mounted underneath the aircraft fuselage. The F-15B was selected to fly Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation's (GAC)QuietSpike(TM)(QS) project; however, this experiment is very unique and unlike any of the previous testbed experiments flown on the F-15B. It involves the addition of a relatively long quiet spike boom attached to the radar bulkhead of the aircraft. This QS experiment is a stepping stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate sonic born strength of business jets over land. The QS boom is a concept in Which an aircraft's front-end would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing would effectively lengthen the aircraft, reducing peak sonic boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, non-coalescing shocklets. Prior to flying the Quietspike(TM) experiment on the F-15B aircraft several ground vibration tests (GVT) were required in order to understand the QS modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B. However, due to the project's late hardware delivery of the QS and the intense schedule, a "traditional" GVT of the mated F-1513 Quietspike(tm) ready-for-flight configuration would not have left sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. The objective of the QuietSpike (TM) build-up ground testing approach was to ultimately obtain confidence in the F-15B Quietspike(TM) finite element model (FEM) to be used for the flutter analysis. In order to obtain the F15B QS FEM with reliable foundation stiffness between the QS and the F-15B radar bulkhead as well as QS modal characteristics, several different GVT configurations were performed. EAch of the four GVT's performed had a

  1. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; ...

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated

  2. Shock initiation of explosives: Temperature spikes and growth spurts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-08-01

    When energetic materials are subjected to high-velocity impacts, the first steps in the shock-to-detonation transition are the creation, ignition, and growth of hot spots. We used 1-3.2 km s-1 laser-launched flyer plates to impact powdered octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine, a powerful explosive, and monitored hundreds of emission bursts with an apparatus that determined temperature and emissivity at all times. The time-dependent volume fraction of hot spots was determined by measuring the time-dependent emissivity. After the shock, most hot spots extinguished, but the survivors smoldered for hundreds of nanoseconds until their temperatures spiked, causing a hot spot growth spurt. Depending on the impact duration, the growth spurts could be as fast as 300 ns and as slow as 13 μs.

  3. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobley, R. A.; Hayat, H.; Wright, C. D.

    2018-05-01

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  4. From wheels to wings with evolutionary spiking circuits.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Zufferey, Jean-Christophe; Nicoud, Jean-Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We give an overview of the EPFL indoor flying project, whose goal is to evolve neural controllers for autonomous, adaptive, indoor micro-flyers. Indoor flight is still a challenge because it requires miniaturization, energy efficiency, and control of nonlinear flight dynamics. This ongoing project consists of developing a flying, vision-based micro-robot, a bio-inspired controller composed of adaptive spiking neurons directly mapped into digital microcontrollers, and a method to evolve such a neural controller without human intervention. This article describes the motivation and methodology used to reach our goal as well as the results of a number of preliminary experiments on vision-based wheeled and flying robots.

  5. Quantum square-well with logarithmic central spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znojil, Miloslav; Semorádová, Iveta

    2018-01-01

    Singular repulsive barrier V (x) = -gln(|x|) inside a square-well is interpreted and studied as a linear analog of the state-dependent interaction ℒeff(x) = -gln[ψ∗(x)ψ(x)] in nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In the linearized case, Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory is shown to provide a closed-form spectrum at sufficiently small g or after an amendment of the unperturbed Hamiltonian. At any spike strength g, the model remains solvable numerically, by the matching of wave functions. Analytically, the singularity is shown regularized via the change of variables x = expy which interchanges the roles of the asymptotic and central boundary conditions.

  6. Spiking neural networks on high performance computer clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Taha, Tarek M.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we examine the acceleration of two spiking neural network models on three clusters of multicore processors representing three categories of processors: x86, STI Cell, and NVIDIA GPGPUs. The x86 cluster utilized consists of 352 dualcore AMD Opterons, the Cell cluster consists of 320 Sony Playstation 3s, while the GPGPU cluster contains 32 NVIDIA Tesla S1070 systems. The results indicate that the GPGPU platform can dominate in performance compared to the Cell and x86 platforms examined. From a cost perspective, the GPGPU is more expensive in terms of neuron/s throughput. If the cost of GPGPUs go down in the future, this platform will become very cost effective for these models.

  7. Brian: a simulator for spiking neural networks in python.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Dan; Brette, Romain

    2008-01-01

    "Brian" is a new simulator for spiking neural networks, written in Python (http://brian. di.ens.fr). It is an intuitive and highly flexible tool for rapidly developing new models, especially networks of single-compartment neurons. In addition to using standard types of neuron models, users can define models by writing arbitrary differential equations in ordinary mathematical notation. Python scientific libraries can also be used for defining models and analysing data. Vectorisation techniques allow efficient simulations despite the overheads of an interpreted language. Brian will be especially valuable for working on non-standard neuron models not easily covered by existing software, and as an alternative to using Matlab or C for simulations. With its easy and intuitive syntax, Brian is also very well suited for teaching computational neuroscience.

  8. Importance of vesicle release stochasticity in neuro-spike communication.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Hamideh; Akan, Ozgur B

    2017-07-01

    Aim of this paper is proposing a stochastic model for vesicle release process, a part of neuro-spike communication. Hence, we study biological events occurring in this process and use microphysiological simulations to observe functionality of these events. Since the most important source of variability in vesicle release probability is opening of voltage dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) followed by influx of calcium ions through these channels, we propose a stochastic model for this event, while using a deterministic model for other variability sources. To capture the stochasticity of calcium influx to pre-synaptic neuron in our model, we study its statistics and find that it can be modeled by a distribution defined based on Normal and Logistic distributions.

  9. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks.

  10. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron.

    PubMed

    Cobley, R A; Hayat, H; Wright, C D

    2018-05-11

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  11. Screening Fluorescent Voltage Indicators with Spontaneously Spiking HEK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Kralj, Joel M.; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    Development of improved fluorescent voltage indicators is a key challenge in neuroscience, but progress has been hampered by the low throughput of patch-clamp characterization. We introduce a line of non-fluorescent HEK cells that stably express NaV 1.3 and KIR 2.1 and generate spontaneous electrical action potentials. These cells enable rapid, electrode-free screening of speed and sensitivity of voltage sensitive dyes or fluorescent proteins on a standard fluorescence microscope. We screened a small library of mutants of archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) in spiking HEK cells and identified two mutants with greater voltage-sensitivity than found in previously published Arch voltage indicators. PMID:24391999

  12. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns.

  13. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns. PMID:26900845

  14. Extracting information in spike time patterns with wavelets and information theory.

    PubMed

    Lopes-dos-Santos, Vítor; Panzeri, Stefano; Kayser, Christoph; Diamond, Mathew E; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method to assess the information carried by temporal patterns in spike trains. The method first performs a wavelet decomposition of the spike trains, then uses Shannon information to select a subset of coefficients carrying information, and finally assesses timing information in terms of decoding performance: the ability to identify the presented stimuli from spike train patterns. We show that the method allows: 1) a robust assessment of the information carried by spike time patterns even when this is distributed across multiple time scales and time points; 2) an effective denoising of the raster plots that improves the estimate of stimulus tuning of spike trains; and 3) an assessment of the information carried by temporally coordinated spikes across neurons. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that the Wavelet-Information (WI) method performs better and is more robust to spike time-jitter, background noise, and sample size than well-established approaches, such as principal component analysis, direct estimates of information from digitized spike trains, or a metric-based method. Furthermore, when applied to real spike trains from monkey auditory cortex and from rat barrel cortex, the WI method allows extracting larger amounts of spike timing information. Importantly, the fact that the WI method incorporates multiple time scales makes it robust to the choice of partly arbitrary parameters such as temporal resolution, response window length, number of response features considered, and the number of available trials. These results highlight the potential of the proposed method for accurate and objective assessments of how spike timing encodes information. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Axonal propagation of simple and complex spikes in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Zayd M; Raman, Indira M

    2005-01-12

    In cerebellar Purkinje neurons, the reliability of propagation of high-frequency simple spikes and spikelets of complex spikes is likely to regulate inhibition of Purkinje target neurons. To test the extent to which a one-to-one correspondence exists between somatic and axonal spikes, we made dual somatic and axonal recordings from Purkinje neurons in mouse cerebellar slices. Somatic action potentials were recorded with a whole-cell pipette, and the corresponding axonal signals were recorded extracellularly with a loose-patch pipette. Propagation of spontaneous and evoked simple spikes was highly reliable. At somatic firing rates of approximately 200 spikes/sec, <10% of spikes failed to propagate, with failures becoming more frequent only at maximal somatic firing rates (approximately 260 spikes/sec). Complex spikes were elicited by climbing fiber stimulation, and their somatic waveforms were modulated by tonic current injection, as well as by paired stimulation to depress the underlying EPSCs. Across conditions, the mean number of propagating action potentials remained just above two spikes per climbing fiber stimulation, but the instantaneous frequency of the propagating spikes changed, from approximately 375 Hz during somatic hyperpolarizations that silenced spontaneous firing to approximately 150 Hz during spontaneous activity. The probability of propagation of individual spikelets could be described quantitatively as a saturating function of spikelet amplitude, rate of rise, or preceding interspike interval. The results suggest that ion channels of Purkinje axons are adapted to produce extremely short refractory periods and that brief bursts of forward-propagating action potentials generated by complex spikes may contribute transiently to inhibition of postsynaptic neurons.

  16. Rebound spiking in layer II medial entorhinal cortex stellate cells: Possible mechanism of grid cell function

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Christopher F.; Ferrante, Michele; Chapman, G. William; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Rebound spiking properties of medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) stellate cells induced by inhibition may underlie their functional properties in awake behaving rats, including the temporal phase separation of distinct grid cells and differences in grid cell firing properties. We investigated rebound spiking properties using whole cell patch recording in entorhinal slices, holding cells near spiking threshold and delivering sinusoidal inputs, superimposed with realistic inhibitory synaptic inputs to test the capacity of cells to selectively respond to specific phases of inhibitory input. Stellate cells showed a specific phase range of hyperpolarizing inputs that elicited spiking, but non-stellate cells did not show phase specificity. In both cell types, the phase range of spiking output occurred between the peak and subsequent descending zero crossing of the sinusoid. The phases of inhibitory inputs that induced spikes shifted earlier as the baseline sinusoid frequency increased, while spiking output shifted to later phases. Increases in magnitude of the inhibitory inputs shifted the spiking output to earlier phases. Pharmacological blockade of h-current abolished the phase selectivity of hyperpolarizing inputs eliciting spikes. A network computational model using cells possessing similar rebound properties as found in vitro produces spatially periodic firing properties resembling grid cell firing when a simulated animal moves along a linear track. These results suggest that the ability of mEC stellate cells to fire rebound spikes in response to a specific range of phases of inhibition could support complex attractor dynamics that provide completion and separation to maintain spiking activity of specific grid cell populations. PMID:26385258

  17. Stimulus-dependent spiking relationships with the EEG

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The development and refinement of noninvasive techniques for imaging neural activity is of paramount importance for human neuroscience. Currently, the most accessible and popular technique is electroencephalography (EEG). However, nearly all of what we know about the neural events that underlie EEG signals is based on inference, because of the dearth of studies that have simultaneously paired EEG recordings with direct recordings of single neurons. From the perspective of electrophysiologists there is growing interest in understanding how spiking activity coordinates with large-scale cortical networks. Evidence from recordings at both scales highlights that sensory neurons operate in very distinct states during spontaneous and visually evoked activity, which appear to form extremes in a continuum of coordination in neural networks. We hypothesized that individual neurons have idiosyncratic relationships to large-scale network activity indexed by EEG signals, owing to the neurons' distinct computational roles within the local circuitry. We tested this by recording neuronal populations in visual area V4 of rhesus macaques while we simultaneously recorded EEG. We found substantial heterogeneity in the timing and strength of spike-EEG relationships and that these relationships became more diverse during visual stimulation compared with the spontaneous state. The visual stimulus apparently shifts V4 neurons from a state in which they are relatively uniformly embedded in large-scale network activity to a state in which their distinct roles within the local population are more prominent, suggesting that the specific way in which individual neurons relate to EEG signals may hold clues regarding their computational roles. PMID:26108954

  18. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network.

    PubMed

    Casellato, Claudia; Antonietti, Alberto; Garrido, Jesus A; Carrillo, Richard R; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in a large number of different neural processes, especially in associative learning and in fine motor control. To develop a comprehensive theory of sensorimotor learning and control, it is crucial to determine the neural basis of coding and plasticity embedded into the cerebellar neural circuit and how they are translated into behavioral outcomes in learning paradigms. Learning has to be inferred from the interaction of an embodied system with its real environment, and the same cerebellar principles derived from cell physiology have to be able to drive a variety of tasks of different nature, calling for complex timing and movement patterns. We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. Encoding and decoding strategies based on neuronal firing rates were applied. Adaptive motor control protocols with acquisition and extinction phases have been designed and tested, including an associative Pavlovian task (Eye blinking classical conditioning), a vestibulo-ocular task and a perturbed arm reaching task operating in closed-loop. The SNN processed in real-time mossy fiber inputs as arbitrary contextual signals, irrespective of whether they conveyed a tone, a vestibular stimulus or the position of a limb. A bidirectional long-term plasticity rule implemented at parallel fibers-Purkinje cell synapses modulated the output activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei. In all tasks, the neurorobot learned to adjust timing and gain of the motor responses by tuning its output discharge. It succeeded in reproducing how human biological systems acquire, extinguish and express knowledge of a noisy and changing world. By varying stimuli and perturbations patterns, real-time control robustness and generalizability were validated. The implicit spiking dynamics of the cerebellar model fulfill timing, prediction and learning functions.

  19. Neuro-inspired spike-based motion: from dynamic vision sensor to robot motor open-loop control through spike-VITE.

    PubMed

    Perez-Peña, Fernando; Morgado-Estevez, Arturo; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Lopez-Coronado, Juan

    2013-11-20

    In this paper we present a complete spike-based architecture: from a Dynamic Vision Sensor (retina) to a stereo head robotic platform. The aim of this research is to reproduce intended movements performed by humans taking into account as many features as possible from the biological point of view. This paper fills the gap between current spike silicon sensors and robotic actuators by applying a spike processing strategy to the data flows in real time. The architecture is divided into layers: the retina, visual information processing, the trajectory generator layer which uses a neuroinspired algorithm (SVITE) that can be replicated into as many times as DoF the robot has; and finally the actuation layer to supply the spikes to the robot (using PFM). All the layers do their tasks in a spike-processing mode, and they communicate each other through the neuro-inspired AER protocol. The open-loop controller is implemented on FPGA using AER interfaces developed by RTC Lab. Experimental results reveal the viability of this spike-based controller. Two main advantages are: low hardware resources (2% of a Xilinx Spartan 6) and power requirements (3.4 W) to control a robot with a high number of DoF (up to 100 for a Xilinx Spartan 6). It also evidences the suitable use of AER as a communication protocol between processing and actuation.

  20. Neuro-Inspired Spike-Based Motion: From Dynamic Vision Sensor to Robot Motor Open-Loop Control through Spike-VITE

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Peña, Fernando; Morgado-Estevez, Arturo; Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Fernandez, Angel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Francisco; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Lopez-Coronado, Juan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a complete spike-based architecture: from a Dynamic Vision Sensor (retina) to a stereo head robotic platform. The aim of this research is to reproduce intended movements performed by humans taking into account as many features as possible from the biological point of view. This paper fills the gap between current spike silicon sensors and robotic actuators by applying a spike processing strategy to the data flows in real time. The architecture is divided into layers: the retina, visual information processing, the trajectory generator layer which uses a neuroinspired algorithm (SVITE) that can be replicated into as many times as DoF the robot has; and finally the actuation layer to supply the spikes to the robot (using PFM). All the layers do their tasks in a spike-processing mode, and they communicate each other through the neuro-inspired AER protocol. The open-loop controller is implemented on FPGA using AER interfaces developed by RTC Lab. Experimental results reveal the viability of this spike-based controller. Two main advantages are: low hardware resources (2% of a Xilinx Spartan 6) and power requirements (3.4 W) to control a robot with a high number of DoF (up to 100 for a Xilinx Spartan 6). It also evidences the suitable use of AER as a communication protocol between processing and actuation. PMID:24264330

  1. EVALUATION OF SPIKING PROCEDURES FOR RECOVERY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM IN STREAM WATERS USING USEPA METHOD 1623

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 1623 is widely used to monitor source waters and drinking water supplies for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Analyzing matrix spikes is an important component of Method 1623. Matrix spikes are used to determine the effect of the environmental...

  2. Reconstruction of audio waveforms from spike trains of artificial cochlea models

    PubMed Central

    Zai, Anja T.; Bhargava, Saurabh; Mesgarani, Nima; Liu, Shih-Chii

    2015-01-01

    Spiking cochlea models describe the analog processing and spike generation process within the biological cochlea. Reconstructing the audio input from the artificial cochlea spikes is therefore useful for understanding the fidelity of the information preserved in the spikes. The reconstruction process is challenging particularly for spikes from the mixed signal (analog/digital) integrated circuit (IC) cochleas because of multiple non-linearities in the model and the additional variance caused by random transistor mismatch. This work proposes an offline method for reconstructing the audio input from spike responses of both a particular spike-based hardware model called the AEREAR2 cochlea and an equivalent software cochlea model. This method was previously used to reconstruct the auditory stimulus based on the peri-stimulus histogram of spike responses recorded in the ferret auditory cortex. The reconstructed audio from the hardware cochlea is evaluated against an analogous software model using objective measures of speech quality and intelligibility; and further tested in a word recognition task. The reconstructed audio under low signal-to-noise (SNR) conditions (SNR < –5 dB) gives a better classification performance than the original SNR input in this word recognition task. PMID:26528113

  3. NASA's F-15B testbed aircraft with Gulfstream Quiet Spike sonic boom mitigator attached

    2006-07-06

    Gulfstream Aerospace and NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are testing the structural integrity of a telescopic 'Quiet Spike' sonic boom mitigator on the F-15B testbed. The Quiet Spike was developed as a means of controlling and reducing the sonic boom caused by an aircraft 'breaking' the sound barrier.

  4. Automated Epileptiform Spike Detection via Affinity Propagation-Based Template Matching

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jin, Jing; Dauwels, Justin; Cash, Sydney S.; Westover, M. Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Interictal epileptiform spikes are the key diagnostic biomarkers for epilepsy. The clinical gold standard of spike detection is visual inspection performed by neurologists. This is a tedious, time-consuming, and expert-centered process. The development of automated spike detection systems is necessary in order to provide a faster and more reliable diagnosis of epilepsy. In this paper, we propose an efficient template matching spike detector based on a combination of spike and background waveform templates. We generate a template library by clustering a collection of spikes and background waveforms extracted from a database of 50 patients with epilepsy. We benchmark the performance of five clustering techniques based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. In addition, background templates are integrated with existing spike templates to improve the overall performance. The affinity propagation-based template matching system with a combination of spike and background templates is shown to outperform the other four conventional methods with the highest area-under-curve (AUC) of 0.953. PMID:29060543

  5. The Effect of Neural Noise on Spike Time Precision in a Detailed CA3 Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuriscak, Eduard; Marsalek, Petr; Stroffek, Julius; Wünsch, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies emphasize the role of the millisecond precision of neuronal spike times as an important coding mechanism for transmitting and representing information in the central nervous system. We investigate the spike time precision of a multicompartmental pyramidal neuron model of the CA3 region of the hippocampus under the influence of various sources of neuronal noise. We describe differences in the contribution to noise originating from voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic vesicle release, and vesicle quantal size. We analyze the effect of interspike intervals and the voltage course preceding the firing of spikes on the spike-timing jitter. The main finding of this study is the ranking of different noise sources according to their contribution to spike time precision. The most influential is synaptic vesicle release noise, causing the spike jitter to vary from 1 ms to 7 ms of a mean value 2.5 ms. Of second importance was the noise incurred by vesicle quantal size variation causing the spike time jitter to vary from 0.03 ms to 0.6 ms. Least influential was the voltage-gated channel noise generating spike jitter from 0.02 ms to 0.15 ms. PMID:22778784

  6. Spike Lee and Commentaries on His Work. Occasional Papers Series 2, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Herman C., Ed.

    This monograph presents a critical essay and a comprehensive 454-item bibliography on the contemporary African-American filmmaker, Spike Lee. The essay, entitled "African-American Folklore and Cultural History in the Films of Spike Lee" (Gloria J. Gibson-Hudson), analyzes Lee's filmmaking approach from a cultural and historical…

  7. Development of on-off spiking in superior paraolivary nucleus neurons of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Richard A.; Vonderschen, Katrin; Berrebi, Albert S.

    2013-01-01

    The superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON) is a prominent cell group in the auditory brain stem that has been increasingly implicated in representing temporal sound structure. Although SPON neurons selectively respond to acoustic signals important for sound periodicity, the underlying physiological specializations enabling these responses are poorly understood. We used in vitro and in vivo recordings to investigate how SPON neurons develop intrinsic cellular properties that make them well suited for encoding temporal sound features. In addition to their hallmark rebound spiking at the stimulus offset, SPON neurons were characterized by spiking patterns termed onset, adapting, and burst in response to depolarizing stimuli in vitro. Cells with burst spiking had some morphological differences compared with other SPON neurons and were localized to the dorsolateral region of the nucleus. Both membrane and spiking properties underwent strong developmental regulation, becoming more temporally precise with age for both onset and offset spiking. Single-unit recordings obtained in young mice demonstrated that SPON neurons respond with temporally precise onset spiking upon tone stimulation in vivo, in addition to the typical offset spiking. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that SPON neurons develop sharp on-off spiking, which may confer sensitivity to sound amplitude modulations or abrupt sound transients. These findings are consistent with the proposed involvement of the SPON in the processing of temporal sound structure, relevant for encoding communication cues. PMID:23515791

  8. Reduced Spiking in Entorhinal Cortex during the Delay Period of a Cued Spatial Response Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Kishan; Keller, Lauren A.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic persistent spiking mechanisms in medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) neurons may play a role in active maintenance of working memory. However, electrophysiological studies of rat mEC units have primarily focused on spatial modulation. We sought evidence of differential spike rates in the mEC in rats trained on a T-maze, cued spatial delayed…

  9. Neuronal Networks in Children with Continuous Spikes and Waves during Slow Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M.; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least greater than 85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and…

  10. Characterizing neural activities evoked by manual acupuncture through spiking irregularity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ming; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Yu, Hai-Tao; Chen, Ying-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    The neural system characterizes information in external stimulations by different spiking patterns. In order to examine how neural spiking patterns are related to acupuncture manipulations, experiments are designed in such a way that different types of manual acupuncture (MA) manipulations are taken at the ‘Zusanli’ point of experimental rats, and the induced electrical signals in the spinal dorsal root ganglion are detected and recorded. The interspike interval (ISI) statistical histogram is fitted by the gamma distribution, which has two parameters: one is the time-dependent firing rate and the other is a shape parameter characterizing the spiking irregularities. The shape parameter is the measure of spiking irregularities and can be used to identify the type of MA manipulations. The coefficient of variation is mostly used to measure the spike time irregularity, but it overestimates the irregularity in the case of pronounced firing rate changes. However, experiments show that each acupuncture manipulation will lead to changes in the firing rate. So we combine four relatively rate-independent measures to study the irregularity of spike trains evoked by different types of MA manipulations. Results suggest that the MA manipulations possess unique spiking statistics and characteristics and can be distinguished according to the spiking irregularity measures. These studies have offered new insights into the coding processes and information transfer of acupuncture.

  11. Testing of information condensation in a model reverberating spiking neural network.

    PubMed

    Vidybida, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    Information about external world is delivered to the brain in the form of structured in time spike trains. During further processing in higher areas, information is subjected to a certain condensation process, which results in formation of abstract conceptual images of external world, apparently, represented as certain uniform spiking activity partially independent on the input spike trains details. Possible physical mechanism of condensation at the level of individual neuron was discussed recently. In a reverberating spiking neural network, due to this mechanism the dynamics should settle down to the same uniform/ periodic activity in response to a set of various inputs. Since the same periodic activity may correspond to different input spike trains, we interpret this as possible candidate for information condensation mechanism in a network. Our purpose is to test this possibility in a network model consisting of five fully connected neurons, particularly, the influence of geometric size of the network, on its ability to condense information. Dynamics of 20 spiking neural networks of different geometric sizes are modelled by means of computer simulation. Each network was propelled into reverberating dynamics by applying various initial input spike trains. We run the dynamics until it becomes periodic. The Shannon's formula is used to calculate the amount of information in any input spike train and in any periodic state found. As a result, we obtain explicit estimate of the degree of information condensation in the networks, and conclude that it depends strongly on the net's geometric size.

  12. A case for spiking neural network simulation based on configurable multiple-FPGA systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shufan; Wu, Qiang; Li, Renfa

    2011-09-01

    Recent neuropsychological research has begun to reveal that neurons encode information in the timing of spikes. Spiking neural network simulations are a flexible and powerful method for investigating the behaviour of neuronal systems. Simulation of the spiking neural networks in software is unable to rapidly generate output spikes in large-scale of neural network. An alternative approach, hardware implementation of such system, provides the possibility to generate independent spikes precisely and simultaneously output spike waves in real time, under the premise that spiking neural network can take full advantage of hardware inherent parallelism. We introduce a configurable FPGA-oriented hardware platform for spiking neural network simulation in this work. We aim to use this platform to combine the speed of dedicated hardware with the programmability of software so that it might allow neuroscientists to put together sophisticated computation experiments of their own model. A feed-forward hierarchy network is developed as a case study to describe the operation of biological neural systems (such as orientation selectivity of visual cortex) and computational models of such systems. This model demonstrates how a feed-forward neural network constructs the circuitry required for orientation selectivity and provides platform for reaching a deeper understanding of the primate visual system. In the future, larger scale models based on this framework can be used to replicate the actual architecture in visual cortex, leading to more detailed predictions and insights into visual perception phenomenon.

  13. A Visual Guide to Sorting Electrophysiological Recordings Using 'SpikeSorter'.

    PubMed

    Swindale, Nicholas V; Mitelut, Catalin; Murphy, Timothy H; Spacek, Martin A

    2017-02-10

    Few stand-alone software applications are available for sorting spikes from recordings made with multi-electrode arrays. Ideally, an application should be user friendly with a graphical user interface, able to read data files in a variety of formats, and provide users with a flexible set of tools giving them the ability to detect and sort extracellular voltage waveforms from different units with some degree of reliability. Previously published spike sorting methods are now available in a software program, SpikeSorter, intended to provide electrophysiologists with a complete set of tools for sorting, starting from raw recorded data file and ending with the export of sorted spikes times. Procedures are automated to the extent this is currently possible. The article explains and illustrates the use of the program. A representative data file is opened, extracellular traces are filtered, events are detected and then clustered. A number of problems that commonly occur during sorting are illustrated, including the artefactual over-splitting of units due to the tendency of some units to fire spikes in pairs where the second spike is significantly smaller than the first, and over-splitting caused by slow variation in spike height over time encountered in some units. The accuracy of SpikeSorter's performance has been tested with surrogate ground truth data and found to be comparable to that of other algorithms in current development.

  14. Network rhythms influence the relationship between spike-triggered local field potential and functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Maunsell, John H.R.

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the functional connectivity between neurons is key for understanding brain function. We recorded spikes and local field potentials (LFP) from multi-electrode arrays implanted in monkey visual cortex to test the hypotheses that spikes generated outward traveling LFP waves and the strength of functional connectivity depended on stimulus contrast, as described recently. These hypotheses were proposed based on the observation that the latency of the peak negativity of the spike-triggered LFP average (STA) increased with distance between the spike and LFP electrodes, and the magnitude of the STA negativity and the distance over which it was observed decreased with increasing stimulus contrast. Detailed analysis of the shape of the STA, however, revealed contributions from two distinct sources – a transient negativity in the LFP locked to the spike (∼0 ms) that attenuated rapidly with distance, and a low frequency rhythm with peak negativity ∼25 ms after the spike that attenuated slowly with distance. The overall negative peak of the LFP, which combined both these components, shifted from ∼0 to ∼25 ms going from electrodes near the spike to electrodes far from the spike, giving an impression of a traveling wave, although the shift was fully explained by changing contributions from the two fixed components. The low frequency rhythm was attenuated during stimulus presentations, decreasing the overall magnitude of the STA. These results highlight the importance of accounting for the network activity while using STAs to determine functional connectivity. PMID:21880928

  15. A Markovian event-based framework for stochastic spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Touboul, Jonathan D; Faugeras, Olivier D

    2011-11-01

    In spiking neural networks, the information is conveyed by the spike times, that depend on the intrinsic dynamics of each neuron, the input they receive and on the connections between neurons. In this article we study the Markovian nature of the sequence of spike times in stochastic neural networks, and in particular the ability to deduce from a spike train the next spike time, and therefore produce a description of the network activity only based on the spike times regardless of the membrane potential process. To study this question in a rigorous manner, we introduce and study an event-based description of networks of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons, i.e. that is based on the computation of the spike times. We show that the firing times of the neurons in the networks constitute a Markov chain, whose transition probability is related to the probability distribution of the interspike interval of the neurons in the network. In the cases where the Markovian model can be developed, the transition probability is explicitly derived in such classical cases of neural networks as the linear integrate-and-fire neuron models with excitatory and inhibitory interactions, for different types of synapses, possibly featuring noisy synaptic integration, transmission delays and absolute and relative refractory period. This covers most of the cases that have been investigated in the event-based description of spiking deterministic neural networks.

  16. Drought Response in the Spikes of Barley: Gene Expression in the Lemma, Palea, Awn, and Seed

    The photosynthetic organs of the barley spike (lemma, palea, and awn) are considered resistant to drought. This is a beneficial trait because they can sustain grain-filling when drought occurs at the reproductive stage. However, there is little information about gene expression in the spike organs u...

  17. Relationship between focal penicillin spikes and cortical spindles in the cerveau isolé cat.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, R S; Kaibara, M; Girvin, J P

    1983-01-01

    Using the unanesthetized, cerveau isolé preparation in the cat, the association between artificially induced penicillin (PCN) spikes and spontaneously occurring electrocorticographic (ECoG) spindles was investigated. Spikes were elicited by surface application of small pledgets of PCN. After the application of PCN, there was a decrease in spindle amplitude but no change in frequency, duration, or spindle wave frequency in the area of the focus. Examination of the times of occurrence of the spikes and spindles disclosed that in the majority of cases, within a few minutes of the initiation of the foci, there was very high simultaneity, usually 100% between the occurrences of these two events. Examination of the times of occurrence of the spikes within the ECoG spindles failed to disclose any compelling evidence which would favor either the hypothesis that spikes "trigger" spindles or the hypothesis that spindles predispose to focal spikes. Thus, whether spikes trigger spindles, or spikes simply occur in a nonspecific manner during the occurrence of the spindle, or whether it is a combination of both these explanations, must remain an open question on the basis of the data available.

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Spikes data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 17 pesticides in 12 control samples (spikes) from 11 households. Measurements were made in samples of blood serum. Controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from a sample m...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spikes data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 metals in 71 control samples (spikes) from 47 households. Measurements were made in samples of indoor and outdoor air, blood, and urine. Controls were used to assess recovery of target anal...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Spikes data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 17 pesticides in 12 control samples (spikes) from 11 households. Measurements were made in samples of blood serum. Controls were used to assess recovery of target analytes from a sample m...

  1. MicroRNA172 plays a critical role in wheat spike morphogenesis and grain threshability

    Wheat domestication from wild species involved mutations in the Q gene. The q allele (wild wheats) is associated with elongated spikes and hulled grains, whereas the mutant Q allele (domesticated wheats) confers subcompact spikes and free-threshing grains. Previous studies showed that Q encodes an ...

  2. Conduction Delay Learning Model for Unsupervised and Supervised Classification of Spatio-Temporal Spike Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Precise spike timing is considered to play a fundamental role in communications and signal processing in biological neural networks. Understanding the mechanism of spike timing adjustment would deepen our understanding of biological systems and enable advanced engineering applications such as efficient computational architectures. However, the biological mechanisms that adjust and maintain spike timing remain unclear. Existing algorithms adopt a supervised approach, which adjusts the axonal conduction delay and synaptic efficacy until the spike timings approximate the desired timings. This study proposes a spike timing-dependent learning model that adjusts the axonal conduction delay and synaptic efficacy in both unsupervised and supervised manners. The proposed learning algorithm approximates the Expectation-Maximization algorithm, and classifies the input data encoded into spatio-temporal spike patterns. Even in the supervised classification, the algorithm requires no external spikes indicating the desired spike timings unlike existing algorithms. Furthermore, because the algorithm is consistent with biological models and hypotheses found in existing biological studies, it could capture the mechanism underlying biological delay learning. PMID:29209191

  3. Conduction Delay Learning Model for Unsupervised and Supervised Classification of Spatio-Temporal Spike Patterns.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Precise spike timing is considered to play a fundamental role in communications and signal processing in biological neural networks. Understanding the mechanism of spike timing adjustment would deepen our understanding of biological systems and enable advanced engineering applications such as efficient computational architectures. However, the biological mechanisms that adjust and maintain spike timing remain unclear. Existing algorithms adopt a supervised approach, which adjusts the axonal conduction delay and synaptic efficacy until the spike timings approximate the desired timings. This study proposes a spike timing-dependent learning model that adjusts the axonal conduction delay and synaptic efficacy in both unsupervised and supervised manners. The proposed learning algorithm approximates the Expectation-Maximization algorithm, and classifies the input data encoded into spatio-temporal spike patterns. Even in the supervised classification, the algorithm requires no external spikes indicating the desired spike timings unlike existing algorithms. Furthermore, because the algorithm is consistent with biological models and hypotheses found in existing biological studies, it could capture the mechanism underlying biological delay learning.

  4. Spatiotemporal Spike Coding of Behavioral Adaptation in the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Logiaco, Laureline; Quilodran, René; Procyk, Emmanuel; Arleo, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The frontal cortex controls behavioral adaptation in environments governed by complex rules. Many studies have established the relevance of firing rate modulation after informative events signaling whether and how to update the behavioral policy. However, whether the spatiotemporal features of these neuronal activities contribute to encoding imminent behavioral updates remains unclear. We investigated this issue in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) of monkeys while they adapted their behavior based on their memory of feedback from past choices. We analyzed spike trains of both single units and pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons using an algorithm that emulates different biologically plausible decoding circuits. This method permits the assessment of the performance of both spike-count and spike-timing sensitive decoders. In response to the feedback, single neurons emitted stereotypical spike trains whose temporal structure identified informative events with higher accuracy than mere spike count. The optimal decoding time scale was in the range of 70–200 ms, which is significantly shorter than the memory time scale required by the behavioral task. Importantly, the temporal spiking patterns of single units were predictive of the monkeys’ behavioral response time. Furthermore, some features of these spiking patterns often varied between jointly recorded neurons. All together, our results suggest that dACC drives behavioral adaptation through complex spatiotemporal spike coding. They also indicate that downstream networks, which decode dACC feedback signals, are unlikely to act as mere neural integrators. PMID:26266537

  5. High precision calcium isotope analysis using 42Ca-48Ca double-spike TIMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Zhou, L.; Gao, S.; Tong, S. Y.; Zhou, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Double spike techniques are widely used for determining calcium isotopic compositions of natural samples. The most important factor controlling precision of the double spike technique is the choice of appropriate spike isotope pair, the composition of double spikes and the ratio of spike to sample(CSp/CN). We propose an optimal 42Ca-48Ca double spike protocol which yields the best internal precision for calcium isotopic composition determinations among all kinds of spike pairs and various spike compositions and ratios of spike to sample, as predicted by linear error propagation method. It is suggested to use spike composition of 42Ca/(42Ca+48Ca) = 0.44 mol/mol and CSp/(CN+ CSp)= 0.12mol/mol because it takes both advantages of the largest mass dispersion between 42Ca and 48Ca (14%) and lowest spike cost. Spiked samples were purified by pass through homemade micro-column filled with Ca special resin. K, Ti and other interference elements were completely separated, while 100% calcium was recovered with negligible blank. Data collection includes integration time, idle time, focus and peakcenter frequency, which were all carefully designed for the highest internal precision and lowest analysis time. All beams were automatically measured in a sequence by Triton TIMS so as to eliminate difference of analytical conditions between samples and standards, and also to increase the analytical throughputs. The typical internal precision of 100 duty cycles for one beam is 0.012‒0.015 ‰ (2δSEM), which agrees well with the predicted internal precision of 0.0124 ‰ (2δSEM). Our methods improve internal precisions by a factor of 2‒10 compared to previous methods of determination of calcium isotopic compositions by double spike TIMS. We analyzed NIST SRM 915a, NIST SRM 915b and Pacific Seawater as well as interspersed geological samples during two months. The obtained average δ44/40Ca (all relative to NIST SRM 915a) is 0.02 ± 0.02 ‰ (n=28), 0.72±0.04 ‰ (n=10) and 1

  6. To sort or not to sort: the impact of spike-sorting on neural decoding performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, Sonia; Sadtler, Patrick; Batista, Aaron; Chase, Steven; Ventura, Valérie

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising technology for restoring motor ability to paralyzed patients. Spiking-based BCIs have successfully been used in clinical trials to control multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices. Current implementations of these devices require a lengthy spike-sorting step, which is an obstacle to moving this technology from the lab to the clinic. A viable alternative is to avoid spike-sorting, treating all threshold crossings of the voltage waveform on an electrode as coming from one putative neuron. It is not known, however, how much decoding information might be lost by ignoring spike identity. Approach. We present a full analysis of the effects of spike-sorting schemes on decoding performance. Specifically, we compare how well two common decoders, the optimal linear estimator and the Kalman filter, reconstruct the arm movements of non-human primates performing reaching tasks, when receiving input from various sorting schemes. The schemes we tested included: using threshold crossings without spike-sorting; expert-sorting discarding the noise; expert-sorting, including the noise as if it were another neuron; and automatic spike-sorting using waveform features. We also decoded from a joint statistical model for the waveforms and tuning curves, which does not involve an explicit spike-sorting step. Main results. Discarding the threshold crossings that cannot be assigned to neurons degrades decoding: no spikes should be discarded. Decoding based on spike-sorted units outperforms decoding based on electrodes voltage crossings: spike-sorting is useful. The four waveform based spike-sorting methods tested here yield similar decoding efficiencies: a fast and simple method is competitive. Decoding using the joint waveform and tuning model shows promise but is not consistently superior. Significance. Our results indicate that simple automated spike-sorting performs as well as the more computationally or manually intensive

  7. An Efficient VLSI Architecture for Multi-Channel Spike Sorting Using a Generalized Hebbian Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Lun; Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Ke, Chi-En

    2015-01-01

    A novel VLSI architecture for multi-channel online spike sorting is presented in this paper. In the architecture, the spike detection is based on nonlinear energy operator (NEO), and the feature extraction is carried out by the generalized Hebbian algorithm (GHA). To lower the power consumption and area costs of the circuits, all of the channels share the same core for spike detection and feature extraction operations. Each channel has dedicated buffers for storing the detected spikes and the principal components of that channel. The proposed circuit also contains a clock gating system supplying the clock to only the buffers of channels currently using the computation core to further reduce the power consumption. The architecture has been implemented by an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with 90-nm technology. Comparisons to the existing works show that the proposed architecture has lower power consumption and hardware area costs for real-time multi-channel spike detection and feature extraction. PMID:26287193

  8. Spike: AI scheduling for Hubble Space Telescope after 18 months of orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a progress report on the Spike scheduling system, developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute for long-term scheduling of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Spike is an activity-based scheduler which exploits artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for constraint representation and for scheduling search. The system has been in operational use since shortly after HST launch in April 1990. Spike was adopted for several other satellite scheduling problems; of particular interest was the demonstration that the Spike framework is sufficiently flexible to handle both long-term and short-term scheduling, on timescales of years down to minutes or less. We describe the recent progress made in scheduling search techniques, the lessons learned from early HST operations, and the application of Spike to other problem domains. We also describe plans for the future evolution of the system.

  9. No bacterial growth found in spiked intravenous fluids over an 8-hour period.

    PubMed

    Haas, Richard E; Beitz, Edwin; Reed, Amy; Burtnett, Howard; Lowe, Jason; Crist, Arthur E; Stierer, Kevin A; Birenberg, Allan M

    2017-04-01

    Protocol changes prompted by the Joint Commission mandating intravenous (IV) fluid bags to be used within 1 hour of spiking because of possible bacterial contamination have sparked clinical and economic concerns. This study investigated the degree of bacterial growth in which samples were obtained from spiked IV fluid bags at the time of spiking and 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours after spiking. No bacterial growth occurred in any of the 80 bags of Lactated Ringer's (LR) IV solutions sampled. This study demonstrated that LR IV bags do not support any bacterial growth for up to 8 hours after spiking. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancement of Spike Synchrony in Hindmarsh-Rose Neural Networks by Randomly Rewiring Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Renhuan; Song, Aiguo; Yuan, Wujie

    Spike synchrony of the neural system is thought to have very dichotomous roles. On the one hand, it is ubiquitously present in the healthy brain and is thought to underlie feature binding during information processing. On the other hand, large scale synchronization is an underlying mechanism of epileptic seizures. In this paper, we investigate the spike synchrony of Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neural networks. Our focus is the influence of the network connections on the spike synchrony of the neural networks. The simulations show that desynchronization in the nearest-neighbor coupled network evolves into accurate synchronization with connection-rewiring probability p increasing. We uncover a phenomenon of enhancement of spike synchrony by randomly rewiring connections. With connection strength c and average connection number m increasing spike synchrony is enhanced but it is not the whole story. Furthermore, the possible mechanism behind such synchronization is also addressed.

  11. Robust spike sorting of retinal ganglion cells tuned to spot stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Alireza; Badea, Tudor C

    2016-08-01

    We propose an automatic spike sorting approach for the data recorded from a microelectrode array during visual stimulation of wild type retinas with tiled spot stimuli. The approach first detects individual spikes per electrode by their signature local minima. With the mixture probability distribution of the local minima estimated afterwards, it applies a minimum-squared-error clustering algorithm to sort the spikes into different clusters. A template waveform for each cluster per electrode is defined, and a number of reliability tests are performed on it and its corresponding spikes. Finally, a divisive hierarchical clustering algorithm is used to deal with the correlated templates per cluster type across all the electrodes. According to the measures of performance of the spike sorting approach, it is robust even in the cases of recordings with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. An Efficient VLSI Architecture for Multi-Channel Spike Sorting Using a Generalized Hebbian Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Lun; Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Ke, Chi-En

    2015-08-13

    A novel VLSI architecture for multi-channel online spike sorting is presented in this paper. In the architecture, the spike detection is based on nonlinear energy operator (NEO), and the feature extraction is carried out by the generalized Hebbian algorithm (GHA). To lower the power consumption and area costs of the circuits, all of the channels share the same core for spike detection and feature extraction operations. Each channel has dedicated buffers for storing the detected spikes and the principal components of that channel. The proposed circuit also contains a clock gating system supplying the clock to only the buffers of channels currently using the computation core to further reduce the power consumption. The architecture has been implemented by an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with 90-nm technology. Comparisons to the existing works show that the proposed architecture has lower power consumption and hardware area costs for real-time multi-channel spike detection and feature extraction.

  13. Knowledge extraction from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding.

    PubMed

    Soltic, Snjezana; Kasabov, Nikola

    2010-12-01

    This paper demonstrates how knowledge can be extracted from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding. Knowledge discovery is a very important feature of intelligent systems. Yet, a disproportionally small amount of research is centered on the issue of knowledge extraction from spiking neural networks which are considered to be the third generation of artificial neural networks. The lack of knowledge representation compatibility is becoming a major detriment to end users of these networks. We show that a high-level knowledge can be obtained from evolving spiking neural networks. More specifically, we propose a method for fuzzy rule extraction from an evolving spiking network with rank order population coding. The proposed method was used for knowledge discovery on two benchmark taste recognition problems where the knowledge learnt by an evolving spiking neural network was extracted in the form of zero-order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy IF-THEN rules.

  14. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na(+) and K(+) currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism.

  15. Changes in Purkinje cell simple spike encoding of reach kinematics during adaption to a mechanical perturbation.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Angela L; Popa, Laurentiu S; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-01-21

    The cerebellum is essential in motor learning. At the cellular level, changes occur in both the simple spike and complex spike firing of Purkinje cells. Because simple spike discharge reflects the main output of the cerebellar cortex, changes in simple spike firing likely reflect the contribution of the cerebellum to the adapted behavior. Therefore, we investigated in Rhesus monkeys how the representation of arm kinematics in Purkinje cell simple spike discharge changed during adaptation to mechanical perturbations of reach movements. Monkeys rapidly adapted to a novel assistive or resistive perturbation along the direction of the reach. Adaptation consisted of matching the amplitude and timing of the perturbation to minimize its effect on the reach. In a majority of Purkinje cells, simple spike firing recorded before and during adaptation demonstrated significant changes in position, velocity, and acceleration sensitivity. The timing of the simple spike representations change within individual cells, including shifts in predictive versus feedback signals. At the population level, feedback-based encoding of position increases early in learning and velocity decreases. Both timing changes reverse later in learning. The complex spike discharge was only weakly modulated by the perturbations, demonstrating that the changes in simple spike firing can be independent of climbing fiber input. In summary, we observed extensive alterations in individual Purkinje cell encoding of reach kinematics, although the movements were nearly identical in the baseline and adapted states. Therefore, adaption to mechanical perturbation of a reaching movement is accompanied by widespread modifications in the simple spike encoding. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351106-19$15.00/0.

  16. Using Matrix and Tensor Factorizations for the Single-Trial Analysis of Population Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Arno; Liu, Jian K.; Karunasekara, P. P. Chamanthi R.; Delis, Ioannis; Gollisch, Tim; Panzeri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neuronal recording techniques are leading to ever larger numbers of simultaneously monitored neurons. This poses the important analytical challenge of how to capture compactly all sensory information that neural population codes carry in their spatial dimension (differences in stimulus tuning across neurons at different locations), in their temporal dimension (temporal neural response variations), or in their combination (temporally coordinated neural population firing). Here we investigate the utility of tensor factorizations of population spike trains along space and time. These factorizations decompose a dataset of single-trial population spike trains into spatial firing patterns (combinations of neurons firing together), temporal firing patterns (temporal activation of these groups of neurons) and trial-dependent activation coefficients (strength of recruitment of such neural patterns on each trial). We validated various factorization methods on simulated data and on populations of ganglion cells simultaneously recorded in the salamander retina. We found that single-trial tensor space-by-time decompositions provided low-dimensional data-robust representations of spike trains that capture efficiently both their spatial and temporal information about sensory stimuli. Tensor decompositions with orthogonality constraints were the most efficient in extracting sensory information, whereas non-negative tensor decompositions worked well even on non-independent and overlapping spike patterns, and retrieved informative firing patterns expressed by the same population in response to novel stimuli. Our method showed that populations of retinal ganglion cells carried information in their spike timing on the ten-milliseconds-scale about spatial details of natural images. This information could not be recovered from the spike counts of these cells. First-spike latencies carried the majority of information provided by the whole spike train about fine-scale image

  17. The Chronotron: A Neuron That Learns to Fire Temporally Precise Spike Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Florian, Răzvan V.

    2012-01-01

    In many cases, neurons process information carried by the precise timings of spikes. Here we show how neurons can learn to generate specific temporally precise output spikes in response to input patterns of spikes having precise timings, thus processing and memorizing information that is entirely temporally coded, both as input and as output. We introduce two new supervised learning rules for spiking neurons with temporal coding of information (chronotrons), one that provides high memory capacity (E-learning), and one that has a higher biological plausibility (I-learning). With I-learning, the neuron learns to fire the target spike trains through synaptic changes that are proportional to the synaptic currents at the timings of real and target output spikes. We study these learning rules in computer simulations where we train integrate-and-fire neurons. Both learning rules allow neurons to fire at the desired timings, with sub-millisecond precision. We show how chronotrons can learn to classify their inputs, by firing identical, temporally precise spike trains for different inputs belonging to the same class. When the input is noisy, the classification also leads to noise reduction. We compute lower bounds for the memory capacity of chronotrons and explore the influence of various parameters on chronotrons' performance. The chronotrons can model neurons that encode information in the time of the first spike relative to the onset of salient stimuli or neurons in oscillatory networks that encode information in the phases of spikes relative to the background oscillation. Our results show that firing one spike per cycle optimizes memory capacity in neurons encoding information in the phase of firing relative to a background rhythm. PMID:22879876

  18. Using Matrix and Tensor Factorizations for the Single-Trial Analysis of Population Spike Trains.

    PubMed

    Onken, Arno; Liu, Jian K; Karunasekara, P P Chamanthi R; Delis, Ioannis; Gollisch, Tim; Panzeri, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Advances in neuronal recording techniques are leading to ever larger numbers of simultaneously monitored neurons. This poses the important analytical challenge of how to capture compactly all sensory information that neural population codes carry in their spatial dimension (differences in stimulus tuning across neurons at different locations), in their temporal dimension (temporal neural response variations), or in their combination (temporally coordinated neural population firing). Here we investigate the utility of tensor factorizations of population spike trains along space and time. These factorizations decompose a dataset of single-trial population spike trains into spatial firing patterns (combinations of neurons firing together), temporal firing patterns (temporal activation of these groups of neurons) and trial-dependent activation coefficients (strength of recruitment of such neural patterns on each trial). We validated various factorization methods on simulated data and on populations of ganglion cells simultaneously recorded in the salamander retina. We found that single-trial tensor space-by-time decompositions provided low-dimensional data-robust representations of spike trains that capture efficiently both their spatial and temporal information about sensory stimuli. Tensor decompositions with orthogonality constraints were the most efficient in extracting sensory information, whereas non-negative tensor decompositions worked well even on non-independent and overlapping spike patterns, and retrieved informative firing patterns expressed by the same population in response to novel stimuli. Our method showed that populations of retinal ganglion cells carried information in their spike timing on the ten-milliseconds-scale about spatial details of natural images. This information could not be recovered from the spike counts of these cells. First-spike latencies carried the majority of information provided by the whole spike train about fine-scale image

  19. Predicting Spike Occurrence and Neuronal Responsiveness from LFPs in Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Storchi, Riccardo; Zippo, Antonio G.; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Local Field Potentials (LFPs) integrate multiple neuronal events like synaptic inputs and intracellular potentials. LFP spatiotemporal features are particularly relevant in view of their applications both in research (e.g. for understanding brain rhythms, inter-areal neural communication and neronal coding) and in the clinics (e.g. for improving invasive Brain-Machine Interface devices). However the relation between LFPs and spikes is complex and not fully understood. As spikes represent the fundamental currency of neuronal communication this gap in knowledge strongly limits our comprehension of neuronal phenomena underlying LFPs. We investigated the LFP-spike relation during tactile stimulation in primary somatosensory (S-I) cortex in the rat. First we quantified how reliably LFPs and spikes code for a stimulus occurrence. Then we used the information obtained from our analyses to design a predictive model for spike occurrence based on LFP inputs. The model was endowed with a flexible meta-structure whose exact form, both in parameters and structure, was estimated by using a multi-objective optimization strategy. Our method provided a set of nonlinear simple equations that maximized the match between models and true neurons in terms of spike timings and Peri Stimulus Time Histograms. We found that both LFPs and spikes can code for stimulus occurrence with millisecond precision, showing, however, high variability. Spike patterns were predicted significantly above chance for 75% of the neurons analysed. Crucially, the level of prediction accuracy depended on the reliability in coding for the stimulus occurrence. The best predictions were obtained when both spikes and LFPs were highly responsive to the stimuli. Spike reliability is known to depend on neuron intrinsic properties (i.e. on channel noise) and on spontaneous local network fluctuations. Our results suggest that the latter, measured through the LFP response variability, play a dominant role. PMID:22586452

  20. The Genetic Basis of Composite Spike Form in Barley and ‘Miracle-Wheat’

    PubMed Central

    Poursarebani, Naser; Seidensticker, Tina; Koppolu, Ravi; Trautewig, Corinna; Gawroński, Piotr; Bini, Federica; Govind, Geetha; Rutten, Twan; Sakuma, Shun; Tagiri, Akemi; Wolde, Gizaw M.; Youssef, Helmy M.; Battal, Abdulhamit; Ciannamea, Stefano; Fusca, Tiziana; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Pozzi, Carlo; Börner, Andreas; Lundqvist, Udda; Komatsuda, Takao; Salvi, Silvio; Tuberosa, Roberto; Uauy, Cristobal; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Rossini, Laura; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Inflorescences of the tribe Triticeae, which includes wheat (Triticum sp. L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) are characterized by sessile spikelets directly borne on the main axis, thus forming a branchless spike. ‘Compositum-Barley’ and tetraploid ‘Miracle-Wheat’ (T. turgidum convar. compositum (L.f.) Filat.) display noncanonical spike-branching in which spikelets are replaced by lateral branch-like structures resembling small-sized secondary spikes. As a result of this branch formation ‘Miracle-Wheat’ produces significantly more grains per spike, leading to higher spike yield. In this study, we first isolated the gene underlying spike-branching in ‘Compositum-Barley,’ i.e., compositum 2 (com2). Moreover, we found that COM2 is orthologous to the branched headt (bht) locus regulating spike branching in tetraploid ‘Miracle-Wheat.’ Both genes possess orthologs with similar functions in maize BRANCHED SILKLESS 1 (BD1) and rice FRIZZY PANICLE/BRANCHED FLORETLESS 1 (FZP/BFL1) encoding AP2/ERF transcription factors. Sequence analysis of the bht locus in a collection of mutant and wild-type tetraploid wheat accessions revealed that a single amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain gave rise to the domestication of ‘Miracle-Wheat.’ mRNA in situ hybridization, microarray experiments, and independent qRT-PCR validation analyses revealed that the branch repression pathway in barley is governed through the spike architecture gene Six-rowed spike 4 regulating COM2 expression, while HvIDS1 (barley ortholog of maize INDETERMINATE SPIKELET 1) is a putative downstream target of COM2. These findings presented here provide new insights into the genetic basis of spike architecture in Triticeae, and have disclosed new targets for genetic manipulations aiming at boosting wheat’s yield potential. PMID:26156223

  1. Predicting spike occurrence and neuronal responsiveness from LFPs in primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Storchi, Riccardo; Zippo, Antonio G; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2012-01-01

    Local Field Potentials (LFPs) integrate multiple neuronal events like synaptic inputs and intracellular potentials. LFP spatiotemporal features are particularly relevant in view of their applications both in research (e.g. for understanding brain rhythms, inter-areal neural communication and neuronal coding) and in the clinics (e.g. for improving invasive Brain-Machine Interface devices). However the relation between LFPs and spikes is complex and not fully understood. As spikes represent the fundamental currency of neuronal communication this gap in knowledge strongly limits our comprehension of neuronal phenomena underlying LFPs. We investigated the LFP-spike relation during tactile stimulation in primary somatosensory (S-I) cortex in the rat. First we quantified how reliably LFPs and spikes code for a stimulus occurrence. Then we used the information obtained from our analyses to design a predictive model for spike occurrence based on LFP inputs. The model was endowed with a flexible meta-structure whose exact form, both in parameters and structure, was estimated by using a multi-objective optimization strategy. Our method provided a set of nonlinear simple equations that maximized the match between models and true neurons in terms of spike timings and Peri Stimulus Time Histograms. We found that both LFPs and spikes can code for stimulus occurrence with millisecond precision, showing, however, high variability. Spike patterns were predicted significantly above chance for 75% of the neurons analysed. Crucially, the level of prediction accuracy depended on the reliability in coding for the stimulus occurrence. The best predictions were obtained when both spikes and LFPs were highly responsive to the stimuli. Spike reliability is known to depend on neuron intrinsic properties (i.e. on channel noise) and on spontaneous local network fluctuations. Our results suggest that the latter, measured through the LFP response variability, play a dominant role.

  2. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  3. Goal-Directed Decision Making with Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Johannes; Lengyel, Máté

    2016-02-03

    Behavioral and neuroscientific data on reward-based decision making point to a fundamental distinction between habitual and goal-directed action selection. The formation of habits, which requires simple updating of cached values, has been studied in great detail, and the reward prediction error theory of dopamine function has enjoyed prominent success in accounting for its neural bases. In contrast, the neural circuit mechanisms of goal-directed decision making, requiring extended iterative computations to estimate values online, are still unknown. Here we present a spiking neural network that provably solves the difficult online value estimation problem underlying goal-directed decision making in a near-optimal way and reproduces behavioral as well as neurophysiological experimental data on tasks ranging from simple binary choice to sequential decision making. Our model uses local plasticity rules to learn the synaptic weights of a simple neural network to achieve optimal performance and solves one-step decision-making tasks, commonly considered in neuroeconomics, as well as more challenging sequential decision-making tasks within 1 s. These decision times, and their parametric dependence on task parameters, as well as the final choice probabilities match behavioral data, whereas the evolution of neural activities in the network closely mimics neural responses recorded in frontal cortices during the execution of such tasks. Our theory provides a principled framework to understand the neural underpinning of goal-directed decision making and makes novel predictions for sequential decision-making tasks with multiple rewards. Goal-directed actions requiring prospective planning pervade decision making, but their circuit-level mechanisms remain elusive. We show how a model circuit of biologically realistic spiking neurons can solve this computationally challenging problem in a novel way. The synaptic weights of our network can be learned using local plasticity rules

  4. Goal-Directed Decision Making with Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, Máté

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and neuroscientific data on reward-based decision making point to a fundamental distinction between habitual and goal-directed action selection. The formation of habits, which requires simple updating of cached values, has been studied in great detail, and the reward prediction error theory of dopamine function has enjoyed prominent success in accounting for its neural bases. In contrast, the neural circuit mechanisms of goal-directed decision making, requiring extended iterative computations to estimate values online, are still unknown. Here we present a spiking neural network that provably solves the difficult online value estimation problem underlying goal-directed decision making in a near-optimal way and reproduces behavioral as well as neurophysiological experimental data on tasks ranging from simple binary choice to sequential decision making. Our model uses local plasticity rules to learn the synaptic weights of a simple neural network to achieve optimal performance and solves one-step decision-making tasks, commonly considered in neuroeconomics, as well as more challenging sequential decision-making tasks within 1 s. These decision times, and their parametric dependence on task parameters, as well as the final choice probabilities match behavioral data, whereas the evolution of neural activities in the network closely mimics neural responses recorded in frontal cortices during the execution of such tasks. Our theory provides a principled framework to understand the neural underpinning of goal-directed decision making and makes novel predictions for sequential decision-making tasks with multiple rewards. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Goal-directed actions requiring prospective planning pervade decision making, but their circuit-level mechanisms remain elusive. We show how a model circuit of biologically realistic spiking neurons can solve this computationally challenging problem in a novel way. The synaptic weights of our network can be learned using

  5. ViSAPy: a Python tool for biophysics-based generation of virtual spiking activity for evaluation of spike-sorting algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Espen; Ness, Torbjørn V; Khosrowshahi, Amir; Sørensen, Christina; Fyhn, Marianne; Hafting, Torkel; Franke, Felix; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-04-30

    New, silicon-based multielectrodes comprising hundreds or more electrode contacts offer the possibility to record spike trains from thousands of neurons simultaneously. This potential cannot be realized unless accurate, reliable automated methods for spike sorting are developed, in turn requiring benchmarking data sets with known ground-truth spike times. We here present a general simulation tool for computing benchmarking data for evaluation of spike-sorting algorithms entitled ViSAPy (Virtual Spiking Activity in Python). The tool is based on a well-established biophysical forward-modeling scheme and is implemented as a Python package built on top of the neuronal simulator NEURON and the Python tool LFPy. ViSAPy allows for arbitrary combinations of multicompartmental neuron models and geometries of recording multielectrodes. Three example benchmarking data sets are generated, i.e., tetrode and polytrode data mimicking in vivo cortical recordings and microelectrode array (MEA) recordings of in vitro activity in salamander retinas. The synthesized example benchmarking data mimics salient features of typical experimental recordings, for example, spike waveforms depending on interspike interval. ViSAPy goes beyond existing methods as it includes biologically realistic model noise, synaptic activation by recurrent spiking networks, finite-sized electrode contacts, and allows for inhomogeneous electrical conductivities. ViSAPy is optimized to allow for generation of long time series of benchmarking data, spanning minutes of biological time, by parallel execution on multi-core computers. ViSAPy is an open-ended tool as it can be generalized to produce benchmarking data or arbitrary recording-electrode geometries and with various levels of complexity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Versatile Clinical Application of the Spike Screw: Direct Anchorage Versus Indirect Anchorage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung A; Chen, Yu; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Seo, Kyung Won; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2015-10-01

    This article represents clinical application of spike screw, novel design of miniscrew, for direct anchorage and indirect anchorage in orthodontic treatment. Accompanied by easy placement and removal, the spike screw provides good stability for the orthodontic anchorage. The spike screw consists of 6 spikes attached to a washer with laser welded stainless-steel hook that is placed by self-drilling fixation miniscrew. The spike screws were applied to correct malocclusions in patients as follows: traction of impacted canines and protraction of posterior teeth as a direct anchorage and correction of midline discrepancy as an indirect anchorage. For orthodontic traction of impacted canines, spike screws were placed in the mandibular labial mucosal area to create extrusive forces. Afterward, it was utilized for the protraction of posterior teeth. In the second case of the indirect anchorage, spike screw was applied on the midpalatal area to correct midline discrepancy that occurred during orthodontic treatment. The extended hook of a washer was prebended along the curvature of the palate and then secured with a mini screw. The extended hook was bonded to maxillary left first molar. In the first case, the spike screw provided adequate anchorage for the vertical traction of horizontally impacted canine. Since the spike screws were placed in the mandibular anterior lesion, the vertical traction force was applied simply with orthodontic elastics. Also, enough distance was achieved for up-down elastics to work by placing the spike screw in the opposite arch. The force of vertical traction was adjusted with selection of size and force of up-down elastics. Later, it was used to provide anchorage for protraction of mandibular molars without changing orientation of the spike screws. In the second case, the spike screw placed in the midpalatal area was attached to the left first molar and worked as an indirect anchorage. The midline discrepancy was resolved by consolidating the

  7. Origin of heterogeneous spiking patterns from continuously distributed ion channel densities: a computational study in spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Balachandar, Arjun; Prescott, Steven A

    2018-05-01

    Distinct spiking patterns may arise from qualitative differences in ion channel expression (i.e. when different neurons express distinct ion channels) and/or when quantitative differences in expression levels qualitatively alter the spike generation process. We hypothesized that spiking patterns in neurons of the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of spinal cord reflect both mechanisms. We reproduced SDH neuron spiking patterns by varying densities of K V 1- and A-type potassium conductances. Plotting the spiking patterns that emerge from different density combinations revealed spiking-pattern regions separated by boundaries (bifurcations). This map suggests that certain spiking pattern combinations occur when the distribution of potassium channel densities straddle boundaries, whereas other spiking patterns reflect distinct patterns of ion channel expression. The former mechanism may explain why certain spiking patterns co-occur in genetically identified neuron types. We also present algorithms to predict spiking pattern proportions from ion channel density distributions, and vice versa. Neurons are often classified by spiking pattern. Yet, some neurons exhibit distinct patterns under subtly different test conditions, which suggests that they operate near an abrupt transition, or bifurcation. A set of such neurons may exhibit heterogeneous spiking patterns not because of qualitative differences in which ion channels they express, but rather because quantitative differences in expression levels cause neurons to operate on opposite sides of a bifurcation. Neurons in the spinal dorsal horn, for example, respond to somatic current injection with patterns that include tonic, single, gap, delayed and reluctant spiking. It is unclear whether these patterns reflect five cell populations (defined by distinct ion channel expression patterns), heterogeneity within a single population, or some combination thereof. We reproduced all five spiking patterns in a computational model by

  8. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz–7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models. PMID:26437411

  9. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-09-30

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz-7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models.

  10. Spike Triggered Covariance in Strongly Correlated Gaussian Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Segev, Ronen; Berry, Michael J.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological systems perform computations on inputs that have very large dimensionality. Determining the relevant input combinations for a particular computation is often key to understanding its function. A common way to find the relevant input dimensions is to examine the difference in variance between the input distribution and the distribution of inputs associated with certain outputs. In systems neuroscience, the corresponding method is known as spike-triggered covariance (STC). This method has been highly successful in characterizing relevant input dimensions for neurons in a variety of sensory systems. So far, most studies used the STC method with weakly correlated Gaussian inputs. However, it is also important to use this method with inputs that have long range correlations typical of the natural sensory environment. In such cases, the stimulus covariance matrix has one (or more) outstanding eigenvalues that cannot be easily equalized because of sampling variability. Such outstanding modes interfere with analyses of statistical significance of candidate input dimensions that modulate neuronal outputs. In many cases, these modes obscure the significant dimensions. We show that the sensitivity of the STC method in the regime of strongly correlated inputs can be improved by an order of magnitude or more. This can be done by evaluating the significance of dimensions in the subspace orthogonal to the outstanding mode(s). Analyzing the responses of retinal ganglion cells probed with Gaussian noise, we find that taking into account outstanding modes is crucial for recovering relevant input dimensions for these neurons. PMID:24039563

  11. The detection of intestinal spike activity on surface electroenterograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye-Lin, Y.; Garcia-Casado, J.; Martinez-de-Juan, J. L.; Prats-Boluda, G.; Ponce, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Myoelectrical recording could provide an alternative technique for assessing intestinal motility, which is a topic of great interest in gastroenterology since many gastrointestinal disorders are associated with intestinal dysmotility. The pacemaker activity (slow wave, SW) of the electroenterogram (EEnG) has been detected in abdominal surface recordings, although the activity related to bowel contractions (spike bursts, SB) has to date only been detected in experimental models with artificially favored electrical conductivity. The aim of the present work was to assess the possibility of detecting SB activity in abdominal surface recordings under physiological conditions. For this purpose, 11 recording sessions of simultaneous internal and external myolectrical signals were conducted on conscious dogs. Signal analysis was carried out in the spectral domain. The results show that in periods of intestinal contractile activity, high-frequency components of EEnG signals can be detected on the abdominal surface in addition to SW activity. The energy between 2 and 20 Hz of the surface myoelectrical recording presented good correlation with the internal intestinal motility index (0.64 ± 0.10 for channel 1 and 0.57 ± 0.11 for channel 2). This suggests that SB activity can also be detected in canine surface EEnG recording.

  12. Spiking Neural Network Decoder for Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dethier, Julie; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Elassaad, Shauki A; Shenoy, Krishna V; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    We used a spiking neural network (SNN) to decode neural data recorded from a 96-electrode array in premotor/motor cortex while a rhesus monkey performed a point-to-point reaching arm movement task. We mapped a Kalman-filter neural prosthetic decode algorithm developed to predict the arm's velocity on to the SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework and simulated it using Nengo , a freely available software package. A 20,000-neuron network matched the standard decoder's prediction to within 0.03% (normalized by maximum arm velocity). A 1,600-neuron version of this network was within 0.27%, and run in real-time on a 3GHz PC. These results demonstrate that a SNN can implement a statistical signal processing algorithm widely used as the decoder in high-performance neural prostheses (Kalman filter), and achieve similar results with just a few thousand neurons. Hardware SNN implementations-neuromorphic chips-may offer power savings, essential for realizing fully-implantable cortically controlled prostheses.

  13. Spike phase synchronization in multiplex cortical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study synchronizability of two multiplex cortical networks: whole-cortex of hermaphrodite C. elegans and posterior cortex in male C. elegans. These networks are composed of two connection layers: network of chemical synapses and the one formed by gap junctions. This work studies the contribution of each layer on the phase synchronization of non-identical spiking Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. The network of male C. elegans shows higher phase synchronization than its randomized version, while it is not the case for hermaphrodite type. The random networks in each layer are constructed such that the nodes have the same degree as the original network, thus providing an unbiased comparison. In male C. elegans, although the gap junction network is sparser than the chemical network, it shows higher contribution in the synchronization phenomenon. This is not the case in hermaphrodite type, which is mainly due to significant less density of gap junction layer (0.013) as compared to chemical layer (0.028). Also, the gap junction network in this type has stronger community structure than the chemical network, and this is another driving factor for its weaker synchronizability.

  14. Serotonin inhibits low-threshold spike interneurons in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cains, Sarah; Blomeley, Craig P; Bracci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs) are important elements of the striatal architecture and the only known source of nitric oxide in this nucleus, but their rarity has so far prevented systematic studies. Here, we used transgenic mice in which green fluorescent protein is expressed under control of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) promoter and striatal NPY-expressing LTSIs can be easily identified, to investigate the effects of serotonin on these neurons. In sharp contrast with its excitatory action on other striatal interneurons, serotonin (30 μm) strongly inhibited LTSIs, reducing or abolishing their spontaneous firing activity and causing membrane hyperpolarisations. These hyperpolarisations persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin, were mimicked by 5-HT2C receptor agonists and reversed by 5-HT2C antagonists. Voltage-clamp slow-ramp experiments showed that serotonin caused a strong increase in an outward current activated by depolarisations that was blocked by the specific M current blocker XE 991. In current-clamp experiments, XE 991 per se caused membrane depolarisations in LTSIs and subsequent application of serotonin (in the presence of XE 991) failed to affect these neurons. We concluded that serotonin strongly inhibits striatal LTSIs acting through postsynaptic 5-HT2C receptors and increasing an M type current. PMID:22495583

  15. Computational properties of networks of synchronous groups of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Dayhoff, Judith E

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate a model in which synchronously firing ensembles of neurons are networked to produce computational results. Each ensemble is a group of biological integrate-and-fire spiking neurons, with probabilistic interconnections between groups. An analogy is drawn in which each individual processing unit of an artificial neural network corresponds to a neuronal group in a biological model. The activation value of a unit in the artificial neural network corresponds to the fraction of active neurons, synchronously firing, in a biological neuronal group. Weights of the artificial neural network correspond to the product of the interconnection density between groups, the group size of the presynaptic group, and the postsynaptic potential heights in the synchronous group model. All three of these parameters can modulate connection strengths between neuronal groups in the synchronous group models. We give an example of nonlinear classification (XOR) and a function approximation example in which the capability of the artificial neural network can be captured by a neural network model with biological integrate-and-fire neurons configured as a network of synchronously firing ensembles of such neurons. We point out that the general function approximation capability proven for feedforward artificial neural networks appears to be approximated by networks of neuronal groups that fire in synchrony, where the groups comprise integrate-and-fire neurons. We discuss the advantages of this type of model for biological systems, its possible learning mechanisms, and the associated timing relationships.

  16. First-spike latency in Hodgkin's three classes of neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengtong; Chen, Yueling; Chen, Yong

    2013-07-07

    We study the first-spike latency (FSL) in Hodgkin's three classes of neurons with the Morris-Lecar neuron model. It is found that all the three classes of neurons can encode an external stimulus into FSLs. With DC inputs, the FSLs of all of the neurons decrease with input intensity. With input current decreased to the threshold, class 1 neurons show an arbitrary long FSL whereas class 2 and 3 neurons exhibit the short-limit FSLs. When the input current is sinusoidal, the amplitude, frequency and initial phase can be encoded by all the three classes of neurons. The FSLs of all of the neurons decrease with the input amplitude and frequency. When the input frequency is too high, all of the neurons respond with infinite FSLs. When the initial phase increases, the FSL decreases and then jumps to a maximal value and finally decreases linearly. With changes in the input parameters, the FSLs of the class 1 and 2 neurons exhibit similar properties. However, the FSL of the class 3 neurons became slightly longer and only produces responses for a narrow range of initial phase if input frequencies are low. Moreover, our results also show that the FSL and firing rate responses are mutually independent processes and that neurons can encode an external stimulus into different FSLs and firing rates simultaneously. This finding is consistent with the current theory of dual or multiple complementary coding mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spike-Timing of Orbitofrontal Neurons Is Synchronized With Breathing.

    PubMed

    Kőszeghy, Áron; Lasztóczi, Bálint; Forro, Thomas; Klausberger, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been implicated in a multiplicity of complex brain functions, including representations of expected outcome properties, post-decision confidence, momentary food-reward values, complex flavors and odors. As breathing rhythm has an influence on odor processing at primary olfactory areas, we tested the hypothesis that it may also influence neuronal activity in the OFC, a prefrontal area involved also in higher order processing of odors. We recorded spike timing of orbitofrontal neurons as well as local field potentials (LFPs) in awake, head-fixed mice, together with the breathing rhythm. We observed that a large majority of orbitofrontal neurons showed robust phase-coupling to breathing during immobility and running. The phase coupling of action potentials to breathing was significantly stronger in orbitofrontal neurons compared to cells in the medial prefrontal cortex. The characteristic synchronization of orbitofrontal neurons with breathing might provide a temporal framework for multi-variable processing of olfactory, gustatory and reward-value relationships.

  18. The formation of spikes in the displacement of miscible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Schroer, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    We report on experiments in which a more viscous fluid displaces a less viscous one in a vertical cylindrical tube. These experiments were performed using silicone oils in a vertical pipette of small diameter. The more viscous fluid also had a slightly larger density than the less viscous fluid. In the initial configuration, the fluids were at rest, and the interface was nominally flat. A dye was added to the more viscous fluid for ease of observation of the interface between the fluids. The flow was initiated by pumping the more viscous fluid into the less viscous one. The displacement velocity was such that the Reynolds number was smaller than unity and the Peclet number for mass transfer between the fluids was large compared to unity. For upward displacement of the more viscous fluid from an initially stable configuration, an axisymmetric finger was observed under all conditions. However, a needle-shaped spike was seen to propagate from the main finger in many cases, similar to that observed by Petitjeans and Maxworthy for the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one.

  19. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pecevski, Dejan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p (*) that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p (*) contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference.

  20. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity123

    PubMed Central

    Pecevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p* that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p* contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference. PMID:27419214

  1. The Analysis and Suppression of the spike noise in vibrator record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, H.; Jiang, T.; Xu, X.; Ge, L.; Lin, J.; Yang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    During the seismic exploration with vibrator, seismic recording systems have often been affected by random spike noise in the background, which leads to strong data distortions as a result of the cross-correlation processing of the vibrator method. Partial or total loss of the desired seismic information is possible if no automatic spike reduction is available in the field prior to correlation of the field record. Generally speaking, original record of vibrator is uncorrelated data, in which the signal is non-wavelet form. In order to obtain the seismic record similar to explosive source, the signal of uncorrelated data needs to use the correlation algorithm to compress into wavelet form. The correlation process results in that the interference of spike in correlated data is not only being suppressed, but also being expanded. So the spike noise suppression of vibrator is indispensable. According to numerical simulation results, the effect of spike in the vibrator record is mainly affected by the amplitude and proportional points in the uncorrelated record. When the spike noise ratio in uncorrelated record reaches 1.5% and the average amplitude exceeds 200, it will make the SNR(signal-to-noise ratio) of the correlated record lower than 0dB, so that it is difficult to separate the signal. While the amplitude and ratio is determined by the intensity of background noise. Therefore, when the noise level is strong, in order to improve SNR of the seismic data, the uncorrelated record of vibrator need to take necessary steps to suppress spike noise. For the sake of reducing the influence of the spike noise, we need to make the detection and suppression of spike noise process for the uncorrelated record. Because vibrator works by inputting sweep signal into the underground long time, ideally, the peak and valley values of each trace have little change. On the basis of the peak and valley values, we can get a reference amplitude value. Then the spike can be detected and

  2. Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes using multiple sparse volumetric priors for presurgical epileptogenic focus localization

    PubMed Central

    Strobbe, Gregor; Carrette, Evelien; López, José David; Montes Restrepo, Victoria; Van Roost, Dirk; Meurs, Alfred; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes observed in EEG recordings of patients with refractory epilepsy provides useful information to localize the epileptogenic focus during the presurgical evaluation. However, the selection of the time points or time epochs of the spikes in order to estimate the origin of the activity remains a challenge. In this study, we consider a Bayesian EEG source imaging technique for distributed sources, i.e. the multiple volumetric sparse priors (MSVP) approach. The approach allows to estimate the time courses of the intensity of the sources corresponding with a specific time epoch of the spike. Based on presurgical averaged interictal spikes in six patients who were successfully treated with surgery, we estimated the time courses of the source intensities for three different time epochs: (i) an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at 50% of the spike peak during the rising phase of the spike, (ii) an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at the spike peak and (iii) an epoch containing the full spike time period starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending 230 ms after the spike peak. To identify the primary source of the spike activity, the source with the maximum energy from 50 ms before the spike peak till 50% of the spike peak was subsequently selected for each of the time windows. For comparison, the activity at the spike peaks and at 50% of the peaks was localized using the LORETA inversion technique and an ECD approach. Both patient-specific spherical forward models and patient-specific 5-layered finite difference models were considered to evaluate the influence of the forward model. Based on the resected zones in each of the patients, extracted from post-operative MR images, we compared the distances to the resection border of the estimated activity. Using the spherical models, the distances to the resection border for the MSVP approach and each of the different time epochs were in

  3. Studies with spike initiators - Linearization by noise allows continuous signal modulation in neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Xiaolong; Lewis, Edwin R.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that noise can be an important element in the translation of neuronal generator potentials (summed inputs) to neuronal spike trains (outputs), creating or expanding a range of amplitudes over which the spike rate is proportional to the generator potential amplitude. Noise converts the basically nonlinear operation of a spike initiator into a nearly linear modulation process. This linearization effect of noise is examined in a simple intuitive model of a static threshold and in a more realistic computer simulation of spike initiator based on the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model. The results are qualitatively similar; in each case larger noise amplitude results in a larger range of nearly linear modulation. The computer simulation of the HH model with noise shows linear and nonlinear features that were earlier observed in spike data obtained from the VIIIth nerve of the bullfrog. This suggests that these features can be explained in terms of spike initiator properties, and it also suggests that the HH model may be useful for representing basic spike initiator properties in vertebrates.

  4. A case-control study of wicket spikes using video-EEG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Maya; Baldassari, Laura E; Scribner, James T; Cho, Yong Won; Motamedi, Gholam K

    2013-01-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics associated with wicket spikes in patients undergoing long-term video-EEG monitoring. A case-control study was performed in 479 patients undergoing video-EEG monitoring, with 3 age- (±3 years) and gender-matched controls per patient with wicket spikes. Logistic regression was utilized to investigate the association between wicket spikes and other factors, including conditions that have been previously associated with wicket spikes. Wicket spikes were recorded in 48 patients. There was a significantly higher prevalence of dizziness/vertigo (p=0.002), headaches (p=0.005), migraine (p=0.015), and seizures (p=0.016) in patients with wickets. The majority of patients with wicket spikes did not exhibit epileptiform activity on EEG; however, patients with history of seizures were more likely to have wickets (p=0.017). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures between the groups. Wickets were more common on the left, during sleep, and more likely to be first recorded on day 1-2 of monitoring. Patients with wicket spikes are more likely to have dizziness/vertigo, headaches, migraine, and seizures. Patients with history of seizures are more likely to have wickets. The prevalence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is not significantly higher in patients with wickets. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transition from a beads-on-string to a spike structure in an electrified viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2017-02-01

    A one-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to study the nonlinear behaviors of a perfectly conducting, slightly viscoelastic liquid jet under a large radial electric field. A singular spike structure different from a beads-on-string structure is detected. The electric field is found to be the key factor for the formation of spikes. The transition from a beads-on-string to a spike structure occurs at sufficiently large electric fields. Moreover, the transition occurs more easily for smaller wave numbers. Viscosity is found to suppress spikes while elasticity promotes them. The mechanism responsible for spike formation is further explored by examining the maximum radius of the jet in the beads-on-string case. The capillary and electrostatic forces prove to be dominant in droplets, and the transition takes place when the electrostatic force exceeds the capillary force. The self-similarity in spikes is discussed. Different from the transition moment, the inertial, electrostatic, and solvent viscous forces are important in a developed spike.

  6. STDP allows fast rate-modulated coding with Poisson-like spike trains.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Matthieu; Masquelier, Timothée; Hugues, Etienne

    2011-10-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has been shown to enable single neurons to detect repeatedly presented spatiotemporal spike patterns. This holds even when such patterns are embedded in equally dense random spiking activity, that is, in the absence of external reference times such as a stimulus onset. Here we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that STDP can also learn repeating rate-modulated patterns, which have received more experimental evidence, for example, through post-stimulus time histograms (PSTHs). Each input spike train is generated from a rate function using a stochastic sampling mechanism, chosen to be an inhomogeneous Poisson process here. Learning is feasible provided significant covarying rate modulations occur within the typical timescale of STDP (~10-20 ms) for sufficiently many inputs (~100 among 1000 in our simulations), a condition that is met by many experimental PSTHs. Repeated pattern presentations induce spike-time correlations that are captured by STDP. Despite imprecise input spike times and even variable spike counts, a single trained neuron robustly detects the pattern just a few milliseconds after its presentation. Therefore, temporal imprecision and Poisson-like firing variability are not an obstacle to fast temporal coding. STDP provides an appealing mechanism to learn such rate patterns, which, beyond sensory processing, may also be involved in many cognitive tasks.

  7. Comparison of degradation between indigenous and spiked bisphenol A and triclosan in a biosolids amended soil.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Kate A; Warne, Michael Stj; Smernik, Ronald J; Shareef, Ali; Kookana, Rai S

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the degradation of indigenous bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) in a biosolids-amended soil, to the degradation of spiked labelled surrogates of the same compounds (BPA-d16 and TCS-(13)C12). The aim was to determine if spiking experiments accurately predict the degradation of compounds in biosolids-amended soils using two different types of biosolids, a centrifuge dried biosolids (CDB) and a lagoon dried biosolids (LDB). The rate of degradation of the compounds was examined and the results indicated that there were considerable differences between the indigenous and spiked compounds. These differences were more marked for BPA, for which the indigenous compound was detectable throughout the study, whereas the spiked compound decreased to below the detection limit prior to the study completion. The rate of degradation for the indigenous BPA was approximately 5-times slower than that of the spiked BPA-d16. The indigenous and spiked TCS were both detectable throughout the study, however, the shape of the degradation curves varied considerably, particularly in the CDB treatment. These findings show that spiking experiments may not be suitable to predict the degradation and persistence of organic compounds following land application of biosolids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Removing cosmic spikes using a hyperspectral upper-bound spectrum method

    DOE PAGES

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2016-11-04

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in amore » hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. As a result, a comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.« less

  9. Biophysical properties and computational modeling of calcium spikes in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, Henry C

    2013-06-01

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nuclei, with their extensive innervation of nearly the whole brain have important modulatory effects on many cognitive and physiological processes. They play important roles in clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders. In order to quantify the effects of serotonergic transmission on target cells it is desirable to construct computational models and to this end these it is necessary to have details of the biophysical and spike properties of the serotonergic neurons. Here several basic properties are reviewed with data from several studies since the 1960s to the present. The quantities included are input resistance, resting membrane potential, membrane time constant, firing rate, spike duration, spike and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude, spike threshold, cell capacitance, soma and somadendritic areas. The action potentials of these cells are normally triggered by a combination of sodium and calcium currents which may result in autonomous pacemaker activity. We here analyse the mechanisms of high-threshold calcium spikes which have been demonstrated in these cells the presence of TTX (tetrodotoxin). The parameters for calcium dynamics required to give calcium spikes are quite different from those for regular spiking which suggests the involvement of restricted parts of the soma-dendritic surface as has been found, for example, in hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of single bursts versus single spikes at excitatory dendrodendritic synapses.

    PubMed

    Masurkar, Arjun V; Chen, Wei R

    2012-02-01

    The synchronization of neuronal activity is thought to enhance information processing. There is much evidence supporting rhythmically bursting external tufted cells (ETCs) of the rodent olfactory bulb glomeruli coordinating the activation of glomerular interneurons and mitral cells via dendrodendritic excitation. However, as bursting has variable significance at axodendritic cortical synapses, it is not clear if ETC bursting imparts a specific functional advantage over the preliminary spike in dendrodendritic synaptic networks. To answer this question, we investigated the influence of single ETC bursts and spikes with the in vitro rat olfactory bulb preparation at different levels of processing, via calcium imaging of presynaptic ETC dendrites, dual electrical recording of ETC -interneuron synaptic pairs, and multicellular calcium imaging of ETC-induced population activity. Our findings supported single ETC bursts, versus single spikes, driving robust presynaptic calcium signaling, which in turn was associated with profound extension of the initial monosynaptic spike-driven dendrodendritic excitatory postsynaptic potential. This extension could be driven by either the spike-dependent or spike-independent components of the burst. At the population level, burst-induced excitation was more widespread and reliable compared with single spikes. This further supports the ETC network, in part due to a functional advantage of bursting at excitatory dendrodendritic synapses, coordinating synchronous activity at behaviorally relevant frequencies related to odor processing in vivo. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The influence of single bursts vs. single spikes at excitatory dendrodendritic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Masurkar, Arjun V.; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    The synchronization of neuronal activity is thought to enhance information processing. There is much evidence supporting rhythmically bursting external tufted cells (ETCs) of the rodent olfactory bulb glomeruli coordinating the activation of glomerular interneurons and mitral cells via dendrodendritic excitation. However, as bursting has variable significance at axodendritic cortical synapses, it is not clear if ETC bursting imparts a specific functional advantage over the preliminary spike in dendrodendritic synaptic networks. To answer this question, we investigated the influence of single ETC bursts and spikes with the in-vitro rat olfactory bulb preparation at different levels of processing, via calcium imaging of presynaptic ETC dendrites, dual electrical recording of ETC–interneuron synaptic pairs, and multicellular calcium imaging of ETC-induced population activity. Our findings supported single ETC bursts, vs. single spikes, driving robust presynaptic calcium signaling, which in turn was associated with profound extension of the initial monosynaptic spike-driven dendrodendritic excitatory postsynaptic potential. This extension could be driven by either the spike-dependent or spike-independent components of the burst. At the population level, burst-induced excitation was more widespread and reliable compared with single spikes. This further supports the ETC network, in part due to a functional advantage of bursting at excitatory dendrodendritic synapses, coordinating synchronous activity at behaviorally relevant frequencies related to odor processing in vivo. PMID:22277089

  12. Hybrid Spintronic-CMOS Spiking Neural Network with On-Chip Learning: Devices, Circuits, and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Banerjee, Aparajita; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, spiking neural networks (SNNs) have emerged as one of the popular architectures to emulate the brain. In SNNs, information is temporally encoded and communication between neurons is accomplished by means of spikes. In such networks, spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms require the online programing of synapses based on the temporal information of spikes transmitted by spiking neurons. In this work, we propose a spintronic synapse with decoupled spike-transmission and programing-current paths. The spintronic synapse consists of a ferromagnet-heavy-metal heterostructure where the programing current through the heavy metal generates spin-orbit torque to modulate the device conductance. Low programing energy and fast programing times demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed device as a nanoelectronic synapse. We perform a simulation study based on an experimentally benchmarked device-simulation framework to demonstrate the interfacing of such spintronic synapses with CMOS neurons and learning circuits operating in the transistor subthreshold region to form a network of spiking neurons that can be utilized for pattern-recognition problems.

  13. Removing cosmic spikes using a hyperspectral upper-bound spectrum method

    SciT

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in amore » hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. As a result, a comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.« less

  14. STDP Allows Fast Rate-Modulated Coding with Poisson-Like Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Hugues, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has been shown to enable single neurons to detect repeatedly presented spatiotemporal spike patterns. This holds even when such patterns are embedded in equally dense random spiking activity, that is, in the absence of external reference times such as a stimulus onset. Here we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that STDP can also learn repeating rate-modulated patterns, which have received more experimental evidence, for example, through post-stimulus time histograms (PSTHs). Each input spike train is generated from a rate function using a stochastic sampling mechanism, chosen to be an inhomogeneous Poisson process here. Learning is feasible provided significant covarying rate modulations occur within the typical timescale of STDP (∼10–20 ms) for sufficiently many inputs (∼100 among 1000 in our simulations), a condition that is met by many experimental PSTHs. Repeated pattern presentations induce spike-time correlations that are captured by STDP. Despite imprecise input spike times and even variable spike counts, a single trained neuron robustly detects the pattern just a few milliseconds after its presentation. Therefore, temporal imprecision and Poisson-like firing variability are not an obstacle to fast temporal coding. STDP provides an appealing mechanism to learn such rate patterns, which, beyond sensory processing, may also be involved in many cognitive tasks. PMID:22046113

  15. Quiet Spike(TradeMark) Build-up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Flight tests of the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation s Quiet Spike(TradeMark) hardware were recently completed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B airplane. NASA Dryden uses a modified F-15B (836) airplane as a testbed aircraft to cost-effectively fly flight research experiments that are typically mounted underneath the airplane, along the fuselage centerline. For the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment, instead of a centerline mounting, a forward-pointing boom was attached to the radar bulkhead of the airplane. The Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment is a stepping-stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate the sonic-boom strength of business jets flying over land. Prior to flying the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment on the F-15B airplane several ground vibration tests were required to understand the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B airplane. Because of flight hardware availability and compressed schedule requirements, a "traditional" ground vibration test of the mated F-15B Quiet Spike(TradeMark) ready-for-flight configuration did not leave sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight-testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. This report provides an overview of each phase of the "nontraditional" ground vibration testing completed for the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) project.

  16. Removing Cosmic Spikes Using a Hyperspectral Upper-Bound Spectrum Method.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Stephen M; Timlin, Jerilyn A

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in a hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. A comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.

  17. Synaptic convergence regulates synchronization-dependent spike transfer in feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sailamul, Pachaya; Jang, Jaeson; Paik, Se-Bum

    2017-12-01

    Correlated neural activities such as synchronizations can significantly alter the characteristics of spike transfer between neural layers. However, it is not clear how this synchronization-dependent spike transfer can be affected by the structure of convergent feedforward wiring. To address this question, we implemented computer simulations of model neural networks: a source and a target layer connected with different types of convergent wiring rules. In the Gaussian-Gaussian (GG) model, both the connection probability and the strength are given as Gaussian distribution as a function of spatial distance. In the Uniform-Constant (UC) and Uniform-Exponential (UE) models, the connection probability density is a uniform constant within a certain range, but the connection strength is set as a constant value or an exponentially decaying function, respectively. Then we examined how the spike transfer function is modulated under these conditions, while static or synchronized input patterns were introduced to simulate different levels of feedforward spike synchronization. We observed that the synchronization-dependent modulation of the transfer function appeared noticeably different for each convergence condition. The modulation of the spike transfer function was largest in the UC model, and smallest in the UE model. Our analysis showed that this difference was induced by the different spike weight distributions that was generated from convergent synapses in each model. Our results suggest that, the structure of the feedforward convergence is a crucial factor for correlation-dependent spike control, thus must be considered important to understand the mechanism of information transfer in the brain.

  18. Femtosecond laser fabricated spike structures for selective control of cellular behavior.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Sabrina; Fadeeva, Elena; Koch, Jürgen; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Chichkov, Boris N

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate the potential of femtosecond laser generated micrometer sized spike structures as functional surfaces for selective cell controlling. The spike dimensions as well as the average spike to spike distance can be easily tuned by varying the process parameters. Moreover, negative replications in soft materials such as silicone elastomer can be produced. This allows tailoring of wetting properties of the spike structures and their negative replicas representing a reduced surface contact area. Furthermore, we investigated material effects on cellular behavior. By comparing human fibroblasts and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells we found that the influence of the material was cell specific. The cells not only changed their morphology, but also the cell growth was affected. Whereas, neuroblastoma cells proliferated at the same rate on the spike structures as on the control surfaces, the proliferation of fibroblasts was reduced by the spike structures. These effects can result from the cell specific adhesion patterns as shown in this work. These findings show a possibility to design defined surface microstructures, which could control cellular behavior in a cell specific manner.

  19. Advanced correlation grid: Analysis and visualisation of functional connectivity among multiple spike trains.

    PubMed

    Masud, Mohammad Shahed; Borisyuk, Roman; Stuart, Liz

    2017-07-15

    This study analyses multiple spike trains (MST) data, defines its functional connectivity and subsequently visualises an accurate diagram of connections. This is a challenging problem. For example, it is difficult to distinguish the common input and the direct functional connection of two spike trains. The new method presented in this paper is based on the traditional pairwise cross-correlation function (CCF) and a new combination of statistical techniques. First, the CCF is used to create the Advanced Correlation Grid (ACG) correlation where both the significant peak of the CCF and the corresponding time delay are used for detailed analysis of connectivity. Second, these two features of functional connectivity are used to classify connections. Finally, the visualization technique is used to represent the topology of functional connections. Examples are presented in the paper to demonstrate the new Advanced Correlation Grid method and to show how it enables discrimination between (i) influence from one spike train to another through an intermediate spike train and (ii) influence from one common spike train to another pair of analysed spike trains. The ACG method enables scientists to automatically distinguish between direct connections from spurious connections such as common source connection and indirect connection whereas existing methods require in-depth analysis to identify such connections. The ACG is a new and effective method for studying functional connectivity of multiple spike trains. This method can identify accurately all the direct connections and can distinguish common source and indirect connections automatically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spike-Threshold Adaptation Predicted by Membrane Potential Dynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Bertrand; Peña, José Luis; Brette, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Neurons encode information in sequences of spikes, which are triggered when their membrane potential crosses a threshold. In vivo, the spiking threshold displays large variability suggesting that threshold dynamics have a profound influence on how the combined input of a neuron is encoded in the spiking. Threshold variability could be explained by adaptation to the membrane potential. However, it could also be the case that most threshold variability reflects noise and processes other than threshold adaptation. Here, we investigated threshold variation in auditory neurons responses recorded in vivo in barn owls. We found that spike threshold is quantitatively predicted by a model in which the threshold adapts, tracking the membrane potential at a short timescale. As a result, in these neurons, slow voltage fluctuations do not contribute to spiking because they are filtered by threshold adaptation. More importantly, these neurons can only respond to input spikes arriving together on a millisecond timescale. These results demonstrate that fast adaptation to the membrane potential captures spike threshold variability in vivo. PMID:24722397

  1. Neonatal NMDA Receptor Blockade Disrupts Spike Timing and Glutamatergic Synapses in Fast Spiking Interneurons in a NMDA Receptor Hypofunction Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin S.; Corbin, Joshua G.; Huntsman, Molly M.

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of parvalbumin-positive, fast-spiking interneurons (FSI) is considered a primary contributor to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ), but deficits in FSI physiology have not been explicitly characterized. We show for the first time, that a widely-employed model of schizophrenia minimizes first spike latency and increases GluN2B-mediated current in neocortical FSIs. The reduction in FSI first-spike latency coincides with reduced expression of the Kv1.1 potassium channel subunit which provides a biophysical explanation for the abnormal spiking behavior. Similarly, the increase in NMDA current coincides with enhanced expression of the GluN2B NMDA receptor subunit, specifically in FSIs. In this study mice were treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, during the first week of life. During adolescence, we detected reduced spike latency and increased GluN2B-mediated NMDA current in FSIs, which suggests transient disruption of NMDA signaling during neonatal development exerts lasting changes in the cellular and synaptic physiology of neocortical FSIs. Overall, we propose these physiological disturbances represent a general impairment to the physiological maturation of FSIs which may contribute to schizophrenia-like behaviors produced by this model. PMID:25290690

  2. Which spike train distance is most suitable for distinguishing rate and temporal coding?

    PubMed

    Satuvuori, Eero; Kreuz, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    It is commonly assumed in neuronal coding that repeated presentations of a stimulus to a coding neuron elicit similar responses. One common way to assess similarity are spike train distances. These can be divided into spike-resolved, such as the Victor-Purpura and the van Rossum distance, and time-resolved, e.g. the ISI-, the SPIKE- and the RI-SPIKE-distance. We use independent steady-rate Poisson processes as surrogates for spike trains with fixed rate and no timing information to address two basic questions: How does the sensitivity of the different spike train distances to temporal coding depend on the rates of the two processes and how do the distances deal with very low rates? Spike-resolved distances always contain rate information even for parameters indicating time coding. This is an issue for reasonably high rates but beneficial for very low rates. In contrast, the operational range for detecting time coding of time-resolved distances is superior at normal rates, but these measures produce artefacts at very low rates. The RI-SPIKE-distance is the only measure that is sensitive to timing information only. While our results on rate-dependent expectation values for the spike-resolved distances agree with Chicharro et al. (2011), we here go one step further and specifically investigate applicability for very low rates. The most appropriate measure depends on the rates of the data being analysed. Accordingly, we summarize our results in one table that allows an easy selection of the preferred measure for any kind of data. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh-Rose small-world neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural networks.

  4. What can neuromorphic event-driven precise timing add to spike-based pattern recognition?

    PubMed

    Akolkar, Himanshu; Meyer, Cedric; Clady, Zavier; Marre, Olivier; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Panzeri, Stefano; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-03-01

    This letter introduces a study to precisely measure what an increase in spike timing precision can add to spike-driven pattern recognition algorithms. The concept of generating spikes from images by converting gray levels into spike timings is currently at the basis of almost every spike-based modeling of biological visual systems. The use of images naturally leads to generating incorrect artificial and redundant spike timings and, more important, also contradicts biological findings indicating that visual processing is massively parallel, asynchronous with high temporal resolution. A new concept for acquiring visual information through pixel-individual asynchronous level-crossing sampling has been proposed in a recent generation of asynchronous neuromorphic visual sensors. Unlike conventional cameras, these sensors acquire data not at fixed points in time for the entire array but at fixed amplitude changes of their input, resulting optimally sparse in space and time-pixel individually and precisely timed only if new, (previously unknown) information is available (event based). This letter uses the high temporal resolution spiking output of neuromorphic event-based visual sensors to show that lowering time precision degrades performance on several recognition tasks specifically when reaching the conventional range of machine vision acquisition frequencies (30-60 Hz). The use of information theory to characterize separability between classes for each temporal resolution shows that high temporal acquisition provides up to 70% more information that conventional spikes generated from frame-based acquisition as used in standard artificial vision, thus drastically increasing the separability between classes of objects. Experiments on real data show that the amount of information loss is correlated with temporal precision. Our information-theoretic study highlights the potentials of neuromorphic asynchronous visual sensors for both practical applications and theoretical

  5. Coincidence detection in the medial superior olive: mechanistic implications of an analysis of input spiking patterns

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Tom P.; Bremen, Peter; Joris, Philip X.

    2014-01-01

    Coincidence detection by binaural neurons in the medial superior olive underlies sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural correlation (ρ). It is unclear whether this process is akin to a counting of individual coinciding spikes, or rather to a correlation of membrane potential waveforms resulting from converging inputs from each side. We analyzed spike trains of axons of the cat trapezoid body (TB) and auditory nerve (AN) in a binaural coincidence scheme. ITD was studied by delaying “ipsi-” vs. “contralateral” inputs; ρ was studied by using responses to different noises. We varied the number of inputs; the monaural and binaural threshold and the coincidence window duration. We examined physiological plausibility of output “spike trains” by comparing their rate and tuning to ITD and ρ to those of binaural cells. We found that multiple inputs are required to obtain a plausible output spike rate. In contrast to previous suggestions, monaural threshold almost invariably needed to exceed binaural threshold. Elevation of the binaural threshold to values larger than 2 spikes caused a drastic decrease in rate for a short coincidence window. Longer coincidence windows allowed a lower number of inputs and higher binaural thresholds, but decreased the depth of modulation. Compared to AN fibers, TB fibers allowed higher output spike rates for a low number of inputs, but also generated more monaural coincidences. We conclude that, within the parameter space explored, the temporal patterns of monaural fibers require convergence of multiple inputs to achieve physiological binaural spike rates; that monaural coincidences have to be suppressed relative to binaural ones; and that the neuron has to be sensitive to single binaural coincidences of spikes, for a number of excitatory inputs per side of 10 or less. These findings suggest that the fundamental operation in the mammalian binaural circuit is coincidence counting of single binaural input

  6. Spike sorting using locality preserving projection with gap statistics and landmark-based spectral clustering.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh; Khosravi, Abbas; Creighton, Douglas; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2014-12-30

    Understanding neural functions requires knowledge from analysing electrophysiological data. The process of assigning spikes of a multichannel signal into clusters, called spike sorting, is one of the important problems in such analysis. There have been various automated spike sorting techniques with both advantages and disadvantages regarding accuracy and computational costs. Therefore, developing spike sorting methods that are highly accurate and computationally inexpensive is always a challenge in the biomedical engineering practice. An automatic unsupervised spike sorting method is proposed in this paper. The method uses features extracted by the locality preserving projection (LPP) algorithm. These features afterwards serve as inputs for the landmark-based spectral clustering (LSC) method. Gap statistics (GS) is employed to evaluate the number of clusters before the LSC can be performed. The proposed LPP-LSC is highly accurate and computationally inexpensive spike sorting approach. LPP spike features are very discriminative; thereby boost the performance of clustering methods. Furthermore, the LSC method exhibits its efficiency when integrated with the cluster evaluator GS. The proposed method's accuracy is approximately 13% superior to that of the benchmark combination between wavelet transformation and superparamagnetic clustering (WT-SPC). Additionally, LPP-LSC computing time is six times less than that of the WT-SPC. LPP-LSC obviously demonstrates a win-win spike sorting solution meeting both accuracy and computational cost criteria. LPP and LSC are linear algorithms that help reduce computational burden and thus their combination can be applied into real-time spike analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis for Abnormal Spike Development of the Wheat Mutant dms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin-Xin; Li, Qiao-Yun; Shen, Chun-Cai; Duan, Zong-Biao; Yu, Dong-Yan; Niu, Ji-Shan; Ni, Yong-Jing; Jiang, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) spike development is the foundation for grain yield. We obtained a novel wheat mutant, dms, characterized as dwarf, multi-pistil and sterility. Although the genetic changes are not clear, the heredity of traits suggests that a recessive gene locus controls the two traits of multi-pistil and sterility in self-pollinating populations of the medium plants (M), such that the dwarf genotype (D) and tall genotype (T) in the progeny of the mutant are ideal lines for studies regarding wheat spike development. The objective of this study was to explore the molecular basis for spike abnormalities of dwarf genotype. Results Four unigene libraries were assembled by sequencing the mRNAs of the super-bulked differentiating spikes and stem tips of the D and T plants. Using integrative analysis, we identified 419 genes highly expressed in spikes, including nine typical homeotic genes of the MADS-box family and the genes TaAP2, TaFL and TaDL. We also identified 143 genes that were significantly different between young spikes of T and D, and 26 genes that were putatively involved in spike differentiation. The result showed that the expression levels of TaAP1-2, TaAP2, and other genes involved in the majority of biological processes such as transcription, translation, cell division, photosynthesis, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and energy production and conversion were significantly lower in D than in T. Conclusions We identified a set of genes related to wheat floral organ differentiation, including typical homeotic genes. Our results showed that the major causal factors resulting in the spike abnormalities of dms were the lower expression homeotic genes, hormonal imbalance, repressed biological processes, and deficiency of construction materials and energy. We performed a series of studies on the homeotic genes, however the other three causal factors for spike abnormal phenotype of dms need further study. PMID:26982202

  8. On the applicability of STDP-based learning mechanisms to spiking neuron network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A.; Vlasov, D.; Serenko, A.; Rybka, R.; Moloshnikov, I.

    2016-11-01

    The ways to creating practically effective method for spiking neuron networks learning, that would be appropriate for implementing in neuromorphic hardware and at the same time based on the biologically plausible plasticity rules, namely, on STDP, are discussed. The influence of the amount of correlation between input and output spike trains on the learnability by different STDP rules is evaluated. A usability of alternative combined learning schemes, involving artificial and spiking neuron models is demonstrated on the iris benchmark task and on the practical task of gender recognition.

  9. Fusion partners can increase the expression of recombinant interleukins via transient transfection in 2936E cells

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jane; Zhang, Jue; Dang, Thien-Lan; Hasegawa, Haruki; Cheng, Janet D; Gianan, Irene; O'Neill, Jason W; Wolfson, Martin; Siu, Sophia; Qu, Sheldon; Meininger, David; Kim, Helen; Delaney, John; Mehlin, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The expression levels of five secreted target interleukins (IL-11, 15, 17B, 32, and IL23 p19 subunit) were tested with three different fusion partners in 2936E cells. When fused to the N-terminus, human serum albumin (HSA) was found to enhance the expression of both IL-17B and IL-15, cytokines which did not express at measurable levels on their own. Although the crystallizable fragment of an antibody (Fc) was also an effective fusion partner for IL-17B, Fc did not increase expression of IL-15. Fc was superior to HSA for the expression of the p19 subunit of IL-23, but no partner led to measurable levels of IL-32γ secretion. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not enhance the expression of any target and suppressed the production of IL-11, a cytokine which expressed robustly both on its own and when fused to HSA or Fc. Cleavage of the fusion partner was not always possible. The use of HSA or Fc as N-terminal fusions can be an effective technique to express difficult proteins, especially for applications in which the fusion partner need not be removed. PMID:20014434

  10. Delay selection by spike-timing-dependent plasticity in recurrent networks of spiking neurons receiving oscillatory inputs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert R; Burkitt, Anthony N; Thomas, Doreen A; Gilson, Matthieu; Grayden, David B

    2013-01-01

    Learning rules, such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), change the structure of networks of neurons based on the firing activity. A network level understanding of these mechanisms can help infer how the brain learns patterns and processes information. Previous studies have shown that STDP selectively potentiates feed-forward connections that have specific axonal delays, and that this underlies behavioral functions such as sound localization in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. In this study, we investigate how STDP leads to the selective potentiation of recurrent connections with different axonal and dendritic delays during oscillatory activity. We develop analytical models of learning with additive STDP in recurrent networks driven by oscillatory inputs, and support the results using simulations with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. Our results show selective potentiation of connections with specific axonal delays, which depended on the input frequency. In addition, we demonstrate how this can lead to a network becoming selective in the amplitude of its oscillatory response to this frequency. We extend this model of axonal delay selection within a single recurrent network in two ways. First, we show the selective potentiation of connections with a range of both axonal and dendritic delays. Second, we show axonal delay selection between multiple groups receiving out-of-phase, oscillatory inputs. We discuss the application of these models to the formation and activation of neuronal ensembles or cell assemblies in the cortex, and also to missing fundamental pitch perception in the auditory brainstem.

  11. Delay Selection by Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Recurrent Networks of Spiking Neurons Receiving Oscillatory Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert R.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Thomas, Doreen A.; Gilson, Matthieu; Grayden, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Learning rules, such as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), change the structure of networks of neurons based on the firing activity. A network level understanding of these mechanisms can help infer how the brain learns patterns and processes information. Previous studies have shown that STDP selectively potentiates feed-forward connections that have specific axonal delays, and that this underlies behavioral functions such as sound localization in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl. In this study, we investigate how STDP leads to the selective potentiation of recurrent connections with different axonal and dendritic delays during oscillatory activity. We develop analytical models of learning with additive STDP in recurrent networks driven by oscillatory inputs, and support the results using simulations with leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. Our results show selective potentiation of connections with specific axonal delays, which depended on the input frequency. In addition, we demonstrate how this can lead to a network becoming selective in the amplitude of its oscillatory response to this frequency. We extend this model of axonal delay selection within a single recurrent network in two ways. First, we show the selective potentiation of connections with a range of both axonal and dendritic delays. Second, we show axonal delay selection between multiple groups receiving out-of-phase, oscillatory inputs. We discuss the application of these models to the formation and activation of neuronal ensembles or cell assemblies in the cortex, and also to missing fundamental pitch perception in the auditory brainstem. PMID:23408878

  12. The Holocene Geomagnetic Field: Spikes, Low Field Anomalies, and Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of the Holocene magnetic field is constrained by individual paleomagnetic records of variable quality and resolution, composite regional secular variation curves, and low resolution global time-varying geomagnetic field models. Although spatial and temporal data coverages have greatly improved in recent years, typical views of millennial-scale secular variation and the underlying physical processes continue to be heavily influenced by more detailed field structure and short term variability inferred from the historical record and modern observations. Recent models of gyre driven decay of the geomagnetic dipole on centennial time scales, and studies of the evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly provide one prominent example. Since 1840 dipole decay has largely been driven by meridional flux advection, with generally smaller fairly steady contributions from magnetic diffusion. The decay is dominantly associated with geomagnetic activity in the Southern Hemisphere. In contrast to the present decay, dipole strength generally grew between 1500 and 1000 BC, sustaining high but fluctuating values around 90-100 ZAm2 until after 1500 AD. Thus high dipole moments appear to have been present shortly after 1000 AD at the time of the Levantine spikes, which represent extreme variations in regional geomagnetic field strength. It has been speculated that the growth in dipole moment originated from a strong flux patch near the equatorial region at the core-mantle boundary that migrated north and west to augment the dipole strength, suggesting the presence of a large-scale anticyclonic gyre in the northern hemisphere, not totally unlike the southern hemisphere flow that dominates present day dipole decay. The later brief episodes of high field strength in the Levant may have contributed to prolonged values of high dipole strength until the onset of dipole decay in the late second millennium AD. This could support the concept of a large-scale stable flow

  13. Colored noise and memory effects on formal spiking neuron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. A.; Vilela, R. D.

    2015-06-01

    Simplified neuronal models capture the essence of the electrical activity of a generic neuron, besides being more interesting from the computational point of view when compared to higher-dimensional models such as the Hodgkin-Huxley one. In this work, we propose a generalized resonate-and-fire model described by a generalized Langevin equation that takes into account memory effects and colored noise. We perform a comprehensive numerical analysis to study the dynamics and the point process statistics of the proposed model, highlighting interesting new features such as (i) nonmonotonic behavior (emergence of peak structures, enhanced by the choice of colored noise characteristic time scale) of the coefficient of variation (CV) as a function of memory characteristic time scale, (ii) colored noise-induced shift in the CV, and (iii) emergence and suppression of multimodality in the interspike interval (ISI) distribution due to memory-induced subthreshold oscillations. Moreover, in the noise-induced spike regime, we study how memory and colored noise affect the coherence resonance (CR) phenomenon. We found that for sufficiently long memory, not only is CR suppressed but also the minimum of the CV-versus-noise intensity curve that characterizes the presence of CR may be replaced by a maximum. The aforementioned features allow to interpret the interplay between memory and colored noise as an effective control mechanism to neuronal variability. Since both variability and nontrivial temporal patterns in the ISI distribution are ubiquitous in biological cells, we hope the present model can be useful in modeling real aspects of neurons.

  14. Spike-frequency adaptation in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Neil J; McAlpine, David

    2004-02-01

    We investigated spike-frequency adaptation of neurons sensitive to interaural phase disparities (IPDs) in the inferior colliculus (IC) of urethane-anesthetized guinea pigs using a stimulus paradigm designed to exclude the influence of adaptation below the level of binaural integration. The IPD-step stimulus consists of a binaural 3,000-ms tone, in which the first 1,000 ms is held at a neuron's least favorable ("worst") IPD, adapting out monaural components, before being stepped rapidly to a neuron's most favorable ("best") IPD for 300 ms. After some variable interval (1-1,000 ms), IPD is again stepped to the best IPD for 300 ms, before being returned to a neuron's worst IPD for the remainder of the stimulus. Exponential decay functions fitted to the response to best-IPD steps revealed an average adaptation time constant of 52.9 +/- 26.4 ms. Recovery from adaptation to best IPD steps showed an average time constant of 225.5 +/- 210.2 ms. Recovery time constants were not correlated with adaptation time constants. During the recovery period, adaptation to a 2nd best-IPD step followed similar kinetics to adaptation during the 1st best-IPD step. The mean adaptation time constant at stimulus onset (at worst IPD) was 34.8 +/- 19.7 ms, similar to the 38.4 +/- 22.1 ms recorded to contralateral stimulation alone. Individual time constants after stimulus onset were correlated with each other but not with time constants during the best-IPD step. We conclude that such binaurally derived measures of adaptation reflect processes that occur above the level of exclusively monaural pathways, and subsequent to the site of primary binaural interaction.

  15. A History of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Markram, Henry; Gerstner, Wulfram; Sjöström, Per Jesper

    2011-01-01

    How learning and memory is achieved in the brain is a central question in neuroscience. Key to today’s research into information storage in the brain is the concept of synaptic plasticity, a notion that has been heavily influenced by Hebb's (1949) postulate. Hebb conjectured that repeatedly and persistently co-active cells should increase connective strength among populations of interconnected neurons as a means of storing a memory trace, also known as an engram. Hebb certainly was not the first to make such a conjecture, as we show in this history. Nevertheless, literally thousands of studies into the classical frequency-dependent paradigm of cellular learning rules were directly inspired by the Hebbian postulate. But in more recent years, a novel concept in cellular learning has emerged, where temporal order instead of frequency is emphasized. This new learning paradigm – known as spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) – has rapidly gained tremendous interest, perhaps because of its combination of elegant simplicity, biological plausibility, and computational power. But what are the roots of today’s STDP concept? Here, we discuss several centuries of diverse thinking, beginning with philosophers such as Aristotle, Locke, and Ribot, traversing, e.g., Lugaro’s plasticità and Rosenblatt’s perceptron, and culminating with the discovery of STDP. We highlight interactions between theoretical and experimental fields, showing how discoveries sometimes occurred in parallel, seemingly without much knowledge of the other field, and sometimes via concrete back-and-forth communication. We point out where the future directions may lie, which includes interneuron STDP, the functional impact of STDP, its mechanisms and its neuromodulatory regulation, and the linking of STDP to the developmental formation and continuous plasticity of neuronal networks. PMID:22007168

  16. Neuromorphic implementations of neurobiological learning algorithms for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Walter, Florian; Röhrbein, Florian; Knoll, Alois

    2015-12-01

    The application of biologically inspired methods in design and control has a long tradition in robotics. Unlike previous approaches in this direction, the emerging field of neurorobotics not only mimics biological mechanisms at a relatively high level of abstraction but employs highly realistic simulations of actual biological nervous systems. Even today, carrying out these simulations efficiently at appropriate timescales is challenging. Neuromorphic chip designs specially tailored to this task therefore offer an interesting perspective for neurorobotics. Unlike Von Neumann CPUs, these chips cannot be simply programmed with a standard programming language. Like real brains, their functionality is determined by the structure of neural connectivity and synaptic efficacies. Enabling higher cognitive functions for neurorobotics consequently requires the application of neurobiological learning algorithms to adjust synaptic weights in a biologically plausible way. In this paper, we therefore investigate how to program neuromorphic chips by means of learning. First, we provide an overview over selected neuromorphic chip designs and analyze them in terms of neural computation, communication systems and software infrastructure. On the theoretical side, we review neurobiological learning techniques. Based on this overview, we then examine on-die implementations of these learning algorithms on the considered neuromorphic chips. A final discussion puts the findings of this work into context and highlights how neuromorphic hardware can potentially advance the field of autonomous robot systems. The paper thus gives an in-depth overview of neuromorphic implementations of basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity which are required to realize advanced cognitive capabilities with spiking neural networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Depotentiation following Induction of Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pedroarena-Leal, Nicole; Heidemeyer, Larissa; Trenado, Carlos; Ruge, Diane

    2018-06-18

    Depotentiation (DP) is a crucial mechanism for the tuning of memory traces once LTP (Long Term Potentiation) has been induced via learning, artificial procedures, or other activities. Putative unuseful LTP might be abolished via this process. Its deficiency is thought to play a role in pathologies, such as drug induced dyskinesia. However, since it is thought that it represents a mechanism that is linked to the susceptibility to interference during consolidation of a memory trace, it is an important process to consider when therapeutic interventions, such as psychotherapy, are administered. Perhaps a person with an abnormal depotentiation is prone to lose learned effects very easily or on the other end of the spectrum is prone to overload with previously generated unuseful LTP. Perhaps this process partly explains why some disorders and patients are extremely resistant to therapy. The present study seeks to quantify the relationship between LTP and depotentiation in the human brain by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the cortex of healthy participants. The results provide further evidence that depotentiation can be quantified in humans by use of noninvasive brain stimulation techniques. They provide evidence that a nonfocal rhythmic on its own inefficient stimulation, such as a modified thetaburst stimulation, can depotentiate an associative, focal spike timing-dependent PAS (paired associative stimulation)-induced LTP. Therefore, the depotentiation-like process does not seem to be restricted to specific subgroups of synapses that have undergone LTP before. Most importantly, the induced LTP seems highly correlated with the amount of generated depotentiation in healthy individuals. This might be a phenomenon typical of health and might be distorted in brain pathologies, such as dystonia, or dyskinesias. The ratio of LTP/DP might be a valuable marker for potential distortions of persistence versus deletion of memory traces represented by LTP

  18. Connectomic constraints on computation in feedforward networks of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Venkatakrishnan; Banerjee, Arunava

    2014-10-01

    Several efforts are currently underway to decipher the connectome or parts thereof in a variety of organisms. Ascertaining the detailed physiological properties of all the neurons in these connectomes, however, is out of the scope of such projects. It is therefore unclear to what extent knowledge of the connectome alone will advance a mechanistic understanding of computation occurring in these neural circuits, especially when the high-level function of the said circuit is unknown. We consider, here, the question of how the wiring diagram of neurons imposes constraints on what neural circuits can compute, when we cannot assume detailed information on the physiological response properties of the neurons. We call such constraints-that arise by virtue of the connectome-connectomic constraints on computation. For feedforward networks equipped with neurons that obey a deterministic spiking neuron model which satisfies a small number of properties, we ask if just by knowing the architecture of a network, we can rule out computations that it could be doing, no matter what response properties each of its neurons may have. We show results of this form, for certain classes of network architectures. On the other hand, we also prove that with the limited set of properties assumed for our model neurons, there are fundamental limits to the constraints imposed by network structure. Thus, our theory suggests that while connectomic constraints might restrict the computational ability of certain classes of network architectures, we may require more elaborate information on the properties of neurons in the network, before we can discern such results for other classes of networks.

  19. Just-in-time connectivity for large spiking networks.

    PubMed

    Lytton, William W; Omurtag, Ahmet; Neymotin, Samuel A; Hines, Michael L

    2008-11-01

    The scale of large neuronal network simulations is memory limited due to the need to store connectivity information: connectivity storage grows as the square of neuron number up to anatomically relevant limits. Using the NEURON simulator as a discrete-event simulator (no integration), we explored the consequences of avoiding the space costs of connectivity through regenerating connectivity parameters when needed: just in time after a presynaptic cell fires. We explored various strategies for automated generation of one or more of the basic static connectivity parameters: delays, postsynaptic cell identities, and weights, as well as run-time connectivity state: the event queue. Comparison of the JitCon implementation to NEURON's standard NetCon connectivity method showed substantial space savings, with associated run-time penalty. Although JitCon saved space by eliminating connectivity parameters, larger simulations were still memory limited due to growth of the synaptic event queue. We therefore designed a JitEvent algorithm that added items to the queue only when required: instead of alerting multiple postsynaptic cells, a spiking presynaptic cell posted a callback event at the shortest synaptic delay time. At the time of the callback, this same presynaptic cell directly notified the first postsynaptic cell and generated another self-callback for the next delay time. The JitEvent implementation yielded substantial additional time and space savings. We conclude that just-in-time strategies are necessary for very large network simulations but that a variety of alternative strategies should be considered whose optimality will depend on the characteristics of the simulation to be run.

  20. Just in time connectivity for large spiking networks

    PubMed Central

    Lytton, William W.; Omurtag, Ahmet; Neymotin, Samuel A; Hines, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    The scale of large neuronal network simulations is memory-limited due to the need to store connectivity information: connectivity storage grows as the square of neuron number up to anatomically-relevant limits. Using the NEURON simulator as a discrete-event simulator (no integration), we explored the consequences of avoiding the space costs of connectivity through regenerating connectivity parameters when needed – just-in-time after a presynaptic cell fires. We explored various strategies for automated generation of one or more of the basic static connectivity parameters: delays, postsynaptic cell identities and weights, as well as run-time connectivity state: the event queue. Comparison of the JitCon implementation to NEURON’s standard NetCon connectivity method showed substantial space savings, with associated run-time penalty. Although JitCon saved space by eliminating connectivity parameters, larger simulations were still memory-limited due to growth of the synaptic event queue. We therefore designed a JitEvent algorithm that only added items to the queue when required: instead of alerting multiple postsynaptic cells, a spiking presynaptic cell posted a callback event at the shortest synaptic delay time. At the time of the callback, this same presynaptic cell directly notified the first postsynaptic cell and generated another self-callback for the next delay time. The JitEvent implementation yielded substantial additional time and space savings. We conclude that just-in-time strategies are necessary for very large network simulations but that a variety of alternative strategies should be considered whose optimality will depend on the characteristics of the simulation to be run. PMID:18533821

  1. Extracting functionally feedforward networks from a population of spiking neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kathleen; Tauskela, Joseph S.; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches are a ubiquitous form of activity characterized by spontaneous bursts whose size distribution follows a power-law. Recent theoretical models have replicated power-law avalanches by assuming the presence of functionally feedforward connections (FFCs) in the underlying dynamics of the system. Accordingly, avalanches are generated by a feedforward chain of activation that persists despite being embedded in a larger, massively recurrent circuit. However, it is unclear to what extent networks of living neurons that exhibit power-law avalanches rely on FFCs. Here, we employed a computational approach to reconstruct the functional connectivity of cultured cortical neurons plated on multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and investigated whether pharmacologically induced alterations in avalanche dynamics are accompanied by changes in FFCs. This approach begins by extracting a functional network of directed links between pairs of neurons, and then evaluates the strength of FFCs using Schur decomposition. In a first step, we examined the ability of this approach to extract FFCs from simulated spiking neurons. The strength of FFCs obtained in strictly feedforward networks diminished monotonically as links were gradually rewired at random. Next, we estimated the FFCs of spontaneously active cortical neuron cultures in the presence of either a control medium, a GABAA receptor antagonist (PTX), or an AMPA receptor antagonist combined with an NMDA receptor antagonist (APV/DNQX). The distribution of avalanche sizes in these cultures was modulated by this pharmacology, with a shallower power-law under PTX (due to the prominence of larger avalanches) and a steeper power-law under APV/DNQX (due to avalanches recruiting fewer neurons) relative to control cultures. The strength of FFCs increased in networks after application of PTX, consistent with an amplification of feedforward activity during avalanches. Conversely, FFCs decreased after application of APV/DNQX, consistent

  2. Extracting functionally feedforward networks from a population of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kathleen; Tauskela, Joseph S; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches are a ubiquitous form of activity characterized by spontaneous bursts whose size distribution follows a power-law. Recent theoretical models have replicated power-law avalanches by assuming the presence of functionally feedforward connections (FFCs) in the underlying dynamics of the system. Accordingly, avalanches are generated by a feedforward chain of activation that persists despite being embedded in a larger, massively recurrent circuit. However, it is unclear to what extent networks of living neurons that exhibit power-law avalanches rely on FFCs. Here, we employed a computational approach to reconstruct the functional connectivity of cultured cortical neurons plated on multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and investigated whether pharmacologically induced alterations in avalanche dynamics are accompanied by changes in FFCs. This approach begins by extracting a functional network of directed links between pairs of neurons, and then evaluates the strength of FFCs using Schur decomposition. In a first step, we examined the ability of this approach to extract FFCs from simulated spiking neurons. The strength of FFCs obtained in strictly feedforward networks diminished monotonically as links were gradually rewired at random. Next, we estimated the FFCs of spontaneously active cortical neuron cultures in the presence of either a control medium, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist (PTX), or an AMPA receptor antagonist combined with an NMDA receptor antagonist (APV/DNQX). The distribution of avalanche sizes in these cultures was modulated by this pharmacology, with a shallower power-law under PTX (due to the prominence of larger avalanches) and a steeper power-law under APV/DNQX (due to avalanches recruiting fewer neurons) relative to control cultures. The strength of FFCs increased in networks after application of PTX, consistent with an amplification of feedforward activity during avalanches. Conversely, FFCs decreased after application of APV

  3. An FPGA Implementation of a Polychronous Spiking Neural Network with Delay Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runchun; Cohen, Gregory; Stiefel, Klaus M; Hamilton, Tara Julia; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André

    2013-01-01

    We present an FPGA implementation of a re-configurable, polychronous spiking neural network with a large capacity for spatial-temporal patterns. The proposed neural network generates delay paths de novo, so that only connections that actually appear in the training patterns will be created. This allows the proposed network to use all the axons (variables) to store information. Spike Timing Dependent Delay Plasticity is used to fine-tune and add dynamics to the network. We use a time multiplexing approach allowing us to achieve 4096 (4k) neurons and up to 1.15 million programmable delay axons on a Virtex 6 FPGA. Test results show that the proposed neural network is capable of successfully recalling more than 95% of all spikes for 96% of the stored patterns. The tests also show that the neural network is robust to noise from random input spikes.

  4. Volatile organic compound matrix spike recoveries for ground- and surface-water samples, 1997-2001

    Rowe, Barbara L.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program used field matrix spikes (FMSs), field matrix spike replicates (FMSRs), laboratory matrix spikes (LMSs), and laboratory reagent spikes (LRSs), in part, to assess the quality of volatile organic compound (VOC) data from water samples collected and analyzed in more than 50 of the Nation's largest river basins and aquifers (Study Units). The data-quality objectives of the NAWQA Program include estimating the extent to which variability, degradation, and matrix effects, if any, may affect the interpretation of chemical analyses of ground- and surface-water samples. In order to help meet these objectives, a known mass of VOCs was added (spiked) to water samples collected in 25 Study Units. Data within this report include recoveries from 276 ground- and surface-water samples spiked with a 25-microliter syringe with a spike solution containing 85 VOCs to achieve a concentration of 0.5 microgram per liter. Combined recoveries for 85 VOCs from spiked ground- and surface-water samples and reagent water were used to broadly characterize the overall recovery of VOCs. Median recoveries for 149 FMSs, 107 FMSRs, 20 LMSs, and 152 LRSs were 79.9, 83.3, 113.1, and 103.5 percent, respectively. Spike recoveries for 85 VOCs also were calculated individually. With the exception of a few VOCs, the median percent recoveries determined from each spike type for individual VOCs followed the same pattern as for all VOC recoveries combined, that is, listed from least to greatest recovery-FMSs, FMSRs, LRSs, and LMSs. The median recoveries for individual VOCs ranged from 63.7 percent to 101.5 percent in FMSs; 63.1 percent to 101.4 percent in FMSRs; 101.7 percent to 135.0 percent in LMSs; and 91.0 percent to 118.7 percent in LRSs. Additionally, individual VOC recoveries were compared among paired spike types, and these recoveries were used to evaluate potential bias in the method. Variability associated with field

  5. Field application of Z-spike rejuvenation to salvage timber railroad bridges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    The technique of rejuvenating wood and timber members by shear spiking (vertically inserting fiberglass reinforced polymer rods into deteriorated members) evolved over several years of laboratory research at Colorado State University (CSU). Specimens...

  6. Classification of epileptiform and wicket spike of EEG pattern using backpropagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspita, Juni Wijayanti; Jaya, Agus Indra; Gunadharma, Suryani

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by recurrent seizures that is resulted by permanent brain abnormalities. One of tools to support the diagnosis of epilepsy is Electroencephalograph (EEG), which describes the recording of brain electrical activity. Abnormal EEG patterns in epilepsy patients consist of Spike and Sharp waves. While both waves, there is a normal pattern that sometimes misinterpreted as epileptiform by electroenchepalographer (EEGer), namely Wicket Spike. The main difference of the three waves are on the time duration that related to the frequency. In this study, we proposed a method to classify a EEG wave into Sharp wave, Spike wave or Wicket spike group using Backpropagation Neural Network based on the frequency and amplitude of each wave. The results show that the proposed method can classifies the three group of waves with good accuracy.

  7. SPIKES: a framework for breaking bad news to patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcelle

    2010-08-01

    SPIKES is an acronym for presenting distressing information in an organized manner to patients and families. The SPIKES protocol provides a step-wise framework for difficult discussions such as when cancer recurs or when palliative or hospice care is indicated. Each letter represents a phase in the six-step sequence. S stands for setting, P for perception, I for invitation or information, K for knowledge, E for empathy, and S for summarize or strategize. Breaking bad news is a complex communication task, but following the SPIKES protocol can help ease the distress felt by the patient who is receiving the news and the healthcare professional who is breaking the news. Key components of the SPIKES strategy include demonstrating empathy, acknowledging and validating the patient's feelings, exploring the patient's understanding and acceptance of the bad news, and providing information about possible interventions. Having a plan of action provides structure for this difficult discussion and helps support all involved.

  8. Multivariate Autoregressive Modeling and Granger Causality Analysis of Multiple Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Krumin, Michael; Shoham, Shy

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of microelectrode arrays and optical methods allowing simultaneous recording of spiking activity from populations of neurons in various parts of the nervous system. The analysis of multiple neural spike train data could benefit significantly from existing methods for multivariate time-series analysis which have proven to be very powerful in the modeling and analysis of continuous neural signals like EEG signals. However, those methods have not generally been well adapted to point processes. Here, we use our recent results on correlation distortions in multivariate Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson spiking neuron models to derive generalized Yule-Walker-type equations for fitting ‘‘hidden” Multivariate Autoregressive models. We use this new framework to perform Granger causality analysis in order to extract the directed information flow pattern in networks of simulated spiking neurons. We discuss the relative merits and limitations of the new method. PMID:20454705

  9. A model of the thermal-spike mechanism in graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a thermal spike on a moisture-saturated graphite/epoxy composite was studied in detail. A single thermal spike from 25 C to 132 C was found to produce damage as evidenced by a significant increase in the level of moisture saturation in the composite. Approximately half of this increase remained after a vacuum anneal at 150 C for 7 days, suggesting the presence of an irreversible damage component. Subsequent thermal spikes created less and less additional moisture absorption, with the cumulative effect being a maximum or limiting moisture capacity of the composite. These observations are explained in terms of a model previously developed to explain the reverse thermal effect of moisture absorption in epoxy and epoxy matrix composites. This model, based on the inverse temperature dependence of free volume, contributes an improved understanding of thermal-spike effects in graphite/epoxy composites.

  10. Minimizing the effect of process mismatch in a neuromorphic system using spike-timing-dependent adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Katherine; Murray, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates whether spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) can minimize the effect of mismatch within the context of a depth-from-motion algorithm. To improve noise rejection, this algorithm contains a spike prediction element, whose performance is degraded by analog very large scale integration (VLSI) mismatch. The error between the actual spike arrival time and the prediction is used as the input to an STDP circuit, to improve future predictions. Before STDP adaptation, the error reflects the degree of mismatch within the prediction circuitry. After STDP adaptation, the error indicates to what extent the adaptive circuitry can minimize the effect of transistor mismatch. The circuitry is tested with static and varying prediction times and chip results are presented. The effect of noisy spikes is also investigated. Under all conditions the STDP adaptation is shown to improve performance.

  11. Automatic online spike sorting with singular value decomposition and fuzzy C-mean clustering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding how neurons contribute to perception, motor functions and cognition requires the reliable detection of spiking activity of individual neurons during a number of different experimental conditions. An important problem in computational neuroscience is thus to develop algorithms to automatically detect and sort the spiking activity of individual neurons from extracellular recordings. While many algorithms for spike sorting exist, the problem of accurate and fast online sorting still remains a challenging issue. Results Here we present a novel software tool, called FSPS (Fuzzy SPike Sorting), which is designed to optimize: (i) fast and accurate detection, (ii) offline sorting and (iii) online classification of neuronal spikes with very limited or null human intervention. The method is based on a combination of Singular Value Decomposition for fast and highly accurate pre-processing of spike shapes, unsupervised Fuzzy C-mean, high-resolution alignment of extracted spike waveforms, optimal selection of the number of features to retain, automatic identification the number of clusters, and quantitative quality assessment of resulting clusters independent on their size. After being trained on a short testing data stream, the method can reliably perform supervised online classification and monitoring of single neuron activity. The generalized procedure has been implemented in our FSPS spike sorting software (available free for non-commercial academic applications at the address: http://www.spikesorting.com) using LabVIEW (National Instruments, USA). We evaluated the performance of our algorithm both on benchmark simulated datasets with different levels of background noise and on real extracellular recordings from premotor cortex of Macaque monkeys. The results of these tests showed an excellent accuracy in discriminating low-amplitude and overlapping spikes under strong background noise. The performance of our method is competitive with respect to

  12. An empirical investigation of motion effects in eMRI of interictal epileptiform spikes.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Padmavathi; Mulkern, Robert V; Wells, William M; Triantafyllou, Christina; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Bubrick, Ellen J; Orbach, Darren B

    2011-12-01

    We recently developed a functional neuroimaging technique called encephalographic magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI). Our method acquires rapid single-shot gradient-echo echo-planar MRI (repetition time=47 ms); it attempts to measure an MR signal more directly linked to neuronal electromagnetic activity than existing methods. To increase the likelihood of detecting such an MR signal, we recorded concurrent MRI and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) during fast (20-200 ms), localized, high-amplitude (>50 μV on EEG) cortical discharges in a cohort of focal epilepsy patients. Seen on EEG as interictal spikes, these discharges occur in between seizures and induced easily detectable MR magnitude and phase changes concurrent with the spikes with a lag of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. Due to the time scale of the responses, localized changes in blood flow or hemoglobin oxygenation are unlikely to cause the MR signal changes that we observed. While the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear, in this study, we empirically investigate one potentially important confounding variable - motion. Head motion in the scanner affects both EEG and MR recording. It can produce brief "spike-like" artifacts on EEG and induce large MR signal changes similar to our interictal spike-related signal changes. In order to explore the possibility that interictal spikes were associated with head motions (although such an association had never been reported), we had previously tracked head position in epilepsy patients during interictal spikes and explicitly demonstrated a lack of associated head motion. However, that study was performed outside the MR scanner, and the root-mean-square error in the head position measurement was 0.7 mm. The large inaccuracy in this measurement therefore did not definitively rule out motion as a possible signal generator. In this study, we instructed healthy subjects to make deliberate brief (<500 ms) head motions inside the MR scanner and imaged these

  13. Automatic online spike sorting with singular value decomposition and fuzzy C-mean clustering.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Andriy; Bonifazzi, Claudio; Montani, Fernando; Fadiga, Luciano

    2012-08-08

    Understanding how neurons contribute to perception, motor functions and cognition requires the reliable detection of spiking activity of individual neurons during a number of different experimental conditions. An important problem in computational neuroscience is thus to develop algorithms to automatically detect and sort the spiking activity of individual neurons from extracellular recordings. While many algorithms for spike sorting exist, the problem of accurate and fast online sorting still remains a challenging issue. Here we present a novel software tool, called FSPS (Fuzzy SPike Sorting), which is designed to optimize: (i) fast and accurate detection, (ii) offline sorting and (iii) online classification of neuronal spikes with very limited or null human intervention. The method is based on a combination of Singular Value Decomposition for fast and highly accurate pre-processing of spike shapes, unsupervised Fuzzy C-mean, high-resolution alignment of extracted spike waveforms, optimal selection of the number of features to retain, automatic identification the number of clusters, and quantitative quality assessment of resulting clusters independent on their size. After being trained on a short testing data stream, the method can reliably perform supervised online classification and monitoring of single neuron activity. The generalized procedure has been implemented in our FSPS spike sorting software (available free for non-commercial academic applications at the address: http://www.spikesorting.com) using LabVIEW (National Instruments, USA). We evaluated the performance of our algorithm both on benchmark simulated datasets with different levels of background noise and on real extracellular recordings from premotor cortex of Macaque monkeys. The results of these tests showed an excellent accuracy in discriminating low-amplitude and overlapping spikes under strong background noise. The performance of our method is competitive with respect to other robust spike

  14. Neuronal Spike Timing Adaptation Described with a Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Model

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Wondimu; Marinov, Toma M.; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    The voltage trace of neuronal activities can follow multiple timescale dynamics that arise from correlated membrane conductances. Such processes can result in power-law behavior in which the membrane voltage cannot be characterized with a single time constant. The emergent effect of these membrane correlations is a non-Markovian process that can be modeled with a fractional derivative. A fractional derivative is a non-local process in which the value of the variable is determined by integrating a temporal weighted voltage trace, also called the memory trace. Here we developed and analyzed a fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model in which the exponent of the fractional derivative can vary from 0 to 1, with 1 representing the normal derivative. As the exponent of the fractional derivative decreases, the weights of the voltage trace increase. Thus, the value of the voltage is increasingly correlated with the trajectory of the voltage in the past. By varying only the fractional exponent, our model can reproduce upward and downward spike adaptations found experimentally in neocortical pyramidal cells and tectal neurons in vitro. The model also produces spikes with longer first-spike latency and high inter-spike variability with power-law distribution. We further analyze spike adaptation and the responses to noisy and oscillatory input. The fractional model generates reliable spike patterns in response to noisy input. Overall, the spiking activity of the fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model deviates from the spiking activity of the Markovian model and reflects the temporal accumulated intrinsic membrane dynamics that affect the response of the neuron to external stimulation. PMID:24675903

  15. Absolute spike frequency as a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ly; Sperling, Michael R; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Nei, Maromi

    2017-04-01

    Frequent interictal epileptiform abnormalities may correlate with poor prognosis after temporal lobe resection for refractory epilepsy. To date, studies have focused on limited resections such as selective amygdalohippocampectomy and apical temporal lobectomy without hippocampectomy. However, it is unclear whether the frequency of spikes predicts outcome after standard anterior temporal lobectomy. Preoperative scalp video-EEG monitoring data from patients who subsequently underwent anterior temporal lobectomy over a three year period and were followed for at least one year were reviewed for the frequency of interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Surgical outcome for those patients with frequent spikes (>60/h) was compared with those with less frequent spikes. Additionally, spike frequency was evaluated as a continuous variable and correlated with outcome to determine if increased spike frequency correlated with worse outcome, as assessed by modified Engel Class outcome. Forty-seven patients (18 men, 29 women; mean age 40 years at surgery) were included. Forty-six patients had standard anterior temporal lobectomy (24 right, 22 left) and one had a modified left temporal lobectomy. There was no significant difference in seizure outcome between those with frequent (57% Class I) vs. those with less frequent (58% Class I) spikes. Increased spike frequency did not correlate with worse outcome. Greater than 20 complex partial seizures/month and generalized tonic-clonic seizures within one year of surgery correlated with worse outcome. This study suggests that absolute spike frequency does not predict seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy unlike in selective procedures, and should not be used as a prognostic factor in this population. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuromagnetic Evidence of Spatially Distributed Sources Underlying Epileptiform Spikes in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Daniel S.; Sutherling, William; Engle, Jerome; Beatty, Jackson

    1984-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements were performed on 17 subjects with focal seizure disorders. In all of the subjects, the interictal spike in the scalp electroencephalogram was associated with an orderly extracranial magnetic field pattern. In eight of these subjects, multiple current sources underlay the magnetic spike complex. The multiple sources within a given subject displayed a fixed chronological sequence of discharge, demonstrating a high degree of spatial and temporal organization within the interictal focus.

  17. A reanalysis of "Two types of asynchronous activity in networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons".

    PubMed

    Engelken, Rainer; Farkhooi, Farzad; Hansel, David; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Wolf, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity in the central nervous system varies strongly in time and across neuronal populations. It is a longstanding proposal that such fluctuations generically arise from chaotic network dynamics. Various theoretical studies predict that the rich dynamics of rate models operating in the chaotic regime can subserve circuit computation and learning. Neurons in the brain, however, communicate via spikes and it is a theoretical challenge to obtain similar rate fluctuations in networks of spiking neuron models. A recent study investigated spiking balanced networks of leaky integrate and fire (LIF) neurons and compared their dynamics to a matched rate network with identical topology, where single unit input-output functions were chosen from isolated LIF neurons receiving Gaussian white noise input. A mathematical analogy between the chaotic instability in networks of rate units and the spiking network dynamics was proposed. Here we revisit the behavior of the spiking LIF networks and these matched rate networks. We find expected hallmarks of a chaotic instability in the rate network: For supercritical coupling strength near the transition point, the autocorrelation time diverges. For subcritical coupling strengths, we observe critical slowing down in response to small external perturbations. In the spiking network, we found in contrast that the timescale of the autocorrelations is insensitive to the coupling strength and that rate deviations resulting from small input perturbations rapidly decay. The decay speed even accelerates for increasing coupling strength. In conclusion, our reanalysis demonstrates fundamental differences between the behavior of pulse-coupled spiking LIF networks and rate networks with matched topology and input-output function. In particular there is no indication of a corresponding chaotic instability in the spiking network.

  18. Statistical evaluation of synchronous spike patterns extracted by frequent item set mining

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Emiliano; Picado-Muiño, David; Denker, Michael; Borgelt, Christian; Grün, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    We recently proposed frequent itemset mining (FIM) as a method to perform an optimized search for patterns of synchronous spikes (item sets) in massively parallel spike trains. This search outputs the occurrence count (support) of individual patterns that are not trivially explained by the counts of any superset (closed frequent item sets). The number of patterns found by FIM makes direct statistical tests infeasible due to severe multiple testing. To overcome this issue, we proposed to test the significance not of individual patterns, but instead of their signatures, defined as the pairs of pattern size z and support c. Here, we derive in detail a statistical test for the significance of the signatures under the null hypothesis of full independence (pattern spectrum filtering, PSF) by means of surrogate data. As a result, injected spike patterns that mimic assembly activity are well detected, yielding a low false negative rate. However, this approach is prone to additionally classify patterns resulting from chance overlap of real assembly activity and background spiking as significant. These patterns represent false positives with respect to the null hypothesis of having one assembly of given signature embedded in otherwise independent spiking activity. We propose the additional method of pattern set reduction (PSR) to remove these false positives by conditional filtering. By employing stochastic simulations of parallel spike trains with correlated activity in form of injected spike synchrony in subsets of the neurons, we demonstrate for a range of parameter settings that the analysis scheme composed of FIM, PSF and PSR allows to reliably detect active assemblies in massively parallel spike trains. PMID:24167487

  19. Galactic center gamma-ray excess from dark matter annihilation: is there a black hole spike?

    PubMed

    Fields, Brian D; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shelton, Jessie

    2014-10-10

    If the supermassive black hole Sgr A* at the center of the Milky Way grew adiabatically from an initial seed embedded in a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter (DM) halo, then the DM profile near the hole has steepened into a spike. We calculate the dramatic enhancement to the gamma-ray flux from the Galactic center (GC) from such a spike if the 1-3 GeV excess observed in Fermi data is due to DM annihilations. We find that for the parameter values favored in recent fits, the point-source-like flux from the spike is 35 times greater than the flux from the inner 1° of the halo, far exceeding all Fermi point source detections near the GC. We consider the dependence of the spike signal on astrophysical and particle parameters and conclude that if the GC excess is due to DM, then a canonical adiabatic spike is disfavored by the data. We discuss alternative Galactic histories that predict different spike signals, including (i) the nonadiabatic growth of the black hole, possibly associated with halo and/or black hole mergers, (ii) gravitational interaction of DM with baryons in the dense core, such as heating by stars, or (iii) DM self-interactions. We emphasize that the spike signal is sensitive to a different combination of particle parameters than the halo signal and that the inclusion of a spike component to any DM signal in future analyses would provide novel information about both the history of the GC and the particle physics of DM annihilations.

  20. Photospheric Current Spikes And Their Possible Association With Flares - Results from an HMI Data Driven Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, M. L.; Kwan, C.; Ayhan, B.; Eric, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    A data driven, near photospheric magnetohydrodynamic model predicts spikes in the horizontal current density, and associated resistive heating rate. The spikes appear as increases by orders of magnitude above background values in neutral line regions (NLRs) of active regions (ARs). The largest spikes typically occur a few hours to a few days prior to M or X flares. The spikes correspond to large vertical derivatives of the horizontal magnetic field. The model takes as input the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic & Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. This 2.5 D field is used to determine an analytic expression for a 3 D magnetic field, from which the current density, vector potential, and electric field are computed in every AR pixel for 14 ARs. The field is not assumed to be force-free. The spurious 6, 12, and 24 hour Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion are filtered out of the time series of the HMI magnetic field for each pixel. The subset of spikes analyzed at the pixel level are found to occur on HMI and granulation scales of 1 arcsec and 12 minutes. Spikes are found in ARs with and without M or X flares, and outside as well as inside NLRs, but the largest spikes are localized in the NLRs of ARs with M or X flares. The energy to drive the heating associated with the largest current spikes comes from bulk flow kinetic energy, not the electromagnetic field, and the current density is highly non-force free. The results suggest that, in combination with the model, HMI is revealing strong, convection driven, non-force free heating events on granulation scales, and it is plausible these events are correlated with subsequent M or X flares. More and longer time series need to be analyzed to determine if such a correlation exists.

  1. Quiet Spike(TradeMark) Build-up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Flight tests of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation s Quiet Spike(TradeMark) hardware were recently completed on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B airplane. NASA Dryden uses a modified F-15B airplane as a testbed aircraft to cost-effectively fly flight research experiments that are typically mounted underneath the F-15B airplane, along the fuselage centerline. For the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment, however, instead of a centerline mounting, a relatively long forward-pointing boom was attached to the radar bulkhead of the F-15B airplane. The Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment is a stepping-stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate the sonic-boom strength of business jets over land. The Quiet Spike(TradeMark) boom is a concept in which an aircraft s noseboom would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing effectively lengthens the aircraft, thus reducing the peak sonic-boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, noncoalescing shocklets. Prior to flying the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) experiment on the F-15B airplane several ground vibration tests were required to understand the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B airplane. However, due to the flight hardware availability and compressed schedule requirements, a "traditional" ground vibration test of the mated F-15B Quiet Spike(TradeMark) ready-for- flight configuration did not leave sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. This paper provides an overview of each phase of the "nontraditional" ground vibration testing completed for the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) project which includes the test setup details, instrumentation layout, and modal results obtained in support of the structural dynamic modeling and flutter

  2. Unsupervised neural spike sorting for high-density microelectrode arrays with convolutive independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Leibig, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas; Zeck, Günther

    2016-09-15

    Unsupervised identification of action potentials in multi-channel extracellular recordings, in particular from high-density microelectrode arrays with thousands of sensors, is an unresolved problem. While independent component analysis (ICA) achieves rapid unsupervised sorting, it ignores the convolutive structure of extracellular data, thus limiting the unmixing to a subset of neurons. Here we present a spike sorting algorithm based on convolutive ICA (cICA) to retrieve a larger number of accurately sorted neurons than with instantaneous ICA while accounting for signal overlaps. Spike sorting was applied to datasets with varying signal-to-noise ratios (SNR: 3-12) and 27% spike overlaps, sampled at either 11.5 or 23kHz on 4365 electrodes. We demonstrate how the instantaneity assumption in ICA-based algorithms has to be relaxed in order to improve the spike sorting performance for high-density microelectrode array recordings. Reformulating the convolutive mixture as an instantaneous mixture by modeling several delayed samples jointly is necessary to increase signal-to-noise ratio. Our results emphasize that different cICA algorithms are not equivalent. Spike sorting performance was assessed with ground-truth data generated from experimentally derived templates. The presented spike sorter was able to extract ≈90% of the true spike trains with an error rate below 2%. It was superior to two alternative (c)ICA methods (≈80% accurately sorted neurons) and comparable to a supervised sorting. Our new algorithm represents a fast solution to overcome the current bottleneck in spike sorting of large datasets generated by simultaneous recording with thousands of electrodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast EEG spike detection via eigenvalue analysis and clustering of spatial amplitude distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Tadanori; Shimada, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Bunnoshin

    2018-06-01

    Objective. In the current study, we tested a proposed method for fast spike detection in electroencephalography (EEG). Approach. We performed eigenvalue analysis in two-dimensional space spanned by gradients calculated from two neighboring samples to detect high-amplitude negative peaks. We extracted the spike candidates by imposing restrictions on parameters regarding spike shape and eigenvalues reflecting detection characteristics of individual medical doctors. We subsequently performed clustering, classifying detected peaks by considering the amplitude distribution at 19 scalp electrodes. Clusters with a small number of candidates were excluded. We then defined a score for eliminating spike candidates for which the pattern of detected electrodes differed from the overall pattern in a cluster. Spikes were detected by setting the score threshold. Main results. Based on visual inspection by a psychiatrist experienced in EEG, we evaluated the proposed method using two statistical measures of precision and recall with respect to detection performance. We found that precision and recall exhibited a trade-off relationship. The average recall value was 0.708 in eight subjects with the score threshold that maximized the F-measure, with 58.6  ±  36.2 spikes per subject. Under this condition, the average precision was 0.390, corresponding to a false positive rate 2.09 times higher than the true positive rate. Analysis of the required processing time revealed that, using a general-purpose computer, our method could be used to perform spike detection in 12.1% of the recording time. The process of narrowing down spike candidates based on shape occupied most of the processing time. Significance. Although the average recall value was comparable with that of other studies, the proposed method significantly shortened the processing time.

  4. Impact of Fast Sodium Channel Inactivation on Spike Threshold Dynamics and Synaptic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Neurons spike when their membrane potential exceeds a threshold value. In central neurons, the spike threshold is not constant but depends on the stimulation. Thus, input-output properties of neurons depend both on the effect of presynaptic spikes on the membrane potential and on the dynamics of the spike threshold. Among the possible mechanisms that may modulate the threshold, one strong candidate is Na channel inactivation, because it specifically impacts spike initiation without affecting the membrane potential. We collected voltage-clamp data from the literature and we found, based on a theoretical criterion, that the properties of Na inactivation could indeed cause substantial threshold variability by itself. By analyzing simple neuron models with fast Na inactivation (one channel subtype), we found that the spike threshold is correlated with the mean membrane potential and negatively correlated with the preceding depolarization slope, consistent with experiments. We then analyzed the impact of threshold dynamics on synaptic integration. The difference between the postsynaptic potential (PSP) and the dynamic threshold in response to a presynaptic spike defines an effective PSP. When the neuron is sufficiently depolarized, this effective PSP is briefer than the PSP. This mechanism regulates the temporal window of synaptic integration in an adaptive way. Finally, we discuss the role of other potential mechanisms. Distal spike initiation, channel noise and Na activation dynamics cannot account for the observed negative slope-threshold relationship, while adaptive conductances (e.g. K+) and Na inactivation can. We conclude that Na inactivation is a metabolically efficient mechanism to control the temporal resolution of synaptic integration. PMID:21573200

  5. The introduction of dengue vaccine may temporarily cause large spikes in prevalence.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Medlock, J

    2015-04-01

    A dengue vaccine is expected to be available within a few years. Once vaccine is available, policy-makers will need to develop suitable policies to allocate the vaccine. Mathematical models of dengue transmission predict complex temporal patterns in prevalence, driven by seasonal oscillations in mosquito abundance. In particular, vaccine introduction may induce a transient period immediately after vaccine introduction where prevalence can spike higher than in the pre-vaccination period. These spikes in prevalence could lead to doubts about the vaccination programme among the public and even among decision-makers, possibly impeding the vaccination programme. Using simple dengue transmission models, we found that large transient spikes in prevalence are robust phenomena that occur when vaccine coverage and vaccine efficacy are not either both very high or both very low. Despite the presence of transient spikes in prevalence, the models predict that vaccination does always reduce the total number of infections in the 15 years after vaccine introduction. We conclude that policy-makers should prepare for spikes in prevalence after vaccine introduction to mitigate the burden of these spikes and to accurately measure the effectiveness of the vaccine programme.

  6. Spiking neural networks for handwritten digit recognition-Supervised learning and network optimization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shruti R; Rajendran, Bipin

    2018-07-01

    We demonstrate supervised learning in Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) for the problem of handwritten digit recognition using the spike triggered Normalized Approximate Descent (NormAD) algorithm. Our network that employs neurons operating at sparse biological spike rates below 300Hz achieves a classification accuracy of 98.17% on the MNIST test database with four times fewer parameters compared to the state-of-the-art. We present several insights from extensive numerical experiments regarding optimization of learning parameters and network configuration to improve its accuracy. We also describe a number of strategies to optimize the SNN for implementation in memory and energy constrained hardware, including approximations in computing the neuronal dynamics and reduced precision in storing the synaptic weights. Experiments reveal that even with 3-bit synaptic weights, the classification accuracy of the designed SNN does not degrade beyond 1% as compared to the floating-point baseline. Further, the proposed SNN, which is trained based on the precise spike timing information outperforms an equivalent non-spiking artificial neural network (ANN) trained using back propagation, especially at low bit precision. Thus, our study shows the potential for realizing efficient neuromorphic systems that use spike based information encoding and learning for real-world applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural Dynamics as Sampling: A Model for Stochastic Computation in Recurrent Networks of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buesing, Lars; Bill, Johannes; Nessler, Bernhard; Maass, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The organization of computations in networks of spiking neurons in the brain is still largely unknown, in particular in view of the inherently stochastic features of their firing activity and the experimentally observed trial-to-trial variability of neural systems in the brain. In principle there exists a powerful computational framework for stochastic computations, probabilistic inference by sampling, which can explain a large number of macroscopic experimental data in neuroscience and cognitive science. But it has turned out to be surprisingly difficult to create a link between these abstract models for stochastic computations and more detailed models of the dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. Here we create such a link and show that under some conditions the stochastic firing activity of networks of spiking neurons can be interpreted as probabilistic inference via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. Since common methods for MCMC sampling in distributed systems, such as Gibbs sampling, are inconsistent with the dynamics of spiking neurons, we introduce a different approach based on non-reversible Markov chains that is able to reflect inherent temporal processes of spiking neuronal activity through a suitable choice of random variables. We propose a neural network model and show by a rigorous theoretical analysis that its neural activity implements MCMC sampling of a given distribution, both for the case of discrete and continuous time. This provides a step towards closing the gap between abstract functional models of cortical computation and more detailed models of networks of spiking neurons. PMID:22096452

  8. Integration of Continuous-Time Dynamics in a Spiking Neural Network Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Jan; Dahmen, David; Schuecker, Jannis; Frommer, Andreas; Bolten, Matthias; Helias, Moritz; Diesmann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary modeling approaches to the dynamics of neural networks include two important classes of models: biologically grounded spiking neuron models and functionally inspired rate-based units. We present a unified simulation framework that supports the combination of the two for multi-scale modeling, enables the quantitative validation of mean-field approaches by spiking network simulations, and provides an increase in reliability by usage of the same simulation code and the same network model specifications for both model classes. While most spiking simulations rely on the communication of discrete events, rate models require time-continuous interactions between neurons. Exploiting the conceptual similarity to the inclusion of gap junctions in spiking network simulations, we arrive at a reference implementation of instantaneous and delayed interactions between rate-based models in a spiking network simulator. The separation of rate dynamics from the general connection and communication infrastructure ensures flexibility of the framework. In addition to the standard implementation we present an iterative approach based on waveform-relaxation techniques to reduce communication and increase performance for large-scale simulations of rate-based models with instantaneous interactions. Finally we demonstrate the broad applicability of the framework by considering various examples from the literature, ranging from random networks to neural-field models. The study provides the prerequisite for interactions between rate-based and spiking models in a joint simulation. PMID:28596730

  9. Phasic spike patterning in rat supraoptic neurones in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Nancy; Brown, Colin H; Ludwig, Mike; Leng, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    In vivo, most vasopressin cells of the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus fire action potentials in a ‘phasic’ pattern when the systemic osmotic pressure is elevated, while most oxytocin cells fire continuously. The phasic firing pattern is believed to arise as a consequence of intrinsic activity-dependent changes in membrane potential, and these have been extensively studied in vitro. Here we analysed the discharge patterning of supraoptic nucleus neurones in vivo, to infer the characteristics of the post-spike sequence of hyperpolarization and depolarization from the observed spike patterning. We then compared patterning in phasic cells in vivo and in vitro, and we found systematic differences in the interspike interval distributions, and in other statistical parameters that characterized activity patterns within bursts. Analysis of hazard functions (probability of spike initiation as a function of time since the preceding spike) revealed that phasic firing in vitro appears consistent with a regenerative process arising from a relatively slow, late depolarizing afterpotential that approaches or exceeds spike threshold. By contrast, in vivo activity appears to be dominated by stochastic rather than deterministic mechanisms, and appears consistent with a relatively early and fast depolarizing afterpotential that modulates the probability that random synaptic input exceeds spike threshold. Despite superficial similarities in the phasic firing patterns observed in vivo and in vitro, there are thus fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms. PMID:15146047

  10. Mixed Signal Learning by Spike Correlation Propagation in Feedback Inhibitory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Naoki; Fukai, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    The brain can learn and detect mixed input signals masked by various types of noise, and spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is the candidate synaptic level mechanism. Because sensory inputs typically have spike correlation, and local circuits have dense feedback connections, input spikes cause the propagation of spike correlation in lateral circuits; however, it is largely unknown how this secondary correlation generated by lateral circuits influences learning processes through STDP, or whether it is beneficial to achieve efficient spike-based learning from uncertain stimuli. To explore the answers to these questions, we construct models of feedforward networks with lateral inhibitory circuits and study how propagated correlation influences STDP learning, and what kind of learning algorithm such circuits achieve. We derive analytical conditions at which neurons detect minor signals with STDP, and show that depending on the origin of the noise, different correlation timescales are useful for learning. In particular, we show that non-precise spike correlation is beneficial for learning in the presence of cross-talk noise. We also show that by considering excitatory and inhibitory STDP at lateral connections, the circuit can acquire a lateral structure optimal for signal detection. In addition, we demonstrate that the model performs blind source separation in a manner similar to the sequential sampling approximation of the Bayesian independent component analysis algorithm. Our results provide a basic understanding of STDP learning in feedback circuits by integrating analyses from both dynamical systems and information theory. PMID:25910189

  11. Stability and Control Analysis of the F-15B Quiet SpikeTM Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWherter, Shaun C.; Moua, Cheng M.; Gera, Joseph; Cox, Timothy H.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Quiet Spike(TradeMark) flight research program was to analyze the aerodynamic, structural, and mechanical proof-of-concept of a large multi-stage telescoping nose spike installed on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B airplane. This report describes the preflight stability and control analysis performed to assess the effect of the spike on the stability, controllability, and handling qualities of the airplane; and to develop an envelope expansion approach to maintain safety of flight. The overall flight test objective was to collect flight data to validate the spike structural dynamics and loads model up to Mach 1.8. Other objectives included validating the mechanical feasibility of a morphing fuselage at operational conditions and determining the near-field shock wave characterization. The two main issues relevant to the stability and control objectives were the effects of the spike-influenced aerodynamics on the F-15B airplane flight dynamics, and the air data and angle-of-attack sensors. The analysis covered the sensitivity of the stability margins, and the handling qualities due to aerodynamic variation and the maneuvering limitations of the F-15B Quiet Spike configuration. The results of the analysis and the implications for the flight test program are also presented.

  12. Analysis of surface EMG spike shape across different levels of isometric force.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, David A; Lester, Steven M; Lenhardt, Sean A; Cambridge, Edward D J

    2007-01-15

    This research evaluated changes in surface electromyographic (SEMG) spike shape across different levels of isometric force. Ninety-six subjects generated three 5-s isometric step contractions of the elbow flexors at 40, 60, 80, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Force and bipolar SEMG activity were monitored concurrently. The mean spike amplitude (MSA) exhibited a linear increase across the four levels of force. The mean spike frequency (MSF) remained stable from 40 to 80% of MVC; it then decreased from 80 to 100% of MVC. There was a concomitant increase in mean spike slope (MSS) that indicates that the biceps brachii (BB) relied on the recruitment of higher threshold motor units (MUs) from 40 to 80% of MVC. However, there progressive decrease in the mean number of peaks per spike (MNPPS) that suggests that MU synchronization was additionally required to increase force from 80 to 100% of MVC. The spike shape measures, taken together, indicate that the decrease in frequency content of the signal was due to synchronization, not an increased probability of temporal overlap due an increase in rate-coding.

  13. Inference of neuronal network spike dynamics and topology from calcium imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Lütcke, Henry; Gerhard, Felipe; Zenke, Friedemann; Gerstner, Wulfram; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging enables functional analysis of neuronal circuits by inferring action potential (AP) occurrence (“spike trains”) from cellular fluorescence signals. It remains unclear how experimental parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acquisition rate affect spike inference and whether additional information about network structure can be extracted. Here we present a simulation framework for quantitatively assessing how well spike dynamics and network topology can be inferred from noisy calcium imaging data. For simulated AP-evoked calcium transients in neocortical pyramidal cells, we analyzed the quality of spike inference as a function of SNR and data acquisition rate using a recently introduced peeling algorithm. Given experimentally attainable values of SNR and acquisition rate, neural spike trains could be reconstructed accurately and with up to millisecond precision. We then applied statistical neuronal network models to explore how remaining uncertainties in spike inference affect estimates of network connectivity and topological features of network organization. We define the experimental conditions suitable for inferring whether the network has a scale-free structure and determine how well hub neurons can be identified. Our findings provide a benchmark for future calcium imaging studies that aim to reliably infer neuronal network properties. PMID:24399936

  14. A 16-Channel Nonparametric Spike Detection ASIC Based on EC-PC Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Xu, Jian; Lian, Yong; Khalili, Azam; Rastegarnia, Amir; Guan, Cuntai; Yang, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    In extracellular neural recording experiments, detecting neural spikes is an important step for reliable information decoding. A successful implementation in integrated circuits can achieve substantial data volume reduction, potentially enabling a wireless operation and closed-loop system. In this paper, we report a 16-channel neural spike detection chip based on a customized spike detection method named as exponential component-polynomial component (EC-PC) algorithm. This algorithm features a reliable prediction of spikes by applying a probability threshold. The chip takes raw data as input and outputs three data streams simultaneously: field potentials, band-pass filtered neural data, and spiking probability maps. The algorithm parameters are on-chip configured automatically based on input data, which avoids manual parameter tuning. The chip has been tested with both in vivo experiments for functional verification and bench-top experiments for quantitative performance assessment. The system has a total power consumption of 1.36 mW and occupies an area of 6.71 mm (2) for 16 channels. When tested on synthesized datasets with spikes and noise segments extracted from in vivo preparations and scaled according to required precisions, the chip outperforms other detectors. A credit card sized prototype board is developed to provide power and data management through a USB port.

  15. An Investigation on the Role of Spike Latency in an Artificial Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Eugenio; Polese, Davide; Dini, Francesca; Paolesse, Roberto; Filippini, Daniel; Lundström, Ingemar; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the reactions to external stimuli may appear only few hundreds of milliseconds after the physical interaction of the stimulus with the proper receptor. This behavior suggests that neurons transmit the