Science.gov

Sample records for e-mail petty officer

  1. 71. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' LOUNGE AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' LOUNGE - AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING COFFEE MESS, ICE CREAM COOLER, ICE MACHINE AND SCUTTLEBUTT. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  2. Navy Leadership -- Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy

    Communication Specialist Seaman Jackson Woods (Released) 180501-N-SB460-349 The 2017 Navy Sailors of the Year Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew N. Skipworth (Released) 180514-N-OM610-221 Vice Chief of Naval . (Released) 180517-N-MD297-0228 Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Steven S. Giordano, speaks during the

  3. Econometric Models of U.S. Navy Career Petty Officer Retention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    PF AD-AL04 076 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/6 5/9 ECONO ETRIC MODELS OF U.S. NAVY CAREER PETTY OFFICER RETENTION.(Ul JUN 81 J J B PKO...THESIS D . ECONOMETRIC MODELS OF U. S. NAVY CAREER PETTY OFFICER RETENTION SML Vby John Joseph Bepko III June 1981 Thesis Advisor: George W. Thomas...DOCUMENTATION PACE 33703 coTu~rwc oEm 0419PsR 01N1911VT*48~ &GM01 1𔃻. 411CIP1SIMYS CATALOG IulmSIS Econometric Models of U. S. Navy Career Petty 1’ t h s s j

  4. Promoting walking among office employees ― evaluation of a randomized controlled intervention with pedometers and e-mail messages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to evaluate a 6-month intervention to promote office-employees’ walking with pedometers and e-mail messages. Methods Participants were recruited by 10 occupational health care units (OHC) from 20 worksites with 2,230 employees. Voluntary and insufficiently physically active employees (N = 241) were randomized to a pedometer (STEP, N = 123) and a comparison group (COMP, N = 118). STEP included one group meeting, log-monitored pedometer-use and six e-mail messages from OHC. COMP participated in data collection. Reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance (RE-AIM) and costs were assessed with questionnaires (0, 2, 6, 12 months), process evaluation and interviews (12 months). Results The intervention reached 29% (N = 646) of employees in terms of participation willingness. Logistic regression showed that the proportion of walkers tended to increase more in STEP than in COMP at 2 months in “walking for transportation” (Odds ratio 2.12, 95%CI 0.94 to 4.81) and at 6 months in “walking for leisure” (1.86, 95%CI 0.94 to 3.69). Linear model revealed a modest increase in the mean duration of “walking stairs” at 2 and 6 months (Geometric mean ratio 1.26, 95%CI 0.98 to 1.61; 1.27, 0.98 to 1.64). Adoption and implementation succeeded as intended. At 12 months, some traces of the intervention were sustained in 15 worksites, and a slightly higher number of walkers in STEP in comparison with COMP was observed in “walking stairs” (OR 2.24, 95%CI 0.94 to 5.31) and in “walking for leisure” (2.07, 95%CI 0.99 to 4.34). The direct costs of the intervention were 43 Euros per participant. Conclusions The findings indicate only modest impact on some indicators of walking. Future studies should invest in reaching the employees, minimizing attrition rate and using objective walking assessment. Trial registeration ISRCTN79432107 PMID:22672576

  5. O How Wondrous Is E-Mail!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the use of e-mail for communication and collaborative projects in schools. Discusses the effectiveness of an e-mail system based on a UNIX host; problems with POP (post office protocol) client programs; and the new Internet Mail Access Protocol (IMAP) which addresses most of the shortcomings of the POP protocol while keeping advantages…

  6. Resolution of Low Back and Radicular Pain in a 40-year-old Male United States Navy Petty Officer after Collaborative Medical and Chiropractic Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-08

    www.journalchiromed.com Journal of Chiropractic Medicine (2010) 9, 17–21Resolution of low back and radicular pain in a 40-year-old male United States...Navy Petty Officer after collaborative medical and chiropractic care☆ Gregory R. Lillie DC, MS⁎ Chiropractic Physician, Naval Branch Health Clinic...Military personnel; ChiropracticObjective: The aim of this study is to describe the interdisciplinary care, including chiropractic services, in a military

  7. Secure E-mailing Between Physicians and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J.; Palen, Ted E.; Kanter, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization. PMID:24887522

  8. Hooked on E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Information overload, and an expectation that e-mails, tweets, and text messages will be answered immediately, impact productivity. The younger, information-addicted workers have a greater capacity to process this open floodgate of information, as well as a better ability to multitask. Research suggests that there is a marked drop in worker…

  9. Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients.

    PubMed

    Boukus, Ellyn R; Grossman, Joy M; O'Malley, Ann S

    2010-10-01

    Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients.

  10. Take charge of your e-mail!

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil B; Atreja, Ashish; Jain, Anil

    2008-08-01

    Although e-mail is supposed to help save time and increase efficiency, for many it has become a burden. You can fight e-mail overload by taking steps to decrease the amount of unwanted e-mail you receive and by managing your in-box in an organized manner.

  11. Senior Citizens Who Use E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Edelbaum, Jessica K.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in the aging population and use of computer-related technology have spawned research regarding older adults' use of the Internet. This study examined characteristics differentiating rural Midwestern senior citizens (N = 298) who use e-mail from those who do not. Compared to those who did not use e-mail, e-mail-using seniors were younger…

  12. Unsolicited E-mails to Forensic Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Appel, Jacob M; Ash, Peter; Frierson, Richard L; Giorgi-Guarnieri, Deborah; Martinez, Richard; Newman, Alan W; Pinals, Debra A; Resnick, Phillip J; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2016-12-01

    E-mail communication is pervasive. Since many forensic psychiatrists have their e-mail addresses available online (either on personal websites, university websites, or articles they have authored), they are likely to receive unsolicited e-mails. Although there is an emerging body of literature about exchanging e-mail with patients, there is little guidance about how to respond to e-mails from nonpatients. Therefore, we used a Delphi technique to develop a consensus about salient points for the forensic psychiatrist to consider regarding responding to e-mails from nonpatients and the risks entailed. Four scenarios are described, including e-mails from nonpatients and unknown others requesting advice or help. The potential ethics-related, legal, moral, and practical concerns for forensic psychiatrists are discussed. Finally, potential pitfalls for forensic psychiatrists are described. © 2016 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  13. Doctors Who Are Using E-mail With Their Patients: a Qualitative Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Madhavi R; Jenckes, Mollie W; Sands, Daniel Z; Ford, Daniel E

    2003-01-01

    Background Despite the potential for rapid, asynchronous, documentable communication, the use of e-mail for physician-patient communication has not been widely adopted. Objective To survey physicians currently using e-mail with their patients daily to understand their experiences. Methods In-depth phone interviews of 45 physicians currently using e-mail with patients were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Two investigators independently qualitatively coded comments. Differences were adjudicated by group consensus. Results Almost all of the 642 comments from these physicians who currently use e-mail with patients daily could be grouped into 1 of 4 broad domains: (1) e-mail access and content, (2) effects of e-mail on the doctor-patient relationship, (3) managing clinical issues by e-mail, and (4) integrating e-mail into office processes. The most consistent theme was that e-mail communication enhances chronic-disease management. Many physicians also reported improved continuity of care and increased flexibility in responding to nonurgent issues. Integration of e-mail into daily workflow, such as utilization of office personnel, appears to be a significant area of concern for many of the physicians. For other issues, such as content, efficiency of e-mail, and confidentiality, there were diverging experiences and opinions. Physicians appear to be selective in choosing which patients they will communicate with via e-mail, but the criteria for selection is unclear. Conclusions These physician respondents did perceive benefits to e-mail with a select group of patients. Several areas, such as identifying clinical situations where e-mail communication is effective, incorporating e-mail into office flow, and being reimbursed for online medical care/communication, need to be addressed before this mode of communication diffuses into most practices. PMID:12857665

  14. Transparent Proxy for Secure E-Mail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalák, Juraj; Hudec, Ladislav

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the security of e-mail messages and e-mail server implementation by means of a transparent SMTP proxy. The security features include encryption and signing of transported messages. The goal is to design and implement a software proxy for secure e-mail including its monitoring, administration, encryption and signing keys administration. In particular, we focus on automatic public key on-the-fly encryption and signing of e-mail messages according to S/MIME standard by means of an embedded computer system whose function can be briefly described as a brouter with transparent SMTP proxy.

  15. E-Mail and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret

    2009-01-01

    The proliferation of the use of e-mail and texting has created some ethical dilemmas for family counselors. Although e-mail can expand and encourage communication, it is not problem free and, in fact, can pose problems. There are issues with privacy, confidentiality, and maintaining an appropriate professional relationship. Family counselors…

  16. Did You Get My E-Mail? Moving E-Mails beyond the Inbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The challenge today is how to make e-mail and other forms of electronic communication effective in motivating volunteer action. Is it possible to make e-mails feel personal and welcoming? E-mail, instant messaging, texting, and social media are tools that allow individuals to communicate quickly and inexpensively, but they are lifeless without the…

  17. Pettis v. Smith.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Court Decision: 880 Southern Reporter, 2d Series 145; 2004 Aug 13 (date of decision). The Court of Appeal of Louisiana's Second Circuit held that a living will gave informed consent to the withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration even though the living will did not specifically identify such treatment as a life-sustaining procedure. Mrs. Doris suffered a stroke that left her in a semi-coma. According to two physicians, Mrs. Doris's condition was not likely to improve and her condition was characterized as a persistent vegetative state. Mrs. Doris received nourishment by way of a gastric feeding tube without which she would live for at most a week. Two of Mrs. Doris's children petitioned for the removal of her feeding tube. One of the children, Oris Pettis, opposed removing the feeding tube on the grounds that Mrs. Doris's living will was not properly witnessed and that Mrs. Doris did not give informed consent to remove a feeding tube. The Court of Appeal dispensed with Pettis's first argument by holding that the will was properly witnessed. Considering Pettis's second argument, the court held that a gastric feeding tube is not considered "comfort care" and is, instead, a "life-sustaining procedure." In 1991, the Louisiana legislature amended its laws to include "invasive administration of nutrition and hydration" within the definition of "life-sustaining procedure." Moreover, the court concluded that it was not necessary for a person writing a living will to specifically list the types of "life-sustaining procedures" he or she wished to withdraw. The Court affirmed a lower court decision denying Pettis' claims and upholding Mrs. Doris's living will.

  18. Secure e-mailing between physicians and patients: transformational change in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J; Palen, Ted E; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization.

  19. Petty v. United States.

    PubMed

    1980-12-31

    Under a ruling of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa, the registration form which individuals were required to sign before receiving a swine flu vaccination did not meet the statutory requirement of an "informed consent" form. Moreover, the federal government was negligent in failing to establish adequate procedures for assuring that the risks and benefits of the swine flu vaccine were fully explained to each individual. This case was appealed before the U.S. Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, as found in Petty v. United States, Federal Reporter, 2d Series, 740: 1428-1442.

  20. Who Owns Your E-mail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panepinto, Joe

    1995-01-01

    Examines recent findings that could influence the use of e-mail on university campuses. National privacy legislation and the inviolability of student records are discussed. It is concluded that more effective safeguards are necessary, and that the current steps are inadequate for the protection of students' rights. (Author/LRW)

  1. in e-mail and in chat.

    PubMed

    Stommel, Wyke; Van Der Houwen, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine problem presentations in e-mail and chat counseling. Previous studies of online counseling have found that the medium (e.g., chat, email) impacts the unfolding interaction. However, the implications for counseling are unclear. We focus on problem presentations and use conversation analysis to compare 15 chat and 22 e-mail interactions from the same counseling program. We find that in e-mail counseling, counselors open up the interactional space to discuss various issues, whereas in chat, counselors restrict problem presentations and give the client less space to elaborate. We also find that in e-mail counseling, clients use narratives to present their problem and orient to its seriousness and legitimacy, while in chat counseling, they construct problem presentations using a symptom or a diagnosis. Furthermore, in email counseling, clients close their problem presentations stating completeness, while in chat counseling, counselors treat clients’ problem presentations as incomplete. Our findings shed light on how the medium has implications for counseling.

  2. E-mail communication in the management of gastroenterology patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Plener, Ian; Hayward, Andrew; Saibil, Fred

    2014-01-01

    E-mail correspondence between physicians and patients can be a useful tool to improve communication efficiency, provide economic and ecological benefits, improve therapeutic interventions and adherence, and enhance self-management. The model of self-management in chronic disease has become an integral component of North American and British medicine. From a practical standpoint, the use of e-mail between physicians and patients can complement the self-management model. E-mail communication has many benefits from both patient and physician perspectives. E-mail contact reduces the inefficiencies associated with telecommunications. Physicians are able to better document out-of-office patient encounters and provide access to specialist care for patients in remote locations. This use of e-mail has the potential to increase patient safety through physician approval of self-manager actions, including earlier initiation of needed treatments. Fewer clinic visits afford additional time for new consultations and sicker patients, reducing the overall burden on referral and wait times. The present article reviews some of the literature regarding physician-patient e-mail communication in the general ambulatory setting, in the context of chronic disease and with a specific focus on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The authors provide a framework for the use of e-mail communication in the IBD population, with emphasis on the concept of e-mail use. Also illustrated are the benefits and disadvantages, and examples of the e-mail contract as proposed by the Canadian Medical Protective Association. Examples of specific e-mail communication topics are provided for several IBD scenarios. Potential negative consequences of this mode of communication are also discussed. PMID:24619639

  3. Teleradiology applications with DICOM-e-mail.

    PubMed

    Weisser, G; Engelmann, U; Ruggiero, S; Runa, A; Schröter, A; Baur, S; Walz, M

    2007-05-01

    For the connection of several partners to a Dicom-e-mail based teleradiology network concepts were developed to allow the integration of different teleradiology applications. The organisational and technical needs for such an integration were analysed. More than 60 institutions including 23 hospitals in the Rhein-Neckar-Region, Germany were connected. The needed functionality was grouped in six teleradiology applications (emergency consultation, tele-guided examinations, expert consultations, cooperative work, scientific cooperations and homework with on call services) and their technical and organisational needs according to availability, speed of transfer, workflow definitions and data security needs was analysed. For the local integration of teleradiology services the setup and workflow is presented for a standalone teleradiology workstation and a server based teleradiology gateway. The line type needed for different groups of applications and users is defined. The security concept and fallback strategies are laid out, potential security problems and sources of errors are discussed. The specialties for the emergency teleradiology application are presented. The DICOM-e-mail protocol is a flexible and powerful protocol that can be used for a variety of teleradiology applications. It can meet the conditions for emergency applications but is limited if synchronous applications like teleconferences are needed.

  4. E-mail, decisional styles, and rest breaks.

    PubMed

    Baker, James R; Phillips, James G

    2007-10-01

    E-mail is a common but problematic work application. A scale was created to measure tendencies to use e-mail to take breaks (e-breaking); and self-esteem and decisional style (vigilance, procrastination, buck-passing, hypervigilance) were used to predict the self-reported and actual e-mail behaviors of 133 participants (students and marketing employees). Individuals who were low in defensive avoidance (buck-passing) engaged in more e-mailing per week, both in time spent on e-mail and message volume. E-breakers were more likely to engage in behavioral procrastination and spent more time on personal e-mail.

  5. E-mail security. An overview of threats and safeguards.

    PubMed

    Stine, Kevin; Scholl, Matthew

    2010-04-01

    Not everyone in the organization needs to know how to secure the e-mail service, but anyone who handles patient information must understand e-mail's vulnerabilities and recognize when a system is secure enough to transmit sensitive information.

  6. The Traveler's Guide to E-mail Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Presents options that travelers can use to keep in e-mail contact. Discusses equipment/access issues related to traveling with a laptop; Internet cafes; free e-mail services; accessing home mail via a Web page; and new options e-mail access for travelers. Includes Internet resources on Internet access providers. (AEF)

  7. Prevent Spam Filters from Blocking Legitimate E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    There's no question about it: Spam is a scourge. This ever-increasing torrent of unsolicited commercial mass e-mail saps productivity and, for some, threatens the very viability of e-mail. The battle against spam, unfortunately, is creating problems of its own, with people sometimes unable to send legitimate e-mail and other times unable to…

  8. A Discourse Analysis of School Counseling Supervisory E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Gordon, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This article is a discourse analysis of weekly computer-mediated communications between 8 school counseling interns and their e-mail supervisor over a 16-week semester. Course-required e-mail supervision was provided as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face individual and group supervision. School counselor supervisees and supervisor enacted 3…

  9. E-Mail at Work: Is it Really Private?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Cindy

    This paper examines the controversy of e-mail privacy in the workplace. Once an employee uses an e-mail system that belongs to the employer, according to recent case law, their privacy rights are forfeited. Employers will now have to start creating policies to safeguard themselves from expensive litigation, and employees will have to be more…

  10. E-mail: Boon or Bane for School Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article, by a principal who received over 17,000 e-mails in his first year on the job, explores ways in which email is reshaping education leadership. The main assets of e-mail--swift and efficient communication, more informed decision making through improved consultation with stakeholders, and automatic archiving of correspondence--come at a…

  11. Private E-Mail Requests and the Diffusion of Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Greg; Yechiam, Eldad

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-mail technology and requesting information from multiple sources simultaneously focuses on an experiment demonstrating that addressing e-mails simultaneously to multiple recipients may actually reduce the number of helpful responses. Discusses diffusion of responsibility and implications for the application of social cueing theory…

  12. How E-mail Can Give You Back Your Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Suggests the use of e-mail in the place of writing comments on individual papers. Notes the importance of using e-mail and the listserv in a student's writing experience. Considers some of the implications for professional benefit by exploring the relationship between online communication and oral discussion and between private and public…

  13. Universal Access to E-Mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robert H.; And Others

    E-mail has swept the communications and information world, providing instantaneous global information and data exchange. However, an information elite still exists, made up of those with access to and knowledge about computers and e-mail. The diverging trends in access based on income and education are placing significant groups of current and…

  14. The Impact of a Targeted Training Program on E-Mail System Processing Capabilities and Self-Perception of E-Mail Overload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einstein, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    As business e-mail volumes continue to grow and employees spend increasingly larger portions of their day processing e-mail, there is strong evidence of the negative impacts of e-mail processing, especially with respect to e-mail overload. This study sought to determine whether a training program focused on select e-mail features and processing…

  15. Successful practices in the use of secure e-mail.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura W; Garrido, Terhilda; Christensen, Kate; Handley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Physician use of secure e-mail with patients is anticipated to increase under Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements, but little is known about how physicians can successfully incorporate it into daily work. We interviewed 27 "super user" physicians at Kaiser Permanente and Group Health who were identified by leaders as being technologically, operationally, and clinically adept and as having high levels of secure e-mail use with patients. They highly valued the use of secure e-mail with patients, despite concerns about a lack of adequate time to respond, and provided tips for using it successfully. They identified benefits that included better care and improved relationships with their patients.

  16. Speech-based E-mail and driver behavior: effects of an in-vehicle message system interface.

    PubMed

    Jamson, A Hamish; Westerman, Stephen J; Hockey, G Robert J; Carsten, Oliver M J

    2004-01-01

    As mobile office technology becomes more advanced, drivers have increased opportunity to process information "on the move." Although speech-based interfaces can minimize direct interference with driving, the cognitive demands associated with such systems may still cause distraction. We studied the effects on driving performance of an in-vehicle simulated "E-mail" message system; E-mails were either system controlled or driver controlled. A high-fidelity, fixed-base driving simulator was used to test 19 participants on a car-following task. Virtual traffic scenarios varying in driving demand. Drivers compensated for the secondary task by adopting longer headways but showed reduced anticipation of braking requirements and shorter time to collision. Drivers were also less reactive when processing E-mails, demonstrated by a reduction in steering wheel inputs. In most circumstances, there were advantages in providing drivers with control over when E-mails were opened. However, during periods without E-mail interaction in demanding traffic scenarios, drivers showed reduced braking anticipation. This may be a result of increased cognitive costs associated with the decision making process when using a driver-controlled interface when the task of scheduling E-mail acceptance is added to those of driving and E-mail response. Actual or potential applications of this research include the design of speech-based in-vehicle messaging systems.

  17. Deaf and hard of hearing Americans' instant messaging and e-mail use: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Frank G

    2002-10-01

    An online survey of 884 deaf and hard of hearing adults asked about their current and past use of communication technologies, notably TTY, telecommunications relay services, e-mail, and instant messaging (IM). Results showed that respondents were using e-mail and IM far more than TTY and relay services. The study participants virtually all had e-mail and IM at home. In fact, about one quarter had a high-speed ("broadband") connection at home. While the vast majority also had and used e-mail at work, just 1 in 3 had IM at his or her place of employment. The findings have several implications. Most important for educators is that strong reading and writing skills are essential if adults who are deaf or hard of hearing are to take advantage of today's communications technologies. Another conclusion is that some workers who are deaf or hard of hearing appear to face discrimination in employment because office policies forbid the use of a highly effective reasonable accommodation, instant messaging.

  18. The Educational Impact of E-Mail: Extraverted versus Introverted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunderewicz, Larisa; Michener, Stacey; Chambliss, Catherine

    College students (N=151) completed surveys assessing the relationship between e-mail use and extraversion. The variables studied included time spent on e-mail; the frequency of e-mail usage; and the purposes e-mail served for each student. The results suggest that extraverts use e-mail as a form of procrastination more than introverts, and that…

  19. Successful Practices in the Use of Secure E-mail

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura W; Garrido, Terhilda; Christensen, Kate; Handley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Physician use of secure e-mail with patients is anticipated to increase under Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements, but little is known about how physicians can successfully incorporate it into daily work. We interviewed 27 “super user” physicians at Kaiser Permanente and Group Health who were identified by leaders as being technologically, operationally, and clinically adept and as having high levels of secure e-mail use with patients. They highly valued the use of secure e-mail with patients, despite concerns about a lack of adequate time to respond, and provided tips for using it successfully. They identified benefits that included better care and improved relationships with their patients. PMID:24937149

  20. 76 FR 46853 - International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...] International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and Collaboration Group... Business Machines Corporation (IBM), ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E- mail and Collaboration Group... Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and Collaboration [[Page 46854

  1. Fostering E-Mail Security Awareness: The West Point Carronade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Aaron J.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point had a problem with some cadets clicking on suspicious attachments and embedded links, significantly affecting network performance and resource availability. West Point information technology leadership needed a way to increase e-mail security awareness in hopes of maintaining a strong…

  2. Colleges Get out of E-Mail Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Frantic troubleshooting by an overworked staff versus someone else fixing problems smoothly. A sliver of server space per person versus a five-gigabyte chunk. Half a million dollars versus free. That's what colleges are faced with as they decide whether to continue running their own e-mail services or outsource them to a professional service like…

  3. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  4. E-mail et Web: Pour une Navigation Sans Risque

    SciT

    Dellabella, Sebastien

    2010-06-28

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l’utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  5. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted…

  6. Langley Communications: Socializing and Snooping on E-mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rymer, Jone

    1998-01-01

    Presents a case study for use in business communication classes to help students understand and learn both the context and the strategies for the communication with business management. Deals with a business problem revolving around issues of appropriate e-mail use and privacy. Includes five assignments. (SR)

  7. Postgraduate Supervision: E-Mail as an Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Toy; Coetzee, Elsabe

    2014-01-01

    Supervisors at higher education institutions cannot ignore the possibilities created by technology, and for the sake of this article, e-mail, as an aid for supervision on postgraduate level. After completing the modules for the Magister Technologiae (M Tech): Education qualification, students are required to complete a dissertation of limited…

  8. E-mail communication patterns and job burnout.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Mujica, Claudia P; Quintane, Eric

    2018-01-01

    A considerable body of research has documented the negative effects of job burnout on employees and their organizations, emphasizing the importance of the identification of early signs of the phenomenon for the purposes of prevention and intervention. However, such timely identification is difficult due to the time and cost of assessing the burnout levels of all employees in an organization using established scales. In this paper, we propose an innovative way to identify employees at risk of job burnout by analyzing their e-mail communication patterns. Building on the Job Demands-Resources model, we theorize about the relationship between e-mail communication patterns and levels of employee exhaustion and disengagement (two dimensions of burnout). We analyzed 52,190 e-mails exchanged between 57 employees of a medium sized R&D company over a five-month period. We then related these employees' communication patterns to their levels of burnout, collected using an established scale (the OLBI-Oldenburg Burnout Inventory). Our results provide support for the overall proposition of the paper, that e-mail communications can be used to identify individuals at risk of job burnout. Our models explain up to 34% of the variance of burnout and up to 37% and 19% respectively of the variance of exhaustion and disengagement. They also successfully distinguish between employees with a higher risk of burnout and those with lower levels of risk (F1 score of 84% with recall of 100% and 73% precision). We discuss the implications of our results and present suggestions for future research.

  9. E-mail et Web: Pour une Navigation Sans Risque

    Dellabella, Sebastien

    2018-04-27

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l’utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  10. E-mail communication patterns and job burnout

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    A considerable body of research has documented the negative effects of job burnout on employees and their organizations, emphasizing the importance of the identification of early signs of the phenomenon for the purposes of prevention and intervention. However, such timely identification is difficult due to the time and cost of assessing the burnout levels of all employees in an organization using established scales. In this paper, we propose an innovative way to identify employees at risk of job burnout by analyzing their e-mail communication patterns. Building on the Job Demands–Resources model, we theorize about the relationship between e-mail communication patterns and levels of employee exhaustion and disengagement (two dimensions of burnout). We analyzed 52,190 e-mails exchanged between 57 employees of a medium sized R&D company over a five-month period. We then related these employees’ communication patterns to their levels of burnout, collected using an established scale (the OLBI–Oldenburg Burnout Inventory). Our results provide support for the overall proposition of the paper, that e-mail communications can be used to identify individuals at risk of job burnout. Our models explain up to 34% of the variance of burnout and up to 37% and 19% respectively of the variance of exhaustion and disengagement. They also successfully distinguish between employees with a higher risk of burnout and those with lower levels of risk (F1 score of 84% with recall of 100% and 73% precision). We discuss the implications of our results and present suggestions for future research. PMID:29518128

  11. Report on Climate Change E-mails Exonerates Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-07-01

    A new report commissioned by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has largely exonerated climate scientists from the university's Climatic Research Unit (CRU) who wrote a number of controversial e-mail messages that were made public without authorization in November 2009. Critics have argued that the e-mails indicate that scientists had tampered with scientific data—including data related to land station temperatures and temperature reconstructions from tree ring analysis—subverted the peer review process, misused the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process, and withheld data from critics. At a 7 July news conference to release the “Independent climate change e-mails review,” report chair Muir Russell said, “Climate science is a matter of such global importance that the highest standards of honesty, rigor, and openness are needed in its conduct. On the specific allegations made against the behavior of CRU scientists, we find that their rigor and honesty as scientists are not in doubt.” He continued, “In addition, we do not find that their behavior has prejudiced the balance of advice given to policy makers. In particular, we did not find any evidence of behavior that might undermine the conclusions of the IPCC assessments.” Russell is chair of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland and formerly was principal and vice-chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland.

  12. Comparing Two Survey Research Approaches: E-Mail and Web-Based Technology versus Traditional Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Colleen M.; Mailloux, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasted two survey methodologies: e-mail-Web and traditional mail. Found that: (1) e-mail-Web respondents were proportionately more likely to be male and enrolled in school full-time; (2) more individual question non-response was present for the e-mail-Web sample; and (3) e-mail-Web respondents value different aspects of graduate school. (EV)

  13. Discussions on Petty Bourgeois and Angry Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuanshan, Zhang; Lei, Rao; Liangyu, Feng; Gui, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Petty bourgeois and angry youth are two large sets of contemporary Chinese youth. There is no doubt that most contemporary youth do not belong to either of these two sets. However, these two large sets are indeed very fashionable at this time, and it is easy to simply distinguish between them by means of two terms: the label "shuai dai"…

  14. Petty Cash. Student's Manual and Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElveen, Peggy C.

    Both a set of student materials and an instructor's manual on maintaining a petty cash fund are included in this packet, which is one of a series. The student materials include a pretest, five learning activities which contain the information and forms needed to complete the activities, a student self-check, with each activity, and a posttest. The…

  15. Therapeutic neuroscience education via e-mail: a case report.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan

    2014-11-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) aims to alter a patient's thoughts and beliefs about pain and has shown efficacy in treating chronic pain. To date, TNE sessions mainly consist of one-on-one verbal communication. This approach limits availability of TNE to pain patients in remote areas. A 32-year-old patient with chronic low back pain (CLBP) who underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) attended a single clinic one-on-one TNE session followed by TNE via electronic mail (e-mail), pacing and graded exposure over a 4-month period. A physical examination, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) were assessed during her initial physical therapy visit as well as 1 and 4 months later. Pre-TNE, the patient reported: NPRS (arm) = 7/10; NPRS (leg) = 4/10; ODI = 10.0%; DASH = 36.7%; FABQ-W = 24; and FABQ-PA = 17. After 5 e-mail sessions all outcome measures improved, most noticeably NRS (arm) = 2/10; NRS (leg) = 0/10; DASH = 16.7%; FABQ-W = 8; and FABQ-PA = 7. TNE can potentially be delivered to suffering pain patients in remote areas or to individuals who have time and financial constraints, and likely at a significant reduced cost via e-mail.

  16. An AIS-Based E-mail Classification Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jinjian; Mao, Ruilong; Bie, Rongfang; Gao, Xiao-Zhi

    This paper proposes a new e-mail classification method based on the Artificial Immune System (AIS), which is endowed with good diversity and self-adaptive ability by using the immune learning, immune memory, and immune recognition. In our method, the features of spam and non-spam extracted from the training sets are combined together, and the number of false positives (non-spam messages that are incorrectly classified as spam) can be reduced. The experimental results demonstrate that this method is effective in reducing the false rate.

  17. Potential Limitations of E-mail and Text Messaging in Improving Adherence in Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Osamah J; Luzuriaga, Christine; Ellish, Nancy; Robin, Alan

    2015-01-01

    To determine how receptive patients are to the use of e-mail and text message reminders for appointments and medications. We conducted a consecutive cross-sectional survey of eligible patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension at a private glaucoma subspecialty practice with 3 locations from February 2011 to January 2012. Main outcome measures were answers to survey questions regarding how receptive patients are to e-mail and text messaging reminders for appointments and medications. Of 989 patients, 404 (40.8%) patients reported that e-mail reminders would help remember appointments and 185 (18.7%) reported that they would help for medications. Among those with access to text messaging, 280 (68.9%) reported text messaging would help them remember appointments and 193 (47.5%) reported it would help with medications. Patients who reported e-mail would help them remember medications were more likely to live in an urban location [P=0.05, odds ratio (OR)=1.84], check the internet at least daily (P≤0.001, OR=1.04), check e-mail when not at home or the office (P=0.02, OR=1.62), and know how to open attachments (P=0.03, OR=1.87). Patients who reported that text messaging would help them remember their medications were more likely to be 40 or less (P≤0.001, OR=8.54) and African American (P<0.001, OR=2.59). E-mail and text messaging reminders currently may have a limited utility in improving adherence in the general glaucoma population but may be useful in younger patients with glaucoma.

  18. Advantages and Disadvantages of Using E-Mail as Instructional Aid: Some Random Thoughts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Gong-Li

    This paper explores the educational benefits and limitations of e-mail as an instructional aid to classroom-based teaching. It looks at practical ideas of how e-mail has been used to aid classroom instruction, and highlights and examines each usage of e-mail in terms of its effects on classroom teaching. E-mail systems have been used for classroom…

  19. Crossing the Threshold of Rocket Mail: E-Mail Use by U.S. Humanities Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Anne E.; Clement, Russell T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of e-mail by humanities faculty based on an e-mail survey of faculty at Brigham Young University (Utah) and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Results indicate that humanities faculty are significantly heavier e-mail users than previously reported. (LRW)

  20. Comparing Response Rates in E-Mail and Paper Surveys: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Tse-Hua; Fan, Xitao

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined 35 study results within last 10 years that directly compared the response rates of e-mail versus mail surveys. Individual studies reported inconsistent findings concerning the response rate difference between e-mail and mail surveys, but e-mail surveys generally have lower response rate (about 20% lower on the average)…

  1. Understanding the "Other Side": Intercultural learning in a Spanish-English E-Mail Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dowd, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Reviews recent research on intercultural learning and reports on a yearlong e-mail exchange between Spanish and English second year university students. Identifies key characteristics of e-mail exchanges that helped to develop learners' intercultural communicative competence. Outlines elements of e-mail messages that may enable students to develop…

  2. The Application of E-Mail to College English Teaching in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guofeng

    2010-01-01

    With the development of information technology in the past 10 years, e-mail has been widely used in the field of English teaching. This paper, based on an analysis of the ways of using e-mail in college English teaching in China, probes the feasibility and the benefits of application of e-mail to college English teaching.

  3. Collaboration via E-Mail and Internet Relay Chat: Understanding Time and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duin, Ann Hill; Archee, Ray

    1996-01-01

    Examines how college students working across distances used e-mail and Internet Relay Chat (IRC) to facilitate their collaboration and decision-making processes. Finds that students came to a decision more quickly using e-mail than with IRC, and when IRC was slow, students reverted to a series of rapid-fire e-mail messages. (RS)

  4. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Americans' Instant Messaging and E-mail Use: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowe, Frank G.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 884 adults with hearing impairments found they were using e-mail and instant messaging (IM) more than TTY and telecommunications relay services. Virtually all participants had e-mail and IM at home. While the vast majority also had and used e-mail at work, just 1 in 3 had IM. (Contains 2 references.) (Author/CR)

  5. You've Got Mail!: Understanding How E-Mail Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptually, e-mail is not a whole lot different from regular postal mail ("snail mail"), except that it is much faster. E-mail requires three things: (1) a personal computer; (2) a telephone or communication line; and (3) an Internet provider (e-mail service account). This article provides details on how it works--plus some research activities…

  6. The Impact of E-Mail Address on Credibility in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livermore, Jeffrey A.; Scafe, Marla G.; Asher, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The researchers have often been surprised to see the e-mail addresses used by our students and colleagues. Many students and faculty choose their own user names and choose their providers. E-mail addresses may provide an insight into the background and employment situation of the user. This study quantifies the impact that e-mail address choices…

  7. The Development of E-Mail Literacy: From Writing to Peers to Writing to Authority Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily

    2006-01-01

    Though e-mail has become a common interpersonal communication medium, it does not mean that this medium is used without difficulty. While people can write e-mails to peers in any manner they like, writing e-mails to authority figures requires higher pragmatic competence and critical language awareness of how discourse shapes and reflects power…

  8. Improving Instructor Response to Student E-Mails Using Template and Reminder Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matthew; Song, Minjung

    2011-01-01

    Student e-mails without the student's name, message, file attachment, and other identifying information may impede a timely and thorough instructor response. To help resolve this issue, we apply template and reminder interventions to improve student e-mail format defined as the degree of agreement between a student's e-mail format and an…

  9. Professional e-mail communication among health care providers: proposing evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Malka, S Terez; Kessler, Chad S; Abraham, John; Emmet, Thomas W; Wilbur, Lee

    2015-01-01

    E-mail is now a primary method of correspondence in health care, and proficiency with professional e-mail use is a vital skill for physicians. Fundamentals of e-mail courtesy can be derived from lay literature, but there is a dearth of scientific literature that addresses the use of e-mail between physicians. E-mail communication between providers is generally more familiar and casual than other professional interactions, which can promote unprofessional behavior or misunderstanding. Not only e-mail content but also wording, format, and tone may influence clinical recommendations and perceptions of the e-mail sender. In addition, there are serious legal and ethical implications when unprofessional or unsecured e-mails related to patient-identifying information are exchanged or included within an electronic medical record. The authors believe that the appropriate use of e-mail is a vital skill for physicians, with serious legal and ethical ramifications and the potential to affect professional development and patient care. In this article, the authors analyze a comprehensive literature search, explore several facets of e-mail use between physicians, and offer specific recommendations for professional e-mail use.

  10. E-Mail Molecules—Individualizing the Large Lecture Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamser, Carl C.

    2003-11-01

    All students in the organic chemistry class are assigned a unique set of nine molecules to report on as optional extra credit assignments. The molecules are taken from a list containing over 200 molecules on the class Web site; they represent an assortment of biologically relevant compounds, from acetaminophen to yohimbine. Once a week, students may submit information about one of the molecules for two points extra credit (where the course includes a total of over 600 points from traditional quizzes and exams). The information requested about the molecules varies slightly each term as student expertise grows, for example, molecular formula, hybridizations, functional groups, or number of stereocenters, but always includes biological relevance and sources of information. Initially students submitted data directly to the instructor by e-mail, but submissions now are handled by a Web-based course management system (WebCT). The goal is to give students individualized assignments that are relatively realistic in light of their future careers in health sciences. Nearly all of the students do some of the molecules, and many students do all of them. About 30 40% of the students who do the assignments regularly gain a grade benefit. Student responses to the exercise have been positive.

  11. What a difference your e-mail makes: effects of informal e-mail addresses in online résumé screening.

    PubMed

    van Toorenburg, Marlies; Oostrom, Janneke K; Pollet, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Résumés are screened rapidly, with some reports stating that recruiters form their impressions within 10 seconds. Certain résumé characteristics can have a significant impact on the snap judgments these recruiters make. The main goal of the present study was to examine the effect of the e-mail address (formal vs. informal) used in a résumé on the hirability perceptions formed by professional recruiters (N=73). In addition, the effect of the e-mail address on hirability perceptions was compared to the effects of spelling errors and typeface. Participants assessed the cognitive ability, personality, and the hirability of six fictitious applicants for the job of an HR specialist. The hirability ratings for the résumés with informal e-mail addresses were significantly lower than the hirability ratings for résumés that featured a formal e-mail address. The effect of e-mail address was as strong as the effect of spelling errors and stronger than that of typeface. The effect of e-mail address on hirability was mediated by perceptions of conscientiousness and honesty-humility. This study among actual recruiters shows for the first time that the choice of the e-mail address used on a résumé might make a real difference.

  12. Secure E-Mail Communication across Company Boundaries Experiences and Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Markus; von der Heidt, Guido; Hille, Carsten; Jacobson, Gunnar

    The important role of e-mail in business communication demands a protection of the transmitted information, not only within one company, but in particular across company borders. E-mail encryption using digital certificates provides means to fulfill this demand. The article discusses the obstacles organizations are faced with during the set up and operation of e-mail encryption between companies. Based on the case study of Siemens, experiences made as well as organizational and infrastructural solutions are outlined.

  13. E-mail in patient–provider communication: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiali; Rust, George; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Strothers, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review systematically the role of e-mails in patient–provider communication in terms of e-mail content, and perspectives of providers and patients on e-mail communication in health care. Methods A systematic review of studies on e-mail communication between patients and health providers in regular health care published from 2000 to 2008. Results A total of 24 studies were included in the review. Among these studies, 21 studies examined e-mail communication between patients and providers, and three studies examined the e-mail communication between parents of patients in pediatric primary care and pediatricians. In the content analyses of e-mail messages, topics well represented were medical information exchange, medical condition or update, medication information, and subspecialty evaluation. A number of personal and institutional features were associated with the likelihood of e-mail use between patients and providers. While benefits of e-mails in enhancing communication were recognized by both patients and providers, concerns about confidentiality and security were also expressed. Conclusion The e-mail is transforming the relationship between patients and providers. The rigorous exploration of pros and cons of electronic interaction in health care settings will help make e-mail communication a more powerful, mutually beneficial health care provision tool. Practice implications It is important to develop an electronic communication system for the clinical practice that can address a range of concerns. More efforts need to be made to educate patients and providers to appropriately and effectively use e-mail for communication. PMID:19914022

  14. Embracing technology: patients', family members' and nurse specialists' experience of communicating using e-mail.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Amanda; Moore, Sally; Plant, Hilary

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the usefulness of e-mail as a means of communication between nurse specialists and patients with lung cancer and their families. The study involved two lung cancer nurse specialists and 16 patients and family members who used e-mail with them during the 6-month study period. Data were collected from three sources: (1) e-mail contact between the nurse specialists and patients/family members, (2) patient/family member questionnaire and (3) a focus group/reflective session with the nurse specialists. Quantitative data collected from the e-mails and the questionnaires were analysed descriptively and are presented as summary statistics. Text data from the questionnaires and e-mails were analysed using content analysis. Findings suggest that e-mail can be an effective and convenient means of communication between nurse specialists, and patients and family members. Patients and family members reported high levels of satisfaction with this method of communication. It was found to be quick and easy, and patients and family members were satisfied with both the response and the speed of response from the nurse specialists. Nurse specialists were also positive about e-mail use and found that the benefits of using e-mail with patients/family members outweighed any disadvantages. Further investigation is recommended involving other health care professionals and different patient groups to ensure the safe and appropriate use of e-mail within health care.

  15. Send it: study of e-mail etiquette and notions from doctors in training.

    PubMed

    Resendes, Sarah; Ramanan, Thammi; Park, Angela; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 247 billion e-mails are sent each day. Little empiric evidence is available to guide how e-mail presentation style, tone, and content affect e-mail recipients and whether these factors impact opinions about the sender and the rapidity of response. In a study of physicians in training assessing a series of 100 e-mail examples, we examined the following: (1) formatting characteristics most and least endorsed, (2) impression of the sender based on the e-mail itself, and (3) factors associated with the decision to respond. We reasoned that our study would provide empiric data to support recommendations for e-mail etiquette, focusing specifically on doctors in training. Cross-sectional survey study. Division of Orthopaedic Surgery at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. After each e-mail, the participating surgical residents completed a series of questions focusing on their impression of the e-mail appearance, their perception of the sender, and their motivation to respond to the e-mail. Thirty-two residents participated in this study. The responses indicate that the key negatively endorsed features of the e-mails included the use of colored backgrounds (84%), difficult-to-read font (83%), lack of a subject header (55%), opening salutations without recipient names (50%), or no salutation at all (42%). The senders of negatively endorsed e-mails were perceived by participants as inefficient (p = 0.03), unprofessional (p < 0.001), and irritating (p = 0.007). E-mails with overall positive endorsements were significantly more likely to have the participants perceive the e-mail senders as professional (p < 0.001), pleasant (p = 0.048), and kind (p = 0.059). The participants were 2.6-fold more likely to respond immediately when they perceived e-mails as favorable compared with disliking them (42% vs 16% of responses, respectively, p < 0.001). The e-mails perceived as being disliked overall are likely to result in a negative perception of the

  16. Pettiness: Conceptualization, measurement and cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Ng, Reuben; Levy, Becca

    2018-01-01

    Although pettiness, defined as the tendency to get agitated over trivial matters, is a facet of neuroticism which has negative health implications, no measure exists. The goal of the current study was to develop, and validate a short pettiness scale. In Study 1 (N = 2136), Exploratory Factor Analysis distilled a one-factor model with five items. Convergent validity was established using the Big Five Inventory, DASS, Satisfaction with Life Scale, and Conner-Davidson Resilience Scale. As predicted, pettiness was positively associated with neuroticism, depression, anxiety and stress but negatively related to extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness, life satisfaction and resilience. Also, as predicted, pettiness was not significantly related to physical functioning, or blind and constructive patriotism, indicating discriminant validity. Confirmatory Factor Analysis in Study 2 (N = 734) revealed a stable one-factor model of pettiness. In Study 3 (N = 532), the scale, which showed a similar factor structure in the USA and Singapore, also reflected predicted cross-cultural patterns: Pettiness was found to be significantly lower in the United States, a culture categorized as "looser" than in Singapore, a culture classified as "tighter" in terms of Gelfand and colleagues' framework of national tendencies to oppose social deviance. Results suggest that this brief 5-item tool is a reliable and valid measure of pettiness, and its use in health research is encouraged.

  17. Chris Pierce and the Yankee Donut Company: An E-Mail-Based Management Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Danna N.; Rollag, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an e-mail-based simulation that helps students experience the fast-paced, complex world of the middle manager. In this electronic in-basket exercise, students assume the role of a district manager in a doughnut company as they respond to a rapid series of high- and low-priority e-mails ostensibly sent from…

  18. The Most Preferred Free E-mail Service Used by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Bicen, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the most preferred free web based e-mail used by students in the technology departments of the Near East University (Departments CIS, CEIT and COM.ENG), and also to find out which technical characteristics affect the participants when making a decision for the choice of an e-mail service. The volunteer…

  19. Cyberdermatoethics I: ethical, legal, technologic, and clinical aspects of patient-physician e-mail.

    PubMed

    Luo, John; Logan, Christopher; Long, Thomas P; Bercovitch, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    As Internet access has become ubiquitous, electronic mail (e-mail) is becoming more widely used as a means of communication between patient and dermatologist. Dealing with the ethical, legal, and clinical consequences has lagged behind the technology. Privacy of e-mail cannot exist without security, and as a foundation for understanding e-mail security, the elements of e-mail technology are reviewed. One of the greatest risks of e-mail is compromise of privacy. Although self-documenting and convenient, e-mail lacks the emotional cues of face-to-face encounters, is asynchronous and not always read in timely fashion, and is not suitable for certain clinical concerns such as urgent matters and cancer diagnoses. Legal issues relating to federal privacy regulations, ethical issues such as autonomy and justice, and guidelines for the use of e-mail in clinical practice are reviewed. Case scenarios are used to present the pitfalls in clinical e-mail encounters, including establishment of the doctor-patient relationship, diagnosis and treatment over the Internet, and curbside consultations.

  20. The STRENGTH Ezine: an application of e-mail for health promotion in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Abroms, Lorien C; Fagan, Pebbles; Eisenberg, Marla E; Lee, Hye-Seung H; Remba, Natania; Sorensen, Glorian

    2004-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the efficacy of e-mail for promoting behavior change. This study evaluates the participation in and outcomes associated with an e-mail-based health promotion program. Adolescent girls aged 15 to 17 years were recruited at a shopping mall. Participants with an e-mail address were assigned to the interactive e-mail magazine (Ezine) group (n = 37), whereas those not reporting an e-mail address were assigned to the non-Ezine group (n = 33). Participants in the Ezine group received the health Ezine, which included a quiz and an advice column, on a weekly basis. Results indicate that among the Ezine group, there was a high recall of the Ezine (81.1%), and more than one third of the participants replied to Ezine volumes with quiz answers or an advice question (36.6%). Differences in health behavior change between the Ezine and non-Ezine groups were not significant. E-mails on health-related matters can generate moderate levels of involvement in adolescent girls. Given the widespread use of e-mail, more studies are needed on the effective application of e-mail for health behavior change.

  1. Social Work Practice in the Digital Age: Therapeutic E-Mail as a Direct Practice Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The author addresses the risks and benefits of incorporating therapeutic e-mail communication into clinical social work practice. Consumer demand for online clinical services is growing faster than the professional response. E-mail, when used as an adjunct to traditional meetings with clients, offers distinct advantages and risks. Benefits include…

  2. Districts Weigh Benefits and Drawbacks of Setting Up Student E-Mail Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Some school districts hoping to improve communication and student engagement in learning are taking a step many educators still view warily: providing students with their own e-mail accounts. However, making e-mail a regular part of students' school lives raises a host of concerns about inappropriate use. In addition, many teachers doubt that the…

  3. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table ... in health and medicine? Sign up for MedlinePlus e-mail updates, and you'll receive alerts whenever ...

  4. Using E-Mail in Computer Assisted Freshman Composition and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Rebecca; Humphries, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Describes teaching freshman composition and rhetoric via e-mail as a distance education course at Tomball Community College (Texas). Discusses student and instructor responsibilities, e-mail procedures, problems encountered (lack of time, and managing disk and mailbox space), and benefits (reduced paper use, typed corrections, accurate records,…

  5. Test of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of an E-Mail Marketing Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Menon, R. G. Vishnu; Sigurdarson, Johannes Pall; Kristjansson, Jon Skafti; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    An e-mail marketing experiment based on the behavioral perspective model was conducted to investigate consumer choice. Conversion e-mails were sent to two groups from the same marketing database of registered consumers interested in children's books. The experiment was based on A-B-A-C-A and A-C-A-B-A withdrawal designs and consisted of sending B…

  6. Mitigating E-Mail Requests in Teenagers' First and Second Language Academic Cyber-Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcón Soler, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The study analyses teenagers' e-mail requests during academic cyber-consultation, exploring how the performance of request modifiers is influenced by participants' perceptions of the degree of imposition of the speech act and social distance with the recipient. A total of 295 e-mail requests, 145 produced by British English speakers (BES) and 150…

  7. E-mail marketing grows up: a primer for the managed care industry.

    PubMed

    Dysart, J

    2000-02-01

    Managed care plans are jumping onto the electronic marketing bandwagon in a big way, taking advantage of not only the basic E-mail system but also expanding on that medium and developing creative vehicles to send the health plan's message. In this article, the author describes how E-mail technology is being used to hone the marketing edge in MCOs.

  8. Using E-mail in a Math/Computer Core Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurwitz, Chaya

    This paper notes the advantages of using e-mail in computer literacy classes, and discusses the results of incorporating an e-mail assignment in the "Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning and Computer Programming" core course at Brooklyn College (New York). The assignment consisted of several steps. The students first read and responded…

  9. An IT Manager's View on E-Mail and Internet Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Mayur S.; Hart, Jeff; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    E-mail is mandatory tool of communications any business to survive in the 21st century. It is imperative that Information technology (IT) managers monitor and make sure that the e-mail systems are used properly. In order to organize a systematic process for proper use of email an administrator must have an input into the development of appropriate…

  10. Perceptions and use of e-mail among Universiti Utara Malaysia staff: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Shafinah Farvin Packeer; Ku-Mahamud, Ku Ruhana; Ramli, Razamin; Abdullah, Kamarudin

    2017-10-01

    The use of e-mail has become common either for work purposes or personal usage. Despite its usefulness, complain about the overwhelming messages received which cause the users to have problem in managing those messages. Similar situation occurred among Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) staff. Thus, a pilot study was conducted to investigate its staff's perception and use of e-mail in order to improve the e-mail service provided to them. This paper discusses the findings from the pilot study, which involves 41 UUM staff. Self-administered questionnaires were used to gather the data, while descriptive statistical analysis was used for data analysis. The findings of the study reveal that UUM staff appreciate the e-mail service. However they faced problems like limited storage size and overwhelming e-mails. They think that UUM e-mail is being abused by the repeating advertisements and news sent to them. The output of this study can be used as a guideline by the UUM management in revising its e-mail policy to serve better quality of e-mail service.

  11. Location Is Everything: The Use and Marketing of Reference E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    Reference e-mail continues to be a vital reference service. This article studies the trends in reference e-mail use over an eight year period. Usage statistics are analyzed particularly in light of the marketing of the service via changes in the location of the service on the official university libraries' Web pages. Included are recommendations…

  12. Request Strategies in Professional E-Mail Correspondence: Insights from the United States Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the rhetorical features of e-mail correspondence, this is the first study to examine the request strategies in e-mails written by native English-speaking professionals from a variety of industries in the United States. This study uses Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper's (1989) speech act framework to analyze the request…

  13. "My Heart Want to Say Something": Exploring ELL Vocabulary Use through E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Sung-on; Piazza, Carolyn L.; Pierce, Michael J.; Bryce, Sara M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on one high school English-language-learner's (ELL) breadth and depth of vocabulary as he communicated with his teacher through e-mail across geographic boundaries for over 18 months. Design/methodology/approach: The authors began by separating 358 e-mails into three time periods (first beginning,…

  14. Ars Dictaminis Perverted: The Personal Solicitation E-Mail as a Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Derek G.

    2009-01-01

    Phishing e-mails deceive individuals into giving out personal information which may then be utilized for identity theft. One particular type, the Personal Solicitation E-mail (PSE) mimics personal letters--modern perversions of "ars dictaminis" (the classical art of letter writing). In this article, I determine and discuss 19 appeals common to the…

  15. Outcomes of an Intercultural E-Mail Based University Discussion Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furcsa, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the development of intercultural awareness in an electronic mail (e-mail) discussion project between Hungarian learners of English and American speakers. Students discussed topics relating to cultures, languages, and pedagogical issues. The e-mails were analyzed in terms of language skill improvement, apprehensiveness…

  16. Linguistic Characteristics of ESL Writing in Task-based E-mail Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yili

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the efficacy of integrating task-based e-mail activities into a process-oriented English-as-Second-Language (ESL) writing class. Particular focus was on the linguistic characteristics of 132 pieces of e-mail writing by ESL students in tasks that differed in terms of purpose, audience interaction, and task structure. Computerized text…

  17. Con Artists Attack Colleges with Fake Help-Desk E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    An e-mail scam has hit tens of thousands of users at dozens of colleges over the past few weeks, leaving network administrators scrambling to respond before campus computer accounts are taken over by spammers. Students, professors, and staff members at the affected colleges received e-mail messages that purported to come from the colleges' help…

  18. Development of an E-mail Application Seemit and its Utilization in an Information Literacy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Toshihiro; Miyazaki, Makoto; Nakano, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Kenichi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    We have developed a simple e-mail application named Seemit which is designed for being used in information literacy courses. It has necessary and sufficient functionality of an e-mail application, and it has been developed for the purpose of learning basic operations and mechanisms of e-mail transfer easily. It is equipped with the function to automatically set the configuration of user's SMTP/POP servers and e-mail address, etc. The process of transferring e-mail via SMTP and POP can be demonstrated step by step showing actual messages passed during the client-server interaction. We have utilized Seemit in a university-wide information literacy course which holds about 1800 students.

  19. Electronic Mail (E-Mail) Management and Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    age or date of birth ; present or 14 AFI33-119 1 MARCH 1999future assignments for overseas, or for routinely deployable or sensitive units; and office...Server Naming Convention. The DMS-AF primary (e.g., ESL® Primary, Lotus ® Hub, and Microsoft® Bridgehead) server and its backup must conform to the 8...determine if there is some benefit to establishing standard lower-level folder names which bases should adhere to. Standard public folders offer a

  20. Sir William Petty: modern epidemiologist (1623-1687).

    PubMed

    Banta, J E

    1987-01-01

    William Petty, physician, epidemiologist, political economist, demographer, cartographer, and administrator was an intellectual product of the seventeenth century. Petty was born in the year 1623 in Romsey, England of lower middle class parents; however, by the time of his death in 1687 he had become a knight of the realm, founder of the Royal Society, and friend of kings. Petty's life reflected the northern renaissance which induced such dramatic changes in science, technology, politics, and entrepreneurship. His education was eclectic, nonetheless he took his Doctor of Physic degree from Oxford in 1649 and became an Oxford don, where he spent the next few years as an academic before undertaking a definitive survey of Ireland on behalf of the Cromwell government. Ireland changed Petty's destiny and he became a man of the world and entrepreneur which stimulated his interest in public policy formulation and economics. It was Petty's peculiar genius to be innovative in the application of measurement, statistics, and mathematics to socioeconomic and demographic phenomena. As a physician he related his knowledge of health and disease to these phenomena in what in the modern context would be called human ecology or social epidemiology. These relationships and their measurement were employed to establish an objective set of data which could be analyzed for the purpose of rational public policy planning by the state. This scientific approach to public policy places Petty squarely in the context of modern epidemiologic and public health practice and marks the initiation of a major use of the epidemiologic method.

  1. Identifying Speech Acts in E-Mails: Toward Automated Scoring of the "TOEIC"® E-Mail Task. Research Report. ETS RR-12-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Felice, Rachele; Deane, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an approach to automatically score the "TOEIC"® Writing e-mail task. We focus on one component of the scoring rubric, which notes whether the test-takers have used particular speech acts such as requests, orders, or commitments. We developed a computational model for automated speech act identification and tested it…

  2. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study-elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample-used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of older…

  3. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study--elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample--used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of…

  4. Social work practice in the digital age: therapeutic e-mail as a direct practice methodology.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Marian

    2012-07-01

    The author addresses the risks and benefits of incorporating therapeutic e-mail communication into clinical social work practice. Consumer demand for online clinical services is growing faster than the professional response. E-mail, when used as an adjunct to traditional meetings with clients, offers distinct advantages and risks. Benefits include the potential to reach clients in geographically remote and underserved communities, enhancing and extending the therapeutic relationship and improving treatment outcomes. Risks include threats to client confidentiality and privacy, liability coverage for practitioners, licensing jurisdiction, and the lack of competency standards for delivering e-mail interventions. Currently, the social work profession does not have adequate instructive guidelines and best-practice standards for using e-mail as a direct practice methodology. Practitioners need (formal) academic training in the techniques connected to e-mail exchanges with clients. The author describes the ethical and legal risks for practitioners using therapeutic e-mail with clients and identifies recommendations for establishing best-practice standards.

  5. The impact of e-mail in acquiring and retaining whole-blood donors: a comparative analysis of the Puget Sound Blood Center donor e-mail communication program.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Maria Elena

    2005-12-01

    With the emergence of e-mail as a common form of communication, it is important to understand the role and impact e-mail can have on acquiring and retaining whole-blood donors. Whole-blood donors who opted in to receive e-mail communications (n = 43,232) from the Puget Sound Blood Center (PSBC) and as a result participated in one or more of five e-mail marketing campaigns between July 2002 and March 2003 were studied. New donors with e-mail addresses grew by 74 percent over the measurement period compared with 2 percent growth of those without e-mail addresses. Nearly 15,000 prospective donors were reached as a result of donors passing along e-mails they received from PSBC to friends and family. Nearly 5 percent of PSBC e-mail campaign recipients registered to donate online. PSBC e-mail campaigns have outperformed e-mail marketing industry mean open rates by 44 percent and click-through rates by 36 percent. E-mail is now a mainstream communication medium. It has proven to be an effective method of reaching new donors and generating new donation registrations. Donors respond more favorably to e-mail communications from PSBC compared with e-mail they receive from other organizations. Deeper understanding of how different segments of blood donors use e-mail may help blood centers adjust their donor acquisition and retention programs. New recruitment methods are needed to grow the overall donor base, and e-mail appears to have the potential to make a significant contribution to meeting this objective.

  6. The Messages They Send: E-Mail Use by Adolescents with and without a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Durkin, Kevin; Walker, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contemporary adolescents use e-mail for a variety of purposes, including peer communication and education. Research into these uses has focused on typically developing individuals; much less is known about the use of e-mail by exceptional youth. Aims: The present study examined the structure and form of e-mail messages sent by…

  7. Exploring Students' Use of E-Mail for Out-of-Class Communication: Frequency, Satisfaction, and Learning Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Q.; Ahn, S.; Meyers, R. A.; Timmerman, C. E.; Fonner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors assessed students' use of e-mail for out-of-class communication (OCC) and its impact on satisfaction and learning self-efficacy. Findings showed that students and instructors use e-mail frequently for OCC, and frequency of use is positively associated with student satisfaction with e-mail as an OCC medium. Moreover, the content of…

  8. Internet use and e-mail communications between patients and providers: a survey of rheumatology outpatients.

    PubMed

    Siva, Chokkalingam; Smarr, Karen L; Hanson, Kathleen Donovan; Parikh, Meghal; Lawlor, Kenneth; Ge, Bin

    2008-12-01

    As health care costs rise in the United States and elsewhere, adopting health information technology is being advocated to reduce costs and improve efficiency. Physician e-mail communication is a frequently proposed tool in this strategy. We examined the interest of rheumatology outpatients in using E-mail for communication with their rheumatologist. We sought to identify their privacy and cost concerns on this issue, and examine the patients' demographics, internet usage, and preferences. An anonymous survey was given to 150 consecutive patients. Patients responded to questions on demographics, rheumatic diseases, comorbidities, computer/internet access, E-mail use, privacy concerns, payment issues, and preferences regarding communication with their rheumatologist. Statistical analyses on the relationships between demographics and patient preferences on communications with their rheumatologist were conducted. There were 145 respondents; the mean age was 52.3 years, mean education level was 13.6 years. The sample tended to be women (74%), retired/disabled (46%) or employed full time (35%). Most had internet access (74.5%). Differences were found based on gender, age, education, and income levels. Younger adults were more likely to desire E-mail communication with their rheumatologists, especially if paid by insurance. More men than women had concerns about privacy; persons with higher income levels were more willing to self-pay for E-mail. As a significant number of patients with rheumatic diseases express interest in E-mail communication with their providers, rheumatologists need to be cognizant of patients' preferences. To deliver patient-centered care, rheumatology practices might consider incorporating E-mail communication into their practices.

  9. Do you feel you know how to write an e-mail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonova, Anna O.

    2003-10-01

    Computers have opened doors to the new era of telecommunication. Electronic mail is becoming very popular in different spheres of professional activity and everyday life of people all over the world as it provides people an excellent opportunity for real, natural communication. The use of e-mail and the Internet involves a whole range of skills including knowing how to use a personal computer, knowing how to navigate the immense resources of cyberspace, and becoming familiar with the special register of e-mail communication (which lies somewhere between the formality of traditional writing and the spontaneity of speech). Conferencing via e-mail, or communicating with partners through networked computers, offers many opportunities in the Scientific Community. E-mail allows us to collaborate easily with thousands of colleagues, sharing new ideas, resources, and materials. It can provide the information, contacts, and stimulation that can make our research work more effective and enjoyable. The English language is world-wide accepted as lingua-franca of the Internet and intercultural communication. This brings us to a necessity to introduce some ideas on e-mail writing.

  10. Internet and e-mail use in ENT: a survey of patient usage and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, B; Farboud, A; Trinidade, A; Kothari, P

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, internet and e-mail are important modes of communication and information. This paper seeks to determine internet usage as a source of health information amongst ENT patients and to investigate whether patients prefer to communicate primarily with the hospital via e-mail. The method used is a questionnaire study and 201 patients attending an ENT clinic completed questionnaires over 2 weeks in December 2010. Of those with internet access (85%), 37% had used it for health information prior to their appointment; 90% rated the information between average and excellent; over half stated they would like doctor-recommended websites. Overall, 8% had previously used e-mail to communicate with healthcare professionals, but 50% stated that they wished to use e-mail in the future. ENT patients are becoming increasingly computer-literate. As healthcare professionals, we must do more to incorporate the internet as a source of reliable healthcare information. Properly implemented, e-mail can become an invaluable method of communication with patients.

  11. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts.

  12. Consumer understanding of calorie labeling: a healthy monday e-mail and text message intervention.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michelle L; Lee, Katherine; Loglisci, Ralph; Righter, Allison; Hipper, Thomas J; Cheskin, Lawrence J

    2015-03-01

    To assess caloric knowledge of participants and determine if an e-mail and/or text message intervention could increase knowledge of recommended daily caloric intake. Randomized, control trial. Johns Hopkins Hospital Cobblestone Café. The 246 participants reported eating at the Café at least twice/week. Participants randomized to control, e-mail, or text condition. The text and e-mail conditions received a message on four consecutive Mondays stating the recommended daily caloric intake. Knowledge of the government reference value of 2,000 calories. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. Multivariate logistic regression examined the effectiveness of text and e-mail messaging for improving knowledge of the government calorie reference value. Baseline awareness of the daily calorie reference value in study population was low. Participants in the text message condition were twice as likely to know the government calorie reference value compared to controls (p = .047, odds ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [1.01, 4.73]). No significant differences were found for the e-mail condition (p = .5). Many people do not know the daily recommended caloric intake. Public education on the government calorie reference value is necessary for menu-labeling interventions to be more effective. Weekly text messaging can serve as an effective modality for delivering calorie information and nutrition education. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. [E-mail in psychotherapy--an aftercare model via electronic mail for psychotherapy inpatients].

    PubMed

    Wolf, Markus; Maurer, Wolf-Jürgen; Dogs, Peter; Kordy, Hans

    2006-01-01

    We introduce an aftercare program for psychotherapy inpatients, which is based on regular communication via E-mail. The organizational and operational structure of the program are described within the context of computer mediated communication. First results on utilization and acceptance are reported. In comparison to patients who did not participate in either aftercare program of the clinic, the E-mail participants are younger and higher educated. Inpatient treatment of the participants was three days shorter in duration than that of non participants. Both groups were similar with regard to symptom distress at discharge from hospital. A low dropout rate of 8%, the high activity and satisfaction emphasize the positive acceptance of the program. Therapists' E-mail activity turned out to be important for the participants. Neither age, internet experience or symptom related variables nor the own E-mail activity were associated with participants' evaluation of the new service. Based on these first positive experiences the perspectives of using E-mail in psychotherapy will be discussed.

  14. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts. PMID:26422171

  15. Don't LOL at virtual visits. Technology is allowing more doctors and patients to consult via e-mail, and insurance companies are reimbursing for it.

    PubMed

    Robeznieks, Andis

    2007-10-15

    In today's "I-gotta-know-now" society, many patients turn to e-mail to contact doctors on matters, as opposed to waiting for an in-person office visit. Now, some insurers are actually reimbursing doctors for their electronic time, which is also known as a "virtual visit." Internist Paul Tang, left, doesn't consider the practice mainstream yet. "No one is reimbursing us," he says.

  16. The remote diagnosis of malaria using telemedicine or e-mailed images.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K; Mody, Rupal M; Dooley, David P; Hospenthal, Duane R; Horvath, Lynn L; Moran, Kimberly A; Muntz, Ronald W

    2006-12-01

    We determined the ability of blinded remote expert microscopy to identify malaria parasites through transmission of malaria smear images via telemedicine and as e-mail attachments. Protocols for malaria smear transmission included: (1) transmission of sender-selected televised smears at various bandwidths (Bw), (2) transmission of remote reader-directed televised smears at various Bw, and (3) transmission of digital photomicrographs as e-mail attachments. Twenty (14%) of 147 sender-selected, and 13 (6%) of 221 reader-directed, images were deemed unreadable by slide readers. The presence or absence of malaria was correctly identified in 98% of the remaining images. Sixty-four (34%) of 190 digital microphotographs were deemed unreadable, while the presence or absence of malaria was correctly identified in 100% of the remaining images. Correct speciation ranged from 45% to 83% across various transmission methods and Bw. The use of telemedicine and e-mail technology shows promise for the remote diagnosis of malaria.

  17. Impact of predictive scoring model and e-mail messages on African American blood donors.

    PubMed

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Timm, Brad; Dasgupta, Pinaki; Hillyer, Christopher D; Kessler, Debra; Rebosa, Mark; France, Christopher R; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-06-01

    Expanding the African American (AA) donor pool is critical to sustain transfusion support for sickle cell disease patients. The aims were to: 1) apply cognitive computing on donation related metrics to develop a predictive model that effectively identifies repeat AA donors, 2) determine whether a single e-mail communication could improve AA donor retention and compare retention results on higher versus lower predictive score donors, and 3) evaluate the effect of e-mail marketing on AA donor retention with culturally versus nonculturally tailored message. Between 2011 and 2012, 30,786 AA donors donated blood at least once on whom predictive repeat donor scores (PRDSs) was generated from donor-related metrics (frequency of donations, duration between donations, age, blood type, and sex). In 2013, 28% (8657/30,786) of 2011 to 2012 donors returned to donate on whom PRDS was validated. Returning blood donors had a higher mean PRDS compared to nonreturning donors (0.649 vs. 0.268; p < 0.001). In the e-mail pilot, high PRDS (≥0.6) compared to low PRDS (<0.6) was associated with 89% higher donor presentation rate (p < 0.001), 20% higher e-mail opening rate (p < 0.001), and, specifically among those who opened the e-mail, 159% higher presentation rate (p < 0.001). Finally, blood donation rate did not differ (p = 0.79) as a function of generic (n = 9312, 1.4%) versus culturally tailored (n = 9326, 1.3%) message. Computational algorithms utilizing readily available donor metrics can identify highly committed AA donors and in conjunction with targeted e-mail communication has the potential to increase the efficiency of donor marketing. © 2017 AABB.

  18. The finer points of lying online: e-mail versus pen and paper.

    PubMed

    Naquin, Charles E; Kurtzberg, Terri R; Belkin, Liuba Y

    2010-03-01

    The authors present 3 experimental studies that build on moral disengagement theory by exploring lying in online environments. Findings indicate that, when e-mail is compared with pen and paper communication media (both of which are equal in terms of media richness, as both are text only), people are more willing to lie when communicating via e-mail than via pen and paper and feel more justified in doing so. The findings were consistent whether the task assured participants that their lie either would or would not be discovered by their counterparts. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  19. 20 CFR 638.807 - Imprest and petty cash funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 638.807 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.807 Imprest... centers shall establish auditable petty cash funds. The Job Corps Director shall develop procedures to...

  20. Use of simulated electronic mail (e-mail) to assess medical student knowledge, professionalism, and communication skills.

    PubMed

    Christner, Jennifer G; Stansfield, R Brent; Schiller, Jocelyn H; Madenci, Arin; Keefer, Patricia M; Pituch, Ken

    2010-10-01

    Physicians communicate with patients using electronic mail (e-mail) with increasing frequency. Communication skills specific to e-mail do not appear to be taught explicitly in medical school. Therefore, the effect of an instructive session on effective e-mail communication was examined. Four simulated e-mails from a parent were developed. Students responded to an initial e-mail and then participated in a session on effective e-mail communication. Responses to a final e-mail were assessed using a rubric with subscores for medical knowledge, communication, and professionalism. Performance improved from the first to final e-mail response in the overall score and in each subscore. Improvement was sustained over the course of the academic year. Interrater reliability revealed good agreement. Communicating effectively with patients via e-mail is not intuitive but can be taught. It is feasible to introduce responses to a simulated e-mail case in a clinical clerkship as an assessment tool.

  1. Perceived Barriers to and Facilitators of Patient-to-Provider E-Mail in the Management of Diabetes Care.

    PubMed

    Popeski, Naomi; McKeen, Caitlin; Khokhar, Bushra; Edwards, Alun; Ghali, William A; Sargious, Peter; White, Debbie; Hebert, Marilynne; Rabi, Doreen M

    2015-12-01

    1) to describe current utilization of e-mail in the clinical care of patients with diabetes; and 2) to identify barriers to and facilitators of the adoption of e-mail in diabetes care. Participants included diabetes care providers, including 9 physicians and 7 allied health professionals (AHPs). Participation involved, first, completing a self-administered survey to evaluate the use of e-mail within diabetes-related clinical practice. Second, focus group discussions were conducted with diabetes care providers using semistructured interviews to collect data about their perceptions of using e-mail to exchange information with patients diagnosed with diabetes. Patients' perspectives on the use of e-communication with their care providers was also proposed on the basis of the discussions. Significant differences were found between physicians and AHPs concerning questions that were related to the use of e-mail and the amount of time spent using e-mail to communicate to patients. There was perceived function and value to the use of e-mail among AHPs, while few physicians used e-mail routinely and were uncertain about its potential in improving care. Five themes, including barriers, benefits, risks, safeguards and compensation, were developed from the focus group interviews. Currently, most of the physicians surveyed do not e-mail patients directly; however, AHPs frequently use e-mail in diabetes care and find this tool valuable. Variation in practices regarding clinical e-mail across care disciplines suggest that appropriate policy with guidelines for e-mail and e-communication within the health care system may improve uptake of clinical e-mail and perhaps, by extension, improve efficiency and access in diabetes care. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Inexpensive E-mail Systems for LANs and Dial-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    Internet e-mail is becoming more accessible to K-12 teachers. Many colleges and universities will give accounts to teachers for the price of asking. Unfortunately, many of these university systems are hard to use and are usually not offered to K-12 students. Also, most schools do not have phone lines in classrooms. This paper discusses two systems…

  3. Identification and Disidentification in Organizational Discourse: A Metaphor Analysis of E-Mail Communication at Enron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnage, Anna K.

    2010-01-01

    This project is situated within the interpretive tradition in organizational communication research, focusing on organizational discourse. It goes further by bringing the discussion into the 21st century through examining how communication technology--specifically e-mail--plays a role in the linguistic practices that help create, maintain and…

  4. Exploring Culture from a Distance: A U.S./Israeli E-Mail Exchange Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutta, Joyce W.; Spector-Cohen, Elana

    2002-01-01

    Explores the use of electronic mail to link native-English-speaking teachers and teacher candidates in one country with English-as-a-Foreign-Language students in the other. An average of 10 participants per semester have spent approximately 2 months leaning about each other's cultures through an e-mail exchange of ideas and views. (Author/VWL)

  5. A Grounded Theory Study of the Relationship between E-Mail and Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camargo, Marta Rocha

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This study consisted of a qualitative investigation into the role of e-mail in work-related burnout among high technology employees working full time and on-site for Internet, hardware, and software companies. Method: Grounded theory methodology was used to provide a systemic approach in categorising, sorting, and analysing data…

  6. Factors that impact nurses' use of electronic mail (e-mail).

    PubMed

    Hughes, J A; Pakieser, R A

    1999-01-01

    As electronic applications are used increasingly in healthcare, nurses are being challenged to adopt them. Electronic mail (e-mail) is an electronic tool with general as well as healthcare uses. E-mail use may be an opportunity to learn a tool that requires skills similar to those used in other applications. This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitators that impact nurses' use of e-mail in the workplace. Data for this study were gathered using focus group methodology. Content analysis identified and labeled factors into seven major categories. Specific factors identified were generally consistent with those previously described in the literature as affecting use of computers in general. However, there were several additional factors identified that were not reported in other previous studies: lack of face-to-face communication, individual writing skills, recency of any educational experience, volume of mail received, password integrity, and technical support. Findings from this study provide information for any individual involved in introducing or updating an e-mail system in a healthcare environment.

  7. E-Rate to Support Wireless E-Mail, Internet Calling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with federal E-rate program's support of school leaders' Blackberry habit. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has cleared the way to allow money from the $2.25 billion program of subsidies for school technology to apply to e-mail service for mobile, wireless devices, such as the BlackBerry, which are increasingly…

  8. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS (Eff. June 28, 2010) § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the...

  9. Shared Semantics and the Use of Organizational Memories for E-Mail Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of shared semantics information to link concepts in an organizational memory to e-mail communications. Presents a framework for determining shared semantics based on organizational and personal user profiles. Illustrates how shared semantics are used by the HyperMail system to help link organizational memories (OM) content to…

  10. Endorsement of the New Ecological Paradigm in Systematic and E-Mail Samples of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rideout, Bruce E.; Hushen, Katherine; McGinty, Dawn; Perkins, Stephanie; Tate, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    As the initial phase of a longitudinal study of environmental perspective in college students, resident student opinion was sampled using the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale administered through systematic alphabetical sampling. Sampling was also carried out by a blanket e-mail distribution of surveys for voluntary response. Results showed…

  11. Changing Cultural Stereotypes through E-Mail Assisted Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itakura, Hiroko

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the question of how cultural stereotypes are formed, modified, dismissed or reinforced, drawing on findings from a collaborative intercultural e-mail project between Hong Kong learners of Japanese at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and native Japanese speakers at Kagoshima University. It also evaluates role of e-mail…

  12. Bridging the Gap? Internet and E-Mail Access within Universities in Developing Commonwealth Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Helen

    This study examined the extent to which e-mail and Internet access is available within universities in developing countries in the British Commonwealth. Data were gathered using a survey of 300 institutions in developing Commonwealth countries, and responses by 112 institutions in 19 countries were evaluated. The study concluded that a major gulf…

  13. E-mail Communities--A Story of Collaboration between Students in Australia and Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelong, Peter; Fearnley-Sander, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes two projects: the first linked teacher-education students in Australia and Indonesia through e-mail and then grew into a link between primary students; the second project was a prize-winning publication by the primary students on the Internet. Gives a list of different materials and guidelines for teachers. (CMK)

  14. Minding Your E-Mail: District Leaders Need to Prepare for Public Records Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Daniel; Keener, Clinton; Shoaf, Michael; McIntyre, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Since the Supreme Court approved a 2006 amendment to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure requiring public entities such as school districts to produce electronically stored public records during the "discovery process" in lawsuits, maintaining such records, especially e-mail messages, has been an ongoing obligation for district leaders. While…

  15. Language with Character: A Stratified Corpus Comparison of Individual Differences in E-Mail Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlander, Jon; Gill, Alastair J.

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does the wording and syntactic form of people's writing reflect their personalities? Using a bottom-up stratified corpus comparison, rather than the top-down content analysis techniques that have been used before, we examine a corpus of e-mail messages elicited from individuals of known personality, as measured by the Eysenck…

  16. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of registration...

  17. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of registration...

  18. 16 CFR 1130.7 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.7 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of registration...

  19. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  20. Not Wanted in the Inbox!: Evaluations of Unsolicited and Harassing E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Pek Ne; Senn, Charlene Y.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed as a first step to explore sexual harassment in the electronic domain. One hundred six students read 10 e-mail messages ranging from jokes to spam to a sexual proposition from a stranger and rated them on an offensiveness evaluative scale. Participants also completed social desirability and attitudes toward sexual…

  1. E-Mail Alerts and RSS Feeds for Distance Learning Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Allyson; Howell, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how E-Mail Alerts and RSS feeds can be helpful tools for busy distance education administrators by helping them to efficiently sort through the research and news information that is now available. These tools and their respective filters and aggregators make it possible for busy distance education administrators to stay…

  2. Using viral e-mails to distribute tobacco control advertisements: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Owen B J; Donovan, Robert; Jalleh, Geoffrey

    2011-08-01

    The authors' objective was to conduct a trial of viral e-mail marketing as a distribution method for tobacco control advertisements. University students (n = 200) in the state of Western Australia were randomly allocated to receive 1 of 2 e-mails with hyperlinks to tobacco control advertisements ("Toilet" and "Rubbish") emphasizing the disgusting nature of smoking. Recipients followed a hyperlink to a Web page playing Toilet or Rubbish on endless loop. Viewers were encouraged to forward the e-mail to their friends and invited to complete an online survey about the advertisement. Unique downloads for each advertisement were identified by internet provider (IP) location and tallied by date and geographical location to assess subsequent dissemination beyond the initial 200 students. There were 826 unique viewings of the advertisements averaging 26.9 viewings per day for the first fortnight, followed by a lower average of 4.1 hits per day for the next 3.5 months. IP addresses identified hits from 3 other Australian states and 7 other countries. Online surveys were completed by 103 respondents (12.5% of total hits) but included few smokers (n = 9). Significantly more respondents rated Toilet as "funny" compared with Rubbish (40% vs. 11%; p < .05), likely explaining why the former accounted for significantly more viewings than the latter (487 vs. 339; p < .001). There was a greater than fourfold return in dissemination for each initial e-mail sent but daily hits rapidly deteriorated over time. Entertainment appears to facilitate viral e-mails being forwarded onwards but only exceptionally compelling tobacco control materials are ever likely to become self-perpetuating.

  3. Usage of insecure E-mail services among researchers with different scientific background.

    PubMed

    Solić, Kresimir; Grgić, Krešimir; Ilakovac, Vesna; Zagar, Drago

    2011-08-01

    Free web‑based e-mail services are considered to have more security flaws than institutional ones, but they are frequently used among scientific researchers for professional communication. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency of usage of the insecure free e-mail services for professional communication among biomedical, economical and technical researchers, who published papers in one of three different journals: Croatian Medical Journal, Automatika and Economic Research. Contact details of the authors who provided their e‑mail address from the papers published in those three journals during one year period were collected. These e‑mail addresses were collected from the electronic archive of the journals in question. The domains of all e‑mail addresses were assessed and contacts were categorized into three groups according to the following types: world-wide known free web‑based e‑mail services, national Internet Service Provider (ISP) e-mail services, and institutional or corporate e-mail addresses. The proportion of authors using free web-based e-mail services, the least secure group type, was highest among biomedical researchers (17.8%) while every e‑mail address collected from the technical journal belonged to the secured institutional e‑mail group type. It seems that all researchers from the technical scientific field and most of the researchers from the economical field value good security practice and use more secure systems for professional communication. High percentage of the biomedical researchers who use insecure e‑mail services may mean that they need to be warned of the possible security disadvantages of those kinds of e‑mail addresses.

  4. E-Mail Communication Practices and Preferences Among Patients and Providers in a Large Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Cook, Natalie; Maganti, Manjula; Dobriyal, Aditi; Sheinis, Michal; Wei, Alice C; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about how electronic mail (e-mail) is currently used in oncology practice to facilitate patient care. The objective of our study was to understand the current e-mail practices and preferences of patients and physicians in a large comprehensive cancer center. Separate cross-sectional surveys were administered to patients and physicians (staff physicians and clinical fellows) at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with current e-mail use. Record review was performed to assess the impact of e-mail communication on care. The survey was completed by 833 patients. E-mail contact with a member of the health care team was reported by 41% of respondents. The team members contacted included administrative assistants (52%), nurses (45%), specialist physicians (36%), and family physicians (18%). Patient factors associated with a higher likelihood of e-mail contact with the health care team included younger age, higher education, higher income, enrollment in a clinical trial, and receipt of multiple treatments. Eighty percent of physicians (n = 63 of 79) reported previous contact with a patient via e-mail. Physician factors associated with a greater likelihood of e-mail contact with patients included older age, more senior clinical position, and higher patient volume. Nine hundred sixty-two patient records were reviewed, with e-mail correspondence documented in only 9% of cases. E-mail is commonly used for patient care but is poorly documented. The use of e-mail in this setting can be developed with appropriate guidance; however, there may be concerns about widening the gap between certain groups of patients. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. E-mail communication in pain practice: The importance of being earnest.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Irene Solera; García, Guadalupe Población; Riquelme, Irene

    2014-07-01

    Information technology can play a vital role in meeting patient needs and reinforcing the relationship among patients and their pain physicians. However, strong resistance remains on the medical side to this type of non-frontal care. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an E-mail intervention on customers' satisfaction. The secondary goals were to analyze the messages from patients to their clinician (not only the volume but also the content) and the impact on client, professional and health services outcomes. A prospective, non-randomized evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for chronic pain from September 2011 to May 2012. A private, specialty referral center in Spain. Participants were users visiting the Pain Management Unit evaluated by one physician. The E-mail address of the facility was written in every medical report provided. Patient satisfaction at the end of the 8-month trial period was assessed and outcomes recorded. Patients reported better communication with their therapist and greater satisfaction with overall care. 780 E-mails were read. Specialists received an average of 5 messages per day (standard deviation 0,3). None of them was unsuitable. This is a prospective, single center evaluation performed by one doctor. There was no control group due to ethical considerations. Electronic communication is a cheap, easy and feasible way to address a wide range of concerns, thus enhancing patients' satisfaction. More efforts are needed to implement routinely usage of this tool. If used appropriately, E-mail can facilitate physician-dependent interactions, promote access to care, save time and reduce costs. Concerns about billing, improper utilization, privacy and confidentiality might complicate its introduction and acceptance. Internet access remains a significant barrier to online patient-provider transference.

  6. Important imaging finding e-mail alert system: experience after 3 years of implementation.

    PubMed

    Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Choy, Garry; Whelton, Dianne G; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an important finding alert (IFA) system that uses e-mail technology to alert referring physicians to an important but nonurgent imaging finding. The institutional review board approved the study; the requirement for informed consent was waived. The authors retrospectively reviewed the radiology reports generated from January 2005 to December 2007 to determine how many reports contained an IFA statement, how many IFA messages were sent, and how many such messages were viewed by referring physicians. They reviewed 1000 randomly selected radiology reports that contained the IFA statement to identify the imaging modalities and findings that triggered the radiologists' use of the IFA system. A total of 1540254 radiology reports were generated during the 3-year period. A total of 56 691 (3.7%) reports contained the IFA statement. IFA e-mail messages were sent for 52 883 (93.3%) of the 56 691 reports, and 42 285 (74.6%) of the 56 691 reports were viewed by the referring physicians. The most common important but nonurgent findings were definitive (449 [44.9%] of 1000 reports) and indeterminate (260 [26.0%] of 1000 reports) abnormalities. More than half (n = 503) of the alerts were related to computed tomographic examinations, and the majority (n = 677, 67.7%) of them were initiated by thoracic and abdominal radiologists. The IFA system is a potentially useful method of communicating nonurgent but important imaging findings with use of e-mail technology.

  7. Weight problems and spam e-mail for weight loss products.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on young adult behaviors with regard to spam e-mails that sell weight loss products. Participants (N = 200) with and without weight problems were asked if they received, opened, and bought products from spam e-mail about weight loss topics in the past year. Psychological factors of self-esteem and perceived stress were measured. Those with weight problems had significantly greater percentages than those without weight problems for receiving (87.7% vs. 73.3%, P = 0.02), opening (41.5% vs. 17.8%, P <0.001), and buying products (18.5% vs. 5.2%, P = 0.003). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, weight problems were significantly associated with receiving (OR: 3.39, 95% CI: 1.31, 8.82), opening (OR: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.53, 6.29), and buying products (OR: 3.38, 95% CI: 1.16, 9.82). Physicians should consider discussing with patients the potential risks of opening and/or purchasing weight loss products from spam e-mails.

  8. Comparison of e-mail communication skills among first- and fourth-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Marnie; Horvath, Zsuzsa; Weinberg, Seth M; Bhatt, Jaya; Spallek, Heiko

    2013-11-01

    As e-mail and other forms of electronic communication increase in popularity, it is important for dental schools to consider a curriculum that prepares their graduates to understand and apply effective electronic communication strategies to their patients. Reflecting this shift in communication behavior, the American Medical Association has developed specific e-mail communication guidelines. Some behavioral examples in these guidelines include protecting patients' protected health information (PHI), ensuring proper record keeping, and using professional, courteous, and understandable language. In this study, a sample of first- and fourth-year dental students (n=160) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine participated in an assignment assessing their patient-provider e-mail communication skills. A rubric was used to evaluate and compare the data between dental student classes. The results reveal a generalized lack of compliance with several of these guidelines by both classes (e.g., failure to protect PHI), despite efforts to expose students to these concepts in the curriculum. In an effort to train emerging dentists to function in a rapidly changing technological environment, these findings suggest a need for growth and development of curricula and perhaps guidelines/recommendations for behavioral competencies regarding dental students' use of electronic communication in the patient care environment.

  9. Petty Cash Custodian Handbook: A ’Guide for Nonappropriated Fund Petty Cash Custodians in Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Activities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    limitations -- taxes V . How to fill out required forms -- AF form 1401 Petty Cash/Refund Voucher -- AF form 2539 NAP Disbursement Request 4N VI. General...AND ACTIVITY CODES ACTIVITY ACTIVITY CODES TITLE CODES TITLE " C2 Lanes Food and Beverage J3 Outside School Program C3 Lanes Pro Shop J4 Comb Fed... Food and Beverage 05 Course Maintenance L z Education E Outdoor Recreation LI Education Services Program El Marina (On-Base) Facility M = Chaplain

  10. Computer-Mediated Communication in Psychology Teaching: Influence of Cultural Background on E-Mail Content and on Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Miriam; Jucks, Regina

    2014-01-01

    A significant amount of communication between lecturers and students takes place via e-mail. This study provides evidence that two types of cultural cues contained in the e-mail impacts lecturers' linguistic adaptation to, and appraisal of, the student. A total of 186 psychology lecturers from universities in Germany answered a fictitious…

  11. Predicted Outcome Value of E-Mail Communication: Factors that Foster Professional Relational Development between Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Stacy; Kelsey, Dawn; Lancaster, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Using predicted outcome value theory as a guide, this study investigated the link between e-mail correspondence as a form of computer mediated extra class communication and how it may shape students' desire to foster student-teacher relational development. The findings revealed that when students believe their teacher e-mails the class frequently,…

  12. Responsiveness to a Prospective Student E-Mail Inquiry by Community Colleges in the Nine Mega-States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadinger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated e-mail responsiveness by community colleges in the nine mega-states to an inquiry from a prospective student. Noel-Levitz (2006b) reported that prospective students want to receive an e-mail with information about an institution prior to applying for admission. Specifically, high school juniors and seniors want…

  13. Talking Shop via E-Mail: A Thematic and Linguistic Analysis of Electronic Mail Communication. Research Report 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Seppo

    The linguistic purposes of this research were to focus on content, themes and topics, and to analyze the way the target language (English) was used in e-mail. Communicativeness and the roles of the communicator (writer-reader) became central, emphasizing the multidirectional character of e-mail communication. The basic tenet of communicativeness…

  14. Uses and Perceptions of E-Mail for Course-Related Communication between Business Faculty and Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements have facilitated the learning process by offering faculty members and students better access to resources, while increasing the potential for more interaction and communication flexibility (Firmin & Miller, 2005). Among these technologies is electronic mail or e-mail. The uses and perceptions of e-mail between business…

  15. Can Messages Make a Difference? The Association between E-Mail Messages and Health Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jeanine Warisse; Robinson, James D.; Tian, Yan; Neustadtl, Alan; Angelus, Pam; Russell, Marie; Mun, Seong K.; Levine, Betty

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of social support messages on patient health outcomes. Forty-one American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian patients received a total of 618 e-mail messages from their healthcare provider (HCP). The e-mail messages were divided into 3,565 message units and coded for instances of emotional social…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of E-Mail and Face-to-Face Communication in an Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Jay M.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic mail (e-mail) is an extremely important medium for Internet-based education. Due to its unique characteristics, there is reason to be concerned that students do not put appropriate care into writing messages that are sent via e-mail. This has significant implications for the effectiveness of online learning environments. This paper…

  17. [Mobile-phone e-mail use, social networks, and loneliness among Japanese high school students].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yasuko; Izumi, Yukiko; Kitaike, Tadashi

    2006-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the loneliness of Japanese high school students who own and use a mobile phone, to clarify the relationships between students' loneliness and their social network and frequency of use of e-mail feature, and to demonstrate relationships with a student's social network and recognition of the benefits and drawbacks of mobile phone use. The participants were 227 students from two classes in each grade of a high school in the Kanto region of Japan. Participants answered a questionnaire covering the UCLA Loneliness Scale as well as questions pertaining to the circumstances of use of their mobile phones, their social networks (e.g., number of friends), and their perceptions of the benefits and drawbacks of mobile phone use. The questionnaires of students owning a mobile phone were analyzed. Total scores for the UCLA Loneliness Scale were calculated, and factor analysis was performed for the benefits and drawbacks. A total of 220 questionnaires were returned, for which 94.1 percent of respondents owned a mobile phone. The percentages of male and female respondents were 58% and 42%. Chronbach's alpha for the UCLA Loneliness Scale (total score) was 0.87, a result similar to previous studies with high school and university students. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with the benefits and drawbacks of mobile phone use. Multiple-regression analysis showed that 42.9% of the variance in "frequency of e-mail use" was explained by grade level, frequency of mobile phone use, and two of the five factors from the benefits and drawbacks ("difficulty of communication," and "possible sleep loss due to nighttime e-mailing"). Stepwise multiple-regression analysis revealed that 24.4% of the variance in UCLA Loneliness Score was explained by gender, the frequency of e-mail use, the number of friends and the presence/absence of a girlfriend or boyfriend. Presence of an active social network and frequent e-mailing by mobile phone reduced

  18. The messages they send: e-mail use by adolescents with and without a history of specific language impairment (SLI).

    PubMed

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Durkin, Kevin; Walker, Allan J

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary adolescents use e-mail for a variety of purposes, including peer communication and education. Research into these uses has focused on typically developing individuals; much less is known about the use of e-mail by exceptional youth. The present study examined the structure and form of e-mail messages sent by adolescents with and without a history of specific language impairment (SLI). Thirty-eight adolescents with a history of SLI and 56 typically developing (TD) peers were assessed on measures of nonverbal abilities, core language skills and literacy skills (reading and spelling). The participants were asked to compose an e-mail reply to a standard e-mail sent by an experimenter. These reply e-mails were coded for linguistic structure, readability and spelling errors. Two adult raters, blind to the participants' language ability, judged how understandable the e-mails were, how grammatically correct the e-mails were, and also the sender's command of the English language. Adolescents with a history of SLI produced e-mails that were similar to those sent by their TD peers in terms of structure and readability. However, they made significantly more spelling errors. Furthermore, the adult raters considered the messages from participants with a history of SLI to be of poorer standard than those sent by their TD peers. The findings suggest that the e-mail messages of adolescents with a history of SLI provide indicators of the sender's language and literacy skills. Implications for intervention and technology development are discussed. © 2011 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  19. Use of e-mail for Parkinson's disease consultations: Are answers just a clic away?

    PubMed

    Viedma-Guiard, E; Agüero, P; Crespo-Araico, L; Estévez-Fraga, C; Sánchez-Díez, G; López-Sendón, J L; Aviles-Olmos, I; García-Ribas, G; Palacios Romero, M L; Masjuan Vallejo, J; Martínez-Castrillo, J C; Alonso-Cánovas, A

    2018-03-01

    The clinical problems of patients with movement disorders (MD) are complex, and the duration and frequency of face-to-face consultations may be insufficient to meet their needs. We analysed the implementation of an e-mail-based query service for our MD unit's patients and their primary care physicians (PCPs). We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive emails sent and received over a period of 4 months, one year after implementation of the e-mail inquiry system. All patients received the during consultations, and PCPs, during scheduled informative meetings. We recorded and later analysed the profile of the questioner, patients' demographic and clinical data, number of queries, reason for consultation, and actions taken. From 1 January 2015 to 30 April 2015, the service received 137 emails from 63 patients (43% male, mean age 71±10.5) diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (76%), atypical parkinsonism (10%), and others (14%); 116 responses were sent. Twenty (32%) emails were written by patients, 38 (60%) by their caregivers, and 5 (8%) by their PCPs. The reasons for consultation were clinical in 50 cases (80%): 16 (32%) described clinical deterioration, 14 (28%) onset of new symptoms, and 20 (40%) side effects or concerns about medications. In 13 cases (20%), the query was bureaucratic: 11 were related to appointments (85%) and 2 were requests for clinical reports (15%). In response, new appointments were scheduled in 9 cases (14%), while the rest of the questions were answered by email. Patients were satisfied overall and the additional care burden on specialists was not excessive. Implementing an e-mail-based consultation system is feasible in MD units. It facilitates both communication between neurologists and patients and continued care in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Health literacy and global cognitive function predict e-mail but not internet use in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schprechman, Jared P; Gathright, Emily C; Goldstein, Carly M; Guerini, Kate A; Dolansky, Mary A; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed.

  1. A Mixed-Methods Study of Patient-Provider E-mail Content in a Safety-Net Setting

    PubMed Central

    Mirsky, Jacob B.; Tieu, Lina; Lyles, Courtney; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the content of patient-provider e-mails in a safety-net primary care clinic. Methods We conducted a content analysis using inductive and deductive coding of e-mail exchanges (n=31) collected from January through November of 2013. Participants were English-speaking adult patients with a chronic condition (or their caregivers) cared for at a single publicly-funded general internal medicine clinic and their primary care providers (attending general internist physicians, clinical fellows, internal medicine residents, and nurse practitioners). Results All e-mails were non-urgent. Patients included a medical update in 19% of all e-mails. Patients requested action in 77% of e-mails, and the most common requests overall were for action regarding medications or treatment (29%). Requests for information were less common (45% of e-mails). Patient requests (n=56) were resolved in 84% of e-mail exchanges, resulting in 63 actions. Conclusion Patients in safety-net clinics are capable of safely and effectively using electronic messaging for between-visit communication with providers. Practical Implications Safety-net systems should implement electronic communications tools as soon as possible to increase healthcare access and enhance patient involvement in their care. PMID:26332306

  2. A Content Analysis of E-mail Communication between Patients and Their Providers: Patients Get the Message

    PubMed Central

    White, Casey B.; Moyer, Cheryl A.; Stern, David T.; Katz, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: E-mail use in the clinical setting has been slow to diffuse for several reasons, including providers' concerns about patients' inappropriate and inefficient use of the technology. This study examined the content of a random sample of patient–physician e-mail messages to determine the validity of those concerns. Design: A qualitative analysis of patient–physician e-mail messages was performed. Measurements: A total of 3,007 patient–physician e-mail messages were collected over 11 months as part of a randomized, controlled trial of a triage-based e-mail system in two primary care centers (including 98 physicians); 10% of messages were randomly selected for review. Messages were coded across such domains as message type, number of requests per e-mail, inclusion of sensitive content, necessity of a physician response, and message tone. Results: The majority (82.8%) of messages addressed a single issue. The most common message types included information updates to the physicians (41.4%), prescription renewals (24.2%), health questions (13.2%), questions about test results (10.9%), referrals (8.8%), “other” (including thank yous, apologies) (8.8%), appointments (5.4%), requests for non-health-related information (4.8%), and billing questions (0.3%). Overall, messages were concise, formal, and medically relevant. Very few (5.1%) included sensitive content, and none included urgent messages. Less than half (43.2%) required a physician response. Conclusion: A triage-based e-mail system promoted e-mail exchanges appropriate for primary care. Most patients adhered to guidelines aimed at focusing content, limiting the number of requests per message, and avoiding urgent requests or highly sensitive content. Thus, physicians' concerns about the content of patients' e-mails may be unwarranted. PMID:15064295

  3. An e-mail survey identified unpublished studies for systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Cardona, Andres Felipe; Ospina, Edgar Guillermo; de Agular, Sylvia

    2006-07-01

    A large number of trials remain difficult to locate or unpublished for systematic reviews. The objective of this article was to determine the usefulness of making e-mail contact with authors of clinical trials and literature reviews found in MEDLINE to identify unpublished or difficult to locate Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs). A structured search for detecting RCTs in MEDLINE was made from January 1999 to June 2003; a questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 525 author's mails. Those RCTs obtained were sought in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, LILACS, and ongoing registers. 40 (7.6%) replies were received; 10 previously undescribed and unpublished RCTs and 21 unregistered ongoing RCTs were found. The most frequently given reasons for not publishing were: lack of time for finalizing the statistical analysis and preparing the manuscript, contractual obligations with the pharmaceutical industry, methodologic errors in designing, and editorial rejection. Using the e-mails of authors detected by the search in electronic databases could contribute toward detecting potentially relevant ongoing or unpublished RCTs enabling rapid, straightforward, low-cost systematic review; in addition, the results of this study support the need of universal registration of all studies at their inception.

  4. In their own words? A terminological analysis of e-mail to a cancer information service.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Stavri, P. Zoë; Chapman, Wendy Webber

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the terms used by consumers to describe their health information needs and determine if this "consumer terminology"differs from those used by health care professionals. METHODS: Features and findings identified in 139 e-mail messages to the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute's Cancer Information and Referral Service were coded and matched against the 2001 Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus. RESULTS:504 unique terms were identified. 185 (36%) were exact matches to concepts in the 2001 UMLS Metathesaurus (MTH). 179 (35%) were partial string matches; 119 (24%) were known synonyms for MTH concepts; and 2 (<1%) were lexical variants. Only 19,or 4% of the total terms, were not found to be present in the 2001 MT1H. CONCLUSION: 96% of the clinical findings and features mentioned in e-mail by correspondents who did not self-identify as healthcare professionals were described using terms from controlled healthcare terminologies. The notion of a paradigmatic "consumer" who uses a particular vocabulary specific to her "consumer" status may be ill-founded. PMID:12463914

  5. Faculty and student expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a campus and distance doctor of pharmacy program.

    PubMed

    Foral, Pamela A; Turner, Paul D; Monaghan, Michael S; Walters, Ryan W; Merkel, Jennifer J; Lipschultz, Jeremy H; Lenz, Thomas L

    2010-12-15

    To examine faculty members' and students' expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a dual pathway pharmacy program. Three parallel survey instruments were administered to campus students, distance students, and faculty members, respectively. Focus groups with students and faculty were conducted. Faculty members perceived themselves as more accessible and approachable by e-mail than either group of students did. Campus students expected a shorter faculty response time to e-mail and for faculty members to be more available than did distance students. E-mail is an effective means of computer-mediated communication between faculty members and students and can be used to promote a sense of community and inclusiveness (ie, immediacy), especially with distant students.

  6. Faculty and Student Expectations and Perceptions of E-mail Communication in a Campus and Distance Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul D.; Monaghan, Michael S.; Walters, Ryan W.; Merkel, Jennifer J.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Lenz, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine faculty members' and students' expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a dual pathway pharmacy program. Methods Three parallel survey instruments were administered to campus students, distance students, and faculty members, respectively. Focus groups with students and faculty were conducted. Results Faculty members perceived themselves as more accessible and approachable by e-mail than either group of students did. Campus students expected a shorter faculty response time to e-mail and for faculty members to be more available than did distance students. Conclusion E-mail is an effective means of computer-mediated communication between faculty members and students and can be used to promote a sense of community and inclusiveness (ie, immediacy), especially with distant students. PMID:21436932

  7. The relationship between the external environment and physician e-mail communication: The mediating role of health information technology availability.

    PubMed

    Mazurenko, Olena; Hearld, Larry R; Menachemi, Nir

    Physician e-mail communication, with patients and other providers, is one of the cornerstones of effective care coordination but varies significantly across physicians. A physician's external environment may contribute to such variations by enabling or constraining a physician's ability to adopt innovations such as health information technology (HIT) that can be used to support e-mail communication. The aim of the study was to examine whether the relationship of the external environment and physician e-mail communication with patients and other providers is mediated by the practice's HIT availability. The data were obtained from the Health Tracking Physician Survey (2008) and the Area Resource File (2008). Cross-sectional multivariable subgroup path analysis was used to investigate the mediating role of HIT availability across 2,850 U.S. physicians. Solo physicians' perceptions about malpractice were associated with 0.97 lower odds (p < .05) of e-mail communication with patients and other providers, as compared to group and hospital practices, even when mediated by HIT availability. Subgroup analyses indicated that different types of practices are responsive to the different dimensions of the external environment. Specifically, solo practitioners were more responsive to the availability of resources in their environment, with per capita income associated with lower likelihood of physician e-mail communication (OR = 0.99, p < .01). In contrast, physicians working in the group practices were more responsive to the complexity of their environment, with a physician's perception of practicing in environments with higher malpractice risks associated with greater information technology availability, which in turn was associated with a greater likelihood of communicating via e-mail with patients (OR = 1.02, p < .05) and other physicians (OR = 1.03, p < .001). The association between physician e-mail communication and the external environment is mediated by the practice

  8. Problems and risks of unsolicited e-mails in patient-physician encounters in travel medicine settings.

    PubMed

    Sing, A; Salzman, J; Sing, D

    2001-01-01

    International travel and use of modern information technology are expressions of modern life style. Seeking on-line travel health advice via E-mail for preventive (teleprevention) or diagnostic reasons may become increasingly popular among patients with financial resources and Internet access. This study was undertaken to compare the behavior of travel clinic or tropical medicine physicians and other providers of travel-related medical information services toward unsolicited E-mails from fictitious patients in pretravel and post-travel scenarios. We also wanted to test the potential of E-mail advice for preventive medicine (teleprevention), and to find out how the "Good Samaritan Law" is observed. Two different E-mails were posted to E-mail addresses of 171 physicians (members of travel health and/or tropical medicine societies) and services offering advice on travel health issues identified by an AltaVista search. These E-mails, from two different fictitious travelers, were asking for advice regarding malaria prophylaxis in a pretravel scenario and describing symptoms suggesting acute malaria. Of the contacted addresses 43.3% and 49.7% respectively, replied to the pre- and post-travel E-mail. Of those suggesting antimalarial chemoprophylaxis in the pretravel scenario, 13.2% proposed inadequate regimens, and at least 3.5% of the post-travel replies were inappropriate. The "Good Samaritan Law" was observed by a significant number of physicians. Both patients and physicians have to be aware of the limitations of E-mail communication. Guidelines protecting physicians against legal and ethical consequences of this new communication technology are urgently needed.

  9. Use of bright light therapy among psychiatrists in massachusetts: an e-mail survey.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark A; Ciraulo, Domenic A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence on the use of bright light therapy for conditions beyond seasonal affective disorder continues to accrue; however, data on the prevalent use of bright light therapy in the community or in hospitals remain limited, particularly in the United States. We conducted a 5-minute e-mail survey of practicing psychiatrists in Massachusetts using the membership roster through the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society to evaluate prevalent use of bright light therapy as well as to solicit attitudes toward the treatment. Three e-mails were sent out over a 2-week period, and responses were obtained from March 2-24, 2013. An iPad raffle was used to incentivize survey completion. Of the 1,366 delivered e-mails, 197 responses were obtained. Of respondents, 72% indicated that they used bright light therapy in their practice, and, among these, all but 1 used bright light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Only 55% of responding psychiatrists who use bright light therapy consider it to treat nonseasonal depression, and 11% of respondents who recommend bright light therapy would consider its use in inpatient settings. Lack of insurance coverage for light-delivery devices was identified as the largest barrier to using bright light therapy, being cited by 55% of respondents. Survey results suggest that limitations in practitioner knowledge of bright light therapy and the absence of bright light therapy in treatment algorithms are the 2 leading modifiable factors to encourage broader implementation. The principal limitation of our survey was the low response rate. As such, we consider these data preliminary. Response bias very likely led to an overestimation in prevalent use of bright light therapy; however, this bias notwithstanding, it appears that bright light therapy is used significantly less often for nonseasonal depression than for seasonal affective disorder. Further, its use in inpatient settings is significantly less than in outpatient settings. We expect that efforts

  10. Heart murmurs recorded by a sensor based electronic stethoscope and e-mailed for remote assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, L; Hasvold, P; Arild, E; Hasvold, T; Wren, C; Dahl, L; Hasvold, P; Arild, E; Hasvold, T

    2002-01-01

    Background: Heart murmurs are common in children, and they are often referred to a specialist for examination. A clinically innocent murmur does not need further investigation. The referral area of the University Hospital is large and sparsely populated. A new service for remote auscultation (telemedicine) of heart murmurs in children was established where heart sounds and short texts were sent as an attachment to e-mails. Aim: To assess the clinical quality of this method. Methods: Heart sounds from 47 patients with no murmur (n = 7), with innocent murmurs (n = 20), or with pathological murmurs (n = 20) were recorded using a sensor based stethoscope and e-mailed to a remote computer. The sounds were repeated, giving 100 cases that were randomly distributed on a compact disc. Four cardiologists assessed and categorised the cases as having "no murmur", "innocent murmur", or "pathological murmur", recorded the assessment time per case, their degree of certainty, and whether they recommended referral. Results: On average, 2.1 minutes were spent on each case. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 89.7% and 98.2% respectively, and the inter-observer and intra-observer variabilities were low (kappa 0.81 and 0.87), respectively. A total of 93.4% of cases with a pathological murmur and 12.6% of cases with an innocent murmur were recommended for referral. Conclusion: Telemedical referral of patients with heart murmurs for remote assessment by a cardiologist is safe and saves time. Skilled auscultation is adequate to detect patients with innocent murmurs. PMID:12244000

  11. Physician assessments of the value of therapeutic information delivered via e-mail

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Repchinsky, Carol; Jovaisas, Barbara; Marlow, Bernard; Marques Ricarte, Ivan L.; Galvão, Maria Cristiane Barbosa; Shulha, Michael; de Gaspé Bonar, James

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Although e-learning programs are popular and access to electronic knowledge resources has improved, raising awareness about updated therapeutic recommendations in practice continues to be a challenge. Objective of program To raise awareness about and document the use of therapeutic recommendations. Program description In 2010, family physicians evaluated e-Therapeutics (e-T) Highlights with a Web-based tool called the Information Assessment Method (IAM). The e-T Highlights consisted of information found in the primary care reference e-Therapeutics+. Each week, family physicians received an e-mail containing a link to 1 Highlight from a different chapter of e-Therapeutics+. Family physicians received continuing medical education credits for each Highlight they rated with the IAM. Of the 5346 participants, 85% of them were full-time or part-time practitioners. A total of 31 429 Highlights ratings were received in 2010 (median of 2 ratings per participant, range 1 to 49). Among participants who rated more than 2 Highlights, the median number of ratings was 7 (mean 11.9). The relevance of the information from individual Highlights varied widely; however, for 90% of the rated Highlights participants indicated total or partial relevance of the information for at least 1 patient. For 41% of rated Highlights, participants expected patient health benefits to result from implementing the recommendation, such as avoiding an unnecessary or inappropriate treatment, or a preventive intervention. Conclusion This continuing medical education program stimulated family physicians to rate therapeutic recommendations that were delivered weekly via e-mail. The process of rating e-T Highlights with the IAM raised awareness about treatment recommendations and documented self-reported use of this information in practice. PMID:24829020

  12. The Use of E-Mail as a Tool To Enhance Second Language Education Programs: An Example from a Core French Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    Outlines reasons why electronic mail, and specifically e-mail exchanges, are valuable tools for promoting authentic target language interaction in the second language (L2) classroom. Research examining the use of e-mail exchanges on the L2 learning process is outlined, followed by one specific example of an e-mail exchange in a secondary core…

  13. "While you still think, I already type": experienced social power reduces deliberation during e-mail communication.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Annika; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-11-01

    E-mail allows individuals to deliberate on their communication before sending it off. For instance, communication partners can easily take their time to ponder how best to frame a request before they actually send a message. Individuals at times strategically exploit this opportunity to deliberate in order to tailor messages to their communication partner, such as when communicating with a relatively more powerful person. As social power reduces concerns about impression management, we predicted that individuals deliberate more while composing e-mail messages under low (vs. high) power. This assumption was tested with well-established power priming. As such, we expected that experienced power in one context would diminish deliberation times during a subsequent e-mail communication. An experiment manipulating the experience of (low vs. high) power and measuring deliberation times during e-mail composition supported this hypothesis. The findings thus indicate how social power alters deliberation times. More importantly, the results show that individuals not only strategically deliberate during e-mail communication in line with their current situation, but also in line with their social standing in a previous situation (here, their experience of power).

  14. New Secure E-mail System Based on Bio-Chaos Key Generation and Modified AES Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoomod, Haider K.; Radi, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    The E-mail messages exchanged between sender’s Mailbox and recipient’s Mailbox over the open systems and insecure Networks. These messages may be vulnerable to eavesdropping and itself poses a real threat to the privacy and data integrity from unauthorized persons. The E-mail Security includes the following properties (Confidentiality, Authentication, Message integrity). We need a safe encryption algorithm to encrypt Email messages such as the algorithm Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) or Data Encryption Standard DES, as well as biometric recognition and chaotic system. The proposed E-mail system security uses modified AES algorithm and uses secret key-bio-chaos that consist of biometric (Fingerprint) and chaotic system (Lu and Lorenz). This modification makes the proposed system more sensitive and random. The execution time for both encryption and decryption of the proposed system is much less from original AES, in addition to being compatible with all Mail Servers.

  15. Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS): e-mail and SMS cell phone text messaging reminders to support diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, David A; Wentzell, Katherine; Laffel, Nikki; Laffel, Lori M

    2009-02-01

    Cell phone text messaging, via the Short Messaging Service (SMS), offers the promise of a highly portable, well-accepted, and inexpensive modality for engaging youth and young adults in the management of their diabetes. This pilot and feasibility study compared two-way SMS cell phone messaging with e-mail reminders that were directed at encouraging blood glucose (BG) monitoring. Forty insulin-treated adolescents and young adults with diabetes were randomized to receive electronic reminders to check their BG levels via cell phone text messaging or e-mail reminders for a 3-month pilot study. Electronic messages were automatically generated, and participant replies with BG results were processed by the locally developed Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS). Participants set their schedule for reminders on the secure CARDS website where they could also enter and review BG data. Of the 40 participants, 22 were randomized to receive cell phone text message reminders and 18 to receive e-mail reminders; 18 in the cell phone group and 11 in the e-mail group used the system. Compared to the e-mail group, users in the cell phone group received more reminders (180.4 vs. 106.6 per user) and responded with BG results significantly more often (30.0 vs. 6.9 per user, P = 0.04). During the first month cell phone users submitted twice as many BGs as e-mail users (27.2 vs. 13.8 per user); by month 3, usage waned. Cell phone text messaging to promote BG monitoring is a viable and acceptable option in adolescents and young adults with diabetes. However, maintaining interest levels for prolonged intervals remains a challenge.

  16. Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS): E-Mail and SMS Cell Phone Text Messaging Reminders to Support Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Wentzell, Katherine; Laffel, Nikki

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell phone text messaging, via the Short Messaging Service (SMS), offers the promise of a highly portable, well-accepted, and inexpensive modality for engaging youth and young adults in the management of their diabetes. This pilot and feasibility study compared two-way SMS cell phone messaging with e-mail reminders that were directed at encouraging blood glucose (BG) monitoring. Methods: Forty insulin-treated adolescents and young adults with diabetes were randomized to receive electronic reminders to check their BG levels via cell phone text messaging or e-mail reminders for a 3-month pilot study. Electronic messages were automatically generated, and participant replies with BG results were processed by the locally developed Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS). Participants set their schedule for reminders on the secure CARDS website where they could also enter and review BG data. Results: Of the 40 participants, 22 were randomized to receive cell phone text message reminders and 18 to receive e-mail reminders; 18 in the cell phone group and 11 in the e-mail group used the system. Compared to the e-mail group, users in the cell phone group received more reminders (180.4 vs. 106.6 per user) and responded with BG results significantly more often (30.0 vs. 6.9 per user, P=0.04). During the first month cell phone users submitted twice as many BGs as e-mail users (27.2 vs. 13.8 per user); by month 3, usage waned. Conclusions: Cell phone text messaging to promote BG monitoring is a viable and acceptable option in adolescents and young adults with diabetes. However, maintaining interest levels for prolonged intervals remains a challenge. PMID:19848576

  17. Behavior change through automated e-mails: mediation analysis of self-help strategy use for depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Amy J; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate whether automated e-mails promoting effective self-help strategies for depressive symptoms were effective in changing self-help behavior, and whether this improved depression outcomes. 568 adults with sub-threshold depression participated in a randomized controlled trial and provided complete data. A series of 12 e-mails promoting the use of evidence-based self-help strategies was compared with e-mails providing non-directive depression information. Depression symptoms were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-9) and use of self-help strategies was assessed at baseline and post-intervention. We hypothesized that those receiving the self-help e-mails would increase their use of evidence-based self-help and this would be associated with improvements in depression. Mediation analyses were conducted using a non-parametric bootstrapping procedure. Total use of the self-help strategies promoted in the e-mails significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on depressive symptoms (B = -0.75, SE = 0.16, 95% CI: -1.06 to -0.48). The direct effect of the intervention on depressive symptoms was much smaller and not significant when the mediation path was included. The majority of the individual strategies also had a significant indirect effect on depressive symptoms. In adults with sub-threshold depression, automated e-mails based on behavior change principles can successfully increase use of self-help strategies, leading to a reduction in depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Directly e-mailing authors of newly published papers encourages community curation

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Stephanie M.; Grumbling, Gary B.; Field, Helen I.; Marygold, Steven J.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Millburn, Gillian H.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the data within Model Organism Databases (MODs) comes from manual curation of the primary research literature. Given limited funding and an increasing density of published material, a significant challenge facing all MODs is how to efficiently and effectively prioritize the most relevant research papers for detailed curation. Here, we report recent improvements to the triaging process used by FlyBase. We describe an automated method to directly e-mail corresponding authors of new papers, requesting that they list the genes studied and indicate (‘flag’) the types of data described in the paper using an online tool. Based on the author-assigned flags, papers are then prioritized for detailed curation and channelled to appropriate curator teams for full data extraction. The overall response rate has been 44% and the flagging of data types by authors is sufficiently accurate for effective prioritization of papers. In summary, we have established a sustainable community curation program, with the result that FlyBase curators now spend less time triaging and can devote more effort to the specialized task of detailed data extraction. Database URL: http://flybase.org/ PMID:22554788

  19. Providing cell phone numbers and e-mail addresses to patients: The patient’s perspective, a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today patients can consult with their treating physician by cell phone or e-mail. These means of communication enhance the quality of medical care and increase patient satisfaction, but they can also impinge on physicians’ free time and their patient schedule while at work. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes and practice of patients on obtaining the cell phone number or e-mail address of their physician for the purpose of medical consultation. Methods Personal interviews with patients, 18 years of age or above, selected by random sampling from the roster of adults insured by Clalit Health Services, Southern Division. The total response rate was 41%. The questionnaire included questions on the attitude and practice of patients towards obtaining their physician’s cell phone number or e-mail address. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square tests to analyze statistically significant differences of categorical variables. Two-tailed p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant, with a power of 0.8. Results The study sample included 200 patients with a mean age of 46.6 ± 17.1, of whom 110 were women (55%). Ninety-three (46.5%) responded that they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s cell phone number, and an additional 83 (41.5%) would not object to obtaining it. Of the 171 patients (85.5%) who had e-mail addresses, 25 (14.6%) said they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s e-mail address, 85 (49.7%) said they would not object to getting it, and 61 (35.7%) were not interested. In practice only one patient had requested the physician’s e-mail address and none actually had it. Conclusions Patients favored cell phones over e-mail for consulting with their treating physicians. With new technologies such as cell phones and e-mail in common use, it is important to determine how they can be best used and how they should be integrated into the flow of clinical practice

  20. Providing cell phone numbers and e-mail addresses to patients: The patient's perspective, a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Roni; Nazarenko, Elena

    2012-08-28

    Today patients can consult with their treating physician by cell phone or e-mail. These means of communication enhance the quality of medical care and increase patient satisfaction, but they can also impinge on physicians' free time and their patient schedule while at work. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes and practice of patients on obtaining the cell phone number or e-mail address of their physician for the purpose of medical consultation. Personal interviews with patients, 18 years of age or above, selected by random sampling from the roster of adults insured by Clalit Health Services, Southern Division. The total response rate was 41%. The questionnaire included questions on the attitude and practice of patients towards obtaining their physician's cell phone number or e-mail address. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square tests to analyze statistically significant differences of categorical variables. Two-tailed p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant, with a power of 0.8. The study sample included 200 patients with a mean age of 46.6 ± 17.1, of whom 110 were women (55%). Ninety-three (46.5%) responded that they would be very interested in obtaining their physician's cell phone number, and an additional 83 (41.5%) would not object to obtaining it. Of the 171 patients (85.5%) who had e-mail addresses, 25 (14.6%) said they would be very interested in obtaining their physician's e-mail address, 85 (49.7%) said they would not object to getting it, and 61 (35.7%) were not interested. In practice only one patient had requested the physician's e-mail address and none actually had it. Patients favored cell phones over e-mail for consulting with their treating physicians. With new technologies such as cell phones and e-mail in common use, it is important to determine how they can be best used and how they should be integrated into the flow of clinical practice.

  1. The Noncommissioned Officer and Petty Officer: Backbone of the Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    cherish, and others may envy. The patriotic flame that burns within every Servicemember is sometimes threatened and can occasionally flicker from the...their crews. “You Have to Go Out but You Don’t Have to Come Back.” Coast- guardsmen are taught to avoid or mitigate unnecessary risk, but this historic

  2. What does an e-mail address add? - Doing health and technology at home.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Hege K

    2011-02-01

    There is increasing interest in using electronic mail and other electronic health technologies (e-health technologies) in patient follow-ups. This study sheds light on patients' reception of provider-initiated e-health in their everyday environments. In a research project carried out in Norway (2005-2007), an electronic address for a hospital dermatology ward was offered to 50 patient families for improved access to expert advice from the patients' homes. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 12 families, this paper explores how the electronic address was integrated into everyday health practice. The research illuminates how the electronic address did not only represent changes related to treatment procedures and frequency or nature of expert contact; it was also important to other practices in the everyday lives of the families of patients with chronic illness. Once in place on the patients' computers, the electronic address was ascribed at least four different roles: it was used as the intended riverbed for a flow of information, but also as a safety alarm, as a shield to the medical gaze and as a token of competence in care and parenting. The multiplicity in use and reception of an electronic address in patient settings illustrates the need to include patients' everyday practices in current professional and political discussions of e-mail and other e-health technologies. Thus this paper argues that there is a need for research on electronic patient-provider communication that moves beyond frequency of use and questions on how technology will affect medical encounters. Social science equally needs to investigate how provider-initiated e-health technologies gets involved in patients' moral and social performance of health and illness in everyday life. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards linking patients and clinical information: detecting UMLS concepts in e-mail.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Aronson, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of detecting terms within the electronic messages of patients that could be used to effectively search electronic knowledge resources and bring health information resources into the hands of patients. Our team is exploring the application of the natural language processing (NLP) tools built within the Lister Hill Center at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to the challenge of detecting relevant concepts from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) within the free text of lay people's electronic messages (e-mail). We obtained a sample of electronic messages sent by patients participating in a randomized field evaluation of an internet-based home care support service to the project nurse, and we subjected elements of these messages to a series of analyses using several vocabularies from the UMLS Metathesaurus and the selected NLP tools. The nursing vocabularies provide an excellent starting point for this exercise because their domain encompasses patient's responses to health challenges. In successive runs we augmented six nursing vocabularies (NANDA Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcomes Classification, Home Health Classification, Omaha System, and the Patient Care Data Set) with selected sets of clinical terminologies (International Classification of Primary Care; International Classification of Primary Care- American English; Micromedex DRUGDEX; National Drug Data File; Thesaurus of Psychological Terms; WHO Adverse Drug Reaction Terminology) and then additionally with either Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) or SNOMED International terms. The best performance was obtained when the nursing vocabularies were complemented with selected clinical terminologies. These findings have implications not only for facilitating lay people's access to electronic knowledge resources but may also be of assistance in developing new tools to aid in linking free text (e.g., clinical

  4. Paper Trail: An Angry Professor Uses a State Law to Get Colleagues' E-Mail Messages and Other Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2005-01-01

    Angry over the department's vote not to hire his wife, University of Georgia history of science professor Alexei Kojevnikov obtained access to professors' and administrators' e-mails and documents related to the hiring process and spousal hires. This article discusses the controversy from different perspectives, the state of Georgia's law that…

  5. Virtual Collaborations in the Spanish Class: From E-Mail to Web Design and CD-ROM Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellebrandt, Josef

    1999-01-01

    Modern technologies can provide language students with authentic content and contextualized, collaborative learning situations. This article illustrates how e-mail exchanges, Web exercises, and CD-ROM development between students in the United States and organizations in Ecuador can promote contextualized and authentic practice of Spanish language…

  6. Assessing the Factors Affecting the Amount of E-Mail Spam Delivery in a Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasenchock, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Eighty to ninety percent of e-mail is considered unsolicited commercial communication, or spam. Not only does spam violate the privacy of users, but it also incurs societal costs associated with time-related losses, serves as a vehicle for cyber-crime, and threatens the success of e-commerce by lowering consumer confidence. This quantitative…

  7. German Deaf People Using Text Communication: Short Message Service, TTY, Relay Services, Fax, and E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R.; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed…

  8. 16 CFR § 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... OR TODDLER PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the...

  9. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  10. Analysis of E-Mail Produced by Middle School Students with Disabilities Using Accessible Interfaces: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Todis, Bonnie; Fickas, Stephen; Ehlhardt, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to investigate electronic communication as a potential method to enhance social communication in a range of students with disabilities. This study investigated the usability of an adapted e-mail interface, TeenMail, for 11 middle school students with significant learning and communication impairments who…

  11. Comparison of Text Messages Versus E-mail When Communicating and Querying With Mothers About Safe Infant Sleep.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Hauck, Fern R; Kellams, Ann L; Colson, Eve R; Geller, Nicole L; Heeren, Timothy C; Kerr, Stephen M; Corwin, Michael J

    To assess how mothers' choice of e-mail or text messages (SMS) to receive safe sleep communications is associated with educational video viewing and responses to care practice queries. Seven hundred ninety-two new mothers received safe sleep-related communications for 60 days after newborn hospital discharge as part of a trial of health education interventions on infant care practices. Mothers chose e-mail or SMS for study communications and were sent 22 short safe sleep videos and 41 queries regarding infant care practices. Study communications via e-mail were elected by 55.7% of participants. The SMS group had a modestly higher overall view rate of videos (59.1% vs 54.4%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.81) and a substantially higher response rate to queries (70.0% vs 45.2%; aOR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.74-4.43). Participants more commonly opted to receive infant care practice videos and queries via e-mail. SMS was associated with higher viewing and response rates, especially for query responses. These results highlight the importance of understanding how specific modalities of communication might vary in reach. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 46 CFR 4.03-55 - Law enforcement officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Law enforcement officer. 4.03-55 Section 4.03-55... AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-55 Law enforcement officer. Law enforcement officer means a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer; or any other law enforcement officer authorized to...

  13. 46 CFR 4.03-55 - Law enforcement officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Law enforcement officer. 4.03-55 Section 4.03-55... AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-55 Law enforcement officer. Law enforcement officer means a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer; or any other law enforcement officer authorized to...

  14. 46 CFR 4.03-55 - Law enforcement officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Law enforcement officer. 4.03-55 Section 4.03-55... AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-55 Law enforcement officer. Law enforcement officer means a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer; or any other law enforcement officer authorized to...

  15. 46 CFR 4.03-55 - Law enforcement officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Law enforcement officer. 4.03-55 Section 4.03-55... AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-55 Law enforcement officer. Law enforcement officer means a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer; or any other law enforcement officer authorized to...

  16. Resident use of the Internet, e-mail, and personal electronics in the care of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Plant, Mathew A; Fish, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    The use of smartphones, e-mail, and the Internet has affected virtually all areas of patient care. Current university and hospital policies concerning the use of devices may be incongruent with day-to-day patient care. The goal was to assess the current usage patterns of the Internet, e-mail, and personal electronics for clinical purposes by surgical residents as well as their communication habits and preferences. Also assessed was residents' knowledge regarding the institutional policies surrounding these issues. Surgical residents (n = 294) at a large teaching institution were surveyed regarding their knowledge of university policies as well as daily use of various communication technologies. Communication preferences were determined using theoretical clinical scenarios. Our survey with a response rate of 54.7% (n = 161) revealed that 93.8% of participants indicated daily Internet use for clinical duties. Most respondents (72%) were either completely unaware of the existence of guidelines for its use or aware but had no familiarity with their content. Use of e-mail for clinical duties was common (85%), and 74% of the respondents rated e-mail as "very important" or "extremely important" for patient care. Everyone who responded had a mobile phone with 98.7% being "smartphones," which the majority (82.9%) stated was "very important" or "extremely important" for patient care. Text messaging was the primary communication method for 57.8% of respondents. The traditional paging system was the primary communication method for only 1.3% of respondents and the preferred method for none. Daily use of technology is the norm among residents; however, knowledge of university guidelines was exceedingly low. Residents need better education regarding current guidelines. Current guidelines do not reflect current clinical practice. Hospitals should consider abandoning the traditional paging system and consider facilitating better use of residents' mobile phones.

  17. PubMed Informer: Monitoring MEDLINE/PubMed through E-mail Alerts, SMS, PDA downloads and RSS feeds

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Summary PubMed Informer is a Web-based monitoring tool for topics of interest from MEDLINE/PubMed primarily designed for healthcare professionals. Five tracking methods are available: Web access, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), PDA downloads and RSS feeds. PubMed Informer delivers focused search updates and specific information to users with varying information-seeking practices. PMID:16779344

  18. Do e-mail alerts of new research increase knowledge translation? A "Nephrology Now" randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Tanna, Gemini V; Sood, Manish M; Schiff, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Daniel; Naimark, David M

    2011-01-01

    As the volume of medical literature increases exponentially, maintaining current clinical practice is becoming more difficult. Multiple, Internet-based journal clubs and alert services have recently emerged. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of the e-mail alert service, Nephrology Now, increases knowledge translation regarding current nephrology literature. Nephrology Now is a nonprofit, monthly e-mail alert service that highlights clinically relevant articles in nephrology. In 2007-2008, the authors randomized 1,683 subscribers into two different groups receiving select intervention articles, and then they used an online survey to assess both groups on their familiarity with the articles and their acquisition of knowledge. Of the randomized subscribers, 803 (47.7%) completed surveys, and the two groups had a similar number of responses (401 and 402, respectively). The authors noted no differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. Familiarity increased as a result of the Nephrology Now alerts (0.23 ± 0.087 units on a familiarity scale; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.41; P = .007) especially in physicians (multivariate odds ratio 1.83; P = .0002). No detectable improvement in knowledge occurred (0.03 ± 0.083 units on a knowledge scale; 95% CI: -0.13 to 0.20; P = .687). An e-mail alert service of new literature improved a component of knowledge translation--familiarity--but not knowledge acquisition in a large, randomized, international population.

  19. Self-esteem, interpersonal risk, and preference for e-mail to face-to-face communication.

    PubMed

    Joinson, Adam N

    2004-08-01

    The media choices made by high and low self-esteem Internet users were studied using web-based methodology (n = 265). Participants were asked to rank four media (face-to-face, e-mail, letter, and telephone) in order of preference across four different communication scenarios designed to pose an interpersonal risk. The level of interpersonal risk posed by two of the scenarios (asking for a pay rise and asking for a date) were also experimentally manipulated by randomly allocating participants to a 25%, 50%, or 75% chance of rejection. Low self-esteem users (LSE) showed a significant preference toward e-mail communication compared to high self-esteem users (HSE). This pattern was reversed for face-to-face preferences. Similarly, a greater chance of rejection in a scenario led to e-mail being preferred to face-to-face communication. The results are discussed in light of both the strategic use of different media and the motivated Internet user.

  20. 46 CFR 4.03-55 - Law enforcement officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Law enforcement officer. 4.03-55 Section 4.03-55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE CASUALTIES AND INVESTIGATIONS Definitions § 4.03-55 Law enforcement officer. Law enforcement officer means a Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer...

  1. The Role of E-Mail Communications in Determining Response Rates and Mode of Participation in a Mixed-Mode Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernat, Alexandru; Lynn, Peter

    2018-01-01

    This article is concerned with the extent to which the propensity to participate in a web face-to-face sequential mixed-mode survey is influenced by the ability to communicate with sample members by e-mail in addition to mail. Researchers may be able to collect e-mail addresses for sample members and to use them subsequently to send survey…

  2. Assessing the potential of e-mail for communicating drug therapy recommendations to physicians in patients with heart failure and ventricular-assist devices.

    PubMed

    Lekura, Jona; Tita, Cristina; Lanfear, David E; Williams, Celeste T; Jennings, Douglas L

    2014-10-01

    This project explores electronic mail (e-mail) as a potential medium for pharmacists to communicate pharmacotherapy interventions to prescribers. This retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted at an urban, academic teaching hospital. The pharmacist attempted a drug therapy intervention via e-mail when unable to make face-to-face contact with the attending physician. Eligible patients for this project were admitted to the advanced heart failure (HF) team between December 1, 2010, and July 31, 2011, and had at least 1 attempted e-mail intervention. The primary outcome was the number of accepted interventions, while the secondary end point was the time until a physician e-mail response. A total of 51 e-mail interventions were attempted on 29 patients (mean age = 53, 24% caucasian, 59% male, 69% left ventricular-assist device [VAD]). Overall, of the total 51 interventions,44 (86.3%) were accepted. The average time to a physician e-mail response was 41 minutes. Initiation of drug therapy and changing dose and route or frequency accounted for the most frequent intervention (33%). The most common drug classes involved in the e-mail interventions were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (15.7%), loop diuretics (9.8%), and antiplatelet agents (7.8%). Clinical pharmacists with well-established physician relationships can effectively implement timely drug therapy recommendations using e-mail communications in patients with advanced HF or VADs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Special online consulting for patients with eating disorders and their relatives: analysis of user characteristics and E-mail content.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Martin; Wesemann, Dorette

    2007-02-01

    In the treatment of chronic diseases, programs that use the internet as a medium are becoming more and more important as a complement to classical intervention techniques. Since 1998, a non-profit information and online consulting service for patients with eating disorders and their friends and relatives (www.ab-server.de) has existed. This was established by members of the Deutsche Forschungsinitiative Essstörungen e.V. (DFE) [German Research Initiative for Eating Disorders] and members of the Clinic of Psychiatry, University of Leipzig, Germany. For the present study, 2,176 e-mail requests from users of the online consultation service were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively in order to better understand the differences between different types and groups of users. The analysis was related to the social field of the person requesting the consultation, the type of disorder reported, and the content of the e-mail request. Three main user groups could be identified: people who described themselves as having an eating disorder (57.2%), people who were related socially to the affected person (32.4%), and interested persons (9.8%). The consulting service was predominantly used by persons suffering from bulimia nervosa or their families and friends (63.1%). One third (33.3%) of the posted e-mails were related to behavioral patterns in dealing with the illness and the affected person. They were followed by inquiries for information about the disease (18.7%) and by those seeking help in finding specialized clinics/therapists and places in therapies. The increasing use of the online consulting service indicates that there is a substantial need for information and help in persons with eating disorders and in their relatives, who are able to easily contact professionals using this online service. Online consulting has a high potential for complementary care of affected people.

  4. Practice Variation and Effects of E-mail-only Performance Feedback on Resource Use in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Tavarez, Melissa M; Ayers, Brandon; Jeong, Jong H; Coombs, Carmen M; Thompson, Ann; Hickey, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    Higher resource utilization in the management of pediatric patients with undifferentiated vomiting and/or diarrhea does not correlate consistently with improved outcomes or quality of care. Performance feedback has been shown to change physician practice behavior and may be a mechanism to minimize practice variation. We aimed to evaluate the effects of e-mail-only, provider-level performance feedback on the ordering and admission practice variation of pediatric emergency physicians for patients presenting with undifferentiated vomiting and/or diarrhea. We conducted a prospective, quality improvement intervention and collected data over 3 consecutive fiscal years. The setting was a single, tertiary care pediatric emergency department. We collected admission and ordering practices data on 19 physicians during baseline, intervention, and postintervention periods. We provided physicians with quarterly e-mail-based performance reports during the intervention phase. We measured admission rate and created four categories for ordering practices: no orders, laboratory orders, pharmacy orders, and radiology orders. There was wide (two- to threefold) practice variation among physicians. Admission rates ranged from 15% to 30%, laboratory orders from 19% to 43%, pharmacy orders from 29% to 57%, and radiology orders from 11% to 30%. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients admitted or with radiology or pharmacy orders placed between preintervention, intervention, or postintervention periods (p = 0.58, p = 0.19, and p = 0.75, respectively). There was a significant but very small decrease in laboratory orders between the preintervention and postintervention periods. Performance feedback provided only via e-mail to pediatric emergency physicians on a quarterly basis does not seem to significantly impact management practices for patients with undifferentiated vomiting and/or diarrhea. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  5. E-mail support as an adjunct to cognitive-behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: Impact on dropout and outcome.

    PubMed

    Delsignore, Aba; Rufer, Michael; Emmerich, Juliane; Weidt, Steffi; Brühl, Annette Beatrix; Moergeli, Hanspeter

    2016-10-30

    The present study evaluates the impact of semi-individualized e-mail support as an adjunct to cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) on dropout and outcome. The effectiveness of additional semi-individualized e-mail support was evaluated for the whole sample and for a subsample of patients at risk of dropping out of therapy. A total of 91 patients with SAD were allocated either to the intervention condition (CBGT with e-mail support), or to the control condition (CBGT without e-mail support). Anxiety symptoms, depression, global symptomatology and life satisfaction were assessed at pretreatment, post-treatment and follow-up (3, 6 and 12 months). From pre-treatment to post-treatment, both groups improved significantly on all symptom measures. Therapy gains were maintained at the 1-year follow-up. Subsample analyses showed that CBGT+e-mail was more effective than CGBT alone in reducing symptom severity among patients missing at least two therapy sessions. Additionally, in this subgroup, those receiving additional e-mail support showed a tendency towards lower dropout rates. Based on the results of this study, semi-individualized e-mail support between sessions seems to enhance the effectiveness of CBGT for SAD patients at risk of dropping out of treatment and should be considered as an additional tool in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Review of 5.5 Years' Experience Using E-mail-Based Telemedicine to Deliver Orthopedic Care to Remote Communities.

    PubMed

    Cota, Adam; Tarchala, Magdalena; Parent-Harvey, Caroline; Engel, Victor; Berry, Greg; Reindl, Rudy; Harvey, Edward J

    2017-01-01

    The use of e-mail-based telemedicine has been demonstrated as an effective and low-cost way of delivering healthcare to patients in remote areas who have limited access to medical services. We established a novel teleorthopedic service for a catchment area encompassing 972,000 km 2 using a commercial off-the-shelf e-mail application. Before the implementation of this program, patients with acute orthopedic injuries were required to travel by air up to 1,900 km for evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. In the present study, we examined the patient demographics and consultation characteristics and calculated the cost savings associated with patient travel for this teleorthopedic service. We retrospectively reviewed 1,000 consecutive e-mail-based consults and radiographic images received for new patients with acute orthopedic injuries from January 2008 to June 2013. Seventy-nine consults were excluded due to incomplete documentation, leaving 921 available for analysis. The service records were examined to identify patient demographics, orthopedic diagnosis, the percentage of patients managed locally, and the medical indications for patients requiring transfer. As the travel costs for patients requiring transport to the university hospital center are borne by governmental health agencies, the savings accrued from treating patients in their home communities were also calculated. For the 921 consultations, the mean age of patients was 27 years (range, 3 months-88 years), with 40.7% of all patients being younger than 18 years. The most common diagnoses were ankle fractures (15.2%), clavicle fractures (11.2%), distal radius fractures (11.2%), and fractures of the foot (10.2%). One hundred ninety patients (20.6%) required transfer, whereas 731 patients (79.4%) were treated in their home communities. Of the patients who were transferred, 123 (64.7%) required surgery, 55 (28.9%) required clinical evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon, and 12 (6.4%) required CT or MRI. Cost

  7. E-mail management of the modified Atkins Diet for adults with epilepsy is feasible and effective.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Terao, Natalie N; Bosarge, Jennifer L; Henry, Bobbie J; Klees, Angela A; Morrison, Peter F; Kossoff, Eric H

    2012-04-01

    The modified Atkins Diet (MAD) is an effective dietary treatment for children with epilepsy. However, adults may have limited access to this therapy because of lack of availability of dietitian or nutrition support or familiarity with the diet by their treating neurologist. This study was designed to investigate the tolerability and efficacy of the MAD administered solely via e-mail to adults with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A prospective, open-label, proof-of-principle 3-month study design was employed. Adults were enrolled, instructed on how to self-administer a 20 g carbohydrate per day MAD, and followed by the investigators only via e-mail. There were no clinic visits or dietitian contacts during the study period. Twenty-five participants (median age 30 years [range 18-66 years], 68% female) consented and 22 started the MAD. The median prior anticonvulsants was 5 (range 2-10) and seizure frequency was 5 per week (range 1-140). Urinary ketosis was achieved in 21 participants (95%), of which 16 (76%) reported at least 40 mg/dl (moderate). Twenty-one participants (95%) remained on the MAD at 1 month and 14 (64%) at 3 months. After 1 month, 9 (41%) had >50% seizure reduction including one (5%) with >90% seizure reduction using intent-to-treat analysis. After 3 months, 6 (27%) had >50% seizure reduction including 3 (14%) with >90% seizure reduction. The mean ketogenic ratio was 1.1:1 (fat:carbohydrates and protein) for those who provided a MAD food record at follow-up. Over the study period, the median number of e-mails sent by the participants was 6 (range 1-19). The most frequent side effect was weight loss. E-mail administration of the MAD to adults with refractory epilepsy appears to be feasible and effective. Therefore, when dietitian or physician support is limited for adult patients with epilepsy, remote access via telemedicine could provide an alternative. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. 11 CFR 102.11 - Petty cash fund (2 U.S.C. 432(h)(2)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Petty cash fund (2 U.S.C. 432(h)(2)). 102.11 Section 102.11 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL REGISTRATION, ORGANIZATION, AND... and Congressional district) sought by such candidate. ...

  9. An analysis of the utilization of e-mail by physicians and patients: defining benefits, addressing concerns and forecasting implications on the doctor-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Lang, Kirk T; Kiel, Joan M

    2008-01-01

    Though e-mail is ubiquitous in everyday life, it has not been the preferred mode of communication between physicians and patients. Several factors, including privacy and security, reimbursement and legal concerns, have been seen as barriers toward increased utilization. This article examines effect of e-mail on the doctor-patient relationship. It also addresses concerns expressed by providers and patients, and explores technology- and policy-based solutions to many of these issues.

  10. German deaf people using text communication: short message service, TTY, relay services, fax, and e-mail.

    PubMed

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed toward sociability (keeping in contact, and making arrangements with friends and family). However, there is some instrumental use (getting tasks or business accomplished, making appointments, and obtaining information). German survey respondents wanted a better relay service, more connectivity among the various technologies, and full interactivity in making calls by any technology. In comparison with an Australian sample, German deaf people could not rely on extensive relay services connecting people with a TTY to hearing telephone subscribers for calls of either a social or business nature.

  11. Satisfaction Data Collected by E-mail and Smartphone for Emergency Department Patients: How Do Responders Compare With Nonresponders?

    PubMed

    Strickler, Jeffery C; Lopiano, Kenneth K

    2016-11-01

    This study profiles an innovative approach to capture patient satisfaction data from emergency department (ED) patients by implementing an electronic survey method. This study compares responders to nonresponders. Our hypothesis is that the cohort of survey respondents will be similar to nonresponders in terms of the key characteristics of age, gender, race, ethnicity, ED disposition, and payor status. This study is a cross-sectional design using secondary data from the database and provides an opportunity for univariate analysis of the key characteristics for each group. The data elements will be abstracted from the database and compared with the same key characteristics from a similar sample from the database on nonresponders to the ED satisfaction survey. Age showed a statistically significant difference between responders and nonresponders. Comparison by disposition status showed no substantial difference between responders and nonresponders. Gender distribution showed a greater number of female than male responders. Race distribution showed a greater number and response by white and Asian patients as compared with African Americans. A review of ethnicity showed fewer Hispanics responded. An evaluation by payor classification showed greater number and response rate by those with a commercial or Workers Comp payor source. The response rate by Medicare recipients was stronger than expected; however, the response rate by Medicaid recipients and self-pay could be a concern for underrepresentation by lower socioeconomic groups. Finally, the evaluation of the method of notification showed that notification by both e-mail and text substantially improved response rates. The evaluation of key characteristics showed no difference related to disposition, but differences related to age, gender, race, ethnicity, and payor classification. These results point to a potential concern for underrepresentation by lower socioeconomic groups. The results showed that notification by

  12. Effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smoking cessation (TABATIC study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gete, Laura; Puigdomènech, Elisa; Briones, Elena Mercedes; Fàbregas-Escurriola, Mireia; Fernandez, Soraya; Del Val, Jose Luis; Ballvé, Jose Luis; Casajuana, Marc; Sánchez-Fondevila, Jessica; Clemente, Lourdes; Castaño, Carmen; Martín-Cantera, Carlos

    2013-04-18

    Intensive interventions on smoking cessation increase abstinence rates. However, few electronic mail (E-mail) based intensive interventions have been tested in smokers and none in primary care (PC) setting. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smokers attending PC services. Randomized Controlled Multicentric Trial. 1060 smokers aged between 18-70 years from Catalonia, Salamanca and Aragón (Spain) who have and check regularly an E-mail account. Patients will be randomly assigned to control or intervention group. Six phase intensive intervention with two face to face interviews and four automatically created and personal E-mail patients tracking, if needed other E-mail contacts will be made. Control group will receive a brief advice on smoking cessation. Will be measured at 6 and 12 months after intervention: self reported continuous abstinence (confirmed by cooximetry), point prevalence abstinence, tobacco consumption, evolution of stage according to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model, length of visit, costs for the patient to access Primary Care Center. Descriptive and logistic and Poisson regression analysis under the intention to treat basis using SPSS v.17. The proposed intervention is an E-mail based intensive intervention in smokers attending primary care. Positive results could be useful to demonstrate a higher percentage of short and long-term abstinence among smokers attended in PC in Spain who regularly use E-mail. Furthermore, this intervention could be helpful in all health services to help smokers to quit. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01494246.

  13. Effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smoking cessation (TABATIC study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intensive interventions on smoking cessation increase abstinence rates. However, few electronic mail (E-mail) based intensive interventions have been tested in smokers and none in primary care (PC) setting. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smokers attending PC services. Methods/design Randomized Controlled Multicentric Trial. Study population: 1060 smokers aged between 18–70 years from Catalonia, Salamanca and Aragón (Spain) who have and check regularly an E-mail account. Patients will be randomly assigned to control or intervention group. Intervention: Six phase intensive intervention with two face to face interviews and four automatically created and personal E-mail patients tracking, if needed other E-mail contacts will be made. Control group will receive a brief advice on smoking cessation. Outcome measures: Will be measured at 6 and 12 months after intervention: self reported continuous abstinence (confirmed by cooximetry), point prevalence abstinence, tobacco consumption, evolution of stage according to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model, length of visit, costs for the patient to access Primary Care Center. Statistical analysis: Descriptive and logistic and Poisson regression analysis under the intention to treat basis using SPSS v.17. Discussion The proposed intervention is an E-mail based intensive intervention in smokers attending primary care. Positive results could be useful to demonstrate a higher percentage of short and long-term abstinence among smokers attended in PC in Spain who regularly use E-mail. Furthermore, this intervention could be helpful in all health services to help smokers to quit. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01494246. PMID:23597262

  14. Forecasting Advancement Rates to Petty Officer Third Class for U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    variable. c. Designation of Data Subsets for Cross-Validation In order to maintain the integrity of the analysis and test the fitted models’ predictive...two models, an H-L goodness-of-fit test is conducted on the 1,524 individual Sailors within the designated test data set; the results of which are...the total number of sea months, the proportion of vacancies to test takers, Armed Forces Qualification Test score, and performance mark average

  15. Retention of First and Second Class Petty Officers in the U.S. Coast Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    enlistment Intentions). intrinsic / extrinsic Job satisfaction factors (as in the Herzberg model of what constitutes em- ployee motivation ), other specific...HERZBERG’S THEORY OF MOTIVATION --------------------------- 11 8. CO"ITMENT----------------------------------------------- 12 C. EXPECTATIONS AND...deme has shown a major interest in studying and devising both descriptive and predictive models and explanations of job turnover and job motivations . A

  16. E-Mail Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A secretary has "n" letters and "n" addressed envelopes. Instead of matching each letter with the corresponding envelope, she inserts the letters in a random manner. What are the chances that every letter will be in the wrong envelope? In this article, the author presents a solution to this problem and discusses possible ways of placing the…

  17. Hacked E-mail

    MedlinePlus

    ... Money & Credit Homes & Mortgages Health & Fitness Jobs & Making Money Privacy, Identity & Online Security Limiting Unwanted Calls and Emails Online Security "Free" Security Scans Computer Security Disposing of Old Computers ...

  18. Uptake and adherence of a self-directed internet-based mental health intervention with tailored e-mail reminders in senior high schools in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lillevoll, Kjersti R; Vangberg, Hans Christian B; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Waterloo, Knut; Eisemann, Martin R

    2014-01-21

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) is a promising approach to the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms among adolescents. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of disseminating a self-directed internet-based mental health intervention (MoodGYM) in senior high schools. It also sought to investigate possible effects of tailored and weekly e-mail reminders on initial uptake and adherence to the intervention. A baseline survey was conducted in four senior high schools in two Norwegian municipalities (n = 1337). 52.8% (707/1337) of the students consented to further participation in the trial and were randomly allocated to one of three MoodGYM intervention groups (tailored weekly e-mail reminder (n = 175), standardized weekly e-mail reminder (n = 176 ) or no e-mail reminder (n = 175)) or a waitlist control group (n = 180). We tested for effects of the intervention on depression and self-esteem using multivariate analysis of variance, effects of tailored e-mail and self-reported current need of help on initial uptake of the intervention using logistic regression and the effect of weekly e-mails on adherence using ordinal regression. There was substantial non-participation from the intervention, with only 8.5% (45/527) participants logging on to MoodGYM, and few proceeding beyond the first part of the programme. No significant effect on depression or self-esteem was found among the sample as a whole or among participants with elevated depression scores at baseline. Having a higher average grade in senior high school predicted initial uptake of the intervention, but tailored e-mail and self-reported current need of help did not. Weekly e-mail prompts did not predict adherence. The main reasons for non-use reported were lack of time/forgetting about it and doubt about the usefulness of the program. Overall, disseminating a self-directed internet-based intervention to a school population proved difficult despite steps taken to

  19. Comparing Traditional Journal Writing with Journal Writing Shared over E-mail List Serves as Tools for Facilitating Reflective Thinking: A Study of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Diane S.; Rupley, William H.; Sparks, Joanne; Holcomb, Angelia

    2007-01-01

    To determine the conditions that would best encourage reflection in journal writing of preservice teachers in field-based reading internships, the degree of reflective content found in self-contained traditional journals was compared to the reflective content found in journal entries shared over e-mail list serves. Participants were 56 preservice…

  20. The Feasibility of an E-Mail-Delivered Intervention to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors in African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Eleanor; Schweitzer, Amy; Hurtado, Maria Eugenia; Hathway, Joanne; DiPietro, Loretta; Lei, Kai Y.; Klein, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of an e-mail-delivered program to promote nutrition and physical activity in African American college students. Participants: Forty-seven students (76% female, aged 18-20 years). Methods: Students participated in a 24-week randomized controlled trial, receiving either general health…

  1. Speech-based interaction with in-vehicle computers: the effect of speech-based e-mail on drivers' attention to the roadway.

    PubMed

    Lee, J D; Caven, B; Haake, S; Brown, T L

    2001-01-01

    As computer applications for cars emerge, a speech-based interface offers an appealing alternative to the visually demanding direct manipulation interface. However, speech-based systems may pose cognitive demands that could undermine driving safety. This study used a car-following task to evaluate how a speech-based e-mail system affects drivers' response to the periodic braking of a lead vehicle. The study included 24 drivers between the ages of 18 and 24 years. A baseline condition with no e-mail system was compared with a simple and a complex e-mail system in both simple and complex driving environments. The results show a 30% (310 ms) increase in reaction time when the speech-based system is used. Subjective workload ratings and probe questions also indicate that speech-based interaction introduces a significant cognitive load, which was highest for the complex e-mail system. These data show that a speech-based interface is not a panacea that eliminates the potential distraction of in-vehicle computers. Actual or potential applications of this research include design of in-vehicle information systems and evaluation of their contributions to driver distraction.

  2. 75 FR 76079 - Purchase of Branch Office(s) and/or Transfer of Assets/Liabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Purchase of Branch Office(s) and/or Transfer of Assets/ Liabilities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552, by fax to (202) 906-6518, or by e-mail to...

  3. E-mail as the Appropriate Method of Communication for the Decision-Maker When Soliciting Advice for an Intellective Decision Task.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Swol, Lyn Van; Braun, Michael T; Epstein, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    For many problems in operating room and anesthesia group management, there are tasks with optimal decisions, and yet experienced personnel tend to make decisions that are worse or no better than random chance. Such decisions include staff scheduling, case scheduling, moving cases among operating rooms, and choosing patient arrival times. In such settings, operating room management leadership decision-making should typically be autocratic rather than participative. Autocratic-style decision-making calls for managers to solicit and consider feedback from stakeholders in the decision outcome but to make the decision themselves using their expert knowledge and the facts received. For this to be effective, often the manager will obtain expert advice from outside the organization (e.g., health system). In this narrative review, we evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using prompt asynchronous written communication (i.e., e-mail) as a communication channel for such interaction between a decision-maker (manager) and advisor. A detailed Appendix (Supplemental Digital Content, http://links.lww.com/AA/B72) lists each observational and experimental result. We find that the current ubiquitous role of e-mail for such communication is appropriate. Its benefits include improved time management via asynchronicity, low cognitive load (e.g., relative to Web conferencing), the ability to hide undesirable and irrelevant cues (e.g., physical appearance), the appropriateness of adding desirable cues (e.g., titles and degrees), the opportunity to provide written expression of confidence, and the ability for the advisor to demonstrate the answer for the decision-maker. Given that the manager is e-mailing an advisor whose competence the manager trusts, it is unnecessary to use a richer communication channel to develop trust. Finally, many of the limitations of e-mail can be rectified through training. We expect that decades from now, e-mail (i.e., asynchronous writing) between an

  4. 76 FR 38975 - Safety Zone; Upper Mississippi River, Mile 856.0 to 855.0, Minneapolis, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... through July 24, 2011, World Sports and Marketing will sponsor the U.S. Wakeboard Nationals between Mile... INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this temporary rule, call or e-mail Chief Petty Officer Bryan Klostermeyer, Sector Upper Mississippi River Response Department at telephone (314) 269-2566, e-mail Bryan.K...

  5. The Additional Value of an E-Mail to Inform Healthcare Professionals of a Drug Safety Issue: A Randomized Controlled Trial in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Piening, Sigrid; de Graeff, Pieter A; Straus, Sabine M J M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Mol, Peter G M

    2013-09-01

    The usefulness and the impact of Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs, or 'Dear Doctor letters') in changing the clinical behaviour of physicians have been debated. Changes in the current risk communication methods should preferably be based on the preferences of the healthcare professionals, to optimize the uptake of the message. The aim of this study was to assess whether safety issues are communicated more effectively with an additional e-mail sent by the Dutch Medicines Evaluation Board (MEB) than with the DHPC only. A randomized controlled trial was conducted amongst ophthalmologists and hospital pharmacists in the Netherlands, who were the target group of a DHPC that was issued for pegaptanib, a drug that is administered intra-ocularly in patients with macular degeneration. The intervention group (N = 110) received the pegaptanib DHPC, as well as the MEB e-mail. The control group (N = 105) received the traditional paper-based DHPC only. Two weeks later, the study population received an invitation to fill out an online questionnaire. Questions were asked about the respondents' knowledge and attitude regarding the pegaptanib issue, and any action they had consequently taken. Additional questions were asked about their satisfaction with the DHPC and the e-mail, and their preferred source of such information. Forty respondents (18.6%) completed the questionnaire. Eighty-one percent of the respondents in the intervention group (N = 21) and 47% of the control group (N = 19) correctly indicated that a serious increase in intra-ocular pressure could be caused by pegaptanib injections (Fishers' exact test, p = 0.046). Nine respondents in the intervention group versus none of the control group respondents indicated that they had taken action in response to the pegaptanib safety issue (Fishers' exact test, p = 0.01). The majority of both the intervention group and the control group confirmed that they would like to receive an MEB e-mail with safety

  6. 75 FR 66120 - Information Collection Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval; OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ...-mail). Please provide a copy of your comments to Hope Grey, Information Collection Clearance Officer, U...), or hope_grey@fws.gov (e-mail). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request additional information about this ICR, contact Hope Grey by mail or e-mail (see ADDRESSES) or by telephone at (703) 358-2482...

  7. Remote Collection of Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Outpatient Hand Surgery: A Randomized Trial of Telephone, Mail, and E-Mail.

    PubMed

    Schwartzenberger, Justin; Presson, Angela; Lyle, Adam; O'Farrell, Andrew; Tyser, Andrew R

    2017-09-01

    Obtaining remote patient-reported outcomes (PRO) is limited by low patient response rates and resource-intensive collection methods. We hypothesized that an e-mail-delivered Web-based data collection tool would outperform the traditional methods of telephone and standard mail for collecting long-term Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) scores at a minimum of 1 year following carpal tunnel release (CTR). We conducted a randomized trial of 969 patients who underwent CTR at a tertiary medical center within the past 5 years. Participants were randomized to the PRO collection methods of mail, telephone, and e-mail. The primary outcome was survey response rate at 1 year after surgery. Secondary analyses included data completeness and the effect of time from surgery, mode effects, and patient modality preference. At 1 year from surgery, the response rates were 64% for telephone and 42% for both mail and e-mail. Ninety-nine percent of telephone surveys were complete compared with 88% and 83% for mail and e-mail, respectively. There was no significant difference in the overall response rate at 1 or 5 years after surgery, nor in the BCTQ score between the modalities. A higher response rate and increased survey completeness was achieved by telephone contact methods compared with standard mailings or Web-based methods for PRO collection after CTR 1 to 5 years after surgery. A Web-based method demonstrated response rates equivalent to those of standard mail, was the most preferred modality, and offered logistical advantages such as automation and immediate integration with outcome databases. Obtaining PRO routinely after treatment may increase in importance. A Web-based interface may assist clinicians in decreasing the resource utilization typically associated with more traditional methods used to obtain outcome data. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 54809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... disposal of low-level radioactive waste; and all generators, collectors, and processors of low-level waste...), NEOB-10202, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Comments can also be e-mailed to...

  9. 75 FR 24708 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Announcement of Office of Management and Budget...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ...: Daniel Gittleson, Office of Information Management, Food and Drug Administration, 1350 Piccard Dr., PI50-400B, Rockville, MD 20850, 301-796-5156, e-mail: Daniel[email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY...

  10. 75 FR 81616 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Announcement of Office of Management and Budget...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Daniel Gittleson, Office of Information Management, Food and Drug Administration, 1350 Piccard Dr., PI50-400B, Rockville, MD 20850, 301-796-5156, e-mail: Daniel[email protected

  11. Just-in-Time Evidence-Based E-mail “Reminders” in Home Health Care: Impact on Nurse Practices

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Pezzin, Liliana E; McDonald, Margaret V; Feldman, Penny H; Peng, Timothy R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of two interventions designed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices by home health nurses caring for heart failure (HF) patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Information on nurse practices was abstracted from the clinical records of patients admitted between June 2000 and November 2001 to the care of 354 study nurses at a large, urban, nonprofit home care agency. Study Design The study employed a randomized design with nurses assigned to usual care or one of two intervention groups upon identification of an eligible patient. The basic intervention was a one-time e-mail reminder highlighting six HF-specific clinical recommendations. The augmented intervention consisted of the initial e-mail reminder supplemented by provider prompts, patient education material, and clinical nurse specialist outreach. Data Collection At each home health visit provided by a study nurse to an eligible HF patient during the 45-day follow-up period, a structured chart abstraction tool was used to collect information on whether the nurse provided the care practices highlighted in the e-mail reminder. Principal Findings Both the basic and the augmented interventions greatly increased the practice of evidence-based care, according to patient records, in the areas of patient assessment and instructions about HF disease management. While not all results were statistically significant at conventional levels, intervention effects were positive in virtually all cases and effect magnitudes frequently were large. Conclusions The results of this randomized trial strongly support the efficacy of just-in-time evidence-based reminders as a means of changing clinical practice among home health nurses who are geographically dispersed and spend much of their time in the field. PMID:15960694

  12. The Impact of Gender on the Quality and Content of E-Mail Advice Professors Give to Students Applying to Graduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinpreis, Rhea E.; Anders, Katie A.; Riley, Monica G.; Ritzke, Dawn M.; McDonald, Theodore W.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if gender plays a role in the quality and quantity of the advice given to undergraduates about applying to graduate school. Four hundred male and female psychologists who listed a university address and e-mail address in the 1997 Directory of the American Psychological Association were sent an e-mail inquiry from a pseudostudent (either Theresa or Brian Miller). In the first e-mail, the pseudostudent asked if the subjects would be willing to look at his or her GRE scores and grade point average (GPA) for the purpose of providing advice about his or her chances of getting into the graduate program at the subject's school. Two hundred forty subjects consented to examine the figures, nearly equally split between males and females. Subjects were then sent the GPA and scores of an outstanding, average, or poor applicant. The results indicated that female faculty were significantly more likely to consent to examine the data of a female pseudostudent and male faculty were significantly more likely to consent to examine the data of a male pseudostudent. However, once the faculty member agreed to offer advice, gender had no impact on the length or quality of advice given to the pseudostudent, and advice became a function of the pseudostudent's academic credentials. Furthermore, while male and female subjects were equally likely to encourage, discourage, or recant on their offer to give feedback, male subjects were more likely to refuse to review the data and female subjects were more likely to offer a neutral response to the data. The results are discussed in terms of the difficulty students face in finding adequate information about pursuing a graduate education. These problems may be magnified for female students because there are fewer female faculty available to serve as mentors.

  13. E-mail-based symptomatic surveillance combined with self-collection of nasal swabs: a new tool for acute respiratory infection epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Akmatov, Manas K; Krebs, Stephan; Preusse, Matthias; Gatzemeier, Anja; Frischmann, Ursula; Schughart, Klaus; Pessler, Frank

    2011-11-01

    We examined the feasibility of combining communication by e-mail and self-collection of nasal swabs for the prospective detection of acute respiratory infections in a non-medical setting. The study was conducted among a convenience sample of employees (n=53) at a research institution (December 2009-April 2010). Real-time data on the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms and a nasal self-swab were collected prospectively, with automated weekly e-mails as a reminder mechanism. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect respiratory viral pathogens in the swabs. Fifty-one out of 53 participants completed the study. The study design was well accepted. Thirty (∼57%) participants reported at least one episode of acute respiratory infection and returned the nasal swab during the study period (eight participants reported two episodes). The majority had no difficulties taking the self-swab and preferred this to swabbing by study personnel. Most participants obtained and returned the swabs within the recommended time. Viral respiratory pathogens were detected in 19 of 38 swabs (50%), with coronaviruses 229E/NL63 and OC43 and rhinoviruses A and B constituting 17 positive swabs (89%). Combining e-mail-based symptomatic surveillance with nasal self-swabbing promises to be a powerful tool for the real-time identification of incident cases of acute respiratory infections and the associated pathogens in population-based studies. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring potential use of internet, E-mail, and instant text messaging to promote breast health and mammogram use among immigrant Hispanic women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Dang, Catherine M; Estrada, Sylvia; Bresee, Catherine; Phillips, Edward H

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of death in Hispanic women (HW). Internet, e-mail, and instant text messaging may be cost-effective in educating HW about breast health and in reducing breast cancer mortality. We surveyed 905 HW women attending a free health fair about their technology use, acculturation, insurance status, mammography use, and breast cancer knowledge. Data were analyzed by t test or χ(2) tests. Mean age was 51.9 ± 14.2 years (range, 18 to 88 years). Ninety-two per cent were foreign-born. Most had completed some high school (39%) or elementary (38%) education. Most (62%) were uninsured. The majority spoke (67%) and read (66%) only Spanish. Only 60 per cent of HW older than 40 years had a recent mammogram. HW older than 40 years who had not had a recent mammogram were younger (mean 54.9 ± 10.8 vs 58 ± 10.4 years) and less likely to have health insurance (25 vs 44%; P < 0.001). Most HW never use the Internet (58%) or e-mail (64%). However, 70 per cent have mobile phones (66% older than 40 years), and 65 per cent use text messaging daily (58% older than 40 years, P = 0.001). In fact, 45 per cent wish to receive a mammogram reminder by text. Text messaging may be an inexpensive way to promote breast health and screening mammography use among uninsured HW.

  15. What a rude e-mail! Examining the differential effects of incivility versus support on mood, energy, engagement, and performance in an online context.

    PubMed

    Giumetti, Gary W; Hatfield, Andrea L; Scisco, Jenna L; Schroeder, Amber N; Muth, Eric R; Kowalski, Robin M

    2013-07-01

    Existing research on workplace incivility has demonstrated an association with a host of negative outcomes, including increased burnout, turnover intentions, and physical symptoms. With the rise in Internet communication over the last decade, interpersonal mistreatment has spilled over to the Internet, but little is known about the impact of incivility communicated via e-mail on employee psychological and performance outcomes. The current study presents a within-subjects experiment wherein incivility and support were manipulated in a laboratory-based simulated workplace setting. Eighty-four participants completed a series of math tasks while interacting with either an uncivil or a supportive supervisor via e-mail. Data were collected on energy, cardiac activity, mood, task performance, and engagement. Findings indicate that participants reported higher levels of negative affect and lower levels of energy after working with the uncivil supervisor than with the supportive supervisor. Additionally, participants performed significantly worse on the math tasks and had lower engagement in the uncivil condition than the supportive condition, and these relationships were mediated by energy. No differences were found in cardiac activity between the two conditions. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the 21st century world of work. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Favor Asking and ESL: Something to Break the Routine: A Collaborative Writing Activity; Using E-Mail Assignments and Online Correction in ESL Instruction; Tips for facilitating Full-Time Employment in TESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tamara; Iannacone, Vince; Melby-Mauer, Jean; Tanner, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    The tips discussed here center around favor asking and English as a Second Language, a collaborative writing activity, e-mail assignments nd online correction, and facilitating full-time employment in TESOL (Author/VWL)

  17. Is it too early to move to full electronic PROM data collection?: A randomized controlled trial comparing PROM's after hallux valgus captured by e-mail, traditional mail and telephone.

    PubMed

    Palmen, Leonieke N; Schrier, Joost C M; Scholten, Ruben; Jansen, Justus H W; Koëter, Sander

    2016-03-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROM's) after hallux valgus surgery are used to rate the effectiveness as perceived by the patient. The interpretability of these PROM's is highly dependent on participation rate. Data capture method may be an important factor contributing to the response rate. We investigated the effect on response rate of traditional paper mail, telephone and e-mail PROM's after hallux valgus surgery. All consecutive patients operated between January and September 2013, were identified. Included patients were randomized by envelope in three groups: traditional pen and paper mail, e-mail and telephone. They were asked to fill in a FFI and EQ-5D. Two weeks later non-responders were sent a reminder. Of the 73 included patients, 25 were approached by mail, 24 by e-mail and 24 patients by telephone. The response rate on traditional mail was highest (88%), while response on e-mail was lowest (33%). Response rate on telephone was also high (79%). Response rate on traditional mail and telephone was significantly higher (p<0.001) than response on e-mail. Though electronic data collection has enormous potential, this study shows that e-mail yields unacceptable low response rates. It is too early to replace traditional pen-and-paper PROM's by electronic questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol assessment & feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Jim; Bendtsen, Marcus; Karlsson, Nadine; White, Ian R; Bendtsen, Preben

    2013-10-10

    Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities. This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision. ISRCTN02335307.

  19. 76 FR 12418 - Notice of Hiring or Indemnifying Senior Executive Officers or Directors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Notice of Hiring or Indemnifying Senior Executive Officers or Directors AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552, by fax to (202) 906-6518, or by e-mail to...

  20. Security of e-mail.

    PubMed

    Dubb, H E

    1993-11-05

    In Robert K. Englund's review of Before Writing by Denise Schmandt-Besserat (University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992) in the 11 June issue (p. 1670), two cuneiform characters in columns 1 and 2 on page 1671 were misrepresented. The correct characters are as follows.

  1. The E-Mail Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Judith; Gnanakkan, Dionysius; Bartels, Selina; Lederman, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Many students enter high school with some science knowledge and experience doing investigations but often know little about the nature of science (NOS) or how the knowledge is developed (i.e., science practices). As science teachers, we need to get students excited about science as quickly as possible with activities that introduce the practices…

  2. Honoring Navy SEALs Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew McCabe, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan Keefe, and Petty Officer 1st Class Julio Huertas for their heroic actions in the capture of Ahmed Hashim Abed, the mastermind behind of one of the most notorious crimes against Americans in Iraq.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Poe, Ted [R-TX-2

    2009-12-16

    House - 01/21/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Does additional support provided through e-mail or SMS in a Web-based Social Marketing program improve children's food consumption? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Natalie; Della Bella, Sara; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Suggs, L Suzanne

    2018-02-16

    The FAN Social Marketing program was developed to improve dietary and physical activity habits of families with children in Ticino, Switzerland. The aim of this study was to examine if the effects of the program on children's food intake differed by intervention group. Effects of the FAN program were tested through a Randomized Controlled Trial. The program lasted 8 weeks, during which participants received tailored communication about nutrition and physical activity. Families were randomly allocated to one of three groups, where the parent received the intervention by the Web (G1), Web + e-mail (G2) or Web + SMS (G3). Children in all groups received tailored print letters by post. Children's food consumption was assessed at baseline and immediate post intervention using a 7-day food diary. Generalized linear mixed models with child as a random effect and with time, treatment group, and the time by treatment interaction as fixed effects were used to test the impact of the intervention. Analyses were conducted with a sample of 608 children. After participating in FAN the marginal means of daily consumption of fruit changed from 0.95 to 1.12 in G1, from 0.82 to 0.94 in G2, and from 0.93 to 1.18 in G3. The margins of the daily consumption of sweets decreased in each group (1.67 to 1.56 in G1, 1.71 to 1.49 in G2, and 1.72 to 1.62 in G3). The change in vegetable consumption observed from pre to post intervention in G3 (from 1.13 to 1.21) was significantly different from that observed in G1 (from 1.21 to 1.17). A well-designed Web-based Social Marketing intervention complemented with print letters can help improve children's consumption of water, fruit, soft drinks, and sweets. The use of SMS to support greater behavior change, in addition to Web-based communication, resulted only in a small significant positive change for vegetables, while the use of e-mail in addition to Web did not result in any significant difference. The trial was retrospectively registered in the

  4. 76 FR 43731 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...: Submission for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...) the estimated number of individuals that will participate in the Generic Fundamentals Examination (GFE...-0131), NEOB-10202, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Comments can also be e-mailed...

  5. 76 FR 32332 - Office of Thrift Supervision Integration; Dodd-Frank Act Implementation; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ..., and 34 [Docket ID OCC-2011-0006] RIN 1557-AD41 Office of Thrift Supervision Integration; Dodd-Frank... Thrift Supervision Integration; Dodd- Frank Act Implementation.'' Inadvertently, an incorrect E-mail...) requesting comment on its notice of proposed rulemaking entitled ``Office of Thrift Supervision Integration...

  6. Economic evaluation of a weight control program with e-mail and telephone counseling among overweight employees: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Distance lifestyle counseling for weight control is a promising public health intervention in the work setting. Information about the cost-effectiveness of such interventions is lacking, but necessary to make informed implementation decisions. The purpose of this study was to perform an economic evaluation of a six-month program with lifestyle counseling aimed at weight reduction in an overweight working population with a two-year time horizon from a societal perspective. Methods A randomized controlled trial comparing a program with two modes of intervention delivery against self-help. 1386 Employees from seven companies participated (67% male, mean age 43 (SD 8.6) years, mean BMI 29.6 (SD 3.5) kg/m2). All groups received self-directed lifestyle brochures. The two intervention groups additionally received a workbook-based program with phone counseling (phone; n=462) or a web-based program with e-mail counseling (internet; n=464). Body weight was measured at baseline and 24 months after baseline. Quality of life (EuroQol-5D) was assessed at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after baseline. Resource use was measured with six-monthly diaries and valued with Dutch standard costs. Missing data were multiply imputed. Uncertainty around differences in costs and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios was estimated by applying non-parametric bootstrapping techniques and graphically plotting the results in cost-effectiveness planes and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results At two years the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €1009/kg weight loss in the phone group and €16/kg weight loss in the internet group. The cost-utility analysis resulted in €245,243/quality adjusted life year (QALY) and €1337/QALY, respectively. The results from a complete-case analysis were slightly more favorable. However, there was considerable uncertainty around all outcomes. Conclusions Neither intervention mode was proven to be cost-effective compared to self

  7. SMS text pre-notification and delivery of reminder e-mails to increase response rates to postal questionnaires in the SUSPEND trial: a factorial design, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Starr, Kathryn; McPherson, Gladys; Forrest, Mark; Cotton, Seonaidh C

    2015-07-08

    Patient-reported outcomes are vital in informing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and health-care interventions and policies from the patient's perspective. However, participant non-response may introduce bias and can affect the generalisability of the trial. This study evaluates two interventions aimed at increasing response rates to postal questionnaires within a large, UK-wide RCT: pre-notification via short messenger service (SMS) text prior to sending the initial mailing of trial questionnaires versus no pre-notification; for non-responders to the initial mailing of the questionnaires, an e-mail reminder (containing a hyperlink to complete the questionnaire online) versus a postal reminder. This study is a 2 × 2 partial factorial design RCT nested within an RCT of medical expulsive therapy for ureteric stone disease. Participants who supplied a mobile telephone number were randomly assigned to receive an SMS text pre-notification of questionnaire delivery or no pre-notification. Those who supplied an e-mail address were randomly assigned to receive a questionnaire reminder by e-mail or post. Participants could be randomly assigned to the pre-notification comparison or the reminder comparison or both. The primary outcome measure was response rate at each questionnaire time point. Four hundred eighteen participants were randomly assigned to the SMS pre-notification comparison (80% were male, and the mean age was 41 years with a standard deviation (SD) of 11.1). The intervention had no effect on response rate at either questionnaire time point. In subgroup analyses, SMS pre-notification increased response rates in women but only at the first questionnaire time point. One hundred nineteen participants were randomly assigned to the reminder comparison (80% were male, and the mean age was 42 years with an SD of 12.1). There was no difference in response rate in those who received an e-mail reminder compared with those who received a postal reminder. SMS text pre

  8. 76 FR 36438 - Special Local Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... security zone in the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound Captain of the Port (COTP) Zone. When these..., call or e-mail Petty Officer Joseph Graun, Waterways Management Division at Coast Guard Sector Long...

  9. 76 FR 30707 - Information Collections Being Submitted for Review and Approval to the Office of Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...) includes personally identifiable information derived from a customer's relationship with a provider of... to the Office of Management and Budget AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice and.... Fraser, Office of Management and Budget, via fax at 202-395-5167 or via e-mail to [email protected

  10. Developing Senior Navy Leaders: Requirements for Flag Officer Expertise Today and in the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    who reach flag ranks have already passed numerous tests of their leadership skills, so there is little differentiation in either the demand for or...NooN) Master Chief Petty Officer (MCPON) Director of Test and Evaluation Technology Requirements (N091) Surgeon General of the Navy (N093) Chief of Navy...Operations Fleet Forces Command Naval Reserve Forces Operational Test and Evaluation Forces Naval Special Warfare Command U.S. Naval Forces Central Command

  11. 76 FR 1433 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Standards Committee's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... it becomes available. Contact Person: Judy Sparrow, Office of the National Coordinator, HHS, 330 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20201, 202-205-4528, Fax: 202-690-6079, e-mail: judy.sparrow@hhs.gov Please..., please contact Judy Sparrow at least seven (7) days in advance of the meeting. ONC is committed to the...

  12. 75 FR 21630 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    .... Contact Person: Judy Sparrow, Office of the National Coordinator, HHS, 330 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20201, 202-205- 4528, Fax: 202-690-6079, e-mail: judy.sparrow@hhs.gov . Please call the contact person... that day. If you require special accommodations due to a disability, please contact Judy Sparrow at...

  13. 75 FR 12752 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...: Judy Sparrow, Office of the National Coordinator, HHS, 330 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20201, 202-205-4528, Fax: 202- 690-6079, e-mail: judy.sparrow@hhs.gov Please call the contact person for up-to-date... accommodations due to a disability, please contact Judy Sparrow at least seven (7) days in advance of the meeting...

  14. 75 FR 8078 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... information as it becomes available. Contact Person: Judy Sparrow, Office of the National Coordinator, HHS, 330 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20201, 202-205-4528, Fax: 202- 690-6079, e-mail: judy.sparrow@hhs... contact Judy Sparrow at least seven (7) days in advance of the meeting. ONC is committed to the orderly...

  15. 76 FR 1432 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Person: Judy Sparrow, Office of the National Coordinator, HHS, 330 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20201, 202-205- 4528, Fax: 202-690-6079, e-mail: judy.sparrow@hhs.gov . Please call the contact person for up.... If you require special accommodations due to a disability, please contact Judy Sparrow at least seven...

  16. 75 FR 53679 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...: CPSC Desk Officer, fax: 202-395-6974, or e-mailed to [email protected] . Written comments... cigarette. The standard requires manufacturers to perform prototype tests of each combination of materials... of the reduced testing program will have to maintain records on the cigarette test performed, but...

  17. Do personalised e-mail invitations increase the response rates of breast cancer survivors invited to participate in a web-based behaviour change intervention? A quasi-randomised 2-arm controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Short, Camille E; Rebar, Amanda L; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2015-08-19

    Previous research has shown that the personalisation of study invitations improves response rates in survey-based research. To examine if this finding extends to experimental studies, we examined the impact of personalised study invitation e-mails on the response rates of potentially eligible breast cancer survivors for participation in a 6 month randomised controlled trial testing the efficacy of a physical activity intervention. Potential participants (n = 344) were sent either a personalised email or a generic email. Those sent the personalised email were 1.5 times (95 % CI = 1.18-1.93) more likely to respond than those sent the generic email. These findings suggest that personalisation may be a useful and potentially powerful tool that can be utilised when recruiting participants into experimental studies in order to boost response rates.

  18. 75 FR 44928 - Office of the Secretary: Procedures Relating to Awards Under the Equal Access to Justice Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ...: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA... limited circumstances. In this document, USDA is proposing to raise the hourly fee. DATES: In order to be....regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. E-mail: [email protected]usda.gov . Include...

  19. E-mail on the Move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    PocketScience, Inc. was a member of the NASA Ames Technology Commercialization Center. Their PocketMail product is an email service that brings email capabilities to new hand-held devices. The PocketMail service uses technology originally developed at JPL. Through its involvement with the ATCC, PocketScience, Inc. was able to use this space probe communications technology and adapt it for advanced signal processing on Earth.

  20. Stalked by E-mail on Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugeja, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes the difficulties email has introduced to the academic world, from monopolizing faculty's down time to adding a new dimension to interpersonal problems. He discusses the "withdrawal" symptoms he felt when he decided to go without email during a family vacation, and his realization, upon examining the emails sent…

  1. Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

  2. The Future of Officer Career Development System in the Slovenian Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-13

    Professors Anton Zabkar and Uros Svete, at the Faculty for Social Science at University of Ljubljana, clearly identified the deficiencies in the...short-lived solution], Slovenian Armed Forces Bulletin 10, no. 1 (May 2008): 97-120. 5Anton Zabkar and Uros Svete, “Solanje Vojaskih Profesionalcev...is based on Length of Service ( LoS ) and applies to all DE officers and the other is the LE career structure.87 85Major Al Thorp, e-mail message to

  3. The Effects of Military Assignments and Duties on the Martial Status of Navy Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    by phone or e-mail, by sending Officer Preference and Personal information cards (NAVPERS 1301/1), by Super JASS (Job Advertising and Selection...Kuwait 24 12 Laos NA 12 Malaysia 36 24 Mexico 24 18 Midway Island NA 12 Morocco 24 15 Netherlands 36 24 New Zealand 36 24 Niger 24 12 Norway...basic assumptions: (1) each person tries to find a mate who maximizes his or her well-being, with well-being measured by the consumption of

  4. Ombuds Office

    mission of the Ombuds Office is to enhance communication and mitigate conflict at the Laboratory. Contact alternative for assistance with informal complaint resolution, problem solving, and communication. The Ombuds Ombudsman Association Code of Ethics (pdf) International Ombudsman Association Standards of Practice (pdf

  5. NOAA Civil Rights Office - EEO Office

    Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of the Chief Administration Officer Civil Rights Office (CRO Diversity and Inclusion Management Advisory Council (DIMAC) Diversity and Inclusion Toolkit The NOAA Civil Rights Office Welcome to the NOAA Civil Rights Office The NOAA Civil Rights Office provides overall

  6. Improved Grade Outcomes with an E-Mailed "Grade Nudge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ben O.; White, Dustin R.; Kuzyk, Patricia C.; Tierney, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Information provided at the moment a person makes a decision can influence behavior in predictable ways. The United Kingdom's Behavioural Insights Team have used this idea to help improve the insulation of lofts, collect taxes, and even reduce litter. The authors of this article developed software that appends a personalized message to each…

  7. E-Mail in Academia: Expectations, Use, and Instructional Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith; Hanson-Baldauf, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of and reliance on emergent computer-mediated communication technologies such as instant messaging, blogs, and social networks have arguably widened the generation gap between faculty and traditional undergraduate students. Marc Prensky defined this generational technology divide by coining the terms "digital natives" and…

  8. I Got My Degree Through E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubernick, Lisa; Ebeling, Ashlea

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the growing availability and popularity of online college courses at colleges and universities around the country, with anecdotal examples of student experiences and college policies and pricing, and examination of the advantages and criticisms of the trend, including some research on student outcomes. (MSE)

  9. Clinician-patient E-mail communication: challenges for reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Komives, Eugenie M

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians are rapidly gaining experience with online clinician-patient consultation, and more tools are becoming available to support these efforts. In addition, we now have evidence that using electronic communication is cost-effective to payers and appealing to patients and providers. At present, there appear to be few barriers to the adoption of these solutions for practices that use other online services. Security concerns can easily be overcome by using programs described in this commentary. Larger and longer studies that evaluate the benefits and cost savings in more detail may help convince other payers and providers of the utility of the Web-based programs. More studies are needed to understand the effect of dinician-patient electronic communication on the costs of caring for chronic illness. When these solutions also include support tools, such as electronic prescribing, which could improve patient safety and quality of care, they should be encouraged. In their article entitled, "Electrons in Flight-Email between Doctors and Patients," Delbanco and Sands postulate that the future of e-communication in medicine will be integrated with a patient-controlled health record and will include secure synchronous and asynchronous communication, video conferencing and messaging, instant transcription into the written record, full-patient access to the record, translation into different languages, connectivity to multiple data sources, incorporation of multi-media educational materials. It-will also allow data from home-based diagnostic technology to be sent to clinicians. "Electronic communication will move medicine inexorably toward such transparency, enabling doctors and patients to share knowledge, responsibility, and decision-making more equally. We need to explore rapidly how this change will affect the quality of care for patients and the quality of life for doctors." The widespread dependence on Internet-based electronic communication to support a variety of commercial, educational, and entertainment needs and interests offers us an opportunity to develop innovative approaches to some long-standing problems-assuring the accessibility of clinicians to their patients and the effectiveness and timeliness of communication between them. It is exciting that we now have well-documented examples of how these new technologies can be used to enhance the quality of primary care practice in both large and small practice organizations.

  10. Archiving Writers' Work in the Age of E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolowich, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The job of literary archivist is changing as paper manuscripts yield to laptops, Blackberry's, and Facebook content, and digital preservation lets scholars learn more about authors' creative process than ever before. Personal computers and external storage devices have been around for more than a quarter-century, but only now, as the famous…

  11. A Humanities Network Considers What Lies Beyond E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guernsey, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    H-NET (Humanities and Social Sciences OnLine) is a new, rapidly expanding international online network of scholars that was established to increase electronic mail communication among individuals. Currently, the program is devoting more attention to World Wide Web-related projects providing information and reference sources. Internal conflict…

  12. Keeping It Simple: The Case for E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haimovic, Gila

    The Open University of Israel (OUI) is a distance education institution that offers over 250 computer-mediated courses through the Internet. All OUI students must pass an English reading comprehension exemption exam or take the University's English reading comprehension courses. Because reading instruction differs from content instruction,…

  13. Data Leakage Prevention: E-Mail Protection via Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kamaljeet; Gupta, Ishu; Singh, Ashutosh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Protection of digital assets and intellectual property is becoming a challenge for most of the companies. Due to increasing availability of database services on internet, data may be insecure after passing through precarious networks. To protect intellectual property (IP) is a major concern for today's organizations, because a leakage that compromises IP means, sensitive information of a company is in the hands of biggest competitors. Electronic information processing and communication is replacing paper in many applications increasingly. Instead of paper, an email is being used for communication at workplace and from social media logins to bank accounts. Nowadays an email is becoming a mainstream business tool. An email can be misused to leave company’s sensitive data open to compromise. So, it may be of little surprise that attacks on emails are common. So, here we need an email protection system (EPS) that will protect information to leave organization via mail. In this paper, we developed an algorithm that will offer email protection via gateway during data transfer. This algorithm matches the patterns with the keywords stored in the database and then takes the actions accordingly to protect the data. This paper describes why email protection is important? How companies can protect their confidential information from being leaked by insiders.

  14. Politeness Strategies in Collaborative E-Mail Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinagre, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has been the subject of a wide range of studies over the last twenty years. Previous research suggests that CSCL exchanges can facilitate group-based learning and knowledge construction among learners who are in different geographical locations [Littleton, K. & Whitelock, D. (2004). "Guiding the…

  15. Warning: You Have an E-Mail Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piirto, John

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 101 faculty in a variety of disciplines found that most do not give much attention to the composition of electronic mail messages and are not bothered much when receiving messages containing mechanical or composition errors. Results suggest faculty should be cautious about relaxing the rules of grammar, punctuation, and good writing in…

  16. Improving Student Writing through E-Mail Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Computer technology has become an indispensable tool in writing. Those of us who have spent any time in schools can attest to the prevalence of word processing, concept mapping, Web editing, and electronic presentation software, all deployed, to a large extent, in the collective effort to enhance student writing. The degree to which such tools…

  17. Cross-Cultural Analysis of E-Mail Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachaf, Pnina; Meho, Lokman I.; Hara, Noriko

    2007-01-01

    Studies that examined virtual reference and its potential for collaboration have by and large represented experiences in western English-speaking countries. This article reports the results of a three-nation (Israel, Japan, and Lebanon) comparative analysis to bridge this research gap. Similarities and differences between these countries highlight…

  18. Chief Information Officer > Library

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Chief Information Officer Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Chief Information Officer U.S. Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Home About DoD CIO Bios Organization DCIO C4&IIC DCIO IE

  19. The Use of Office-Based Sedation and General Anesthesia by Board Certified Pediatric Dentists Practicing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Olabi, Nassim F.; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Schrader, Stuart M.; Tomlin, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the use of office-based sedation by board-certified pediatric dentists practicing in the United States. Pediatric dentists have traditionally relied upon self-administered sedation techniques to provide office-based sedation. The use of dentist anesthesiologists to provide office-based sedation is an emerging trend. This study examines and compares these two models of office-based sedations. A survey evaluating office-based sedation of diplomates of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry (ABPD) based on gender, age, years in practice, practice types, regions, and years as a diplomate of the ABPD was completed by 494 active members. The results were summarized using frequencies and percentages. Relationships of dentist age, gender, and number of years in practice with the use of intravenous (IV) sedation was completed using two-way contingency tables and Mantel-Haenszel tests for ordered categorical data. Relationships of office-based sedation use and the type of one's practice were examined using Pearson chi-square tests. Of the 1917 surveys e-mailed, 494 completed the survey for a response rate of 26%. Over 70% of board-certified US pediatric dentists use some form of sedation in their offices. Less than 20% administer IV sedation, 20 to 40% use a dentist anesthesiologist, and 60 to 70% would use dentist anesthesiologists if one were available. PMID:22428969

  20. The use of office-based sedation and general anesthesia by board certified pediatric dentists practicing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Olabi, Nassim F; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Schrader, Stuart M; Tomlin, Angela M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the use of office-based sedation by board-certified pediatric dentists practicing in the United States. Pediatric dentists have traditionally relied upon self-administered sedation techniques to provide office-based sedation. The use of dentist anesthesiologists to provide office-based sedation is an emerging trend. This study examines and compares these two models of office-based sedations. A survey evaluating office-based sedation of diplomates of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry (ABPD) based on gender, age, years in practice, practice types, regions, and years as a diplomate of the ABPD was completed by 494 active members. The results were summarized using frequencies and percentages. Relationships of dentist age, gender, and number of years in practice with the use of intravenous (IV) sedation was completed using two-way contingency tables and Mantel-Haenszel tests for ordered categorical data. Relationships of office-based sedation use and the type of one's practice were examined using Pearson chi-square tests. Of the 1917 surveys e-mailed, 494 completed the survey for a response rate of 26%. Over 70% of board-certified US pediatric dentists use some form of sedation in their offices. Less than 20% administer IV sedation, 20 to 40% use a dentist anesthesiologist, and 60 to 70% would use dentist anesthesiologists if one were available.

  1. Transformational leadership practices of chief nursing officers in Magnet® organizations.

    PubMed

    Clavelle, Joanne T; Drenkard, Karen; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership practices of Magnet® chief nursing officers (CNOs). It is believed that transformational leadership practices influence quality and are integral to Magnet designation. E-mail surveys of 384 Magnet CNOs were conducted in 2011 using the leadership practices inventory (LPI). Enabling others to act and modeling the way are top practices of Magnet CNOs. Those 60 years or older and those with doctorate degrees scored significantly higher in inspiring a shared vision and challenging the process. There was a significant positive relationship between total years as a CNO and inspiring a shared vision and between total scores on the LPI and number of beds in the organization. As CNOs gain experience and education, they exhibit more transformational leadership characteristics. Magnet organizations should take steps to retain CNOs and support their development and advancement.

  2. Educational Services Officer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    publication is a a recommended reading list. A brief description valuable tool to an ESO when it is available of the subject matter of each is given, and...factors that must be considered in the arrangement of an office. 9. Identify the basic office products. 3. Identify the tools necessary for the...of the office. Personnel served by the tools of the trade; however, if the office this office judge it by the measure of does not provide

  3. 20 CFR 422.5 - District offices and branch offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... office is the manager. The principal officer in each branch office is the officer-in-charge. Each... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false District offices and branch offices. 422.5... and Functions of the Social Security Administration § 422.5 District offices and branch offices. There...

  4. 20 CFR 422.5 - District offices and branch offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... office is the manager. The principal officer in each branch office is the officer-in-charge. Each... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false District offices and branch offices. 422.5... and Functions of the Social Security Administration § 422.5 District offices and branch offices. There...

  5. Interactive Office user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  6. Office of Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office on Trafficking in Persons (OTIP) Public Assistance Reporting Information System (PARIS) By Region Office of Regional ... CCDF Allocations Technical Assistance Policy & Program Resources CCDF Reporting OCC Guide to CCDF Resources Program Instructions Information ...

  7. Training for Today's Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Elva Lea

    1974-01-01

    After observing several large company offices in Denver in operation, the author suggests course content slantings and recommendations to better meet office requirements of today and tomorrow. Recommendations are categorized according to clerical practice, data processing, shorthand, and typewriting. (EA)

  8. FIFRA Project Officers Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The FIFRA Project Officers Manual provides guidance to new as well as experienced project officers in the management of grants and cooperative agreements under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act.

  9. Geographic Information Office

    ,

    2004-01-01

    The Geographic Information Office (GIO) is the principal information office for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), focused on: Information Policy and Services, Information Technology, Science Information, Information Security, and the Federal Geographic Data Committee/Geospatial One Stop.

  10. Office Computers: Ergonomic Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganus, Susannah

    1984-01-01

    Each new report of the office automation market indicates technology is overrunning the office. The impacts of this technology are described and some ways to manage and physically "soften" the change to a computer-based office environment are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  11. Child Care Program Office

    Behavioral Health Office of Children's Services Office of the Commissioner Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile Justice Public Assistance Public Health Seniors & Disabilities Services Boards, Councils & Commissions Services

  12. Medicare Information Office

    Agencies Alaska Pioneer Homes Behavioral Health Office of Children's Services Office of the Commissioner Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile Justice Public Assistance Public Health Seniors & Disabilities Services Boards

  13. Office of Children's Services

    Pioneer Homes Behavioral Health Office of Children's Services Office of the Commissioner Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care Services Juvenile Justice Public Assistance Public Health Seniors & Disabilities Services Boards, Councils &

  14. The Changing Office Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinkscale, Bella G.

    A study was undertaken to (1) determine the present state of the office environment by asking corporate officers, governmental officials, and educational administrators to take a close look at their personnel, procedures, and equipment and (2) determine what equipment, office systems, and personnel qualifications are anticipated for the future.…

  15. Harvin claims USNORTHCOM Sailor of the Year title > U.S. Northern Command >

    presents Petty Officer First Class Charles Harvin with a plaque in honor of his award. Harvin now competes ret.) Roy Rodgers presents Petty Officer First Class Charles Harvin with a plaque in honor of his , Petty Officer First Class Charles Harvin spent the latter part of his adolescence in Auburn, Alabama

  16. 48 CFR 1352.201-72 - Contracting Officer's Representative (COR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... notice to the contractor by a unilateral modification to the contract. The COR is located at: Phone Number: E-mail: (b) The responsibilities and limitations of the COR are as follows: (1) The COR is...

  17. 48 CFR 1352.201-72 - Contracting Officer's Representative (COR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... notice to the contractor by a unilateral modification to the contract. The COR is located at: Phone Number: E-mail: (b) The responsibilities and limitations of the COR are as follows: (1) The COR is...

  18. 48 CFR 1352.201-72 - Contracting Officer's Representative (COR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... notice to the contractor by a unilateral modification to the contract. The COR is located at: Phone Number: E-mail: (b) The responsibilities and limitations of the COR are as follows: (1) The COR is...

  19. 6. Interior, rear offices: operations assistant office looking north toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior, rear offices: operations assistant office looking north toward security operations officer's office. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Rushmore Air Force Station, Security Central Control Building, Quesada Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  20. The effects of exercise reminder software program on office workers' perceived pain level, work performance and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Irmak, A; Bumin, G; Irmak, R

    2012-01-01

    In direct proportion to current technological developments, both the computer usage in the workplaces is increased and requirement of leaving the desk for an office worker in order to photocopy a document, send or receive an e-mail is decreased. Therefore, office workers stay in the same postures accompanied by long periods of keyboard usage. In recent years, with intent to reduce the incidence of work related musculoskeletal disorders several exercise reminder software programs have been developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercise reminder software program on office workers' perceived pain level, work performance and quality of life. 39 healthy office workers accepted to attend the study. Participants were randomly split in to two groups, control group (n = 19) and intervention group (n = 20). Visual Analogue Scale to evaluate the perceived pain was administered all of the participants in the beginning and at the end of the study. The intervention group used the program for 10 weeks. Findings showed that the control group VAS scores remained the same, but the intervention group VAS scores decreased in a statistically significant way (p < 0.01). Results support that such exercise reminder software programs may help to reduce perceived pain among office workers. Further long term studies with more subjects are needed to describe the effects of these programs and the mechanism under these effects.

  1. 20 CFR 422.5 - District offices and branch offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false District offices and branch offices. 422.5... and Functions of the Social Security Administration § 422.5 District offices and branch offices. There are over 700 social security district offices and branch offices located in the principal cities and...

  2. ASC Small Business Office

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-23

    Aeronautical Systems Center Dominant Air Power: Design For Tomorrow…Deliver Today ASC Small Business Office 23 May 2006 Teresa Rendon ASC/BC...1. REPORT DATE 23 MAY 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ASC Small Business Office 5a...Limitation on Subcontracting • Teaming • Source Selection of Small Business Participation • Role of the Small Business Office • Questions 3 Dominant Air

  3. Pediatric office emergencies.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Pediatricians regularly see emergencies in the office, or children that require transfer to an emergency department, or hospitalization. An office self-assessment is the first step in determining how to prepare for an emergency. The use of mock codes and skill drills make office personnel feel less anxious about medical emergencies. Emergency information forms provide valuable, quick information about complex patients for emergency medical services and other physicians caring for patients. Furthermore, disaster planning should be part of an office preparedness plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Home Careers at NOAA Search Criteria Click to Search WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE NATIONAL OCEANIC Executive Service ST and SL Responsibilities Performance Management Performance Management Resources Portal Management Fellows (PMFs) Program Coordination Office - Leadership Development Program (PCO-LDP) Employee

  5. The Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naclerio, Nick

    1979-01-01

    Clerical personnel may be able to climb career ladders as a result of office automation and expanded job opportunities in the word processing area. Suggests opportunities in an automated office system and lists books and periodicals on word processing for counselors and teachers. (MF)

  6. The Educator's "Action" Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dikran J.

    Design criteria, standards, and human factors related to designing and planning flexible and efficient work environments for college faculty members are overviewed with six model (example) office plans included. The physical and psychological design needs in such an office facility are given, with task performance data on student faculty…

  7. Office Safety (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Carl

    Toxic chemicals, noise, inadequate lighting, poor equipment design, smoking, and accidents pose serious health hazards for millions of office workers. Stress and boredom also contribute to the problems of safety. Workers should be on guard in the office for hazards, many of which are recognizable through common sense and patience. Workers must…

  8. NMC OFFICE NOTE 124

    surface reports in the NMC observational files. This revision represents the final update to NMC/NCEP Office Note Number 124. This format for representing meteorological surface observational data at NMC observational data format at NCEP. An accurate version of this Office Note is still necessary for historical

  9. Officer Career Development: Surface Warfare Officer Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    findings also have implications for the Navy in its effort to control turnover among military officers. The findings suggest that the role of spousal...gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completingand rcvicving the collection ofinformation . Send conticnts regarding this burden estimate or...to our understanding of the turnover process within a military setting and provides avenues for future research. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES

  10. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Guidelines. These three certified systems are based upon two bacterial genera: Escherichia (E. coli K-12) and... submitted to OBA in paper or electronic form at the OBA mailing, fax, and e-mail addresses shown below under... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: OBA by e-mail at [email protected] , or telephone at 301-496-9838, if you have...

  11. 76 FR 13272 - Branch Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Branch Offices AGENCY: Office of Thrift... required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3507. The Office of Thrift Supervision within... below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the Paperwork Reduction...

  12. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009

    SciT

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2009-12-15

    Presented is the 2009 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office.

  13. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Colin K.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a practical approach to planning for office automation termed the "Focused Process Approach" (the "what" phase, "how" phase, "doing" phase) which is a synthesis of the problem-solving and participatory planning approaches. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  14. Fermilab Education Office - Physicists

    groups: Science Adventures Group Teacher Resource Center Group Twitter Fermilab Education Office For more Fermilab news, follow Fermilab on Facebook and Twitter. Check out Teacher Workshops Get FermiGear! Tweets

  15. Office of exploration overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alred, John

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration case studies for FY89 are reviewed with regard to study ground rules and constraints. Three study scenarios are presented: lunar evolution, Mars evolution, and Mars expedition with emphasis on the key mission objectives.

  16. Officer Leadership Program

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-01-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Office of : Enforcementa and Emergency Services, sponsors an ongoing, cooperative program : with participating law enforcement agencies around the country. In this : program, law enforcement...

  17. Optical Meteor Systems Used by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A. M.; Blaauw, R. C.; Cooke, W. J.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) uses two main meteor camera networks to characterize the meteoroid environment: an all sky system and a wide field system to study cm and mm size meteors respectively. The NASA All Sky Fireball Network consists of fifteen meteor video cameras in the United States, with plans to expand to eighteen cameras by the end of 2015. The camera design and All-Sky Guided and Real-time Detection (ASGARD) meteor detection software [1, 2] were adopted from the University of Western Ontario's Southern Ontario Meteor Network (SOMN). After seven years of operation, the network has detected over 12,000 multi-station meteors, including meteors from at least 53 different meteor showers. The network is used for speed distribution determination, characterization of meteor showers and sporadic sources, and for informing the public on bright meteor events. The NASA Wide Field Meteor Network was established in December of 2012 with two cameras and expanded to eight cameras in December of 2014. The two camera configuration saw 5470 meteors over two years of operation with two cameras, and has detected 3423 meteors in the first five months of operation (Dec 12, 2014 - May 12, 2015) with eight cameras. We expect to see over 10,000 meteors per year with the expanded system. The cameras have a 20 degree field of view and an approximate limiting meteor magnitude of +5. The network's primary goal is determining the nightly shower and sporadic meteor fluxes. Both camera networks function almost fully autonomously with little human interaction required for upkeep and analysis. The cameras send their data to a central server for storage and automatic analysis. Every morning the servers automatically generates an e-mail and web page containing an analysis of the previous night's events. The current status of the networks will be described, alongside with preliminary results. In addition, future projects, CCD photometry and broadband meteor color camera

  18. The strategic security officer.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of the strategic security officer, and the potential that it brings to the healthcare security operational environment. The author believes that training and development, along with strict hiring practices, can enable a security department to reach a new level of professionalism, proficiency and efficiency. The strategic officer for healthcare security is adapted from the "strategic corporal" concept of US Marine Corps General Charles C. Krulak which focuses on understanding the total force implications of the decisions made by the lowest level leaders within the Corps (Krulak, 1999). This article focuses on the strategic organizational implications of every security officer's decisions in the constantly changing and increasingly volatile operational environment of healthcare security.

  19. Impact of office-based intravenous deep sedation providers upon traditional sedation practices employed in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Tarver, Michael; Guelmann, Marcio; Primosch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This survey intended to determine how the implementation of office-based IV deep sedation by a third party provider (OIVSED) impacted the traditional sedation practices employed in pediatric dentistry private practice settings. A digital survey was e-mailed to 924 members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry practicing in California, Florida, and New York, chosen because these states had large samples of practicing pediatric dentists in geographically disparate locations. 151 pediatric dentists using OIVSED responded to the survey. Improved efficiency, safety and quality of care provided, and increased parental acceptance were reported advantages of this service. Although less costly than hospital-based general anesthesia, the average fee for this service was a deterrent to some parents considering this option. Sixty-four percent of respondents continued to provide traditional sedation modalities, mostly oral sedation, in their offices, as parenteral routes taught in their training programs were less often selected. OIVSED users reported both a reduction in the use of traditional sedation modalities in their offices and use of hospital-based GA services in exchange for perceived improvements in efficiency, safety and quality of care delivered. Patient costs, in the absence of available health insurance coverage, inhibited accessing this service by some parents.

  20. Office of Water Prediction

    Toggle navigation National Water Center Home (current) Visualize Map Image Viewer What's New About National Water Center National Water Model National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Welcome to the Office of Water Prediction Scientific excellence and innovation driving water

  1. DNR Recorder's Office

    Search Search DNR's site DNR State of Alaska RO Home UCC Home Recording Info About the Process Fees Admin. Order 16 District Boundaries Searches RO Search Menu UCC Search Menu *NEW* Online Copy Request . Recorder's Office Search Recording Resources Recording requirements. Our current fees. Recording District

  2. Troubleshooting in Medical Offices

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    Physicians usually go into practice with little or no instruction in how to manage their business affairs or organize their offices. Many questions, such as where to practice, whether to join a group and whether to incorporate, must be answered. Several sources of help are available, but nothing substitutes for knowledge of the basic principles outlined in this article.

  3. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Request Forms Military Service Deposit Information NOAA Forms OPM Forms Performance Management Request Home Careers at NOAA Search Criteria Click to Search WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE NATIONAL OCEANIC Federal Employees Health (FEHB) Life (FEGLI) Life Insurance and Active Duty Information Long Term Care

  4. NOAA Workforce Management Office

    Home Careers at NOAA Search Criteria Click to Search WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE NATIONAL OCEANIC Federal Employees Health (FEHB) Life (FEGLI) Life Insurance and Active Duty Information Long Term Care (FLTCIP) New Employee Benefit Information OPM Retirement Information Premium Conversion - Health Benefits

  5. Home :: Southeast Regional Office

    have pleaded guilty to federal wildlife violations after they shot at several dolphins, killing one . Get to know the people who study these fascinating fish and find out more about some of their most Island NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement in Niceville, Fla., is investigating a case involving a dolphin

  6. Office of the Ombudsman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet describes the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman, an impartial resource to help customers resolve student loan concerns when other approaches fail. The ombudsman helps resolve discrepancies in loan balances and payments, and helps customers understand interest and collection charges. The office helps resolve issues related to income tax…

  7. Fermilab Science Education Office

    on the Education Server about Science Education, but turn on JavaScript to enable all this site's - About - FAQ - Fermilab Friends - Fermilab Home Fermilab Office of Education & Public Outreach @fnal.gov Lederman Science Education Center Fermilab MS 777 Box 500 Batavia, IL 60510 (630) 840-8258 * fax

  8. An Admissions Officer's Credentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones has resigned as a dean of admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology after admitting that she had misrepresented her academic degrees when first applying to work at the university in 1979. As one of the nation's most prominent admissions officers--and a leader in the movement to make the application process less…

  9. Impressions of Psychotherapists' Offices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasar, Jack L.; Devlin, Ann Sloan

    2011-01-01

    For counseling settings, research suggests that softness, personalization, and order might affect the experience and the perceived expertness, trustworthiness, and social attractiveness of the therapist. This article discusses exploratory studies on college students' perception of the counseling office environment and whether the likely client…

  10. Office of Cancer Genomics |

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of the NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) is to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advance and accelerate genomics science and technology development, and efficiently translate the genomics data to improve cancer research, prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment.

  11. DNR Recorder's Office

    Preparing Documents Recorder Terms District Info District Contact Info Find Your District RO District Map FAQs Closures/Notices Contact Us State of Alaska / Natural Resources / Recorder's Office Recording imply an endorsement of that organization, site, product, or service. Simplifile contact information

  12. Administrative Areas/Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents administrative areas/offices considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client,…

  13. DNR Recorder's Office

    Department of Natural Resources logo, color scheme Alaska Department of Natural Resources Recorder's Office two pages. ** At the time of recording, a conformed copy is $2.00 - Any copy made after that time will

  14. Cooperative Office Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This manual, intended for inexperienced and experienced coordinators, school administrators, and guidance personnel, is designed to provide practical suggestions for initiating, developing, operating, coordinating, improving, and evaluating cooperative office education programs. Major content is presented primarily in outline form under the…

  15. 37 CFR 1.414 - The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. 1.414 Section 1.414 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office...

  16. 37 CFR 1.414 - The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. 1.414 Section 1.414 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office...

  17. 37 CFR 1.414 - The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. 1.414 Section 1.414 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office...

  18. 37 CFR 1.414 - The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. 1.414 Section 1.414 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN... Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. (a) The United States Patent and Trademark Office...

  19. Office managers' forum.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M; Hankins, Launa; Dieter, Andrea; Garcia, Sandie; Hepp, Delphine; Jordan, Janet L; Silver, William E; Shorr, Jay Alan; Sullivan, Susan E; Whatcott, Pam; Williams, Edwin F; Waldman, S Randolph

    2010-11-01

    This article is a summary of the key elements presented during the conference held as part of the Practice Management and Development course sponsored by the Multi-Specialty Foundation in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2009. This article represents an amalgam of perspectives from practices across the United States. The Office Managers' Forum brought together the office managers and surgeons from practices across the United States as panelists. The panelists answered a multitude of practice management questions that included wide-ranging topics such as accounting and financing, staff well being, working with a spouse, hiring and firing, staff meetings, accreditation, motivation, and problems and perks specifically associated with a facial plastic surgery practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reserve Officer Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    few went beyond the survey instrument to provide additional information. The surveys indicated a consensus among departments in the areas of policy ...uniforms, equipment, and weapons. All departments required their reserves to adhere to the policies and procedures that governed their regular...officers. Some agencies maintained separate policies on the operation and organization of their reserve force separate from that of the regular department

  1. Office hysteroscopy and adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Carlos Roger; Campo, Rudi

    2006-08-01

    Adenomyosis, the heterotopic presence of endometrial glands and stroma within the myometrium, has traditionally been diagnosed by the pathologist in hysterectomy specimens. However, the recent development of high-quality non-invasive techniques such as transvaginal sonography (TVS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hysteroscopy has renewed interest in diagnosing adenomyosis in the office prior to any treatment. Hysteroscopy offers the advantage of direct visualization of the uterine cavity, and since nowadays it is performed in the office, it can be offered as a first-line diagnostic tool for evaluation of uterine abnormalities in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding and/or infertility. The available data clearly indicate that high-quality mini-hysteroscopes, saline as a distension medium, and atraumatic insertion technique are essential for the success of office hysteroscopy. The procedure is indicated in any situation in which an intrauterine anomaly is suspected; it is immediately preceded by a physical exam and a TVS to evaluate uterine characteristics, and it is followed by a second TVS to take advantage of the intracavitary fluid for a contrast image of the uterus. Although diagnostic hysteroscopy does not provide pathognomonic signs for adenomyosis, some evidence suggests that irregular endometrium with endometrial defects, altered vascularization, and cystic haemorrhagic lesion are possibly associated with the entity. In addition to the direct visualization of the uterine cavity, the hysteroscopic approach offers the possibility of obtaining endometrial/myometrial biopsies under visual control. Since they can be performed in the office, the combination of TVS, fluid hysteroscopy and contrast sonography is therefore a powerful screening tool for detecting endometrial and myometrial abnormalities in association with adenomyosis.

  2. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-31

    officers select their own BOLC-B dates completely divorced of their unit assignment and that unit’s ARFORGEN cycle. We reschedule all FY10 cohort LTs...for BOLC-B based upon unit priority based upon number of days until LAD. Rescheduling all FY10 cohort LTs for BOLC-B based upon unit priority...with specialty branches (doctors, lawyers, nurses , chaplains, etc) which have minimal representation in BCT-level units.  DCs are not generally

  3. 9. Southeast view interior, typical interior office, supervisor's office, room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Southeast view interior, typical interior office, supervisor's office, room 24A - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1050, Northwest corner of Doolittle Avenue & D Street; Harrison Township, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  4. Strategic Black Officer Capital Investment: Increasing Competitiveness for General Officer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-17

    support a discussion between the genders since African American women are completing their degrees at a higher rate than men . There are a many...officers, but this was out of an officer corps that numbered more than 15 150,000 men and women , meaning African Americans still made up less than...senior officers.‖6 My research does not necessarily separate African American men and women officers. However, the most recent graduation trends

  5. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    SciT

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  6. VIEW EAST, WEST SIDE OF TWOSTORY OFFICE BUILDING, ONESTORY OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW EAST, WEST SIDE OF TWO-STORY OFFICE BUILDING, ONE-STORY OFFICE BUILDING, AND HEBERTS 1949 HANGAR, AND VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF TWO-STORY OFFICE BUILDING AND NORTH SIDE OF HEBERTS 1949 HANGAR - Capital City Airport, Capital City Aviation, North side of Grand River Avenue, Lansing, Ingham County, MI

  7. 75 FR 74050 - Notice of Public Information Collection(s) Being Submitted for Review and Approval to the Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Notice of Public Information Collection(s) Being Submitted for... Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), the Federal Communications Commission invites the general... Federal Communications Commission's PRA mailbox (e-mail address: [email protected] ). Include in the e-mail the...

  8. 76 FR 45565 - Information Collections Being Submitted for Review and Approval to the Office of Management and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... request for comments. SUMMARY: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), as part of its continuing... small business concerns with fewer than 25 employees. The FCC may not conduct or sponsor a collection of... via e-mail [email protected] ; and to Cathy Williams, FCC, via e-mail [email protected]fcc.gov and to...

  9. Developing a remote practice office.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, V L

    1987-11-01

    Remote practice offices (RPOs) offer unique opportunities for hospitals and physicians to increase market share from targeted areas where previously only limited demand existed. This article discusses the benefits and explores the fundamentals of developing a remote practice office.

  10. The Office of Airline Information.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Airline Information (OAI) mandate is to collect, validate, compile and disseminate data on airline traffic, performance, finances, and fares. Each quarter, BTS Office of Airline Information (OAI) processes more than 3,800 filings sub...

  11. The School Office: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Presents an overview of the fundamental principles of school office design that remain constant despite changes in building technologies, and technological and spatial flexibility. Principles discussed include the school office and traffic patterns, security, and visitor reception requirements. (GR)

  12. Ergonomics in the office environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtney, Theodore K.

    1993-01-01

    Perhaps the four most popular 'ergonomic' office culprits are: (1) the computer or visual display terminal (VDT); (2) the office chair; (3) the workstation; and (4) other automated equipment such as the facsimile machine, photocopier, etc. Among the ergonomics issues in the office environment are visual fatigue, musculoskeletal disorders, and radiation/electromagnetic (VLF,ELF) field exposure from VDT's. We address each of these in turn and then review some regulatory considerations regarding such stressors in the office and general industrial environment.

  13. Michael Griffin Oath Of Office

    2005-04-14

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, is administered the oath of office by John H. Marburger, right, Science Adviser to the President and Office of Science and Technology Policy Director, during a private ceremony at the Old Executive Office Building, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Washington, while his wife Rebecca and daughter Katie look on. Photo Credit: (NASA/Renee Bouchard)

  14. Is the Office Hour Obsolete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A colleague can't make a coffee date at a time the author proposes because it would conflict with his office hour. No student has actually made an appointment with him during the hour, but he is committed to being in his office as promised in case someone drops by. The author's reaction to her colleague's faithfulness to his posted office hour…

  15. Office Workers Stress Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Project, Durham.

    A survey of office workers employed by North Carolina telephone companies was conducted to determine the extent and types of health problems experienced by office workers who use video display terminals (VDTs). Data were gathered by questionnaires mailed to 2,478 office workers, with 966 responses. Questions concerning a wide range of health…

  16. Contracting Officer's Technical Representatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, Steve

    1997-01-01

    The Breakout Session is a traditional conference instrument used by the NASA Occupational Health Program (OHP) as a method to convene people with common interests. Typically these sessions provide discussion of current topics of high priority and currency and allow multiple views and opinions to be shared and evaluated by all participants. Since the Contracting Officer's Technical Representatives (COTRs) occupy the technical focus of support contract management, this particular group, attended by 20 representatives, addressed issues and topics at the forefront of operational concerns.

  17. Badge Office Process Analysis

    SciT

    Haurykiewicz, John Paul; Dinehart, Timothy Grant; Parker, Robert Young

    2016-05-12

    The purpose of this process analysis was to analyze the Badge Offices’ current processes from a systems perspective and consider ways of pursuing objectives set forth by SEC-PS, namely increased customer flow (throughput) and reduced customer wait times. Information for the analysis was gathered for the project primarily through Badge Office Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and in-person observation of prevailing processes. Using the information gathered, a process simulation model was constructed to represent current operations and allow assessment of potential process changes relative to factors mentioned previously. The overall purpose of the analysis was to provide SEC-PS management with informationmore » and recommendations to serve as a basis for additional focused study and areas for potential process improvements in the future.« less

  18. Automating the business office.

    PubMed

    Wright, M A

    1996-10-01

    To measure the success of automating the business office with electronic billing and document management systems, the hospital's original goals were reviewed: Had the number of FTEs been maintained or reduced: Yes--claims volume is up 58% over 6 years with a 22% reduction in FTEs (see Exhibit 3). Was the cost of maintaining the paper filing system reduced? Yes--and the cost saving from the hospital's document imaging system will allow a 4.4 year payback. Is better customer service being provided? Yes--online access to patient demographic and financial information has improved response time. Having met all its goals, North Kansas City Hospital considers the installation of both systems to have been complete success. The facility expects to continue expansion of the document management system into accounts payable, payroll, home health, and other document-intensive areas to achieve further cost savings in the future.

  19. Physician offices marketing: assessing patients' views of office visits.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Dennis; Chandra, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Physician offices often lack the sense of incorporating appropriate strategies to make their facilities as marketer of their services. The patient experience at a physician's office not only incorporates the care they receive from the physician but also the other non-healthcare related aspects, such as the behavior of non-health professionals as well as the appearance of the facility itself. This paper is based on a primary research conducted to assess what patients assess from a physician office visit.

  20. Mining emotional profiles using e-mail messages for earlier warnings of potential terrorist activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitsky, Boris; Kovalerchuk, Boris

    2006-04-01

    We develop a software system Text Scanner for Emotional Distress (TSED) for helping to detect email messages which are suspicious of coming from people under strong emotional distress. It has been confirmed by multiple studies that terrorist attackers have experienced a substantial emotional distress at some points before committing a terrorist attack. Therefore, if an individual in emotional distress can be detected on the basis of email texts, some preventive measures can be taken. The proposed detection machinery is based on extraction and classification of emotional profiles from emails. An emotional profile is a formal representation of a sequence of emotional states through a textual discourse where communicative actions are attached to these emotional states. The issues of extraction of emotional profiles from text and reasoning about it are discussed and illustrated. We then develop an inductive machine learning and reasoning framework to relate an emotional profile to the class "Emotional distress" or "No emotional distress", given a training dataset where the class is assigned by an expert. TSED's machine learning is evaluated using the database of structured customer complaints.

  1. Teachers' Perspectives on Using E-Mail to Communicate with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that positive communication between parents and teachers at all grade levels is essential for student success and parent-teacher relationship formation. This positive communication practice is the key component of the parent-teacher relationship that is supported by the uncertainty reduction theory. The purpose of this study was…

  2. A New Method of Viewing Attachment Document of eMail on Various Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Heeae; Seo, Changwoo; Lim, Yonghwan

    As the computing power of the mobile devices is improving rapidly, many kinds of web services are also available in mobile devices just as Email service. Mobile Mail Service began early, but this service is mostly limited in some specified mobile devices such as Smart Phone. That is a limitation that users have to purchase specified phone to be benefited from Mobile Mail Service. In this paper, it uses DIDL (digital item declaration language) markup type defined in MPEG-21 and MobileGate Server, and solved this problem. DIDL could be converted to other markup types which are displayed by mobile devices. By transforming PC Web Mail contents including attachment document to DIDL markup through MobileGate Server, the Mobile Mail Service could be available for all kinds of mobile devices.

  3. I Think (That) Something's Missing: Complementizer Deletion in Nonnative E-Mails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Sociolinguistic competence is not often examined in nonnative English acquisition. This is particularly true for features where the variants are neither stylistically nor socially constrained, but rather are acceptable in all circumstances. Learning to use a language fully, however, implies being able to deal with this type of…

  4. Using e-mail recruitment and an online questionnaire to establish effect size: A worked example.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Helen M; Wilson, Sue; Calvert, Melanie; Draper, Heather

    2011-06-09

    Sample size calculations require effect size estimations. Sometimes, effect size estimations and standard deviation may not be readily available, particularly if efficacy is unknown because the intervention is new or developing, or the trial targets a new population. In such cases, one way to estimate the effect size is to gather expert opinion. This paper reports the use of a simple strategy to gather expert opinion to estimate a suitable effect size to use in a sample size calculation. Researchers involved in the design and analysis of clinical trials were identified at the University of Birmingham and via the MRC Hubs for Trials Methodology Research. An email invited them to participate.An online questionnaire was developed using the free online tool 'Survey Monkey©'. The questionnaire described an intervention, an electronic participant information sheet (e-PIS), which may increase recruitment rates to a trial. Respondents were asked how much they would need to see recruitment rates increased by, based on 90%. 70%, 50% and 30% baseline rates, (in a hypothetical study) before they would consider using an e-PIS in their research.Analyses comprised simple descriptive statistics. The invitation to participate was sent to 122 people; 7 responded to say they were not involved in trial design and could not complete the questionnaire, 64 attempted it, 26 failed to complete it. Thirty-eight people completed the questionnaire and were included in the analysis (response rate 33%; 38/115). Of those who completed the questionnaire 44.7% (17/38) were at the academic grade of research fellow 26.3% (10/38) senior research fellow, and 28.9% (11/38) professor. Dependent upon the baseline recruitment rates presented in the questionnaire, participants wanted recruitment rate to increase from 6.9% to 28.9% before they would consider using the intervention. This paper has shown that in situations where effect size estimations cannot be collected from previous research, opinions from researchers and trialists can be quickly and easily collected by conducting a simple study using email recruitment and an online questionnaire. The results collected from the survey were successfully used in sample size calculations for a PhD research study protocol.

  5. Novices on the Net: An Introduction to Education Class Uses E-Mail and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corl, Susan F.

    In order to offer computer and/or technology instruction to their education students before they transfer to four-year colleges, Louisiana State University at Eunice (LSUE), a two-year college, added a computer component to an introductory education class. The component introduces pre-service teachers to electronic mail and the Internet in order…

  6. Measuring Information Glut: Applying Systems Thinking to the Problem of E-mail Overload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    consciousness because they consume so much of our productive time and energy. Herbert A. Simon, notable cognitive psychologist, states that “what...systems are the underlying mechanisms behind such things as Amazon’s product reviews and Xbox Live’s Achievements.128 With reputation systems...CIO) of the United States, believes that in comparison to the private industry the U.S. has achieved little in terms of productivity improvements

  7. Teaching and Learning: Whose Computer Is It? December/January E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Yong; Hueyshan Tan, Sophia; Mishra, Punya

    2001-01-01

    Notes that teachers see the computer as a tool to help them teach better, while students use computers to play games, chat, and design Web sites. Describes the after-school program Kids Learning In Computer Klubhouses (KLICK!) that operates clubhouses within local middle schools. Discusses what participants have accomplished for themselves, their…

  8. Incorporating E-Mail into the Learning Process: Its Impact on Student Academic Achievement and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun; Yu, Hsin-Jin Jessy

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study of Taiwan university students that investigated the impacts of incorporating email into the classroom on student achievement and attitudes using a posttest-only control-group design. Results showed a statistically significant difference in academic performance but not in student attitudes toward computers. (Author/LRW)

  9. E-mail to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Within Social Networks: Acceptability and Content

    PubMed Central

    CUTRONA, SARAH L.; WAGNER, JOANN; ROBLIN, DOUGLAS W.; GAGLIO, BRIDGET; WILLIAMS, ANDREW; TORRES-STONE, ROSALIE; MAZOR, KATHLEEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Effective techniques to encourage colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in underscreened populations have included social support interventions and email reminders from physicians. Personalized email messages to promote CRC screening within social networks could be even more effective, but have not been studied. We interviewed 387 email users, aged 42-73 years in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia. Participants were asked to edit a sample message in which the sender shares a recent colonoscopy experience and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. For those reporting willingness to send this message, changes to the message and suggested subject lines were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. The majority of participants (74.4%) were willing to email a modifiable message. Of those willing, 63.5% edited the message. Common edits included deletion (17.7%) or modification (17.4%) of a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks and addition or modification of personalizing words (15.6%). Few edits changed the meaning of the message (5.6%) and even fewer introduced factual inaccuracies (1.7%). Modifiable email messages offer a way for screened individuals to promote CRC screening to social network members. Accuracy and impact of such messages should be further studied. PMID:25839968

  10. Forget E-Mail: New Messaging Service Has Students and Professors Atwitter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Some professors, librarians, and administrators have begun using Twitter, a service that can blast very short notes (up to 140 characters) to select users' cell phones or computer screens. The practice is often called microblogging because people use it to send out pithy updates about their daily lives. No need to wait until you are back at your…

  11. Frauds, Hoaxes, Myths, and Chain Letters: or, What's This Doing in My E-Mail Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbinghouse, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Looks at the equivalent of junk mail on the Internet, including hoaxes, myths and urban legends, frauds, chain letters, and spam. Sidebars include "False Flaming of the FCC" (Barbara Quint) and a list of Web sites useful for determining the legitimacy of questionable mailings and for eliminating unwanted solicitations. (JAK)

  12. Participation Rates in a Worksite Wellness Program Using E-Mail Wellness Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anenson, Larry W.; Brunt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna J.; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which days of the work week had the largest rate of opened e-health messages, whether detailed or basic e-health messages were more likely to be opened, if motivation influenced the rate of message opening, and if the rate of opening messages declined over time. Ninety-one city employees (52 male and 39…

  13. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,…

  14. Beyond Electronic Forms: E-Mail as an Institution-Wide Information Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The University of Delaware developed an intelligent mail server to provide easy, inexpensive access to institutional information for faculty, staff, and students on any node, machine, or operating system on the campuswide computing network. Security concerns have been addressed. The small investment has returned immediate benefits. (MSE)

  15. An Exploratory Study of E-Mail Application on FL Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shang, Hui-Fang

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on examining the overall effect of using email on the improvement of writing performance in aspects of syntactic complexity, grammatical accuracy and lexical density, as well as investigating the relation between the number of email exchanges and writing performance. Subjects in this study were 40 non-traditional EFL students…

  16. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (environmental health and safety). E-mail newsletter

    SciT

    NONE

    Topics of discussion include the following: Effects of pollution on public health and safety; Toxicology; Industrial health; Physiology; Psychology; Clinical medicine; Radiobiology; Animals used as research experimental models.

  17. Phishing E-Mails--Six Month Investigation into What People Click

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrfeld, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Phishing and SPAM emails have been used by marketers and hackers alike since the inception of email and the Internet. Phishing messages have become so common that many legitimate emails often get flagged and placed in a user's spam bucket. No one is denying that these messages are at a minimum a nuisance, and in many cases malicious. But what is…

  18. Factors That Impact Nurses’ Utilization of Electronic Mail (E-Mail).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-21

    of a system but did little to influence behavior. A study by Golden, Beauclair , & Sussman (1992) surveyed 200 electronic mail account holders at an...Aldine Publishing. Golden, P. A., Beauclair , R., & Sussman, L. (1992). Factors affecting electronic mail use. Computers in Human Behavior, 8, 297-311

  19. The chief strategy officer.

    PubMed

    Breene, R Timothy S; Nunes, Paul F; Shill, Walter E

    2007-10-01

    They're nominally and ultimately responsible for strategy, but today's CEOs have less and less time to devote to it. As a result, CEOs are appointing "chief strategy officers"--executives specifically tasked with creating, communicating, executing, and sustaining a company's strategic initiatives. In this article, three authors from Accenture share the results of their research on this emerging organizational role. The typical CSO or top strategy executive is not a pure strategist, conducting long-range planning in relative isolation. Most CSOs consider themselves doers first, with the mandate, credentials, and desire to act as well as advise. They are seasoned executives with a strong strategy orientation who have usually worn many operations hats before taking on the role. Strategy executives are charged with three critical jobs that together form the very definition of strategy execution. First, they must clarify the company's strategy for themselves and for every business unit and function, ensuring that all employees understand the details of the strategic plan and how their work connects to corporate goals. Second, CSOs must drive immediate change. The focus of the job almost always quickly evolves from creating shared alignment around a vision to riding herd on the ensuing change effort. Finally, a CSO must drive decision making that sustains organizational change. He or she must be that person who, in the CEO's stead, can walk into any office and test whether the decisions being made are aligned with the strategy and are creating the desired results. When decisions below the executive suite aren't being made in accordance with strategy, much of the CSO's job involves learning why and quickly determining whether to stay the course or change tack.

  20. 75 FR 2549 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a Meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon... Coordinator, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director, National...

  1. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority...

  2. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority...

  3. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority...

  4. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority...

  5. 49 CFR 800.25 - Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of Aviation Safety, Office of Railroad Safety, Office of Highway Safety, Office of Marine Safety... Offices of Aviation, Railroad, Highway, Marine, and Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety, the authority... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delegation to the Directors of Office of Aviation...

  6. Impact of Dry Eye Symptoms and Daily Activities in a Modern Office.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Mirjam M; Murphy, Paul J; Evans, Katharine S

    2017-06-01

    Modern offices and the use of electronic devices are increasing factors in work-related eye symptoms. However, symptoms of eye fatigue or dry eye sensation can be mixed and confusing. This study surveys the eye symptoms reported during a working day at modern offices to investigate the possible inhibition on daily work activities. Two online digital surveys were sent to three different work locations, by direct e-mail. Survey A consisted of 14 questions that investigated eye symptoms experienced during daily activities at work and the impact on daily activities. Survey B consisted of four general questions, the Dutch Ocular Surface Disease Index, the Work Productivity and Activity Index, and the Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 505 participants completed survey A, and 213 completed survey B. The participants reported that a high proportion of their day was spent working on a computer (60%). The majority experienced an air draft (79.1%) and had no adjustable light (81.5%) at their workspace. Dry eye-related symptoms were reported at a significantly higher frequency at work than at home (P < .001). Up to 70% experienced some inhibition of daily activity at work due to eye symptoms, with more than 5% experiencing symptoms most or all of the time. Indoor environment, work environment, and general health were perceived as the main reasons for developing dry eye. Compared with males, females showed a statistically significant higher Ocular Surface Disease Index score (P < .001) and experienced more inhibition and adverse effects on daily life and work productivity. This investigation shows that dry eye symptoms have a negative impact on daily activities at work. These findings suggest that multidisciplinary understanding of the negative impact of dry eye by a range of specialists will be of help in managing work-related dry eye.

  7. Becoming an Officer of Consequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    ndupress .ndu.edu   issue 44, 1st quarter 2007  /  JFQ        6 Becoming an officer of Consequence m uch of the literature about military history...commander become officers of consequence because their commanders value their judgment and seek their counsel when making difficult choices...COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Becoming an Officer of Consequence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  8. DefenseLink.mil - Special Report - Travels With Mullen

    photography by Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley Grammy award-winning musician Kid Rock and Zac servicemembers and their families stationed overseas. DoD photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint

  9. Navy.mil The Official Website of the United States Navy: Home Page

    of the Navy Chief Of Naval Operations Master Chief Petty Officer Of The Navy Chief Of Naval Personnel Pentagon Hall of Heroes On May 25, Medal of Honor recipient retired Master Chief Petty Officer (SEAL Of Naval Operations Master Chief Petty Officer Of The Navy Chief Of Naval Personnel Biographies SES

  10. 40. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, LAUNDRY & BOS'N STORES), WITH HATCH TO PAINT LOCKER AT LEFT. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  11. 41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, LAUNDRY & BOS'N STORES), WITH HATCH TO PAINT LOCKER AT LEFT. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. Office Space: How Will Technology Affect the Education Office Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2009-01-01

    The office environment 10 years from now will be different from the one today. More office personnel will be organized around processes rather than functions. More work activities will be done by teams rather than individuals, and those teams will change over time, as will the nature of the work projects and the people who constitute the team. The…

  13. Office Careers. Teacher's Guide. Pre-Vocational Office Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Theressa

    This guide is intended for use in providing competency-based prevocational instruction in business and office occupations programs. Addressed in the individual units are the following topics: career awareness (career planning, decision making, and educational planning); personal assessment; the business and office cluster (bookkeeper, word…

  14. Women geoscientists select officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    The Association for Women Geoscientists Foundation has selected a board of directors to spearhead the development of educational and community programs geared to the earth sciences. The foundation, established in 1983, plans to provide grants to women studying the geosciences, to support a geology field program in cooperation with the Girl Scouts of America, and to undertake development of career guidance programs targeting junior and senior high school girls.Lois K. Ongley, an independent geologist in Houston, Tex., is president. Gwenn M. Jensen, an exploration geologist for Cities Service Oil & Gas Corp. in Denver, Colo., is vice president. Constance A. Sancetta, associate research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, is secretary. Susan J. Mara, resource analyst for the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. in San Francisco, Calif., is treasurer. The board of directors' three advisors are Maria Luisa Crawford, department chairman and professor at the geology department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Judith B. Mooney, project manager in the office of nuclear waste isolation of Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio; and A.F. Spilhaus, Jr., AGU executive director and Eos editor-in-chief.

  15. Integrated Budget Office Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushing, Douglas A.; Blakeley, Chris; Chapman, Gerry; Robertson, Bill; Horton, Allison; Besser, Thomas; McCarthy, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Budget Office Toolbox (IBOT) combines budgeting, resource allocation, organizational funding, and reporting features in an automated, integrated tool that provides data from a single source for Johnson Space Center (JSC) personnel. Using a common interface, concurrent users can utilize the data without compromising its integrity. IBOT tracks planning changes and updates throughout the year using both phasing and POP-related (program-operating-plan-related) budget information for the current year, and up to six years out. Separating lump-sum funds received from HQ (Headquarters) into separate labor, travel, procurement, Center G&A (general & administrative), and servicepool categories, IBOT creates a script that significantly reduces manual input time. IBOT also manages the movement of travel and procurement funds down to the organizational level and, using its integrated funds management feature, helps better track funding at lower levels. Third-party software is used to create integrated reports in IBOT that can be generated for plans, actuals, funds received, and other combinations of data that are currently maintained in the centralized format. Based on Microsoft SQL, IBOT incorporates generic budget processes, is transportable, and is economical to deploy and support.

  16. 75 FR 63753 - Family Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Executives Eye Family Office, Private Asset Management (Dec. 5, 2005), at 1; Jim Grote, Old Money vs. New... types of money management firms. It is our understanding that in some cases family offices may need to... of Investment Management, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC...

  17. Why Black Officers Still Fail

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    perspective with regard to Black officer professional mobility . More poignantly stated, black officers feel as though there are structural barriers to...still failing. Dr. Darlene Iskra described the phenomenon whereby some groups fail to achieve upward professional mobility in the military as a

  18. Arkansas' Office Procedures Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Dean

    This curriculum guide provides teachers of office procedures classes with unit lesson plans and information about resource materials that can be examined, selected, and integrated into the instructional program. Contents are mainly established for the following two types of secondary-level programs: cooperative office education and intensive…

  19. Office dispensing: a responsible approach.

    PubMed

    Farris, P K

    2000-09-01

    Office dispensing is a value added service in the dermatologist's office. As dermatologists we can recommend products with known scientific validity that will enhance patient care and provide reliable therapeutic results. Patients enjoy the convenience of being able to purchase products in the office and appreciate the dermatologist who spends time outlining a daily skin care regimen. Office dispensing benefits the physician by forcing him or her to keep current on new innovations in skin care and serves as an effective way to develop your cosmetic practice. Antiaging products, moisturizers and sunscreens, cleansers, and acne products are the basics for any in-office dispensing operation. The addition of hair and nail care products constitutes more advanced dispensing. Despite the mutual benefits for both the patient and physician, office dispensing continues to be controversial. The American Medical Association is concerned that selling health-related goods in the office may compromise the patient-physician relationship. The American Academy of Dermatology continues to support the right of dermatologists to dispense products in their office as long as it is in the best interest of the patient, as it is with all other dermatologic care. Dermatologists must preserve the right to dispense by conducting themselves in a highly professional and ethical manner.

  20. The New Planned Giving Officer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Ronald R.; Quynn, Katelyn L.

    1994-01-01

    A planned giving officer is seen as an asset to college/university development for technical expertise, credibility, and connections. Attorneys, certified public accountants, bank trust officers, financial planners, investment advisers, life insurance agents, and real estate brokers may be qualified but probably also need training. (MSE)

  1. The PR Officer's Survival Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrum, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    A former corporate public relations (PR) professional shares strategies for communicating and cooperating with the chief executive officer, and particularly for coping with differences in perceptions of the public relations officer's role. Basic attributes of a successful PR professional are outlined: good communication skills, an analytical…

  2. Ideas for Office Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alverson, Ruby; And Others

    Prepared by South Carolina office occupations teachers, this booklet contains ideas for effective and motivating teaching methods in office occupations courses on the secondary school level. Besides ideas generally applicable, suggestions are included for teaching the following specific subjects: (1) accounting, (2) recordkeeping, (3) cooperative…

  3. Safety in the Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Pat R.; Greathouse, Lillian R.

    1990-01-01

    Office automation has introduced new hazards to the workplace: electrical hazards related to computer wiring, musculoskeletal problems resulting from use of computer terminals and design of work stations, and environmental concerns related to ventilation, noise levels, and office machine chemicals. (SK)

  4. Athena Community Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Núnez, S.; Barcons, X.; Barret, D.; Bozzo, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M. T.; Gómez, S.; Monterde, M. P.; Rau, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Athena Community Office (ACO) has been established by ESA's Athena Science Study Team (ASST) in order to obtain support in performing its tasks assigned by ESA, and most specially in the ASST role as "focal point for the interests of the broad scientific community". The ACO is led by the Instituto de Física de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), and its activities are funded by CSIC and UC. Further ACO contributors are the University of Geneva, MPE and IRAP. In this poster, we present ACO to the Spanish Astronomical Community, informing about its main responsibilities, which are: assist the ASST in organising and collecting support from the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; organise and maintain the documentation generated by the Athena Working Groups and Topical Panels; manage the Working Group and Topical Panel membership lists; assist the ASST in promoting Athena science capabilities in the research world, through conferences and workshops; keep a record of all papers and presentations related to Athena; support the production of ASST documents; produce and distribute regularly an Athena Newsletter, informing the community about all mission and science developments; create and maintain the Athena Community web portal; maintain an active communication activity; promote, organise and support Athena science-related public outreach, in coordination with ESA and other agencies involved when appropriate; and, design, produce materials and provide pointers to available materials produced by other parties. In summary, ACO is meant to become a focal point to facilitate the scientific exchange between the Athena activities and the scientific community at large, and to disseminate the Athena science objectives to the general public.

  5. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  6. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... officer and chief financial officer. 1710.17 Section 1710.17 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING... Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer. The chief executive officer and the chief financial officer of an Enterprise...

  7. 76 FR 5391 - Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB), February... Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. 2011-2022 Filed 1-28-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  8. 75 FR 10293 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a Meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon... Activities, Office of Science Policy, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge...

  9. 75 FR 15713 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Office of Science Policy; Office of the Director; Notice of a Meeting of the NIH Blue Ribbon... Lewallen, Advisory Committee Coordinator, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science Policy...

  10. Automated Office Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) recorded in routine clinical practice is relatively inaccurate and associated with higher readings compared to BP measured in research studies in accordance with standardized measurement guidelines. The increase in routine office BP is the result of several factors, especially the presence of office staff, which tends to make patients nervous and also allows for conversation to occur. With the disappearance of the mercury sphygmomanometer because of environmental concerns, there is greater use of oscillometric BP recorders, both in the office setting and elsewhere. Although oscillometric devices may reduce some aspects of observer BP measurement error in the clinical setting, they are still associated with higher BP readings, known as white coat hypertension (for diagnosis) or white coat effect (with treated hypertension). Now that fully automated sphygmomanometers are available which are capable of recording several readings with the patient resting quietly, there is no longer any need to have office staff present when BP is being recorded. Such readings are called automated office blood pressure (AOBP) and they are both more accurate than conventional manual office BP and not associated with the white coat phenomena. AOBP readings are also similar to the awake ambulatory BP and home BP, both of which are relatively good predictors of cardiovascular risk. The available evidence suggests that AOBP should now replace manual or electronic office BP readings when screening patients for hypertension and also after antihypertensive drug therapy is initiated. PMID:29625508

  11. Automated Office Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G

    2018-04-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) recorded in routine clinical practice is relatively inaccurate and associated with higher readings compared to BP measured in research studies in accordance with standardized measurement guidelines. The increase in routine office BP is the result of several factors, especially the presence of office staff, which tends to make patients nervous and also allows for conversation to occur. With the disappearance of the mercury sphygmomanometer because of environmental concerns, there is greater use of oscillometric BP recorders, both in the office setting and elsewhere. Although oscillometric devices may reduce some aspects of observer BP measurement error in the clinical setting, they are still associated with higher BP readings, known as white coat hypertension (for diagnosis) or white coat effect (with treated hypertension). Now that fully automated sphygmomanometers are available which are capable of recording several readings with the patient resting quietly, there is no longer any need to have office staff present when BP is being recorded. Such readings are called automated office blood pressure (AOBP) and they are both more accurate than conventional manual office BP and not associated with the white coat phenomena. AOBP readings are also similar to the awake ambulatory BP and home BP, both of which are relatively good predictors of cardiovascular risk. The available evidence suggests that AOBP should now replace manual or electronic office BP readings when screening patients for hypertension and also after antihypertensive drug therapy is initiated. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  12. Office Skills: Time Management Skills for Future Office Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Dennis L.

    1980-01-01

    Compares two time studies which investigated time problems of office assistants and managerial personnel. Suggests that improving performance in the following five areas will help time management: plan, "prioritize," set deadlines, follow through, and think. (LRA)

  13. Office of Equal Opportunity Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Office of Equal Opportunity Programs works to provide quality service for all programs and/or to assist the Center in becoming a model workplace. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Deborah Cotleur along with other staff members to create and modify customer satisfaction surveys. This office aims to assist in developing a model workplace by providing functions as a change agent to the center by serving as an advisor to management to ensure equity throughout the Center. In addition, the office serves as a mediator for the Center in addressing issues and concerns. Lastly, the office provides assistance to employees to enable attainment of personal and organizational goals. The Office of Equal Opportunities is a staff office which reports and provides advice to the Center Director and Executive Leadership, implements laws, regulations, and presidential executive orders, and provides center wide leadership and assistance to NASA GRC employees. Some of the major responsibilities of the office include working with the discrimination complaints program, special emphasis programs (advisory groups), management support, monitoring and evaluation, contract compliance, and community outreach. During my internship in this office, my main objective was to create four customer satisfaction surveys based on EO retreats, EO observances, EO advisory boards, and EO mediation/counseling. I created these surveys after conducting research on past events and surveys as well as similar survey research created and conducted by other NASA centers, program for EO Advisory group members, leadership training sessions for supervisors, preventing sexual harassment training sessions, and observance events. I also conducted research on the style and format from feedback surveys from the Marshall Equal Opportunity website, the Goddard website, and the main NASA website. Using the material from the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs at Glenn Research Center along with my

  14. 77 FR 2729 - Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; Statement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... the Chief Information Officer (AJG) Office of Business Management and Transformation (AJJ) Office of..., oversight, resource management, commemorative events, and standardized education and training programs. E...

  15. Coding for urologic office procedures.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Robert A; Painter, Mark

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes current best practices for documenting, coding, and billing common office-based urologic procedures. Topics covered include general principles, basic and advanced urologic coding, creation of medical records that support compliant coding practices, bundled codes and unbundling, global periods, modifiers for procedure codes, when to bill for evaluation and management services during the same visit, coding for supplies, and laboratory and radiology procedures pertinent to urology practice. Detailed information is included for the most common urology office procedures, and suggested resources and references are provided. This information is of value to physicians, office managers, and their coding staff. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Stress management for office workers].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi

    2002-09-01

    The environment which surrounds office workers has undergone a big transformation with the collapse of lifetime employment, the shift from the long employment principle to meritocracy, the results principle, the introduction of flexible work hours, outsourcing and dispatch work. Today's office worker stressor include 1. VDT work, 2. meritocracy, 3. management by objective, 4. excessive load on the middle and advanced age generations, 5. the collapse of the lifetime employment system and 6. non-employee changes. (1) VDT work management, (2) the use of Information technology, (3) Improvement of office environments, (4) Management of long overtime work and (5) Support of superiors and colleagues are thought as stress management.

  17. Web servicing the biological office.

    PubMed

    Szugat, Martin; Güttler, Daniel; Fundel, Katrin; Sohler, Florian; Zimmer, Ralf

    2005-09-01

    Biologists routinely use Microsoft Office applications for standard analysis tasks. Despite ubiquitous internet resources, information needed for everyday work is often not directly and seamlessly available. Here we describe a very simple and easily extendable mechanism using Web Services to enrich standard MS Office applications with internet resources. We demonstrate its capabilities by providing a Web-based thesaurus for biological objects, which maps names to database identifiers and vice versa via an appropriate synonym list. The client application ProTag makes these features available in MS Office applications using Smart Tags and Add-Ins. http://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/prothesaurus/

  18. 75 FR 59799 - Office of Thrift Supervision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Purchase of Branch Office(s) and/or.... Comments should address one or more of the following points: a. Whether the proposed collection of... collection. Title of Proposal: Purchase of Branch Office(s) and/or Transfer of Assets/Liabilities. OMB Number...

  19. 39 CFR 221.4 - Corporate officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Corporate officers. 221.4 Section 221.4 Postal... Corporate officers. The Board of Governors determines the number of corporate officers and appoints the... postmaster general appoints the remaining corporate officers. The corporate officers of the Postal Service...

  20. 12 CFR 619.9310 - Senior officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Senior officer. 619.9310 Section 619.9310 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9310 Senior officer. The Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Operations Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, the Chief Credit...

  1. 12 CFR 561.34 - Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office. 561.34 Section 561.34 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING ALL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.34 Office. The term Office means the Office as established in section 3 of the...

  2. 7 CFR 2003.14 - Field Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Field Offices. 2003.14 Section 2003.14 Agriculture... Field Offices. Rural Development field offices report to their respective State Director and State Office Program Directors. State Directors may organizationally structure their offices based on the...

  3. 7 CFR 600.6 - Field offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Field offices. 600.6 Section 600.6 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.6 Field offices. Each field office is under the direction and... served by the field office. Usually the geographical area of a field office includes one or more...

  4. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washington office. 4.4 Section 4.4 Banks and... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office. The Washington office of the OCC is the main office and headquarters of the OCC. The Washington office directs OCC policy, oversees OCC operations...

  5. 12 CFR 583.13 - Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office. 583.13 Section 583.13 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.13 Office. The term Office means the Office of Thrift Supervision. ...

  6. 29 CFR 401.18 - Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office. 401.18 Section 401.18 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.18 Office. Office means the Office of Labor-Management Standards...

  7. 49 CFR 1325.3 - Federal office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal office. 1325.3 Section 1325.3... FEDERAL OFFICE OR THEIR REPRESENTATIVES § 1325.3 Federal office. For the purposes of this section, Federal office means the office of President or Vice President of the United States; or of Senator or...

  8. Chief Information Officer > DoDSection508

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Chief Information Officer Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Chief Information Officer U.S. Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Home About DoD CIO Bios Organization DCIO C4&IIC DCIO IE

  9. Chief Information Officer > In the News

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Chief Information Officer Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Search Chief Information Officer: Search Chief Information Officer U.S. Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Home About DoD CIO Bios Organization DCIO C4&IIC DCIO IE

  10. Uniformed Services Worldwide Legal Assistance & Reserve Components Office Directory. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    Number: 256-876-9438 E-mail: ihermin@redstone-emhl.army.mil j ohn .henningsen@redstone. army.mil Practice Area: 600 Public Contract Law Bars...mail Address: thompsonia@cbcph.navy.mil Practice Area: 600 - Public Contract Law ; 451 - Government-Federal Level; 365 - Environmental Law Bars...Employment Law; 600 - Public Contract Law Bars Admitted: DC, IL County of Practice: Prince George’s, MD 22 AIR FORCE 89 AW/JA 1535 Command Drive

  11. The gendered character of the African petty bourgeoisie.

    PubMed

    Mcfadden, P

    1994-02-01

    An African feminist states her states her views on the conditions of women in Africa. Changes have occurred within the middle class, which are reflected in the Women's Movement and in relations between men and women. Women are taking much stronger positions and challenging the African male dominance. Men now speak with reservation about the interact with feminists. African men tend to marry down to women of lesser social and educational class, or to marry non-African women to avoid the issue of equality as Africans. The African middle class is now composed of a sufficient number of women in site of unequal gender relations. Men now ask women about gender issues, albeit for ulterior motives: to avoid feminist backlash in the presentation of papers, or to fulfill a donor requirement. An annoying Change is men's identification of themselves as feminists. The question is raised as to why men cannot think of another term to describe their inherited socialization as oppressors. This acquisition of the term "feminist" becomes just another appropriation to enhance their power or resources. Universal and free education has opened doors for women over the past 30 years. The women's fight against colonialism was a fight for women's opportunities. A disturbing trend is for women to argue for a return to "true" African traditions, when no one today would ever accept life as peasant women did 500 years ago. All African traditions are patriarchal. African feminist traditions need to be reclaimed and resurfaced from under the "layers of male defined and male reconstructed charades." A dangerous precedent is taking place in South Africa, since the International Monetary Fund (IMR) and the World Bank are preempting the opportunities gained by women through liberal state policies. Acceptance of IMF/World Bank terms means lost opportunity to education, to professions, and to economic resources gained in the post-independence era. IMF/World Bank policies are "racist, classiest, and have a gendered character." There is already evidence of men taking over positions previously held by women in this structural adjustment period. There is still the constant harassment by men, but African women want to be free of patriarchal definition and constraints. There are many difficulties in balancing power in intimate relationships.

  12. Scavenging high-voltage copper wire, a hazardous petty larceny.

    PubMed

    Himel, H N; Ahn, L C; Jones, K C; Edlich, R F

    1992-01-01

    With the current emphasis on recycling and the establishment of markets for sale of used copper wire, scavenging of copper wire from old buildings and equipment has become common. Although scavenging without permission constitutes theft, a more significant risk to the perpetrator is the potential for electrical burn injury in attempting to remove "hot" wire. A severe high-voltage electrical burn injury sustained while attempting to scavenge wire from an old house is reported. The circumstances surrounding the injury, the clinical management of the case, and the long-term consequences to the patient are presented and discussed.

  13. Ergonomic Training for Tomorrow's Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Clifford M.; Chapnik, Elissa Beth

    1987-01-01

    The authors focus on issues related to the continual use of video display terminals in the office, including safety and health regulations, potential health problems, and the role of training in minimizing work-related health problems. (CH)

  14. Creating the Optimum Office Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witting, Paul H.

    1982-01-01

    In workstation design, furniture selection and arrangement directly relate to the way in which work is accomplished. Standardized workstations are being developed to fit the specific needs of various job categories within the electronic office. (Author/MLF)

  15. Law Enforcement Officers Equity Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Filner, Bob [D-CA-51

    2009-01-26

    House - 05/04/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, Post Office, and the District of Columbia. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Fermilab Science Education Office - Visitors

    Programs | Science Adventures | Calendar | Registration | About | Contact | FAQ | Fermilab Friends - Fermilab Friends - Fermilab Home Fermilab Office of Education & Public Outreach Fermilab MS 226 Box 500

  17. Office Operative Hysteroscopy: An Update.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Christina Alicia; Isaacson, Keith B

    2018-02-01

    Hysteroscopy is considered the gold standard for the evaluation of intracavitary pathology in both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients associated with abnormal uterine bleeding, as well as for the evaluation of infertile patients with suspected cavity abnormalities. Office-based operative hysteroscopy allows patients to resume activities immediately and successfully integrates clinical practice into a "see and treat" modality, avoiding the added risks of anesthesia and the inconvenience of the operating room. For 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has provided a substantial increase in reimbursement for a select number of office-based hysteroscopic procedures. This review provides an update on the indications, equipment, and procedures for office hysteroscopy, as well as the management of complications that may arise within an office-based practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The Office of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald R.

    1985-01-01

    School managers can make the difference in a successfully automated school office. Before any equipment is considered, administrators need to identify problems, set goals, and select the best alternative. (MLF)

  19. Designing your office for technology.

    PubMed

    Unthank, Michael

    2004-10-01

    To practice efficiently, dentists need to consider the successful integration of technologies, which can benefit their practice of dentistry. The physical environment of the office must be developed to accommodate not only the appropriate placement of computer hardware and high-tech dental devices, but their interconnectivity, as well. Dentists need to make appropriate decisions regarding the types of technology they choose to integrate into their offices, and they need to understand how the technology will be installed and integrated. An office designed to optimize the use of technology will produce ongoing benefits for dentists, their staff members and their patients throughout the lives of their practices. A dentist's practice must be planned to accommodate networks of systems hidden below floors, above ceilings and within walls, as well as to support and connect diverse technology items throughout the office.

  20. The Political Role of Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE General Studies by BERTRAND EPSTEIN, MAJOR...other governmental agency. (References to this study should include the foregoing statement.) iv ABSTRACT THE POLITICAL ROLE OF OFFICERS, by

  1. Office Automation Boosts University's Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh has a 2-year agreement designating the Xerox Corporation as the primary supplier of word processing and related office automation equipment in order to increase productivity and more efficient use of campus resources. (MLF)

  2. Collaborators | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The TARGET initiative is jointly managed within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) by the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG)Opens in a New Tab and the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)Opens in a New Tab.

  3. Contact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    For more information about the Office of Cancer Genomics, please contact: Office of Cancer Genomics National Cancer Institute 31 Center Drive, 10A07 Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2580 Phone: (240) 781-3280 Fax: (240) 541-4510 Email: ocg@mail.nih.gov *Please note that this site will not function properly in Internet Explorer unless you completely turn off the Compatibility View*

  4. A Navy Officer Assignment Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    replace the routine administrative tasks required of both assignment and placement officers without reducing their role in making the essential decisions ...individual has no desire to serve there. This last aspect of the detailer’s job can be the most difficult, since he must both make the decision of who is...34Billet Fill Decision " has been made by a third party, an officer whose primary responsibility is to oversee this program, according to the previous

  5. 76 FR 67472 - Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Information Officer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...: Juanita Galbreath, Deputy Chief Information Officer for Cyber Security and Privacy, Office of the Chief...) Deputy Chief Information Officer, for IT Operations; (3) Deputy Chief Information Officer, for Cyber...

  6. 40 CFR 57.806 - Presiding Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Technology § 57.806 Presiding Officer. (a) Assignment of Presiding Officer. (1) The Administrator shall, as... EPA employee who is an attorney to serve as presiding officer. (b) Powers and duties of Presiding...

  7. 39 CFR 963.4 - Presiding Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.4 Presiding Officer. (a) The presiding... Officer upon delegation thereto. The Judicial Officer may, on his or her own initiative or for good cause...

  8. 49 CFR 599.509 - Hearing Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Officer is solely responsible for the case referred to him or her. The Hearing Officer has no other... penalties. (c) The Hearing Officer decides each case on the basis of the information before him or her, and...

  9. 75 FR 47306 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; Technical Review Panel on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Marian Robinson found in the Federal Register (FR) on July 30, 2010, entitled ``Technical Review Panel on... and should include the e-mail address for Marian Robinson ( marian.robinson@hhs.gov ). Applicability...

  10. 76 FR 40389 - Information Collection Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval; Monitoring...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... additional information about this ICR, contact Hope Grey at [email protected] (e-mail) or 703- 358-2482... than 5 years, the life history of American peregrine falcons is such that it is appropriate to monitor...

  11. 76 FR 53939 - Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Office of the Chief Financial Officer AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of... Chief Financial Officer. This Order of Succession supersedes all prior Orders of Succession for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer. DATES: Effective Date: August 19, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  12. 49 CFR 1.48 - Office of the Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Office of the Chief Information Officer. 1.48... POWERS AND DUTIES Office of the Secretary Ost Officials § 1.48 Office of the Chief Information Officer. The Chief Information Officer (CIO) is the principal information technology (IT), cyber security...

  13. 49 CFR 1.48 - Office of the Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Office of the Chief Information Officer. 1.48... POWERS AND DUTIES Office of the Secretary Ost Officials § 1.48 Office of the Chief Information Officer. The Chief Information Officer (CIO) is the principal information technology (IT), cyber security...

  14. 49 CFR 1.48 - Office of the Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Office of the Chief Information Officer. 1.48... POWERS AND DUTIES Office of the Secretary Ost Officials § 1.48 Office of the Chief Information Officer. The Chief Information Officer (CIO) is the principal information technology (IT), cyber security...

  15. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer. 1.39 Section 1... Headquarters Staff Offices § 1.39 Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer. The Office of the Chief Human... effective organization, utilization, and development of the agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor...

  16. Office of the Chief Financial Officer 2012 Annual Report

    SciT

    Williams, Kim

    2013-01-31

    Fiscal Year 2012 was a year of progress and change in the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) organization. The notable accomplishments outlined below strengthened the quality of the OCFO’s stewardship and services in support of the scientific mission of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Three strategies were key to this progress: organizational transformation aligned with our goals; process redesign and effective use of technology to improve efficiency, and innovative solutions to meet new challenges. Over the next year we will continue to apply these strategies to further enhance our contributions to the Lab’s scientific mission. What follows ismore » the budget, funding and costs for the office for FY 2012.« less

  17. 37 CFR 1.414 - The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Designated Office or Elected Office. 1.414 Section 1.414 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing...

  18. Office Overview | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) aims to improve prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer, advancing proteome/proteogenome science and technology development through community resources (data and reagents), and accelerating the translation of molecular findings into the clinic.

  19. Anthropometry of Law Enforcement Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-10

    were obtained in a sur- vey of Air Force women with regard to height, although they tended to underestimate their weight (table 8). Although the...ESTIMATED BODY DIMENSIONS. Measured Height (in) Estimated Difference Law Enforcement Officers Army Men* Air Force Women** 70.04 68.71 63.82 71.07...69.81 64.80 1.03 0.90 0.98 Measured Weight (lb) Estimated Difference Law Enforcement Officers Army Men* Air Force Women** 189.60 159.10

  20. 14 CFR 77.47 - Legal officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Legal officer. 77.47 Section 77.47... § 77.47 Legal officer. The Chief Counsel designates a member of his staff to serve as legal officer at each hearing under this subpart. The legal officer may examine witnesses and assist and advise the...

  1. 48 CFR 908.7103 - Office machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Office machines. 908.7103... PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7103 Office machines. Acquisitions of office machines by DOE offices and its authorized contractors shall be in accordance with FPMR...

  2. 7 CFR 7.17 - Dual office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dual office. 7.17 Section 7.17 Agriculture Office of... STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.17 Dual office. (a) County committee membership. A member of... any other county office employee. (b) Community committee membership. A member of the community...

  3. 47 CFR 32.2123 - Office equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Office equipment. 32.2123 Section 32.2123... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2123 Office equipment. This account shall include the original cost of office equipment in offices, shops and all other...

  4. 39 CFR 2.3 - Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offices. 2.3 Section 2.3 Postal Service UNITED... (ARTICLE II) § 2.3 Offices. The principal office of the Postal Service is located in Washington, DC, with such regional and other offices and places of business as the Postmaster General establishes from time...

  5. 31 CFR 50.2 - Responsible office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsible office. 50.2 Section 50.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM General Provisions § 50.2 Responsible office. The office responsible for the administration of the...

  6. 12 CFR 561.39 - Principal office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Principal office. 561.39 Section 561.39 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING ALL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 561.39 Principal office. The term principal office means the home...

  7. 7 CFR 600.4 - State offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State offices. 600.4 Section 600.4 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.4 State offices. Each office is under the direction and supervision of... Pacific Basin Area Office, under the direction and supervision of a director, serves the U.S. Trust...

  8. 12 CFR 545.92 - Branch offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Branch offices. 545.92 Section 545.92 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS § 545.92 Branch offices. (a) Definition. A branch office of a Federal savings association (“you”) is any...

  9. 22 CFR 401.3 - Permanent offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Permanent offices. 401.3 Section 401.3 Foreign... Permanent offices. The permanent offices of the Commission shall be at Washington, in the District of... of the Commission shall have full charge and control of said offices, respectively. ...

  10. 29 CFR 4002.2 - Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offices. 4002.2 Section 4002.2 Labor Regulations Relating... GUARANTY CORPORATION § 4002.2 Offices. The principal office of the Corporation is in the Metropolitan area of the City of Washington, District of Columbia. The Corporation may have additional offices at such...

  11. 7 CFR 600.5 - Area offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area offices. 600.5 Section 600.5 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.5 Area offices. Each area office is under the direction and supervision... for NRCS activities in the geographical area served by the area office. Usually the geographical area...

  12. 7 CFR 28.4 - Classing offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classing offices. 28.4 Section 28.4 Agriculture... § 28.4 Classing offices. Classing Offices shall be maintained at points designated by the Administrator. Requests for the review of the classification and/or comparison of cotton performed by Classing Offices may...

  13. 48 CFR 9901.303 - Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Offices. 9901.303 Section 9901.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATION RULES AND PROCEDURES 9901.303 Offices. The...

  14. 32 CFR 643.120 - Post offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Post offices. 643.120 Section 643.120 National... Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.120 Post offices. Title 10 U.S.C. 4779b, provides that the SA shall assign suitable space for post office purposes at military posts where post offices have been established...

  15. 76 FR 44054 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. A2011-21; Order No. 761] Post Office Closing AGENCY... the closing of the Ukiah, California Main Post Office has been filed. It identifies preliminary steps... Office, Ukiah, California. The petition, which was filed by the Save Ukiah Post Office Committee and...

  16. 27 CFR 24.41 - Office facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Office facilities. 24.41... § 24.41 Office facilities. The appropriate TTB officer may require the proprietor to furnish... performing Government duties whether or not such office space is located at the specific premises where...

  17. 12 CFR 145.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Home office. 145.91 Section 145.91 Banks and... § 145.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OCC licensing office if the permanent...

  18. 12 CFR 545.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Home office. 545.91 Section 545.91 Banks and... § 545.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OTS Regional Office if the permanent...

  19. 12 CFR 145.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Home office. 145.91 Section 145.91 Banks and... § 145.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OCC licensing office if the permanent...

  20. 12 CFR 545.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Home office. 545.91 Section 545.91 Banks and... § 545.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OTS Regional Office if the permanent...

  1. 12 CFR 545.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Home office. 545.91 Section 545.91 Banks and... § 545.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OTS Regional Office if the permanent...

  2. 12 CFR 545.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Home office. 545.91 Section 545.91 Banks and... § 545.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OTS Regional Office if the permanent...

  3. 12 CFR 145.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Home office. 145.91 Section 145.91 Banks and... § 145.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OCC licensing office if the permanent...

  4. 12 CFR 545.91 - Home office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Home office. 545.91 Section 545.91 Banks and... § 545.91 Home office. (a) All operations of a Federal savings association (“you”) are subject to direction from the home office. (b) You must notify the appropriate OTS Regional Office if the permanent...

  5. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United...

  6. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United...

  7. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United...

  8. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United...

  9. 46 CFR 15.830 - Radio officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radio officers. 15.830 Section 15.830 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.830 Radio officers. Radio officers are required on certain merchant vessels of the United...

  10. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part 11...

  11. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part 11...

  12. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part 11...

  13. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part 11...

  14. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part 11...

  15. 48 CFR 9901.303 - Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Offices. 9901.303 Section 9901.303 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL... Cost Accounting Standards Board's offices are located in the New Executive Office Building, 725 17th...

  16. 12 CFR 583.14 - Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Officer. 583.14 Section 583.14 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.14 Officer. The term officer as used in any document specified in...

  17. Medical Office Assistants' Handbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This handbook is intended both as a text for use in medical office assistant (MOA) training programs in colleges and as a handbook for people working in medical offices. Addressed in the individual sections of the manual are the following topics: responsibilities of the medical office assistant, office organization, appointments and the waiting…

  18. Michael Griffin Oath Of Office

    2005-04-14

    John H. Marburger, Science Adviser to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), left, talks with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, center, while his wife Rebecca and daughter Katie look on following his swearing-in, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Renee Bouchard)

  19. Michael Griffin Oath Of Office

    2005-04-14

    John H. Marburger, Science Adviser to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), left, shakes hands with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin following his swearing-in, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Renee Bouchard)

  20. Black Officer Accession and Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-15

    of Historically Black educational institutions. FACT. Provided for information at inclosure 1 is correspondence frcm HQ DA outlining the...CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION ............... ....................... 1 Background Information ...INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND INFORMATION A gro’np of black students from the US Army War College Class of 󈨓, reached the conclusion that black officers were