Science.gov

Sample records for e-region electron densities

  1. Ionospheric E-region electron density and neutral atmosphere variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stick, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron density deviations from a basic variation with the solar zenith angle were investigated. A model study was conducted in which the effects of changes in neutral and relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen on calculated electron densities were compared with incoherent scatter measurements in the height range 100-117 km at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The feasibility of determining tides in the neutral atmosphere from electron density profiles was studied. It was determined that variations in phase between the density and temperature variation and the comparable magnitudes of their components make it appear improbable that the useful information on tidal modes can be obtained in this way.

  2. Investigation of Electron Density Profile in the ionospheric D and E region by Kagoshima rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Miyake, T.; Okada, T.; Nagano, I.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.

    2007-12-01

    The radio wave propagation characteristic in the lower ionosphere is important because of its effect on commercial radio communication, navigation, and broadcast services. The electron density is of primary interest in this region because the high ion-neutral collision frequencies result in radio wave absorption. In order to investigate the ionization structure in the ionospheric D and E region by using the propagation characteristics of MF-band and LF-band radio waves, S-310-37 and S-520-23 sounding rocket experiments have been carried out at Uchinoura Space Center (USC). S-310-37 sounding rocket was launched at 11:20 LT on January 16, 2007. The apex of rocket trajectory was about 138 km. Then S-520-23 sounding rocket was launched at 19:20 LT on September 2, 2007. The apex was about 279 km. As a common measurement, these sounding rockets measure the fields intensities and the waveform of radio waves from NHK Kumamoto broadcasting station (873kHz, 500kW) and JJY signals from Haganeyama LF radio station (60kHz, 50kW). The approximate electron density profile can be determined from the comparison between these experimental results and propagation characteristics calculated by the full wave method. We will get the most probable electron density profile in the ionosphere. In presentation, we will show the propagation characteristic of LF/MF radio waves measured by two sounding rocket experiments. Then we will discuss the analysis method and the estimated electron density profile in the ionosphere.

  3. Occurrence climatology of the electron density irregularities in the mid-latitude E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Kil, H.

    2013-12-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere interrupt the propagation of electromagnetic waves and are problematic for navigation and communication systems. For this practical importance, significant efforts have been made to establish information on the occurrence climatology of such irregularities, to understand the onset conditions of such irregularities, and to predict or avoid the impact of these irregularities on the society. While the irregularities occur in all latitudes, less attention has been paid to the irregularities in middle latitudes. This may be because the irregularities in middle latitudes are not as severe as those in other latitude regions. However, middle latitudes are also the place where various forms of irregularities occur. A 40.8 MHz VHF radar was built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea aiming at continuous monitoring of the behavior of the middle-latitude electron density irregularities in the Far East Asian sector. The radar has been continuously operated by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) since December 2009. Using the Daejeon VHF radar data acquired since December 2009, we examine the occurrence types of the irregularities and the dependence of the irregularities on geophysical conditions (local time, altitude, season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity). These results can be used as a tool for investigating the onset conditions of the middle-latitude irregularities.

  4. The relationship between E region electron density and the power of auroral coherent echoes at 45 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. J. S.; Jones, B.; Kustov, A. V.; Uspensky, M. V.

    1999-03-01

    Data taken during joint observations of the European incoherent scatter (EISCAT) radar and the Karmaselga auroral coherent radar (46.5 MHz) are combined to investigate the dependence of the coherent echo power upon the maximum electron density in the E region. For electron densities in the range (1-3)×1011 m-3, an increase in the echo power with the electron density was found. A few coherent echoes were observed for electron densities larger than 3×1011 m-3, but when such echoes occurred, their power was small even though the ionospheric electric field was strong, more than 30 mV/m. These measurements agree reasonably well with the model of Uspensky and Williams [1988] which takes into account ionospheric refraction and assumes that auroral coherent echo is a superposition of scattering from a thick layer of electrojet irregularities. Results of the comparison indicate that electron density at altitudes around 110 km can be roughly estimated solely from coherent radar data.

  5. Improvement of GPS radio occultation retrieval error of E region electron density: COSMIC measurement and IRI model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kang-Hung; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model to simulate temporal and spatial distributions of global E region electron densities retrieved by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites by means of GPS radio occultation (RO) technique. Despite regional discrepancies in the magnitudes of the E region electron density, the IRI model simulations can, on the whole, describe the COSMIC measurements in quality and quantity. On the basis of global ionosonde network and the IRI model, the retrieval errors of the global COSMIC-measured E region peak electron density (NmE) from July 2006 to July 2011 are examined and simulated. The COSMIC measurement and the IRI model simulation both reveal that the magnitudes of the percentage error (PE) and root mean-square-error (RMSE) of the relative RO retrieval errors of the NmE values are dependent on local time (LT) and geomagnetic latitude, with minimum in the early morning and at high latitudes and maximum in the afternoon and at middle latitudes. In addition, the seasonal variation of PE and RMSE values seems to be latitude dependent. After removing the IRI model-simulated GPS RO retrieval errors from the original COSMIC measurements, the average values of the annual and monthly mean percentage errors of the RO retrieval errors of the COSMIC-measured E region electron density are, respectively, substantially reduced by a factor of about 2.95 and 3.35, and the corresponding root-mean-square errors show averaged decreases of 15.6% and 15.4%, respectively. It is found that, with this process, the largest reduction in the PE and RMSE of the COSMIC-measured NmE occurs at the equatorial anomaly latitudes 10°N-30°N in the afternoon from 14 to 18 LT, with a factor of 25 and 2, respectively. Statistics show that the residual errors that remained in the corrected COSMIC-measured NmE vary in a range of -20% to 38%, which are comparable to or larger than the percentage errors of the IRI-predicted NmE fluctuating in a

  6. Empirical Storm-Time Correction to the International Reference Ionosphere Model E-Region Electron and Ion Density Parameterizations Using Observations from TIMED/SABER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christoper J.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Evans, David S.; Bilitza, Dieter; Xu, Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    The response of the ionospheric E-region to solar-geomagnetic storms can be characterized using observations of infrared 4.3 micrometers emission. In particular, we utilize nighttime TIMED/SABER measurements of broadband 4.3 micrometers limb emission and derive a new data product, the NO+(v) volume emission rate, which is our primary observation-based quantity for developing an empirical storm-time correction the IRI E-region electron density. In this paper we describe our E-region proxy and outline our strategy for developing the empirical storm model. In our initial studies, we analyzed a six day storm period during the Halloween 2003 event. The results of this analysis are promising and suggest that the ap-index is a viable candidate to use as a magnetic driver for our model.

  7. Energetic electrons in the midlatitude nighttime E-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Geller, M. A.; Voss, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of electron density profiles in the upper E region near midnight at Wallops Island is shown to indicate that the ionization rate is very strongly correlated with geomagnetic activity. This suggests that energetic electrons are the principal source of ionization at midlatitudes in the upper E region near midnight, even under rather quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  8. Storm/Quiet Ratio Comparisons Between TIMED/SABER NO (sup +)(v) Volume Emission Rates and Incoherent Scatter Radar Electron Densities at E-Region Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, J. R.; Mertens, C. J.; Bilitza, D.; Xu, X.; Russell, J. M., III; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband infrared limb emission at 4.3 microns is measured by the TIMED/SABER instrument. At night, these emission observations at E-region altitudes are used to derive the so called NO+(v) Volume Emission Rate (VER). NO+(v) VER can be derived by removing the background CO2(v3) 4.3 microns radiance contribution using SABER-based non-LTE radiation transfer models, and by performing a standard Abel inversion on the residual radiance. SABER observations show that NO+(v) VER is significantly enhanced during magnetic storms in accordance with increased ionization of the neutral atmosphere by auroral electron precipitation, followed by vibrational excitation of NO+ (i.e., NO+(v)) from fast exothermic ion-neutral reactions, and prompt infrared emission at 4.3 m. Due to charge neutrality, the NO+(v) VER enhancements are highly correlated with electron density enhancements, as observed for example by Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR). In order to characterize the response of the storm-time E-region from both SABER and ISR measurements, a Storm/Quiet ratio (SQR) quantity is defined as a function of altitude. For SABER, the SQR is the ratio of the storm-to-quiet NO+(v) VER. SQR is the storm-to-quiet ratio of electron densities for ISR. In this work, we compare SABER and ISR SQR values between 100 to 120 km. Results indicate good agreement between these measurements. SQR values are intended to be used as a correction factor to be included in an empirical storm-time correction to the International Reference Ionosphere model at E-region altitudes.

  9. Energetic electrons in the midlatitude nighttime E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Geller, M. A.; Voss, H. D.

    1973-01-01

    Nike Apache 14.439 was launched from Wallops Island at 0003 EST on 1 November 1972, a very disturbed night (K sub P = 8). A Geiger counter in the payload detected electrons ( keV) with a maximum flux of 1086 + or -261/sq cm/sec/ster. The height-averaged ionization rate in the upper E region is calculated from the measured electron density profile and has a value of 35 1/cu/cm/sec. The ionization rate can be reconciled with the observed flux of electrons ( 70 2 keV) if the spectrum ( keV) is of the form J ( E) = J sub O exp(-E/E sub O) with E sub O equal to 8.3 keV. The ionization rate on this and other nights is found to be strongly dependent on geomagnetic activity. It is suggested that energetic electrons are the principal source of ionization at midlatitudes in the upper E region near midnight, even under rather quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  10. Rocket measurements of electron temperature in the E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. K., Jr.; Smith, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The rocket borne equipment, experimental method, and data reduction techniques used in the measurement of electron temperature in the E region are fully described. Electron temperature profiles from one daytime equatorial flight and two nighttime midlatitude flights are discussed. The last of these three flights, Nike Apache 14.533, showed elevated E region temperatures which are interpreted as the heating effect of a stable auroral red arc.

  11. Characteristics of the Afternoon E-region Plasma Density Irregularities in Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Yang, T. Y.; Kil, H.; Otsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In middle latitudes, radar probing of E-region ionospheric electron density irregularities has been carried out for several decades. However, no the afternoon (i.e., from noon to pre-sunset time) E-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude have been reported yet. On the other hand, a 40.8 MHz VHF radar operated continuously since December 2009 at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea has often observed the E-region FAIs in the afternoon. In this presentation, therefore, we report firstly the afternoon observations of the mid-latitude E-region FAIs made by the Daejeon radar. We present the characteristics and statistical morphology of the mid-latitude afternoon E-region FAIs based on the continuous and long-term radar observations. And also, to investigate the afternoon E-region FAIs - Sporadic E (Es) relationship, the FAIs have been also compared with Es parameters based on observations made from an ionosonde located at Icheon (37.14°N, 127.54°E, 27.7°N dip latitude), which is 100 km north of Daejeon.

  12. Estimation of nighttime dip-equatorial E-region current density using measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kuldeep; Sekar, R.; Anandarao, B. G.; Gupta, S. P.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the possible ionospheric current during nighttime over low-equatorial latitudes is one of the unresolved issues in ionospheric physics and geomagnetism. A detailed investigation is carried out to estimate the same over Indian longitudes using in situ measurements from Thumba (8.5 ° N, 76.9 ° E), empirical plasma drift model (Fejer et al., 2008) and equatorial electrojet model developed by Anandarao (1976). This investigation reveals that the nighttime E-region current densities vary from ∼0.3 to ∼0.7 A/km2 during pre-midnight to early morning hours on geomagnetically quiet conditions. The nighttime current densities over the dip equator are estimated using three different methods (discussed in methodology section) and are found to be consistent with one another within the uncertainty limits. Altitude structures in the E-region current densities are also noticed which are shown to be associated with altitudinal structures in the electron densities. The horizontal component of the magnetic field induced by these nighttime ionospheric currents is estimated to vary between ∼2 and ∼6 nT during geomagnetically quiet periods. This investigation confirms the existence of nighttime ionospheric current and opens up a possibility of estimating base line value for geomagnetic field fluctuations as observed by ground-based magnetometer.

  13. Parallel electron streaming in the high-latitude E region and its effect on the incoherent scatter spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Tsunoda, R. T.

    2006-07-01

    This article investigates the combined electron heating and streaming effects of low-frequency parallel electric fields on the incoherent scatter measurements of the high-latitude E region. The electric fields distort the electron distribution function, inducing changes on the amplitude and frequency of the ion-acoustic line in the measured incoherent scatter spectrum. If one assumes Maxwellian electrons, the measurements of electron and ion temperatures and electron density are subject to significant percentage errors during geomagnetically active conditions.

  14. Anomalous electron heating effects on the E region ionosphere in TIEGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Oppenheim, Meers; Dimant, Yakov; Wiltberger, Michael; Merkin, Slava

    2016-03-01

    We have recently implemented a new module that includes both the anomalous electron heating and the electron-neutral cooling rate correction associated with the Farley-Buneman Instability (FBI) in the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics global circulation model (TIEGCM). This implementation provides, for the first time, a modeling capability to describe macroscopic effects of the FBI on the ionosphere and thermosphere in the context of a first-principle, self-consistent model. The added heating sources primarily operate between 100 and 130 km altitude, and their magnitudes often exceed auroral precipitation heating in the TIEGCM. The induced changes in E region electron temperature in the auroral oval and polar cap by the FBI are remarkable with a maximum Te approaching 2200 K. This is about 4 times larger than the TIEGCM run without FBI heating. This investigation demonstrates how researchers can add the important effects of the FBI to magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere models and simulators.

  15. Observations of auroral E-region plasma waves and electron heating with EISCAT and a VHF radar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Providakes, J.; Farley, D. T.; Fejer, B. G.; Sahr, J.; Swartz, W. E.

    1988-05-01

    Two radars were used simultaneously to study naturally occurring electron heating events in the auroral E-region ionosphere. During a joint campaign in March 1986 the Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) was positioned to look perpendicular to the magnetic field to observe unstable plasma waves over Tromso, Norway, while EISCAT measured the ambient conditions in the unstable region. On two nights EISCAT detected intense but short lived (less than 1 min) electron heating events during which the temperature suddenly increased by a factor of 2-4 at altitudes near 108 km and the electron densities were less than 70,000/cu cm. On the second of these nights CUPRI was operating and detected strong plasma waves with very large phase velocities at precisely the altitudes and times at which the heating was observed. The altitudes, as well as one component of the irregularity drift velocity, were determined by interferometric techniques. From the observations and our analysis, it is concluded that the electron temperature increases were caused by plasma wave heating and not by either Joule heating or particle precipitation.

  16. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGES

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; ...

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  17. Measurement of Atomic Oxygen in Diffuse Aurora and Ion Density in the E-Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, William E.

    1997-01-01

    An ion mass spectrometer (IMS) was refurbished, calibrated and supplied to the University of Colorado payload (Dr. Charles Barth, P.I.) which was launched from White Sands in September of 1993 as NASA 33.062. The nose cone failed to deploy and their were problems with the ACS so the mission was declared a failure. However, the door covering the IMS deployed and the instrument obtained data. The launch occurred shortly after a payload carrying solar x-ray detectors was launched. Thus a small portion of the Colorado payload science was salvaged; namely, the NO(+)/O2(+) ratio to compare with the measured x-ray flux. Figure I shows the NO(+) to O2(+) ratio vs. altitude. The behavior is typical of the E-region.

  18. Pseudopotentials from electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Andrejkovics, I.

    1996-05-01

    A method is introduced that allows the construction of pseudopotentials in the density-functional theory. This method is based on a procedure worked out by one of the authors [J. Phys. B 26, 43 (1993); Philos. Mag. B 69, 779 (1994)] for determining Kohn-Sham potentials, one-electron orbitals, and energies from the electron density. The Hartree-Fock densities of Bunge, Barrientos, and Bunge [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 53, 114 (1993)] are used to obtain the Kohn-Sham potentials of the Li, Na, and K atoms, and then Phillips-Kleinman-type [Phys. Rev. 116, 287 (1959); 118, 1153 (1960)] pseudopotentials are calculated. The arbitrariness of the pseudo-orbital is removed by minimization of the kinetic energy.

  19. Saturn's ionosphere - Inferred electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1984-04-01

    During the two Voyager encounters with Saturn, radio bursts were detected which appear to have originated from atmospheric lightning storms. Although these bursts generally extended over frequencies from as low as 100 kHz to the upper detection limit of the instrument, 40 MHz, they often exhibited a sharp but variable low frequency cutoff below which bursts were not detected. We interpret the variable low-frequency extent of these bursts to be due to the reflection of the radio waves as they propagate through an ionosphere which varies with local time. We obtain estimates of electron densities at a variety of latitude and local time locations. These compare well with the dawn and dusk densities measured by the Pioneer 11 Voyager Radio Science investigations, and with model predictions for dayside densities. However, we infer a two-order-of-magnitude diurnal variation of electron density, which had not been anticipated by theoretical models of Saturn's ionosphere, and an equally dramatic extinction of ionospheric electron density by Saturn's rings. Previously announced in STAR as N84-17102

  20. Saturn's ionosphere: Inferred electron densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1983-01-01

    During the two Voyager encounters with Saturn, radio bursts were detected which appear to have originated from atmospheric lightning storms. Although these bursts generally extended over frequencies from as low as 100 kHz to the upper detection limit of the instrument, 40 MHz, they often exhibited a sharp but variable low frequency cutoff below which bursts were not detected. We interpret the variable low-frequency extent of these bursts to be due to the reflection of the radio waves as they propagate through an ionosphere which varies with local time. We obtain estimates of electron densities at a variety of latitude and local time locations. These compare well with the dawn and dusk densitis measured by the Pioneer 11 Voyager Radio Science investigations, and with model predictions for dayside densities. However, we infer a two-order-of-magnitude diurnal variation of electron density, which had not been anticipated by theoretical models of Saturn's ionosphere, and an equally dramatic extinction of ionospheric electron density by Saturn's rings.

  1. Nuclear cusps in the HSF electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Challacombe, Matt

    1994-07-01

    The Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) identity provides an alternative definition for the electron density. The behavior of the HSF electron density in the vicinity of nuclei is analyzed. It is shown that the HSF density possesses nuclear cusps at which its gradient is discontinuous. The discontinuities in the HSF density gradient satisfy a simple equation analogous to Kato's electron-nuclear cusp condition. However, in contrast to Kato's condition, the electron-nuclear cusp condition is satisfied by HSF densities originating from both exact and approximate electronic wavefunctions. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate this property of the HSF electron density.

  2. Electron (charge) density studies of cellulose models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introductory material first describes electron density approaches and demonstrates visualization of electron lone pairs and bonding as concentrations of electron density. Then it focuses on the application of Bader’s Quantum Theory of Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) to cellulose models. The purpose of the ...

  3. Obliquely propagating ion acoustic waves in the auroral E region: Further evidence of irregularity production by field-aligned electron streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Villain, J.P. ); Hanuise, C. ); Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.; Ruohoniemi, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Common volume observations of E region high-latitude irregularities at decameter wavelengths have been obtained with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and the SHERPA HF radar located at Schefferville, Quebec. In this paper, the authors analyze an event with characteristics similar to those of a distinctive type of event described by Villain et al. (1987). The experimental configuration, which combines the azimuthal-scanning capability of the Goose Bay radar with the frequency-scanning operation of the Schefferville radar, has provided unambiguous evidence of the existence of two irregularity layers at different altitudes within the E region. The layers, which exhibit different characteristics, can be related to the action of the gradient drift and ion acoustic instability mechanisms. It is shown that the ion acoustic modes have phase velocities in the range of 400 to 550 m/s and are produced in regions of subcritical perpendicular electron Hall drift. They infer that the observed irregularities are produced through a combination of perpendicular and field-aligned relative electron-ion drifts. Features previously observed but no t satisfactorily explained by perpendicular drift excitation alone can be understood in terms of field-aligned drift excitation. They conclude that the role of electron-ion field-aligned drift may be much more important than previously realized.

  4. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena that relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions. Discusses the quantum mechanical background needed and presents ways of using models of electronic ground states to teach electronic structure, bonding concepts,…

  5. The electron drift velocity, ion acoustic speed and irregularity drifts in high-latitude E-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Pellinen, R. J.; Janhunen, P.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the STARE irregularity drift velocity dependence on the EISCAT line-of-sight (los or l-o-s) electron drift velocity magnitude, VE×Blos, and the flow angle ΘN,F (superscript N and/or F refer to the STARE Norway and Finland radar). In the noon-evening sector the flow angle dependence of Doppler velocities, VirrN,F, inside and outside the Farley-Buneman (FB) instability cone (|VE×Blos|>Cs and |VE×Blos|electron drift velocity. We found (b) that if the data points are averages over 100 m/s intervals (bins) of l-o-s electron velocities and 10 deg intervals (bins) of flow angles, then the largest STARE Doppler velocities always reside inside the bin with the largest flow angle. In the flow angle bin 80° the STARE Doppler velocity is larger than its driver term, i.e. the EISCAT l-o-s electron drift velocity component, |VirrN,F|>|VE×Blos|. Both features (a and b) as well as the weak flow angle velocity dependence indicate that the l-o-s electron drift velocity cannot be the sole factor which controls the motion of the backscatter ~1-m irregularities at large flow angles. Importantly, the backscatter was collected at aspect angle ~1° and flow angle Θ>60°, where linear fluid and kinetic theories invariably predict negative growth rates. At least qualitatively, all the facts can be reasonably explained by nonlinear wave-wave coupling found and

  6. Electron density studies of methyl cellobioside

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental X-ray diffraction crystallography determines the variations in electron density that result from the periodic array of atoms in a crystal. Normally, the positions and type of atom are determined from the electron density based on an approximation that the atoms are spherical. However, t...

  7. An improved inversion for FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionosphere electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.

    2015-10-01

    An improved method to retrieve electron density profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) data is presented and applied to Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) observations. The improved inversion uses a monthly grid of COSMIC F region peak densities (NmF2), which are obtained via the standard Abel inversion, to aid the Abel inversion by providing information on the horizontal gradients in the ionosphere. This lessens the impact of ionospheric gradients on the retrieval of GPS RO electron density profiles, reducing the dominant error source in the standard Abel inversion. Results are presented that demonstrate the NmF2 aided retrieval significantly improves the quality of the COSMIC electron density profiles. Improvements are most notable at E region altitudes, where the improved inversion reduces the artificial plasma cave that is generated by the Abel inversion spherical symmetry assumption at low latitudes during the daytime. Occurrence of unphysical negative electron densities at E region altitudes is also reduced. Furthermore, the NmF2 aided inversion has a positive impact at F region altitudes, where it results in a more distinct equatorial ionization anomaly. COSMIC electron density profiles inverted using our new approach are currently available through the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center. Owing to the significant improvement in the results, COSMIC data users are encouraged to use electron density profiles based on the improved inversion rather than those inverted by the standard Abel inversion.

  8. Ionospheric density enhancement during relativistic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. C.; Doupnik, J. R.; Stiles, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the ionospheric density enhancement produced by a widespread relativistic electron precipitation (REP) has been observed with the Chatanika Radar. The REP was associated with a substorm particle energization event, and both the ionospheric absorption and density perturbation exhibited an approximately 90 min periodicity associated with the particles' longitudinal drift. A 80-keV characteristic energy for the precipitating electrons is deduced from ground-based and satellite data. At the maximum of the event, electrons deposited approximately 50 ergs/sq cm per sec in the ionosphere, producing a peak density of 500,000/cu cm at 89 km altitude. At that time the radar observed densities greater than 100,000/cu cm between 70 km and 110 km altitude and riometer absorption at 30 MHz was approximately 12 db.

  9. Electrons In The Low Density Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, Keith W.; Desch, Michael; Fitzenreiter, Richard; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recent occurrence of an interval (May 9th to May 12th, 1999) of abnormally low density solar wind has drawn attention to such events. The SWE instrument on the Wind spacecraft observed nine similar events between launch (November 1994) and August 1999: one in 1997, three in 1998, and five in January-August 1999. No such events were observed in 1996, the year of solar minimum. This already suggests a strong dependence upon solar activity. In this paper we discuss observations of the electron strahl, a strong anisotropy in the solar wind electrons above 60 eV directed along the magnetic field and observed continuously during the periods of low density in 1998 and 1999. When the solar wind density was less than 2/cc, the angular width of the strahl was below 3.5 degrees and the temperature deduced from the slope of the electron strahl phase density (as a function of energy in the energy range 200 to 800 eV) was 100 to 150 eV, equivalent to a typical coronal electron temperature. Three examples of this phenomenon, observed on Feb. 20- 22, April 26-27 and May 9-12, 1999, are discussed to show their similarity to one another. These electron observations are interpreted to show that the strahl occurs as a result of the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant, combined with the lack of coulomb collisions as suggested by Fairfield and Scudder, 1985.

  10. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  11. Electron correlation by polarization of interacting densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, Jerry L.

    2017-02-01

    Coulomb interactions that occur in electronic structure calculations are correlated by allowing basis function components of the interacting densities to polarize dynamically, thereby reducing the magnitude of the interaction. Exchange integrals of molecular orbitals are not correlated. The modified Coulomb interactions are used in single-determinant or configuration interaction calculations. The objective is to account for dynamical correlation effects without explicitly introducing higher spherical harmonic functions into the molecular orbital basis. Molecular orbital densities are decomposed into a distribution of spherical components that conserve the charge and each of the interacting components is considered as a two-electron wavefunction embedded in the system acted on by an average field Hamiltonian plus r12-1. A method of avoiding redundancy is described. Applications to atoms, negative ions, and molecules representing different types of bonding and spin states are discussed.

  12. Electron Density Profiles of the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from h,F2 to - 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms but most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis- status.htm1. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The TOPside Ionogram Scaler with True height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling - 70% of the ionograms. An <> is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle.

  13. Design and calibration of a rocket-borne electron spectrometer for investigation of particle ionization in the nighttime midlatitude E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    An explanation was developed for the formation, near midnight at midlatitudes, of a broad electron density layer extending approximately from 120 to 180 km and usually referred to as the intermediate E layer. The responsible mechanism is believed to be the converging vertical ion drifts resulting from winds of the solar semidiurnal tide. Numerical solutions of the continuity equation appropriate to the intermediate layer is described for particular models of ion drift, diffusion coefficents, and ionization production. Analysis of rocket observations of the layer show that the ionization rate is highly correlated with the planetary geomagnetic index, K sub p. Particle flux measurements support the idea that energetic electrons are the principal source of this ionization. A semiconductor spectrometer experiment for investigation of the particle flux, spectrum, and angular properties was designed and successfully flown on a Nike Apache rocket. A detailed description of the theory, design, and calibration of the experiment and some preliminary results presented.

  14. Estimation of topside electron density profile using on-orbit measured GPS and electron density data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The topside ionophere have lacks of information about plasma, but it is important for human beings and scientific applicaiton. We establish an estimation method for electron density profile using Langmuir Probe and GPS data of CHAMP satellite and have comparision the method results with other satellites measurements. In order to develop the model, hydrostatic mapping function, vertical scale height, and vertical TEC(Total Electron Contents) are used for calculations. The electron density and GPS data with hydrostatic mapping function give the vertical TEC and after some algebra using exponential model of density profile give the vertical scale height of ionosphere. The scale height have about 10^2~10^3 km order of magnitude so it can be used exponential model again since the altitude of CHAMP. Therefore, apply the scale height to exponoential model we can get the topside electron density profile. The result of the density profile model can be compared with other satellite data as STSAT-1, ROCSAT, DMSP which is measured the electron density in similar Local Time, Latitude, Longitude but above the CHAMP. This comparison shows the method is accecptable and it can be applied to other reseach for topside ionosphere.

  15. Ionospheric electron density inversion for Global Navigation Satellite Systems radio occultation using aided Abel inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Min Yang; Lin, Charles C. H.; Tsai, Ho Fang; Lin, Chi Yen

    2017-01-01

    The Abel inversion of ionospheric electron density profiles with the assumption of spherical symmetry applied for radio occultation soundings could introduce a greater systematic error or sometimes artifacts if the occultation rays trespass regions with larger horizontal gradients in electron density. The aided Abel inversions have been proposed by considering the asymmetry ratio derived from ionospheric total electron content (TEC) or peak density (NmF2) of reconstructed observation maps since knowledge of the horizontal asymmetry in ambient ionospheric density could mitigate the inversion error. Here we propose a new aided Abel inversion using three-dimensional time-dependent electron density (Ne) based on the climatological maps constructed from previous observations, as it has an advantage of providing altitudinal information on the horizontal asymmetry. Improvement of proposed Ne-aided Abel inversion and comparisons with electron density profiles inverted from the NmF2- and TEC-aided inversions are studied using observation system simulation experiments. Comparison results show that all three aided Abel inversions improve the ionospheric profiling by mitigating the artificial plasma caves and negative electron density in the daytime E region. The equatorial ionization anomaly crests in the F region become more distinct. The statistical results show that the Ne-aided Abel inversion has less mean and RMS error of error percentage above 250 km altitudes, and the performances for all aided Abel inversions are similar below 250 km altitudes.

  16. Electron densities of three B12 vitamins.

    PubMed

    Mebs, Stefan; Henn, Julian; Dittrich, Birger; Paulmann, Carsten; Luger, Peter

    2009-07-23

    The electron densities of the three natural B(12)-vitamins, two of them being essential cofactors for animal life, were determined in a procedure combining high-order X-ray data collection at low to very low temperatures with high-level density functional calculations. In a series of extensive experimental attempts, a high-order data set of adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) could be collected to a resolution of sin theta/lambda = 1.00 A(-1) at 25 K. This modification contains only minor disorder at the solvent bulk. For methylcobalamin (MeCbl), only a severely disordered modification was found (sin theta/lambda = 1.00 A(-1), 100 K, measured with synchrotron radiation). The already published data set of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) (sin theta/lambda = 1.25 A(-1), 100 K) was reintegrated to guarantee similar treatment of the three compounds and cut to sin theta/lambda = 1.11 A(-1) to obtain a higher degree of completeness and redundancy. On the basis of these accurate experimental geometries of AdoCbl, MeCbl, and CNCbl, state-of-the-art density functional calculations, single-point calculations, and geometry optimizations were performed on model compounds at the BP86/TZVP level of theory to evaluate the electronic differences of the three compounds. AdoCbl and MeCbl are known to undergo different reaction paths in the body. Thus, the focus was directed toward the characterization of the dative Co-C(ax) and Co-N(ax) bonds, which were quantifed by topological parameters, including energy densities; the source function including local source; and the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D), respectively. The source function reveals the existence of delocalized interactions between the corrin macrocycle and the axial ligands. The ELI-D indicates unsaturated Co-C(ax) bonding basins for the two biochemically active cofactors, but not for CNCbl, where a population of 2.2e is found. This may be related to significant pi-backbonding, which is supported by the delocalization index, delta

  17. High Density Mastering Using Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Yoshiaki; Kitahara, Hiroaki; Kasono, Osamu; Katsumura, Masahiro; Wada, Yasumitsu

    1998-04-01

    A mastering system for the next-generation digital versatile disk (DVD) is required to have a higher resolution compared with the conventional mastering systems. We have developed an electron beam mastering machine which features a thermal field emitter and a vacuum sealed air spindle motor. Beam displacement caused by magnetic fluctuation with spindle rotation was about 60 nm(p-p) in both the radial and tangential directions. Considering the servo gain of a read-out system, it has little influence on the read-out signal in terms of tracking errors and jitters. The disk performance was evaluated by recording either the 8/16 modulation signal or a groove on the disk. The electron beam recording showed better jitter values from the disk playback than those from a laser beam recorder. The deviation of track pitch was 44 nm(p-p). We also confirmed the high density recording with a capacity reaching 30 GB.

  18. Single electron densities: a new tool to analyze molecular wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Lüchow, Arne; Petz, René

    2011-09-01

    A new partitioning scheme for the electron density of a many-electron wavefunction into single electron densities is proposed. These densities are based on the most probable arrangement of the electrons in an atom or molecule. Therefore, they contain information about the electron-electron interaction and, most notably, the Fermi hole due to the antisymmetry of the many-electron wavefunction. The single electron densities overlap and can be combined to electron pair distributions close to the qualitative electron pairs that represent, for instance, the basis of the valence shell electron pair repulsion model. Single electron analyses are presented for the water, ethane, and ethene molecules. The effect of electron correlation on the single electron and pair densities is investigated for the water molecule.

  19. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  20. Electron-density irregularities in the day-time equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. G.; Royrvik, O.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-density irregularities have been observed in the day-time equatorial ionosphere using probe experiments carried out in the payloads of two rockets launched near Lima, Peru during Project Condor, 1983. Simultaneous observations of the mesosphere and upper E-region were obtained using the radar at Jicamarca. A layer of mesospheric irregularities is identified as originating in neutral atmosphere turbulence. In the electrojet the rocket data show the regions of type 2 irregularities (between 90 and 105 km) and type 1 irregularities (between 103 and 108 km), differentiated by the slopes of their respective spectra. The irregularities of the upper E-region seen in the rocket data are reconciled with the radar data by postulating a strong aspect sensitivity.

  1. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E.; Moroni, S.; Vitali, E.

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  2. The amplitude of auroral backscatter. I - Model estimates of the dependence on electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskii, M. V.; Williams, P. J. S.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the auroral backscatter amplitude, in the form discussed by Uspensky (1985) and Oksman et al. (1986), has been derived for the radar geometry appropriate to joint observations by the PGI auroral radars at Karmaselga and Essoyla and the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar. The model shows how refraction effects cause a strongly nonlinear dependence of backscatter amplitude on electron density in the E-region. It also explains why the macroaspect sensitivity for auroral radar operating at a frequency of about 45 MHz is only 1-2 dB per degree for aspect angles greater than 5 deg.

  3. Seismo-ionospheric coupling appearing as equatorial electron density enhancements observed via DEMETER electron density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, K.; Lee, E.; Chae, J. S.; Parrot, M.; Pulinets, S.

    2014-10-01

    We report the processes and results of statistical analysis on the ionospheric electron density data measured by the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite over a period of 6 years (2005-2010), in order to investigate the correlation between seismic activity and equatorial plasma density variations. To simplify the analysis, three equatorial regions with frequent earthquakes were selected and then one-dimensional time series analysis between the daily seismic activity indices and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) intensity indices, which represent relative equatorial electron density increase, were performed for each region. The statistically significant values of the lagged cross-correlation function, particularly in the region with minimal effects of longitudinal asymmetry, indicate that some of the very large earthquakes with M > 5.0 in the low-latitude region can accompany observable precursory and concurrent EIA enhancements, even though the seismic activity is not the most significant driver of the equatorial ionospheric evolution. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling is consistent with our observation, and the possibility of earthquake prediction using the EIA intensity variation is discussed.

  4. Electron density modification in ionospheric E layer by inserting fine dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we have developed the kinetics of E-region ionospheric plasma comprising of fine dust grains and shown that the electron density in E-layer can purposely be reduced/enhanced up to desired level by inserting fine dust particles of appropriate physical/material properties; this may certainly be promising for preferred rf-signal processing through these layers. The analytical formulation is based on average charge theory and includes the number and energy balance of the plasma constituents along with charge balance over dust particles. The effect of varying number density, work function, and photo-efficiency of dust particles on ionospheric plasma density at different altitude in E-layer has been critically examined and presented graphically.

  5. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  6. Momentum-space properties from coordinate-space electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Zope, Rajendra R.; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2005-05-22

    Electron density and electron momentum density, while independently tractable experimentally, bear no direct connection without going through the many-electron wave function. However, invoking a variant of the constrained-search formulation of density-functional theory, we develop a general scheme (valid for arbitrary external potentials) yielding decent momentum-space properties, starting exclusively from the coordinate-space electron density. A numerical illustration of the scheme is provided for the closed-shell atomic systems He, Be, and Ne in their ground state and for 1s{sup 1} 2s{sup 1} singlet electronic excited state for helium by calculating the Compton profiles and the expectation values derived from given coordinate-space electron densities.

  7. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  8. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  9. Polar cap electron densities from DE 1 plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Electric-field-spectum measurements from the plasma-wave instrument on the Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft are used to study the local electron density at high altitudes in the northern polar-cap region. The electron density is determined from the upper cutoff of whistler-mode radiation at the electron plasma frequency. Median density values over the polar cap at L greater than 10 are found to vary from 35.2 + or - 8.5 cu cm at 2.1 earth radii to 0.99 + or - 0.51 cu cm at 4.66 earth radii. The steady-state radial-outflow model is examined for consistency with the observed density profile. A power-law fit to the radial variation of the electron density yields an exponent of - 3.85 + or - 0.32, which for the radial-outflow model implies a flow velocity increasing nearly linearly with incresing radial distance. Comparison of the observed electron densities with theoretical polar-wind densities yields consistent results up to 2.8 earth radii. A comparison of the observed electron densities with low-altitude density profiles from the Alouette II and ISIS 1 spacecraft illustrates transitions in the slope of the profile at 1.16 earth radii and between 1.55 and 2.0 earth radii. The changes in the density profile suggest that changes occur in the basic radial-transport processes at these altitudes.

  10. Gutzwiller density functional theory for correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K. M.; Schmalian, J.; Wang, C. Z.

    2008-02-04

    We develop a density functional theory (DFT) and formalism for correlated electron systems by taking as reference an interacting electron system that has a ground state wave function which exactly obeys the Gutzwiller approximation for all one-particle operators. The solution of the many-electron problem is mapped onto the self-consistent solution of a set of single-particle Schroedinger equations, analogously to standard DFT-local density approximation calculations.

  11. Electron and ion densities in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Langer, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A quantitative theory of ionization in diffuse clouds is developed which includes H(+) charge exchange with O. Dissociative charge exchange of He(+) with H2 plays an important role in the densities of H(+) and He(+). The abundance of HD is also discussed.

  12. Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar investigations of the nighttime E-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittier, Robin L.

    Plasma within the ionosphere affects technology, such as long distance communications and satellite navigation, by scattering and altering the propagation of radio waves sent through the ionosphere. Understanding the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere that may interfere with modern technology is therefore an important aspect of Space Weather research. In this thesis, the average characteristics and dynamics of the nighttime E-region (90-150 km in altitude) are investigated during auroral disturbances and near extreme solar minimum. The near-continuous data on electron density obtained with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) near Fairbanks, Alaska are utilized. A number of correlation analyses between E-region electron content and AE index are performed in order to examine the influence of geomagnetic conditions on the E-region in relation to time of the day as well as seasonal and solar cycle effects. It is shown that E-region electron content and AE index exhibit significant positive correlation, particularly near local magnetic midnight, with greater correlation generally occurring in spring and autumn. The midnight feature is interpreted as an indication that the electrojet system near midnight is mostly controlled by electric conductance. The presented statistical results on the current-conductance relationship utilizing a new dataset strengthen conclusions derived from previous studies. The extent of E-region contribution to the total electron content (TEC) is also estimated and investigated for various conditions for the first time using the full altitude profile of PFISR. The estimates ranged between 5%-60% and more active periods generally displayed a more significant contribution from the E-region to TEC. Additionally, using the AE index as an indicator of auroral disturbance onset, the evolution of auroral density enhancements is explored using the superposed epoch analysis technique. The behavior of E-region electron content, peak

  13. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  14. Picosecond imaging of low-density plasmas by electron deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Centurion, M; Reckenthaeler, P; Krausz, F; Fill, E E

    2009-02-15

    We have imaged optical-field ionized plasmas with electron densities as low as 10(13) cm(-3) on a picosecond timescale using ultrashort electron pulses. Electric fields generated by the separation of charges are imprinted on a 20 keV probe electron pulse and reveal a cloud of electrons expanding away from a positively charged plasma core. Our method allows for a direct measurement of the electron energy required to escape the plasma and the total charge. Simulations reproduce the main features of the experiment and allow determination of the energy of the electrons.

  15. Measurement of electron density and temperature in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Presley, L. L.; Stallcop, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of two laser wavelengths passing through plasma measures electron density and temperature. Function depends on determining absorption of light at two wavelengths. Nature of reaction is explained and schematic diagram of equipment is included.

  16. High Current Density Scandate Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-30

    braze alloy . The structure was fired in a furnace at 16500 C for 15 minutes. The resultant structure was sectioned to determine if the scandium flowed...Density Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications FA9550-07-C-0063 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Current Density Scandate Cathodes for Future Vacuum Electronics Applications USAF/AFRL Contract Number FA9550-07-C-0063 Final Report Calabazas Creek

  17. New link between conceptual density functional theory and electron delocalization.

    PubMed

    Matito, Eduard; Putz, Mihai V

    2011-11-17

    In this paper we give a new definition of the softness kernel based on the exchange-correlation density. This new kernel is shown to correspond to the change of electron fluctuation upon external perturbation, thus helping to bridge the gap between conceptual density functional theory and some tools describing electron localization in molecules. With the aid of a few computational calculations on diatomics we illustrate the performance of this new computational tool.

  18. Waves in relativistic electron beam in low-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, I.; Sheinman (Chernenco, J.

    2016-11-01

    Waves in electron beam in low-density plasma are analyzed. The analysis is based on complete electrodynamics consideration. Dependencies of dispersion laws from system parameters are investigated. It is shown that when relativistic electron beam is passed through low-density plasma surface waves of two types may exist. The first type is a high frequency wave on a boundary between the beam and neutralization area and the second type wave is on the boundary between neutralization area and stationary plasma.

  19. Flare X-ray photochemistry of the E region ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.; Santos, A. M.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    Based on electron density profiles obtained from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) we report X-ray flare responses in the E region ionosphere of Mars during six events that occurred on 28 March and 6 April 2001, 17 and 18 March and 21 April 2003, and 19 February 2005. We have developed a time-dependent Analytical Yield Spectrum model to calculate a time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density, and ionospheric electron content (IEC) of the E region for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux, and densities increase by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effect of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The estimated IEC are compared with the measured IEC. It is found that the normalized IEC of the simulated E layer increased by a factor of 5-10 at the flare time compared to a factor of 2 enhancements in the normalized IEC of the corresponding MGS profiles.

  20. Ionospheric E-Region Response to Solar-Geomagnetic Storms Observed by TIMED/SABER and Application to IRI Storm-Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mast, Jeffrey C.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Evans, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The large thermospheric infrared radiance enhancements observed from the TIMED/SABER experiment during recent solar storms provide an exciting opportunity to study the influence of solar-geomagnetic disturbances on the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. In particular, nighttime enhancements of 4.3 um emission, due to vibrational excitation and radiative emission by NO+, provide an excellent proxy to study and analyze the response of the ionospheric E-region to auroral electron dosing and storm-time enhancements to the E-region electron density. In this paper we give a status report of on-going work on model and data analysis methodologies of deriving NO+ 4.3 um volume emission rates, a proxy for the storm-time E-region response, and the approach for deriving an empirical storm-time correction to International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) E-region NO+ and electron densities.

  1. Electron cyclotron emission as a density fluctuation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.G.; Phillips, P.E.; Hubbard, A.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique for measuring density fluctuations using a high-resolution heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed. Although ECE radiometry is typically used for electron temperature measurements, the unique viewing geometry of this system's quasioptical antenna has been found to make the detected emission extremely sensitive to refractive effects under certain conditions. This sensitivity gives the diagnostic the ability to measure very low levels of density fluctuations in the core of Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The refractive effects have been modeled using ray-tracing methods, allowing estimates of the density fluctuation magnitude and spatial localization.

  2. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Automatic calculation of electron density profiles from digital ionograms. III. Processing of bottomside ionograms

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, B.W.; Huang, X.

    1983-05-01

    It is noted that automatic scaling of bottomside Digisonde ionograms gives the E and F region echo traces with high accuracy. Polarization and incidence angle information in the ionogram makes it possible to extract the vertical ordinary polarization echo trace from quiet as well as disturbed ionograms. The scaling algorithm is tested with Digisonde ionograms from Goose Bay, Labrador, which reveal spread F about 50 percent of the time. In spite of these disturbed conditions, f0F2 is determined within 1/2 MHz for 475 ionograms out of 577 during January 1980. A profile inversion algorithm gives a calculation of the electron density profile from the autoscale h-prime(f) points. Parabolic profile shapes are assumed for the E region and for the valley between the E and the F layer. The F layer is approximated through a single sum of Chebyshev polynomials, and the entire profile is described by means of a set of 16 numerical values.

  4. Unsolved Problems: Effects of E-Region Conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Coster, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric plasma enhancement and redistribution at low, mid, and auroral latitudes during major geomagnetic disturbances involves a complex interplay among magnetospheric forcing, solar production, ionospheric processes, season, local and Universal Time (UT), and characteristics of the terrestrial magnetic field. Dramatic features occur with repeatable, but not completely understood, features. These include equatorial depletions, enhancements of the equatorial anomalies, mid-latitude total electron content enhancements near sunset (the "dusk effect"), and at high latitudes sunward-streaming plumes of storm enhanced density (SED) related to plasmaspheric erosion by ring current-driven (SAPS) flow channels and electric fields. An apparent longitude or UT-dependency of some stormtime effects has been noted, and a number of processes have been proposed which might contribute to such observations. Here we examine the effects of peculiarities in the mid-latitude solar-produced E-region conductance on the M-I (magnetosphere-ionosphere) coupling processes associated with the some of the observed ionospheric features and effects. Satellite and ground-based TEC observations are combined with satellite (DMSP) and radar observations of ionospheric plasma concentration and dynamics. Offset of poles, seasonal effects, and magnetic field distortion by the south Atlantic anomaly produced a distorted solar-terminator configuration in the dusk sector during the July 15, 2000 superstorm. Contours of constant Southern Hemisphere E-region shadow height (50 km to 500 km in 50 km steps) are plotted for a uniform grid of latitude/longitude points at 200km altitude. Polarization charge buildup associated with the resultant E-region conductance gradient causes westward and poleward ionospheric plasma redistribution along the contours shown.

  5. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  6. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  7. Electron density and parallel electric field distribution of the auroral density cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alm, L.; Marklund, G. T.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-11-01

    We present an event study in which Cluster satellites C1 and C3 encounters the flux tube of a stable auroral arc in the premidnight sector. C1 observes the midcavity, while C3 enters the flux tube of the auroral arc at an altitude which is below the acceleration region, before crossing into the top half of the acceleration region. This allows us to study the boundary between the ionosphere and the density cavity, as well as large portion of the upper density cavity. The position of the two satellites, in relation to the acceleration region, is described using a pseudo altitude derived from the distribution of the parallel potential drop above and below the satellites. The electron density exhibits an anticorrelation with the pseudo altitude, indicating that the lowest electron densities are found near the top of the density cavity. Over the entire pseudo altitude range, the electron density distribution is similar to a planar sheath, formed out of a plasma sheet dominated electron distribution, in response to the parallel electric field of the acceleration region. This indicates that the parallel electric fields on the ionosphere-cavity boundary, as well as the midcavity parallel electric fields, are part of one unified structure rather than two discrete entities. The results highlight the strong connection between the auroral density cavity and auroral acceleration as well as the necessity of studying them in a unified fashion.

  8. Electron temperature and density relationships in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. M.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    We examine 10 coronal mass ejections from the in-ecliptic portion of the Ulysses mission. Five of these CMEs are magnetic clouds. In each case we observe an inverse relationship between electron temperature and density. For protons this relationship is less clear. Earlier work has shown a similar inverse relationship for electrons inside magnetic clouds and interpreted it to mean that the polytropic index governing the expansion of electrons is less than unity. This requires electrons to be heated as the CME expands. We offer an alternative view that the inverse relationship between electron temperature and density is caused by more rapid cooling of the denser plasma through collisions. More rapid cooling of denser plasma has been shown for 1 AU measurements in the solar wind. As evidence for this hypothesis we show that the denser plasma inside the CMEs tends to be more isotropic indicating a different history of collisions for the dense plasma. Thus, although the electron temperature inside CMEs consistently shows an inverse correlation with the density, this is not an indication of the polytropic index of the plasma but instead supports the idea of collisional modification of the electrons during their transit from the sun.

  9. Rocket radio measurement of electron density in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    One experimental technique based on the Faraday rotation effect of radio waves is presented for measuring electron density in the nighttime ionosphere at midlatitudes. High frequency linearly-polarized radio signals were transmitted to a linearly-polarized receiving system located in a spinning rocket moving through the ionosphere. Faraday rotation was observed in the reference plane of the rocket as a change in frequency of the detected receiver output. The frequency change was measured and the information was used to obtain electron density data. System performance was evaluated and some sources of error were identified. The data obtained was useful in calibrating a Langmuir probe experiment for electron density values of 100/cu cm and greater. Data from two rocket flights are presented to illustrate the experiment.

  10. Electron density measurements in the ITER fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Christopher; Udintsev, Victor; Andrew, Philip; Vayakis, George; Van Zeeland, Michael; Brower, David; Feder, Russell; Mukhin, Eugene; Tolstyakov, Sergey

    2013-08-01

    The operation of ITER requires high-quality estimates of the plasma electron density over multiple regions in the plasma for plasma evaluation, plasma control and machine protection purposes. Although the density regimes of ITER are not very different from those of existing tokamaks (1018-1021 m-3), the severe conditions of the fusion plasma environment present particular challenges to implementing these density diagnostics. In this paper we present an overview of the array of ITER electron density diagnostics designed to measure over the entire ITER domain: plasma core, pedestal, edge, scrape-off layer and divertor. It will focus on the challenges faced in making these measurements, and the technical solutions of the current designs.

  11. Electroweak charge density distributions with parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ren, Zhongzhou; Xu, Chang; Xu, Renli

    2013-11-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering (PVS) is an accurate and model-independent way to investigate the weak-charge density distributions of nuclei. In this paper, we study parity-violating electron scattering with the Helm model where the effects of spin-orbit currents on nuclear weak skins are taken into account. The conditions of two PVS measurements to constrain the surface thickness σW of Helm weak-charge densities are investigated. According to the plane wave Born approximation, Apv is expressed in terms of parameters of the corresponding Helm charge and weak-charge densities. After fitting the results of Apv calculated from the phase-shift analysis method where the Coulomb distortion effects are incorporated, an empirical formula in terms of Helm model parameters for calculating Apv is obtained. If two PVS measurements with different scattering angles are carried out, the modeled weak-charge density distributions with two parameters could be extracted from this empirical formula.

  12. Electron densities and the excitation of CN in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1991-01-01

    In molecular clouds of modest density and relatively high fractional ionization, the rotational excitation of CN is controlled by a competition among electron impact, neutral impact and the interaction with the cosmic background radiation. The degree of excitation can be measured through optical absorption lines and millimeter-wave emission lines. The available, accurate data on CN in diffuse and translucent molecular clouds are assembled and used to determine electron densities. The derived values, n(e) = roughly 0.02 - 0.5/cu cm, imply modest neutral densities, which generally agree well with determinations by other techniques. The absorption- and emission-line measurements of CN both exclude densities higher than n(H2) = roughly 10 exp 3.5/cu cm on scales varying from 0.001 to 60 arcsec in these clouds.

  13. Isotope Generated Electron Density in Silicon Carbide Direct Energy Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    output of a diode into a resistively loaded circuit. This paper describes the use of a nuclear scattering code ( MCNPX ) to calculate the increased...used in the MCNPX calculations . The range constant supplied in section 3.2 (9) must be multiplied by the density of the material used. The density... MCNPX code. Instead, we are only modeling the SiC material and attempting to calculate how many free-electrons are being generated within as a

  14. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-07

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30 ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity v{sub D} on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  15. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Radicella, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    In the last couple of years an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available through the Internet to the scientific community. This kind of data is particularly important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work analyses the behavior of the NeQuick and IRI models, adopted by the ITU-R recommendation P.531-5, with respect to the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos-1809 satellites. Experimental total electron content (TEC) from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above that peak have been compared with values computed with the models. A wide range of different conditions (solar activity, local time, geographical and geomagnetic position has been considered). The analysis done allows to point out the behavior of the models and the improvement needed to allow a better reproduction of the experimental results.

  16. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-04-01

    A likelihood-based metric for scoring the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density is described. The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ{sup 2} significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  17. EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Radar) Electron Density Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-08

    lists the corresponding measurements of electron content made by HILAT and calculated from SPI03 measurements for each of the 7 coincident runs. The...TEC measured by HILAT and TEC calculated from EISCAT measurements, the HILAT values being always larger than those from EISCAT. The measurements...HILAT results could be due to several factors. The EISCAT value was calculated by integrating electron density over the range gates 184 km to 746.5

  18. Electron beam control using shock-induced density downramp injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K.; Tsai, H.-E.; Barber, S.; Lehe, R.; Mao, H.-S.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    In these experiments, we improve the quality of electrons injected along a shock-induced density downramp. We demonstrate that beam ellipticity and steering are influenced by the shock front tilt, and we present simple models to explain these effects. By adjusting the shock front angle, we minimize the beam's off-axis steering and ellipticity, producing high-quality electron beams over a tunable energy range.

  19. Modeling Ionosphere Environments: Creating an ISS Electron Density Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) maintains an altitude typically between 300 km and 400 km in low Earth orbit (LEO) which itself is situated in the Earth's ionosphere. The ionosphere is a region of partially ionized gas (plasma) formed by the photoionization of neutral atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Earth. It is important to understand what electron density the spacecraft is/will be operating in because the ionized gas along the ISS orbit interacts with the electrical power system resulting in charging of the vehicle. One instrument that is already operational onboard the ISS with a goal of monitoring electron density, electron temperature, and ISS floating potential is the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU). Although this tool is a valuable addition to the ISS, there are limitations concerning the data collection periods. The FPMU uses the Ku band communication frequency to transmit data from orbit. Use of this band for FPMU data runs is often terminated due to necessary observation of higher priority Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) and other operations on ISS. Thus, large gaps are present in FPMU data. The purpose of this study is to solve the issue of missing environmental data by implementing a secondary electron density data source, derived from the COSMIC satellite constellation, to create a model of ISS orbital environments. Extrapolating data specific to ISS orbital altitudes, we model the ionospheric electron density along the ISS orbit track to supply a set of data when the FPMU is unavailable. This computer model also provides an additional new source of electron density data that is used to confirm FPMU is operating correctly and supplements the original environmental data taken by FPMU.

  20. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  1. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  2. Pseudoconvexity of the atomic electron density: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O.; Sagar, Robin P.; Smith, Vedene H., Jr.; Chen, Jiqiang; Stott, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    The curvature, ρ''(r), of the atomic electron density ρ(r) is studied using results from a bare-Coulomb-field (BCF) model, Hartree-Fock (HF), and configuration-interaction (CI) calculations. A region of nonconvexity in ρ(r), previously reported by Angulo, Dehesa, and Gálvez [Phys. Rev. A 42, 641 (1990)] for light atoms in a Hartree-Fock framework, is investigated for all atoms up to Z=92 and is found not to be an artifact of the basis set or the HF model. Numerical results for the BCF model show that the total electron density of an arbitrary number of closed shells is convex. However, for the same model with electrons filling orbitals according to Stoner's restriction we find that nonconvexity of the density is a periodic property appearing around closed-shell ground-state hydrogenic configurations. Cusp conditions, reported earlier by Esquivel et al. [Phys. Rev. A 47, 936 (1993)] for the second derivative of the BCF density are verified for model atoms with s and p subshells. Using wave functions of near-HF accuracy we have found a region of nonconvexity in ρ(r) for atoms with Z=3-6, 16-32, and 45-92. Highly correlated densities of CI and Hylleraas-type quality for atoms of Li and Be isoelectronic sequences show that the nonconvex region of ρ(r) is largely unaffected by the inclusion of electron correlation. These results, coupled with those from the BCF model, lead us to suggest that it is the bare Coulomb field of the nucleus that is mainly responsible for the appearance of nonconvex regions in atoms. Furthermore, the degree of nonconvexity is shown to decrease as Z increases along the isoelectronic series. The contributions of different spin densities to the nonconvex electron densities is also studied. Finally, the behavior of the curvature of the electron density far from the nucleus is investigated. The ratio ρ''(r)/ρ(r) is found to approach an asymptotic value from above or below, according to the magnitude of the ionization potential.

  3. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  4. FUSION++: A New Data Assimilative Model for Electron Density Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Comberiate, J.; Paxton, L. J.; Kelly, M.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2014-12-01

    There is a continuing need within the operational space weather community, both civilian and military, for accurate, robust data assimilative specifications and forecasts of the global electron density field, as well as derived RF application product specifications and forecasts obtained from the electron density field. The spatial scales of interest range from a hundred to a few thousand kilometers horizontally (synoptic large scale structuring) and meters to kilometers (small scale structuring that cause scintillations). RF space weather applications affected by electron density variability on these scales include navigation, communication and geo-location of RF frequencies ranging from 100's of Hz to GHz. For many of these applications, the necessary forecast time periods range from nowcasts to 1-3 hours. For more "mission planning" applications, necessary forecast times can range from hours to days. In this paper we present a new ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) specification and forecast model being developed at JHU/APL based upon the well-known data assimilation algorithms Ionospheric Data Assimilation Four Dimensional (IDA4D) and Estimating Model Parameters from Ionospheric Reverse Engineering (EMPIRE). This new forecast model, "Forward Update Simple IONosphere model Plus IDA4D Plus EMPIRE (FUSION++), ingests data from observations related to electron density, winds, electric fields and neutral composition and provides improved specification and forecast of electron density. In addition, the new model provides improved specification of winds, electric fields and composition. We will present a short overview and derivation of the methodology behind FUSION++, some preliminary results using real observational sources, example derived RF application products such as HF bi-static propagation, and initial comparisons with independent data sources for validation.

  5. Sorting carbon nanotubes by electronic structure using density differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael S; Green, Alexander A; Hulvat, James F; Stupp, Samuel I; Hersam, Mark C

    2006-10-01

    The heterogeneity of as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) precludes their widespread application in electronics, optics and sensing. We report on the sorting of carbon nanotubes by diameter, bandgap and electronic type using structure-discriminating surfactants to engineer subtle differences in their buoyant densities. Using the scalable technique of density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we have isolated narrow distributions of SWNTs in which >97% are within a 0.02-nm-diameter range. Furthermore, using competing mixtures of surfactants, we have produced bulk quantities of SWNTs of predominantly a single electronic type. These materials were used to fabricate thin-film electrical devices of networked SWNTs characterized by either metallic or semiconducting behaviour.

  6. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  7. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  8. Electron Density Determination, Bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Wiezorek, Jorg

    2016-09-01

    The project developed quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) methods by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and used them in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electron density distribution in metallic and intermetallic phases with different cubic and non-cubic crystal structures that comprise elements with d-electron shells. The experimental methods developed here focus on the bonding charge distribution as one of the quantum mechanical characteristics central for understanding of intrinsic properties and validation of DFT calculations. Multiple structure and temperature factors have been measured simultaneously from nano-scale volumes of high-quality crystal with sufficient accuracy and precision for comparison with electron density distribution calculations by DFT. The often anisotropic temperature factors for the different atoms and atom sites in chemically ordered phases can differ significantly from those known for relevant pure element crystals due to bonding effects. Thus they have been measured from the same crystal volumes from which the structure factors have been determined. The ferromagnetic ordered intermetallic phases FePd and FePt are selected as model systems for 3d-4d and 3d-5d electron interactions, while the intermetallic phases NiAl and TiAl are used to probe 3d-3p electron interactions. Additionally, pure transition metal elements with d-electrons have been studied. FCC metals exhibit well defined delocalized bonding charge in tetrahedral sites, while less directional, more distributed bonding charge attains in BCC metals. Agreement between DFT calculated and QCBED results degrades as d-electron levels fill in the elements, and for intermetallics as d-d interactions become prominent over p-d interactions. Utilizing the LDA+U approach enabled inclusion of onsite Coulomb-repulsion effects in DFT calculations, which can afford improved agreements with QCBED results

  9. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iwawaki, T. Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Filippi, F.; Nazarov, W.

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  10. Predictions of electron temperatures in the Mars ionosphere and their effects on electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Matta, Majd

    2014-04-01

    Observations of peak electron densities in the Mars ionosphere are well fit by a simplistic theory that assumes the electron temperature, Te, at the peak remains constant as solar zenith angle, χ, changes. However, Te ought to vary with both altitude and χ. Here we use an existing numerical model of ionospheric energetics, which includes both vertical and diurnal variations in temperatures, to predict that Te at the ionospheric peak is relatively independent of χ. This model accurately predicts the observed dependence of peak electron density on χ, whereas predictions using Viking-based electron temperatures that are held constant with time do not. A simplified analytic model is developed to interpret these results further. It predicts that the difference between electron and neutral temperatures is proportional to the ratio of electron heating rate to electron production rate and proportional to the square root of solar irradiance.

  11. Absolute electron density measurements in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. D.; Howlett, L. C.; Rao, N. B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Labelle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron density profile and its variations is crucial to further progress in understanding the physics of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere. To accomplish this, a plasma frequency probe was included in the payload complement of two rockets flown during the Condor rocket campaign conducted from Peru in March 1983. This paper presents density profiles of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere from a night-time flight in which spread-F conditions were present and from a day-time flight during strong electrojet conditions. Results from both flights are in excellent agreement with simultaneous radar data in that the regions of highly disturbed plasma coincide with the radar signatures. The spread-F rocket penetrated a topside depletion during both the upleg and downleg. The electrojet measurements showed a profile peaking at 1.3 x 10 to the 5th per cu cm at 106 km, with large scale fluctuations having amplitudes of roughly 10 percent seen only in the upward gradient in electron density. This is in agreement with plasma instability theory. It is further shown that simultaneous measurements by fixed-bias Langmuir probes, when normalized at a single point to the altitude profile of electron density, are inadequate to correctly parameterize the observed enhancements and depletions.

  12. Nearly degenerate electron distributions and superluminal radiation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2010-02-01

    Polylogarithmic fugacity expansions of the partition function, the caloric and thermal equations of state, and the specific heat of fermionic power-law distributions are derived in the nearly degenerate low-temperature/high-density quantum regime. The spectral functions of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma are obtained by averaging the tachyonic radiation densities of inertial electrons with Fermi power-laws, whose entropy is shown to be extensive and stable. The averaged radiation densities are put to test by performing tachyonic cascade fits to the γ-ray spectrum of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 in a low and high emission state. Estimates of the thermal electron plasma in this active galactic nucleus are extracted from the spectral fits, such as temperature, number count, and internal energy. The tachyonic cascades reproduce the quiescent as well as a burst spectrum of the blazar obtained with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov detectors. Double-logarithmic plots of the differential tachyon flux exhibit intrinsic spectral curvature, caused by the Boltzmann factor of the electron gas.

  13. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian J

    2012-04-01

    The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ(2) significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  14. Measurements of electron number density and plasma temperature using LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-xia; Luo, Wen-feng; He, Jun-fang; Wang, Hong-ying; Yang, Sen-lin; Li, Yuan-yuan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma produced by the radiation of a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser focused onto a standard aluminum alloy E311 was studied spectroscopically. The electron density was inferred by measuring the Stark broadened line profile of Cu I 324.75 nm at a distance of 1.5 mm from the target surface with the laser irradiance of 3.27 GW/cm2. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method with eight neutral iron lines. At the same time, the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium was discussed in light of the results obtained.

  15. Excess electrons in ice: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Inam, Fakharul; Scandolo, Sandro

    2014-02-21

    We present a density functional theory study of the localization of excess electrons in the bulk and on the surface of crystalline and amorphous water ice. We analyze the initial stages of electron solvation in crystalline and amorphous ice. In the case of crystalline ice we find that excess electrons favor surface states over bulk states, even when the latter are localized at defect sites. In contrast, in amorphous ice excess electrons find it equally favorable to localize in bulk and in surface states which we attribute to the preexisting precursor states in the disordered structure. In all cases excess electrons are found to occupy the vacuum regions of the molecular network. The electron localization in the bulk of amorphous ice is assisted by its distorted hydrogen bonding network as opposed to the crystalline phase. Although qualitative, our results provide a simple interpretation of the large differences observed in the dynamics and localization of excess electrons in crystalline and amorphous ice films on metals.

  16. Total electron content and F-region electron density distribution near the magnetic equator in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Sethia, G.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Davies, K.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Total electron content derived from the group delay measurements of ATS-6 radio beacons received at Ootacamund (India) are compared with the electron-density vs height distributions derived from the ionosonde data of the nearby station Kodaikanal. The daily variation of equivalent vertical total electron content does not show the midday bite out which is so prominently present in the corresponding daily variation of the maximum F-region electron density. The topside electron content continues to increase from sunrise to a maximum value around 1500 LT, while the bottomside electron content reaches a maximum value around 0500 LT. Daily variations of these as well as other parameters, e.g. the vertical slab thickness, the bottomside semi-thickness, the height of the F2 peak have been also studied for a geomagnetically quiet and a disturbed day.

  17. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  18. A novel electron density reconstruction method for asymmetrical toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, N.; Ohshima, S.; Minami, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Kado, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Konoshima, S.; Sano, F.; Tanaka, K.; Ohtani, Y.; Zang, L.; Kenmochi, N.

    2014-05-15

    A novel reconstruction method is developed for acquiring the electron density profile from multi-channel interferometric measurements of strongly asymmetrical toroidal plasmas. It is based on a regularization technique, and a generalized cross-validation function is used to optimize the regularization parameter with the aid of singular value decomposition. The feasibility of method could be testified by simulated measurements based on a magnetic configuration of the flexible helical-axis heliotron device, Heliotron J, which has an asymmetrical poloidal cross section. And the successful reconstruction makes possible to construct a multi-channel Far-infrared laser interferometry on this device. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with a conventional method. The factors which may affect the accuracy of the results are investigated, and an error analysis is carried out. Based on the obtained results, the proposed method is highly promising for accurately reconstructing the electron density in the asymmetrical toroidal plasma.

  19. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  20. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  1. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  2. Surprising resistivity decrease in manganites with constant electronic density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Gil, R.; Ruiz-González, M. L.; Alonso, J. M.; Martínez, J. L.; Hernando, A.; Vallet-Regí, M.; González-Calbet, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    A decrease of eight orders of magnitude in the resistance of (La0.5Ca0.5)zMnO3 has been detected when the electronic density is kept constant while the calcium content is modified by introducing cationic vacancies. This effect is related to the disappearance of the charge ordering state and the emergence of an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition. Moreover, high values of the colossal magnetoresistance above room temperature are attained. Dedicated to Professor J M Rojo.

  3. Halogen bonding: a study based on the electronic charge density.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Nancy J Martinez; Pamies, Silvana C; Peruchena, Nélida M; Sosa, Gladis L

    2010-01-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) and atoms in molecules theory (AIM) were used to study the characteristic of the noncovalent interactions in complexes formed between Lewis bases (NH(3), H(2)O, and H(2)S) and Lewis acids (ClF, BrF, IF, BrCl, ICl, and IBr). In order to compare halogen and hydrogen bonds interactions, this study included hydrogen complexes formed by some Lewis bases and HF, HCl, and HBr Lewis acids. Ab initio, wave functions were generated at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with optimized structures at the same level. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of halogen interactions in Lewis complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: (a) why can electronegative atoms such as halogens act as bridges between two other electronegative atoms? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? Considering this, we had performed a profound study of halogen complexes in the framework of the AIM theory. A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. We had also explored the concentration and depletion of the charge density, displayed by the Laplacian topology, in the interaction zone and in the X-Y halogen donor bond. From the atomic properties, it was generally observed that the two halogen atoms gain electron population in response to its own intrinsic nature. Because of this fact, both atoms are energetically stabilized.

  4. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  5. An Overview of Ionospheric Electron Density Variations over Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Türk Katircioglu, Filiz; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..; Zabotin, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    This study will present the temporal variations in electron density measured in Istanbul (42, 29) using Dynasonde observations. Dynasonde is a type of ionosonde that can measure the dynamics of the ionosphere. Istanbul Dynasonde was established in October 2012 and collecting data since then. The NeXtYZ software have been used to convert ionospheric signals into ionospheric data. In this study, among 72 outputs of ionospheric parameters, electron density, and critical frequency for F2 layer, and TEC have been studied to reveal the ionospheric variations over Istanbul. Statistics for seasonal, monthly and daily variations were obtained by scanning thorough about two years of ionograms. Four types of temporal variability were determined depending on the season and the time of the day. Gravity waves were detected very clearly in the ionograms at this mid-latitude station. In addition, magnetic substorm signatures on the electron density are clearly noticeable and are seen both positive and negative phases. In this talk we will give an overview of the results based on the first two years of the Dynasonde operation in Istanbul.

  6. Cutoff probe using Fourier analysis for electron density measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Byung-Keun; You, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dae-Woong; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung

    2012-01-15

    This paper proposes a new method for cutoff probe using a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope, instead of a network analyzer. The nanosecond impulse generator supplies a radiating signal of broadband frequency spectrum simultaneously without frequency sweeping, while frequency sweeping method is used by a network analyzer in a previous method. The transmission spectrum (S21) was obtained through a Fourier analysis of the transmitted impulse signal detected by the oscilloscope and was used to measure the electron density. The results showed that the transmission frequency spectrum and the electron density obtained with a new method are very close to those obtained with a previous method using a network analyzer. And also, only 15 ns long signal was necessary for spectrum reconstruction. These results were also compared to the Langmuir probe's measurements with satisfactory results. This method is expected to provide not only fast measurement of absolute electron density, but also function in other diagnostic situations where a network analyzer would be used (a hairpin probe and an impedance probe) by replacing the network analyzer with a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope.

  7. determination of current density distribution in an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir Prasad

    Electron beams are useful in many applications because they can be focused down to a spot far exceeding the physical limit of focusing visible light or x-rays. Additionally, electron beams are useful in transferring concentrated amounts of energy to a very small well defined region of a target for a fixed duration. This has led to the development of both scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) and electron beam lithography. The goal of this work was to develop a general method that accurately and easily yields the best estimate of the electron current density distribution of a focused electron beam, known as point spread function (PSF). The method developed is fast, easy to use and accurate. Two specific areas of research have been addressed for PSF determination. The first is concerned with the monotonic response of EUV photoresist as a function of electron beam dose. An external metrology is used for mapping the change in thickness that is smaller than the beam spot size. The method developed in this study simultaneously gives the photo-resist thickness change as a function of electron dose and electron beam PSF. A second thrust of this research has been to develop set of PSF characterization approaches that apply to the SEM. Here a knowledge of the PSF offers many benefits including the ability to monitor and optimize SEM performance such as astigmatism control. Perhaps, even more importantly, a knowledge of the PSF combined with a series of well-defined experimental steps has led to the development of new methods for improving the resolution of SEM images through computational means rather than very costly and complex equipment modification.

  8. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  9. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches.

  10. Electron intracule densities with correct electron coalescence cusps from Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg-type identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Stefanov, Boris B.; Tan, Agnes; Umrigar, C. J.

    1995-10-01

    Identities for the electron intracule density I(R) in atoms and molecules are derived within the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) formalism. It is proven that, when applied to arbitrary (exact or approximate) electronic wave functions, these identities produce intracule densities that satisfy a modified condition for the electron coalescence cusp. A corollary of this proof provides a new, simplified derivation of the cusp condition for the exact I(R). An expression for the Hartree-Fock approximation to the HSF electron intracule density that contains only two- and three-electron terms is obtained and its properties are analyzed. A simple scaling of the three-electron contributions in this expression assures integrability of the approximate I(R) and improves its overall accuracy. Numerical tests carried out for the H-, He, Li+, Be2+, Li, and Be systems demonstrate that the application of the scaled HSF-type identity to Hartree-Fock wave functions affords dramatic improvements in the short-range behavior of the electron intracule density.

  11. Electronic density of states in sequence dependent DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, B. P. W.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report in this work a numerical study of the electronic density of states (DOS) in π-stacked arrays of DNA single-strand segments made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T, forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) as well as a Fibonacci (FB) polyGC quasiperiodic sequences. Both structures are constructed starting from a G nucleotide as seed and following their respective inflation rules. Our theoretical method uses Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, within an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, suitable to describe the DNA segments modelled by the quasiperiodic chains. We compared the DOS spectra found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22, with a remarkable concordance, as far as the RS structure is concerned. The electronic spectrum shows several peaks, corresponding to localized states, as well as a striking self-similar aspect.

  12. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  13. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  14. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  15. Damping of Electron Density Structures and Implications for Interstellar Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Terry, P. W.

    2011-04-01

    The forms of electron density structures in kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) turbulence are studied in connection with scintillation. The focus is on small scales L ~ 108-1010 cm where the KAW regime is active in the interstellar medium, principally within turbulent H II regions. Scales at 10 times the ion gyroradius and smaller are inferred to dominate scintillation in the theory of Boldyrev et al. From numerical solutions of a decaying KAW turbulence model, structure morphology reveals two types of localized structures, filaments and sheets, and shows that they arise in different regimes of resistive and diffusive damping. Minimal resistive damping yields localized current filaments that form out of Gaussian-distributed initial conditions. When resistive damping is large relative to diffusive damping, sheet-like structures form. In the filamentary regime, each filament is associated with a non-localized magnetic and density structure, circularly symmetric in cross section. Density and magnetic fields have Gaussian statistics (as inferred from Gaussian-valued kurtosis) while density gradients are strongly non-Gaussian, more so than current. This enhancement of non-Gaussian statistics in a derivative field is expected since gradient operations enhance small-scale fluctuations. The enhancement of density gradient kurtosis over current kurtosis is not obvious, yet it suggests that modest density fluctuations may yield large scintillation events during pulsar signal propagation. In the sheet regime the same statistical observations hold, despite the absence of localized filamentary structures. Probability density functions are constructed from statistical ensembles in both regimes, showing clear formation of long, highly non-Gaussian tails.

  16. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  17. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  18. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  19. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  20. FINDMOL: automated identification of macromolecules in electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    McKee, E W; Kanbi, L D; Childs, K L; Grosse-Kunstleve, R W; Adams, P D; Sacchettini, J C; Ioerger, T R

    2005-11-01

    Automating the determination of novel macromolecular structures via X-ray crystallographic methods involves building a model into an electron-density map. Unfortunately, the conventional crystallographic asymmetric unit volumes are usually not well matched to the biological molecular units. In most cases, the facets of the asymmetric unit cut the molecules into a number of disconnected fragments, rendering interpretation by the crystallographer significantly more difficult. The FINDMOL algorithm is designed to quickly parse the arrangement of trace points (pseudo-atoms) derived from a skeletonized electron-density map without requiring higher level prior information such as sequence information or number of molecules in the asymmetric unit. The algorithm was tested with a variety of density-modified maps computed with medium- to low-resolution data. Typically, the resulting volume resembles the biological unit. In the remaining cases the number of disconnected fragments is very small. In all examples, secondary-structural elements such as alpha-helices or beta-sheets are easily identifiable in the defragmented arrangement. FINDMOL can greatly assist a crystallographer during manual model building or in cases where automatic model building can only build partial models owing to limitations of the data such as low resolution and/or poor phases.

  1. Electron density measurements during the NLC-91 campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulwick, J. C.; Kelley, Michael C.; Alcala, C.

    1994-01-01

    A Super Arcas rocket, MISTI B, containing DC and RF probes, was launched as a part of the PMSE (Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes) Salvo during the NLC-91 (Noctilucent Cloud) campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution. Measurements of large and small scale structures in the electron density were made on rocket ascent and descent at the altitudes of 86.5 and 88.5 +/- 0.5 km corresponding to the two altitudes of strongest backscatter recorded by the nearby CUPRI (Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer) radar. Power spectra of the fluctuations shows two different structuring and scattering mechanisms exist at altitudes only 1 km apart. Since the rocket apogee was 89 km, the rocket was in the height range 88.5 +/- 0.5 km for 30 seconds giving an unusual measurement of horizontal structure over a distance of 5.5 km. Using the simultaneous DC and RF probe measurements of electron depletions and sharp gradient in the lower layer, the role of aerosols in creating these depletions and gradients is speculated upon.

  2. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  3. The behavior of electron density and temperature during ionospheric heating near the fifth electron gyrofrequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Jian; Rietveld, M. T.; Haggstrom, I.; Zhao, Haisheng; Xu, Zhengwen

    2017-01-01

    The experimental phenomena involving the changes in electron temperature and electron density as a function of pump frequency during an ionospheric heating campaign at European Incoherent Scatter near Tromsø, Norway, are reported. When the pump frequency is slightly above the fifth electron gyrofrequency, the UHF radar observation shows some apparent enhancements over a wide altitude range in radar echo, ion line, and electron density respectively, which are apparently altitude independent and consistent temporally with the upshifting and spread of plasma line around the reflection altitude. However, they do not, in fact, correspond to true increase in electron density. Based on some existing theories, some discussions are presented to try to explain the above enhancements and the upshifting and spread of plasma line. Even so, the mechanism remains to be determined. In addition, the observation also shows some enhancements in electron temperature as a function of pump frequency around the reflection altitude of the pump, which are dependent on the behavior of dispersion of the upper hybrid wave near the fifth electron gyrofrequency.

  4. Density fitting for three-electron integrals in explicitly correlated electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, James C.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2014-01-28

    The principal challenge in using explicitly correlated wavefunctions for molecules is the evaluation of nonfactorizable integrals over the coordinates of three or more electrons. Immense progress was made in tackling this problem through the introduction of a single-particle resolution of the identity. Decompositions of sufficient accuracy can be achieved, but only with large auxiliary basis sets. Density fitting is an alternative integral approximation scheme, which has proven to be very reliable for two-electron integrals. Here, we extend density fitting to the treatment of all three-electron integrals that appear at the MP2-F12/3*A level of theory. We demonstrate that the convergence of energies with respect to auxiliary basis size is much more rapid with density fitting than with the traditional resolution-of-the-identity approach.

  5. The Jovian ionospheric E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Fox, J. L.

    1991-02-01

    A model of the Jovian ionosphere was constructed, that includes direct photoionization of hydrocarbon molecules. A high-resolution solar spectrum was synthesized from Hinteregger's solar maximum spectrum (F79050N), and high-resolution cross sections for photoabsorption by H2 bands in the range 842 to 1116 A were constructed. Two strong solar lines and about 30 percent of the continuum flux between 912 and 1116 A penetrate below the methane homopause despite strong absorption by CH4 and H2. It is found that hydrocarbons (mainly C2H2 are ionized at a maximum rate of 55/cu cm per sec at 320 km above the ammonia cloud tops. The hydrocarbon ions produced are quickly converted to more complex hydrocarbon ions through reactions with CH4, C2H2, C2H6, and C2H4. It is found that a hydrocarbon ion layer is formed near 320 km that is about 50 km wide with a peak density in excess of 10,000/cu cm.

  6. Automated Processing of ISIS Topside Ionograms into Electron Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter; Hills, H. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of the topside ionosphere has for the most part relied on just a few years of data from topside sounder satellites. The widely used Bent et al. (1972) model, for example, is based on only 50,000 Alouette 1 profiles. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza, 1990, 2001) uses an analytical description of the graphs and tables provided by Bent et al. (1972). The Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder satellites of the sixties and seventies were ahead of their times in terms of the sheer volume of data obtained and in terms of the computer and software requirements for data analysis. As a result, only a small percentage of the collected topside ionograms was converted into electron density profiles. Recently, a NASA-funded data restoration project has undertaken and is continuing the process of digitizing the Alouette/ISIS ionograms from the analog 7-track tapes. Our project involves the automated processing of these digital ionograms into electron density profiles. The project accomplished a set of important goals that will have a major impact on understanding and modeling of the topside ionosphere: (1) The TOPside Ionogram Scaling and True height inversion (TOPIST) software was developed for the automated scaling and inversion of topside ionograms. (2) The TOPIST software was applied to the over 300,000 ISIS-2 topside ionograms that had been digitized in the fkamework of a separate AISRP project (PI: R.F. Benson). (3) The new TOPIST-produced database of global electron density profiles for the topside ionosphere were made publicly available through NASA s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) ftp archive at . (4) Earlier Alouette 1,2 and ISIS 1, 2 data sets of electron density profiles from manual scaling of selected sets of ionograms were converted fiom a highly-compressed binary format into a user-friendly ASCII format and made publicly available through nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov. The new database for the topside

  7. Electron density profiles from ionograms - Comparisons with rocket profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.; Paul, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    From a series of ten rocket flights at Wallops Island conducted by the University of Illinois, detailed electron density profiles are available in the altitude range 60-120 km. Concurrent ionograms from a nearby conventional ionosonde of good sensitivity and precision, have been reduced to N(h) profiles by the NOAA methods. Special attention is given to the needs for accurate ionosonde calibration, proper ionogram interpretation, and corrections for underlying ionization, 'valley' ionization, and effects of lateral-gradients. Proper corrections in the present cases yield profiles by ionogram inversion which agree to within a few percent in density, and a few hundred meters or less in height, with the rocket results.

  8. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palenskis, V.

    2014-04-15

    Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  9. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  10. Electron star birth: a continuous phase transition at nonzero density.

    PubMed

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Petrov, Pavel

    2011-03-25

    We show that charged black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime can undergo a third-order phase transition at a critical temperature in the presence of charged fermions. In the low temperature phase, a fraction of the charge is carried by a fermion fluid located a finite distance from the black hole. In the zero temperature limit, the black hole is no longer present and all charge is sourced by the fermions. The solutions exhibit the low temperature entropy density scaling s~T(2/z) anticipated from the emergent IR criticality of recently discussed electron stars.

  11. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E.

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed.

  12. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  13. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  14. Discriminating the trapped electron modes contribution in density fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnichand, H.; Sabot, R.; Hacquin, S.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Garbet, X.; Giacalone, J. C.; Guirlet, R.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Meneses, L.

    2015-09-01

    Quasi-coherent (QC) modes have been reported for more than 10 years in reflectometry fluctuations spectra in the core region of fusion plasmas. They have characteristics in-between coherent and broadband fluctuations as they oscillate at a marked frequency but have a wide spectrum. This work presents further evidences of the link recently established between QC modes and the trapped electron modes (TEM) instabilities (Arnichand et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 123017). In electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges of Tore Supra, an enhancement of QC modes amplitude is observed in a region where TEM cause impurity transport and turbulence. In JET Ohmic plasmas, QC modes disappear during density ramp-up and current ramp-down. This is reminiscent of Tore Supra and TEXTOR observations during transitions from the linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) to the saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regimes. Evidencing TEM activity then becomes experimentally possible via analysis of fluctuation spectra.

  15. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  16. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  17. Accuracy of cutoff probe for measuring electron density: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Si-June; Lee, Jang-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2016-09-01

    The electron density has been used for characterizing the plasma for basic research as well as industrial application. To measure the exact electron density, various type of microwave probe has been developed and improved. The cutoff probe is a promising technique inferring the electron density from the plasma resonance peak on the transmission spectrum. In this study, we present the accuracy of electron density inferred from cutoff probe. The accuracy was investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment. The discrepancy between the electron densities from the cutoff probe and other sophisticated microwave probes were investigated and discussed. We found that the cutoff probe has good accuracy in inferred electron density. corresponding author.

  18. A preliminary study of the neutral wind in the auroral E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brekke, A.; Doupnik, J. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Auroral zone E region neutral winds have been derived from simultaneous measurements of ion drift velocities at different altitudes by the incoherent scatter radar facility at Chatanika, Alaska. The wind derived for quiet and moderately disturbed days shows a consistent pattern during the daytime and appears to be that expected from a day-night pressure asymmetry. In the nighttime, however, the winds are much more variable, apparently responding to the momentum transfer and heating effects of ion drag when sizable electric fields and electron densities are present.

  19. Electron response in van der Waals density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per

    2013-03-01

    There is significant interest in density functional theory (DFT) of dispersive or van der Waals (vdW) interactions and in DFT studies of sparse systems where vdW forces contribute to the cohesion and behavior. The Rutgers-Chalmers van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) method [PRL 92, 246401 (2004); PRB 76, 125112 (2007)] is a nonempirical approach to calculate vdW bonding and for DFT characterizations of sparse matter. The vdW-DF framework is defined by a single exchange-correlation density functional that rests on a plasmon-type description for both semilocal components and for a parameter-free evaluation of nonlocal correlation. My talk summarizes a set of vdW-DF studies that seeks to map and analyze details in the vdW-DF electron-response nature. The purpose is in part to extract consequences that can facilitate an experiment-theory comparison that goes beyond binding geometries and energies. The aim is also to seek implications that can help develop the vdW-DF framework. I present an analysis of the relative importance of morphology, screening (image-plane formation), and collective effects in the vdW-DF description of molecular systems. In addition, I compare vdW-DF results with Cu(111) experiments that tests the electron-response behavior in terms of adsorption-induced band shifts, the form of the overall light-molecule physisorption potential, and the corrugation in the kinetic-energy repulsion of molecules at surfaces. Overall, the vdW-DF studies suggest the importance of benchmarking vdW methods across different length scales and by exploring the variation that arise when related structures have a different balance between exchange repulsion and vdW attraction.

  20. Electron temperatures and densities in the venus ionosphere: pioneer venus orbiter electron temperature probe results.

    PubMed

    Brace, L H; Theis, R F; Krehbiel, J P; Nagy, A F; Donahue, T M; McElroy, M B; Pedersen, A

    1979-02-23

    Altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus have been obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperatutre probe. Elevated temperatutres observed at times of low solar wind flux exhibit height profiles that are consistent with a model in which less than 5 percent of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 kilomneters where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. When solar wind fluxes are higher, the electron temperatures and densities are highly structured and the ionopause moves to lower altitudes. The ionopause height in the late afternoon sector observed thus far varies so widely from day to (day that any height variation with solar zenith angle is not apparent in the observations. In the neighborhood of the ionopause, measuremnents of plasma temperatures and densities and magnetic field strength indicate that an induced magnetic barrier plays an important role in the pressure transfer between the solar wind and the ionosphere. The bow, shock is marked by a distinct increase in electron current collected by the instrument, a featutre that provides a convenient identification of the bow shock location.

  1. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  2. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  3. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  4. Neutral Atmosphere Properties Determining D-region Electron Densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taubenheim, J.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing discoveries of various manifestations of meteorological control of the D region ionization and the growth of techniques for its measurement provide a challenge to meteorologists to test their insight into middle atmosphere processes with the physical interpretation of D layer phenomena. Models for ion production due to photoionization of minor atmospheric nitric oxide by quasi-monochromatic solar Lyman-alpha radiation are presented. A ground based measuring technique using low frequency radio reflection heights is briefly described and an approach to the interpretation of data acquired by this method is discussed. It is shown that D region electron density variations can provide an efficient diagnostic tool for the detection of perturbations of the circulation state of the middle atmosphere.

  5. Plasmaspheric Electron Densities and Plasmashere-Ionosphere Coupling Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, Janos; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris; Sannikov, Dmitry; Ferencz, Csaba; Koronczay, David

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities and ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet [1] detects millions of whistlers in a year. The system has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu) project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model [2], that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups [3]. In this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods from Karymshina station (Kamchatka, Russia). Refilling rates, that are not yet known in details are also presented for the various periods. 1.Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, L. Bodnár, D. Hamar, and P. Steinbach (2008), Automatic whistler detector and analyzer system: Automatic whistler detector, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467. 2. Lichtenberger, J. (2009), A new whistler inversion method, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799. 3. Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, D. Hamar, P. Steinbach, C. J. Rodger, M. A. Clilverd, and A. B. Collier (2010), Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A12214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015931.

  6. Electron correlation in solids via density embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chen, Weibing; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-08-07

    Density matrix embedding theory [G. Knizia and G. K.-L. Chan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012)] and density embedding theory [I. W. Bulik, G. E. Scuseria, and J. Dukelsky, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035140 (2014)] have recently been introduced for model lattice Hamiltonians and molecular systems. In the present work, the formalism is extended to the ab initio description of infinite systems. An appropriate definition of the impurity Hamiltonian for such systems is presented and demonstrated in cases of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions, using coupled cluster theory as the impurity solver. Additionally, we discuss the challenges related to disentanglement of fragment and bath states. The current approach yields results comparable to coupled cluster calculations of infinite systems even when using a single unit cell as the fragment. The theory is formulated in the basis of Wannier functions but it does not require separate localization of unoccupied bands. The embedding scheme presented here is a promising way of employing highly accurate electronic structure methods for extended systems at a fraction of their original computational cost.

  7. Electronic Structure and Effectively Unpaired Electron Density Topology in closo-Boranes: Nonclassical Three-Center Two-Electron Bonding.

    PubMed

    Lobayan, Rosana M; Bochicchio, Roberto C; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis

    2011-04-12

    This article provides a detailed study of the structure and bonding in closo-borane cluster compounds X2B3H3 (X = BH(-), P, SiH, CH, N), with particular emphasis on the description of the electron distribution using the topology of the quantum many-body effectively unpaired density. The close relationship observed between the critical points of this quantity and the localization of the electron cloud allows us to characterize the nonclassical bonding patterns of these systems. The obtained results confirm the suitability of the local rule to detect three-center two-electron bonds, which was conjectured in our previous study on boron hydrides.

  8. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  9. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  10. The quasirelativistic contact interaction and effective electron and spin densities at the nucleus: A model based on weighting the electron density with the finite Gaussian nucleus model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malček, Michal; Bučinský, Lukáš; Biskupič, Stanislav; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-01

    The Infinite Order Two Component quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock contact and effective electron/spin densities of Cu, Ag, Au atoms and the chemical shifts of HgF2, Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ are presented. The effective densities for the Gaussian nucleus model based on the weighted product of electron/spin density with the Gaussian distribution of the nucleus are reported for the first time. The effective (average) electron density obtained via the derivative of the energy of the system with respect to the size of the nucleus is shown for comparison. The finite-field difference method to obtain the derivative of the energy is also considered.

  11. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  12. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  13. A basis set convergence study of conventional and HSF electron densities in the Li 2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challacombe, Matt; Cioslowski, Jerzy

    1994-07-01

    Calculations of nonnuclear, Hartree-Fock HSF and CHSF electron densities are reported for the first time. The positions of critical points in the conventional, HSF, and CHSF electron densities of the Li 2 molecule (including the nonnuclear maximum) and corresponding values of the electron density are computed for a sequence of systematically improved basis sets. The basis set convergence of these topological properties, as well as that of the densities at nuclei, are examined. Quantities derived from HSF and CHSF electron densities are found to converge more rapidly than their conventional counterparts.

  14. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-07-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 1016 m-3. This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 1016 m-3. After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  15. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  16. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density in aPositively-Charged Particle Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W.; Friedman, Alex; Vay,Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A.; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2006-04-27

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron cloud density during the beam pulse.

  17. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density in a Positively-Charged Particle Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Vay, J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-05-18

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron cloud density during the beam pulse.

  18. Absolute measurement of electron-cloud density in a positively charged particle beam.

    PubMed

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L

    2006-08-04

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron-cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron-cloud density during the beam pulse.

  19. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  20. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man-Hong, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176080).

  1. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  2. Longitudinal Variation in GPS -TEC and Topside Electron Density Associated with the Wave Number Four Structures over South American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, P. A.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Bailey, G. J.; Shume, E. B.; Denardini, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations of the low-latitude ionospheric electron density have revealed a longitudinal structure in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) intensity, which is characterized by a wave number-four pattern when plotted at a constant-local-time frame. It has been proposed that neutral wind driven dynamo electric fields from the E-region due to non migrating tidal modes are responsible for this pattern. In the present work we have used measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) to investigate the four peaks structure in the topside electron density of the low latitude ionosphere. We also compare the climatology of the Total Electron Content (TEC) as observed by GPS receivers in two equatorial stations over South America, São Luís (2.33 S, 315.8E, declination = -19 degree) in Brazil and Arequipa (16.5S, 288.5E, declination = 0.5 degree) in Peru. TEC variations for three solar activity levels (high, moderate and low) have been analyzed. TEC values over São Luís are found to be larger than that ones over Arequipa independent of the season, local time and solar cycle conditions. We estimated the vertical plasma drifts over these stations using magnetometer data during daytime and using ionosonde data for evening hours. We fed the Sheffield University Plasmasphere Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) with this drifts in an attempt to partially explain the differences in the TEC over these stations. The SUPIM was also used to evaluate the effect of thermospheric wind to cause the four peaks structure in the plasma density. Therefore, we analyze the equatorial ionospheric response to combined effects of thermospheric neutral winds and zonal electric field causing the longitudinal variation in TEC observed in the South American longitude sector.

  3. Electron density measurements in a photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited laser gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, V. A.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Capjack, C. E.; Nikumb, S. K.

    1986-11-01

    Measurements of the electron density within a photo-initiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) laser gas discharge are presented. Ion current measurements were made using a single Langmuir electrostatic probe positioned within the laser discharge volume. Calculations of the electron density were made utilizing a thick-sheath analysis. The results indicate that the electron density increases by two orders of magnitude as the pulser power level is increased. In addition, the electron density was observed to decrease markedly as the dc discharge current was increased.

  4. MAVEN observations of dayside peak electron densities in the ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Andersson, Laila; Girazian, Zachary; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; Elrod, Meredith K.; Connerney, John E. P.; Espley, Jared R.; Eparvier, Frank G.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2017-01-01

    The peak electron density in the dayside Martian ionosphere is a valuable diagnostic of the state of the ionosphere. Its dependence on factors like the solar zenith angle, ionizing solar irradiance, neutral scale height, and electron temperature has been well studied. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft's September 2015 "deep dip" orbits, in which the orbital periapsis was lowered to 125 km, provided the first opportunity since Viking to sample in situ a complete dayside electron density profile including the main peak. Here we present peak electron density measurements from 37 deep dip orbits and describe conditions at the altitude of the main peak, including the electron temperature and composition of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. We find that the dependence of the peak electron density and the altitude of the main peak on solar zenith angle are well described by analytical photochemical theory. Additionally, we find that the electron temperatures at the main peak display a dependence on solar zenith angle that is consistent with the observed variability in the peak electron density. Several peak density measurements were made in regions of large crustal magnetic field, but there is no clear evidence that the crustal magnetic field strength influences the peak electron density, peak altitude, or electron temperature. Finally, we find that the fractional abundance of O2+ and CO2+ at the peak altitude is variable but that the two species together consistently represent 95% of the total ion density.

  5. Measurements of possible D- and E-region telecommunications effects during ionospheric heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Showen, R L

    1980-02-01

    For this research project, measurements were made of the effects that heating the ionosphere might have on the passage of radiowaves through the D- and E-regions. The purpose of this work was to simulate the effects of the proposed Solar Power Satellite microwave power beam on the lower ionosphere. The increased electron temperatures produced by the Platteville, Colorado, HF ionospheric heater caused cross-modulation on certain radiowaves when the heater was rapidly modulated (the Luxembourg effect). Small amounts of cross-modulation were detected at four frequencies between 60 kHz and 5 MHz. Attempts were made to detect phase path changes - indicative of electron number density changes - while the heater was slowly cycled on and off. No phase path changes could be seen for radiowaves of frequency 10.2 or 60 kHz. If these results are extrapolated to the powers and frequency of the Solar Power Satellite power beam, then no significant impact from D- and E-region modification on telecommunications services are expected.

  6. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  7. Atomic and electronic structure of polar oxide interfaces: Electron microscopy and density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Vlado

    Polar oxide interfaces are formed when two polar oxide surfaces join. The apparent presence of an electric dipole moment in the repeat unit parallel to the surface/interface closely relate the polar oxide interfaces instability to that of the of polar oxide surfaces. In this thesis, we combined Electron Microscopy and Density Functional Theory to study how the interface polarity affects the atomic and electronic structure of polar oxide interfaces, by using Fe3O4(111)/MgO(111) as a model system. The formation of Fe nanoinclusions found at the interface and within the polar Fe3 O4(111) film is proposed to be new stabilization mechanism for the magnetite film. High-resolution electron microscopy imaging of the interface together with first principle calculations suggest an atomically abrupt substrate-film interface determined with Fe monolayer in octahedral position (FeB). This interface stacking (O/Mg/O/3FeB/O) provides lowest total interface (system) energy and the most effectively screening of the MgO(111) substrate surface polarity. The results of our study suggest that surface polarity could be used as an additional growth parameter in creating novel material structures, such as metals in oxide matrices.

  8. Unfolding ambient electron plasma density from wave spectra induced by electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraga, A.; Klos, Z.; Oraevsky, V.; Dokukin, V.; Pulinets, S.

    Numerous rocket and few satellite projects were devoted to study of astrophysical plasma with the aid of active electron beam experiments. The quality and volume of wave data from such experiments did not fulfill original expectat ions due to complexity of involved processes, technical malfunctions and limited diagnostics. Due to fortunate, temporal malfunction of plasma accelerator, there were several cases when pulsed electron beam had been injected from the APEX satellite into otherwise unmodified ionospheric plasma. Instantaneous current intensity didn't exceeded 0.15A and an unstabilized acceleration voltage was of the order of 10keV. Injection pitch angle slowly changed according to moderate three-axis satellite stabilization. Injections took place in the altitude range 400-1100km in the European region and in the north, polar region. A receiver with bandwidth of 15kHz was connected to a cylindrical dipole antenna having half lengths of 7.5m. The receiver operated in survey mode providing one spectrum every 2s or 8s. The single spectrum was measured in 1s with an equally spaced mesh of 200 frequencies starting from 100kHz with a step of 50kHz. Electron beam induced spectra show up large variety of narrow band structures. In many cases, from reproducibility or slow evolution of the spectra, it may be inferred that distinct interactions prevail for some ranges of ambient electron gyro (fc) and plasma (fn) frequencies, injection pitch angles and beam intensity. Interaction plausibility arguments are useful in preliminary assignment of spectral structures. We show that discrete emission can be identified at least on ambient plasma frequency or ambient upper hybrid frequency. One class of arguments supporting such identification is provided by interrelation between spectral signatures of local plasma density in passive mode and beam induced spectra. Another class of arguments is provided by interrelations between spectral structures induced by electron beam

  9. A statistical study of magnetospheric electron density using the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, J. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Fear, R. C.; Dandouras, I.

    2016-11-01

    Observations from the WHISPER (Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation) instrument on board Cluster, for the interval spanning 2001-2012, are utilized to determine an empirical model describing the total electron density along closed geomagnetic field lines. The model, representing field lines in the region of 4.5≤L < 9.5, includes dependences on L and magnetic local time. Data verification tests ensured that the WHISPER data set provided unbiased measurements for low-density regions, including comparisons with Plasma Electron and Current Experiment and Electric Field and Waves observations. The model was determined by modeling variations in the electron density along the field lines, which is observed to follow a power law distribution along the geomagnetic field at high latitudes, with power law index values ranging from approximately 0.0 to 1.2. However, a localized peak in electron density close to the magnetic equator is observed, which is described using a Gaussian peak function, with the electron density peak ranging as high as 10 cm-3 above the background power law dependence. The resulting model illustrates some key features of the electron density spatial distribution. The role of the number density distribution, represented by the empirical electron density model, in determining the total plasma mass density is also explored. By combining the empirical electron density model with an empirical average ion mass model, the total plasma mass density distribution is inferred, which includes contributions of both the number density and ion composition of the plasma in the region.

  10. Guiding and collimating the fast electrons by using a low-density-core target with buried high density layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2017-02-01

    A low-density-core target with buried high density layers is proposed to improve the transport of fast electrons and involved problems are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that this target can collimate the fast electrons efficiently and lead to a better beam quality. The enhancement is attributed to the weakening of the two stream instability and the better collimation by the self-generated multilayer megagauss magnetic field as well as the baroclinic magnetic field. Comparing this to that without buried high density layers, the energy flux of fast electrons is increased by a factor of about 1.8 and has a narrower transverse distribution in space. Besides, the dependence of the efficiency on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are also obtained. Such a target can be useful to many applications, such as fast ignition in inertial fusion.

  11. Fast tokamak plasma flux and electron density reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, K.L.; Hallock, G.A.; Wootton, A.J.; Wang, L.

    1997-01-01

    Density profiles in TEXT-U are obtained using a vertical viewing far-infrared (FIR) interferometer. To obtain the local (inverted) density, we have developed a simple analytic model of the plasma equilibrium configuration which is faster than EFIT (a flux surface reconstruction program) and can be easily computed between discharges. This analytic solution of the Grad{endash}Shafranov equation is valid as long as the pressure p is a function of poloidal flux {psi}, i.e., p=p({psi}). The procedure incorporates both magnetic and FIR density data to solve the Grad{endash}Shafranov equation, and provides a density profile which is self-consistent with the reconstructed equilibrium flux surfaces. Examples are presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  13. Materials for high-density electronic packaging and interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Electronic packaging and interconnections are the elements that today limit the ultimate performance of advanced electronic systems. Materials in use today and those becoming available are critically examined to ascertain what actions are needed for U.S. industry to compete favorably in the world market for advanced electronics. Materials and processes are discussed in terms of the final properties achievable and systems design compatibility. Weak points in the domestic industrial capability, including technical, industrial philosophy, and political, are identified. Recommendations are presented for actions that could help U.S. industry regain its former leadership position in advanced semiconductor systems production.

  14. Electronic Structure Methods Based on Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    L. Nordström, L. Tongming, and B. Johansson, “Relativistic Effects on the Thermal Expansion of the Actinide Elements ”, Phys. Rev. B 42, 1990, p 4544...In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Christopher F. Woodward (AFRL/RXLMD) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4347 5e...in valence electrons change the structure of the core electrons. For example in the actinides , where the f-electrons are coupled to the core states

  15. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brijesh, P.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. T.; Corde, S.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M.; Kneip, S.

    2012-06-15

    A density perturbation in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 {+-} 3.6%, divergence of 4 {+-} 0.8 mrad, and charge of 6 {+-} 1.8 pC.

  16. Measurements of Electron Density Profile and Fluctuations on HSX*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Probert, P.; Radder, J.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    The 288 GHz interferometer system on the quasi-helical stellarator HSX views the plasma cross section along 9 adjacent chords with 1.5 cm spacing. At this frequency refraction is manageable but requires correction when performing inversions. The interferometer has sensitivity n_edl = 8 x 10^11 cm-2 and frequency response up to 1 MHz. Improved time response permits measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations as well as fast changes to the equilibrium profile. First results from HSX with 2nd harmonic ECH at 28 GHz, using a 5 chord version of the interferometer, indicate that the density profile is quite peaked for both quasi-helically symmetric (QHS) plasmas and those where the quasisymmetry is broken (mirror mode) for ne = 1 x 10^12 cm-3. However, for densities ne = 3 x 10^11 cm-3, the profile for the QHS plasma (high stored energy) is narrower when compared to the mirror mode (low stored energy). Density profile variation with plasma configuration and resonant heating location using the 9 channel interferometer will be described. For high density HSX plasmas, ne > 3 x 10^12 cm-3, coherent oscillations are observed in the line-integrated density traces which are out of phase across the magnetic axis. These m=1 oscillations are observed at frequencies of 1-2 kHz and result in a periodic displacement of the density profile. *Supported by USDOE under grant DE-FG03-01ER-54615, Task III and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  17. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  18. Materials for High-Density Electronic Packaging and Interconnection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-10

    34 wire "-based systems. An additional study of optical interconnection is strongly recommended’. The literature on electronic packaging has recently...along with the physical design of the electronic systems, and today’s structures represent engineering optimization of many factors. It is of little...34 options exist, including the use of face-down, " beam -lead" or TAB lead frame arrangements, and also face-up wire - bonded configurations. Following

  19. Absolute measurements of night-time electron density using ISR gyro lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Asti; Kelley, Michael; Nicolls, Michael; Sulzer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Gyro line in Incoherent Scatter Spectrum is the underused cousin of the more popular Plasma line. This is because it is very weak during the day and stronger during dawn and dusk hours. When the electron density is such that the electron plasma frequency drops below the electron gyro frequency, the gyro line frequency becomes proportional to the electron density. This is during a time when the plasma line is no longer detected, and we have no other means for getting precise measurements for absolute electron density. In this paper, we will present a linear equation for the gyro line frequency and measurements from the Arecibo radar in Puerto Rico, showing comparison with the plasma line data and derived electron density.

  20. Properties of electron density and other one-electron observables derived from generalized Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Lopez-Boada, Roberto

    1998-07-01

    A generalization of the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) and Rassolov-Chipman identities for the electron density is presented. A companion expression for the electrostatic potential is derived. Properties of the electron density furnished by the generalized HSF identity are discussed. In particular, the behavior in the vicinity of an arbitrary potential singularity and the long-range asymptotics are analyzed in detail. A simple numerical example is provided to illustrate the new theoretical results.

  1. Effective mass in bilayer graphene at low carrier densities: The role of potential disorder and electron-electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Tan, L. Z.; Zou, K.; Stabile, A. A.; Seiwell, D. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Louie, Steven G.; Zhu, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas, the electron-electron interaction generally becomes stronger at lower carrier densities and renormalizes the Fermi-liquid parameters, such as the effective mass of carriers. We combine experiment and theory to study the effective masses of electrons and holes me* and mh* in bilayer graphene in the low carrier density regime on the order of 1 ×1011c m-2 . Measurements use temperature-dependent low-field Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations observed in high-mobility hexagonal boron nitride supported samples. We find that while me* follows a tight-binding description in the whole density range, mh* starts to drop rapidly below the tight-binding description at a carrier density of n =6 ×1011c m-2 and exhibits a strong suppression of 30% when n reaches 2 ×1011c m-2 . Contributions from the electron-electron interaction alone, evaluated using several different approximations, cannot explain the experimental trend. Instead, the effect of the potential fluctuation and the resulting electron-hole puddles play a crucial role. Calculations including both the electron-electron interaction and disorder effects explain the experimental data qualitatively and quantitatively. This Rapid Communication reveals an unusual disorder effect unique to two-dimensional semimetallic systems.

  2. Electron density dynamics in the electronic ground state: motion along the Kekulé mode of benzene.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Choudhary, Deepanshu; Sambre, Vaibhav D; Paulus, Beate

    2012-11-26

    If the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is invoked for the description of chemical reactions, the electron density rearranges following the motion of the nuclei. Even though this approach is central to theoretical chemistry, the explicit time dependence of the electron density is rarely studied, especially if the nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. In this article, we model the motion of benzene along the Kekulé vibrational coordinate to simulate the nuclear dynamics and electron density dynamics in the electronic ground state. Details of the change of core, valence, and π electrons are determined and analyzed. We show how the pictures anticipated by drawing Lewis structures of the rearrangement correlate with the time-dependent quantum description of the process.

  3. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, W.P.

    1999-06-29

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits are disclosed. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing. 8 figs.

  4. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, William P.

    1999-01-01

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing.

  5. Quantitation of molecular densities by cryo-electron microscopy. Determination of the radial density distribution of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, M F; Langmore, J P

    1992-08-05

    We have determined the absolute mass and radial scattering density distribution of tobacco mosaic virus in the frozen-hydrated state by energy-filtered low-dose bright-field transmission electron microscopy. The absolute magnitude of electron scattering from tobacco mosaic virus in 150 nm of ice was within 3.0% of that predicted, with inelastic scattering accounting for approximately 80% of the scattering contrast. In order to test the accuracy of the radial reconstruction, a computer model of tobacco mosaic virus was built from the atomic co-ordinates assuming uniform solvent density. The validity of the model was confirmed by comparison of X-ray scattering and predictions of the model (R factor = 0.05). First-order corrections for the microscope contrast transfer function were necessary and sufficient for conversion of the cryo-electron microscopy images into accurate representations of the mass density. At 1.9 nm resolution the compensated reconstruction and model had density peaks of similar magnitude at 2.4, 4.2, 6.0 and 7.8 nm radius and a central hole of 2 nm radius. Equatorial Fourier transforms of the corrected electron images were in excellent agreement with predictions of the model (R factor = 0.12). Thus, the uniform solvent approximation was adequate at 1.9 nm resolution to describe quantitatively X-ray scattering in liquid water and electron imaging in vitreous ice. This is the first demonstration that cryo-electron microscopy images can be used to quantitate the absolute mass, mass per unit length and internal density distributions of proteins and nucleic acids.

  6. High-energy-density electron jet generation from an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T. P. Shao, F. Q.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, W. Q.; Li, X. H.; Liu, J. X.; Ouyang, J. M.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Wang, J. W.; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-01-14

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose a scheme for strong coupling of a petawatt laser with an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasmas. When relevant parameters are properly chosen, most laser energy can be fully deposited inside the cone with only 10% leaving the tip opening. Due to the asymmetric ponderomotive acceleration by the strongly decayed laser pulse, high-energy-density electrons with net laser energy gain are accumulated inside the cone, which then stream out of the tip opening continuously, like a jet. The jet electrons are fully relativistic, with speeds around 0.98−0.998 c and densities at 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} level. The jet can keep for a long time over 200 fs, which may have diverse applications in practice.

  7. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  8. Modern Possibilities for Calculating Some Properties of Molecules and Crystals from the Experimental Electron Density

    SciTech Connect

    Stash, A.I.; Tsirelson, V.G.

    2005-03-01

    Methods for calculating some properties of molecules and crystals from the electron density reconstructed from a precise X-ray diffraction experiment using the multipole model are considered. These properties include, on the one hand, the characteristics of the electron density and the inner-crystal electrostatic field and, on the other hand, the local electronic energies (kinetic, potential, total), the exchange energy density, the electron-pair localization function, the localized-orbital locator, the effective crystal potential, and others. It is shown that the integration of these characteristics over pseudoatomic volumes bounded by the surfaces of the zero flux of the electron density gradient makes it possible to characterize directly from an experiment the properties of molecules and crystals in terms of the atomic contributions. The computer program WinXPRO2004, realizing these possibilities, is briefly described.

  9. Influence of the electronic plasma density on the wave particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Boscher, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The wave particle interaction, which is well known to be a major phenomenon in the electron radiation belts dynamics, is based on two main parameters: the characteristics of the wave (type of wave, intensity,…) and the characteristics of the ambient plasma. In this work we studied the second parameter. On one side, the electronic plasma density can be derived from in-situ measurements. On the other side, several empirical models exist: GCPM, IZMIRAN or Carpenter models. Here, we compared electronic plasma densities derived from in-situ measurements each other and with existing models. Then, we investigated on the electronic plasma density distribution to distinguish the inside to the outside plasmasphere. Finally, the effect of the electronic plasma density on the diffusion coefficients due to wave particle interaction has been studied via a numerical code, called WAPI, based on quasi linear theory.

  10. The effects of a multidensity plasma on ultraviolet spectroscopic electron density diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Spectroscopic electron density diagnostics have been developed for interpretation of UV, EUV, and X-ray emission line spectra of solar and other astrophysical plasmas, and tokamak plasmas. In principle, accurate electron densities can be determined. However, in practice, a number of difficulties arise with respect to the determination of very accurate electron densities in the 1100-3000 A region. The present study has the objective to investigate one of these difficulties, taking into account the effect on line ratios produced by a source composed of several regions of substantially different densities, all at the same temperature. The study is in particular concerned with a source in which small high density knots are embedded in low-density plasma. Attention is given to line ratios involving the O IV multiplet near 1400 A, obtained from the spectrum of a surge observed outside the solar limb.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  12. Long-term observations of D-region electron densities at high and middle northern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Werner; Keuer, Dieter; Friedrich, Martin; Strelnikova, Irina; Latteck, Ralph

    D-region electron densities are estimated using Doppler radars at frequencies around 3 MHz in Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) since summer 2003 and in Juliusruh, Germany (54.6°N, 13.4°E) since summer 2006. Both experiments utilize partial reflections of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-90 km to estimate electron number densities from differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements. Height profiles of electron density are obtained between about 55 km and 90 km with sampling times of 2-3 minutes and height resolution of 1.5 km at Andenes and 3 km at Juliusruh. The electron density profiles independently derived from DAE and DPE measurements agree remarkably well. The radar results are compared with co-located simultaneously measured electron densities by rocket-borne radio wave propagation experiments (differential absorption, Faraday rotation, and impedance probe) in Andenes with good agreement between insitu and ground-based measurements. The diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities as observed at high and mid-latitudes under quiet ionospheric conditions is presented and compared to the corresponding electron density profiles of the International Reference Ionosphere. The response of D-region ionization to regular solar activity variation as well as to solar activity storms and geomagnetic disturbances has been studied at polar latitudes. Characteristic electron density variations are found during downwelling events of nitric oxide due to strong vertical coupling during stratospheric warming events. In addition, we discuss the inter-relation between D-region electron densities from radar observations, riometer absorption, and the empirical model IMAZ at different levels of solar activity and during particle precipitation events.

  13. Theoretical discussion for electron-density distribution in multicusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan Hualin; Hu Chundong; Xie Yahong; Wu Bin; Wang Jinfang; Liang Lizheng; Wei Jianglong

    2011-03-21

    By introducing some ideas of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and kinetic theories, some useful solutions for electron-density distribution in the radial direction in multicusp ion source are obtained. Therefore, some conclusions are made in this perspective: 1, the electron-density distributions in a specific region in the sheath are the same with or without magnetic field; 2, the influence of magnetic field on the electron density obeys exponential law, which should take into account the collision term as well if the magnetic field is strong; 3, the result derived from the Boltzmann equation is qualitatively consistent with some given experimental results.

  14. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  15. Experimental Characterization of the Electron Heat Transport in Low-Density ASDEX Upgrade Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryter, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Leuterer, F.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Suttrop, W.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2001-06-11

    The electron heat transport is investigated in ASDEX Upgrade conventional L -mode plasmas with pure electron heating provided by electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) at low density. Under these conditions, steady-state and ECH modulation experiments indicate without ambiguity that electron heat transport exhibits a clear threshold in {nabla}T{sub e}/T{sub e} and also suggest that it has a gyro-Bohm character.

  16. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  17. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; ...

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in amore » low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.« less

  18. Warm O(+) polar wind and the DE-1 polar cap electron density profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. W.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical steady state semikinetic polar wind density profiles, based on DE1/RIMS polar wind data (up to 3700 km), were obtained which agree very well with the power law electron density profile measured by the DE1/PWI for high altitudes. The polar wind is found to be O(+) dominated for the full altitude range considered (up to 8 R(E)). Multiple solutions are obtained for various combinations of base altitude ion temperatures and electron temperatures, such that the densities fit the Persoon et al. (1983) profile. For example, good fits to measured density profile are found for low base ion temperatures (5000 K) and high electron temperatures (9000 K), and also for unheated H(+) and O(+)(3000 K) with electron temperatures of 11,000 K. Below 2.8 R(E) the theoretical polar wind density deviates somewhat from the r exp -3.85 power law. It is concluded that this theoretical polar wind density profile, with a sum of base electron and ion temperatures of 14,000 K, yields a close match with the measured DE-1 electron density profile.

  19. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  20. A simple and straightforward expression for curling probe electron density diagnosis in reactive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hotta, Masaya; Nakamura, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS) refers to the family of plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the ability of plasmas to resonate at frequencies close to the plasma frequency. APRS operates by exciting the plasma with a weak RF signal by means of a small electric probe. The response of the plasma is recorded by a network analyzer (NA). A mathematical model is applied to derive characteristics like the electron density and the electron temperature. The curling probe is a promising realization of APRS. The curling probe is well-qualified for the local measurement of the electron density in reactive plasmas. This spiral probe resonates in plasma at a larger density dependent frequency than the plasma frequency. This manuscript represents a simple and straightforward expression relating this resonance frequency to the electron density of the plasma. A good agreement is observed between the proposed expression and the results obtained from previous studies and numerical simulations.

  1. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  2. Comparisons of ionospheric electron density distributions reconstructed by GPS computerized tomography, backscatter ionograms, and vertical ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Lei, Yong; Li, Bofeng; An, Jiachun; Zhu, Peng; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong; Ni, Binbin; Wang, Zemin; Zhou, Xuhua

    2015-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) computerized ionosphere tomography (CIT) and ionospheric sky wave ground backscatter radar are both capable of measuring the large-scale, two-dimensional (2-D) distributions of ionospheric electron density (IED). Here we report the spatial and temporal electron density results obtained by GPS CIT and backscatter ionogram (BSI) inversion for three individual experiments. Both the GPS CIT and BSI inversion techniques demonstrate the capability and the consistency of reconstructing large-scale IED distributions. To validate the results, electron density profiles obtained from GPS CIT and BSI inversion are quantitatively compared to the vertical ionosonde data, which clearly manifests that both methods output accurate information of ionopsheric electron density and thereby provide reliable approaches to ionospheric soundings. Our study can improve current understanding of the capability and insufficiency of these two methods on the large-scale IED reconstruction.

  3. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  4. The experimental electron density in polymorphs A and B of the anti-ulcer drug famotidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard, J.; Hibbs, D. E.

    2004-09-01

    A multipole description of the electron-density distribution in the two polymorphs of famotidine is given. The electrostatic potential shown on the molecular surfaces provides additional information on molecular reactivity.

  5. Seasonal and solar activity variability of D-region electron density at 69°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Werner; Latteck, Ralph; Friedrich, Martin; Wakabayashi, Makato; Rapp, Markus

    2011-06-01

    A narrow beam Doppler radar operating at 3.17 MHz and installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway, (69.3°N, 16.0°E) has been providing electron densities in the lower ionosphere since summer 2003. The experiment utilizes partial reflection of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-95 km to estimate electron densities from differential absorption and differential phase measurements. These ground-based observations are in good agreement with concurrent rocket-borne radio wave propagation measurements at Andenes. Results of the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities and the response of D-region electron densities to solar activity storms are presented.

  6. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  7. Electron density profiles from ionograms - Underlying ionization corrections and their comparison with rocket results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.; Paul, A. K.; Mechtly, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Electron density profiles from nine daytime rocket flights at Wallops Island, Va., conducted at high and low levels of solar activity are compared with profiles calculated by inversion of ionograms obtained at the same times and location. Sources of error and uncertainty in the ionogram inversion are discussed, as are means for their amelioration. In most cases, agreement between the two kinds of measurement within a few percent in electron density and within a few percent of a scale height can be achieved.

  8. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, John P.; Carlson, Benjamin T.; Duggins, Danielle O.; Hammond, Kenneth C.; De Santis, Stefano; Tencate, Alister J.

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  9. A novel three-dimensional variant of the watershed transform for segmentation of electron density maps.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Electron density maps at moderate resolution are often difficult to interpret due to the lack of recognizable features. This is especially true for electron tomograms that suffer in addition to the resolution limitation from low signal-to-noise ratios. Reliable segmentation of such maps into smaller, manageable units can greatly facilitate interpretation. Here, we present a segmentation approach targeting three-dimensional electron density maps derived by electron microscopy. The approach consists of a novel three-dimensional variant of the immersion-based watershed algorithm. We tested the algorithm on calculated data and applied it to a wide variety of electron density maps ranging from reconstructions of single macromolecules to tomograms of subcellular structures. The results indicate that the algorithm is reliable, efficient, accurate, and applicable to a wide variety of biological problems.

  10. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  11. Accurate electron densities from the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg identity applied to constrained wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challacombe, Matt; Cioslowski, Jerzy

    When applied to electronic wavefunctions calculated with Gaussian-type basis functions, the Hiller-Sucher-Feinberg (HSF) identity improves the accuracy of the electron density at non-hydrogen nuclei by more than an order of magnitude, yielding approximate electron-nuclear cusps. However, the HSF electron densities at hydrogen nuclei bound to heavy atoms are greatly overestimated. This phenomenon is associated with the asymptotic behaviour of the HSF density, which incorrectly decreases to a constant when the sum of Hellmann-Feynman forces acting on nuclei is finite. A method for constraining variational wavefunctions to yield vanishing Hellmann-Feynman forces is described. Hartree-Fock calculations of the constrained HSF (CHSF) electron densities with the 6-31G, 6-31G**, and 6-311++G** basis sets are reported at the nuclei of various diatomic molecules, and are compared with their corresponding conventional, HSF, and Hartree-Fock limit values. These calculations show that differences between HSF and CHSF densities are minor at nonhydrogen nuclei. Importantly, the calculated HF/6-311++G** CHSF densities are on average three times more accurate than the conventional densities at hydrogen nuclei.

  12. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Hubertus J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Finally, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  13. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-04-27

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  14. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-04-27

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  15. The COSMOS-[O II] survey: evolution of electron density with star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-01

    Star-forming galaxies at z > 1 exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of the star-forming conditions, we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.5 with emission-line measurements of the {[O II]}λ λ 3726,3729 doublet. By comparing our z ∼ 1.5 sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of 114_{-27}^{+28} cm^{-3} for our z ∼ 1.5 sample, a factor of 5 greater than the typical electron density of local star-forming galaxies. However, we find no offset between the typical electron densities of local and high-redshift galaxies with equivalent star formation rates. Our work indicates that the average electron density of a sample is highly sensitive to the star formation rates, implying that the previously observed evolution is mainly the result of selection effects.

  16. The first in situ electron temperature and density measurements of the Martian nightside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Morooka, M.; Delory, G.; Andrews, D. J.; Lillis, Robert J.; McEnulty, T.; Weber, T. D.; Chamandy, T. M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The first in situ nightside electron density and temperature profiles at Mars are presented as functions of altitude and local time (LT) from the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument on board the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission spacecraft. LPW is able to measure densities as low as ˜100 cm-3, a factor of up to 10 or greater improvement over previous measurements. Above 200 km, near-vertical density profiles of a few hundred cubic centimeters were observed for almost all nightside LT, with the lowest densities and highest temperatures observed postmidnight. Density peaks of a few thousand cubic centimeters were observed below 200 km at all nightside LT. The lowest temperatures were observed below 180 km and approach the neutral atmospheric temperature. One-dimensional modeling demonstrates that precipitating electrons were able to sustain the observed nightside ionospheric densities below 200 km.

  17. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present an algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. It accomplishes this by using feedforward neural networks to automatically infer the upper hybrid resonance frequency, 𝑓𝑢h𝑟, from plasma wave measurement, which is then used to determine the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection (Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014]). We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, as well as the resulting electron number density distribution. Resulting densities are compared with the densities obtained by Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014] and also to the empirical plasmasphere and trough density model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001]. The analysis of the conditions, under which densities obtained by the proposed method differ significantly from the model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001], is presented. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the electron number density on magnetic activity (Kp) and magnetic local time.

  18. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2009-01-01

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems. PMID:20087467

  19. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  20. Electrical conductance of DNA molecules with varied density of itinerant pi electrons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu-Tuan; Fu, Xue; Mei, Liang-Mo; Xie, Shi-Jie

    2006-06-21

    The electrical transport of DNA is closely related to the density of itinerant pi electrons because of the strong electron-lattice interaction. The resistivities of two typical DNA molecules [poly(dG)-poly(dC) and lambda-DNA] with varied densities of itinerant pi electrons are calculated. It is found that the dependence of the resistivity on the density of itinerant pi electrons is symmetrical about the half-filling state of itinerant pi electrons in poly(dG)-poly(dC). At the half-filling state, the Peierls phase transition takes place and poly(dG)-poly(dC) has a large resistivity. When the density of itinerant pi electrons departs far from the half-filling state, the resistivity of poly(dG)-poly(dC) becomes small. For lambda-DNA, there is no Peierls phase transition due to the aperiodicity of its base pair arrangement. The resistivity of poly(dG)-poly(dC) decreases with increasing length of the molecular chain, but the resistivity of lambda-DNA increases with increasing length. The conducting mechanisms for poly(dG)-poly(dC) and a few lambda-DNA molecules with varied densities of itinerant pi electrons are analyzed.

  1. Magnetic and charge structures in itinerant-electron magnets: Coexistence of multiple spin-density and charge-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkawa, Fusayoshi J.

    2002-06-01

    A theory of Kondo lattices is applied to studying possible magnetic and charge structures of itinerant-electron antiferromagnets. Even helical spin structures can be stabilized when the nesting of the Fermi surface is not sharp and the superexchange interaction, which arises from the virtual exchange of pair excitations across the Mott-Hubbard gap, is mainly responsible for magnetic instability. Sinusoidal spin structures or spin-density waves (SDW's) are only stabilized when the nesting of the Fermi surface is sharp enough or when an exchange interaction arising from that of pair excitations of quasiparticles is mainly responsible for magnetic instability. In particular, multiple SDW's are stabilized when their incommensurate ordering wave numbers +/-Q are multiple; magnetizations of different +/-Q components are orthogonal to each other in double and triple SDW's when magnetic anisotropy is weak enough. Unless +/-2Q are commensurate, charge-density waves (CDW's) with +/-2Q coexist with SDW's with +/-Q. Because the quenching of magnetic moments by the Kondo effect or local quantum spin fluctuations depends on local numbers of electrons, the phase of CDW's or electron densities is such that magnetic moments are large where the quenching is weak. It is proposed that the so-called stripe order must be the coexisting state of double incommensurate SDW's and CDW's in tetragonal cuprate-oxide high temperature superconductors, in particular, those with the square CuO2 lattices.

  2. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using optical frequency comb interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki Tojo, Hiroshi; Sasao, Hajime; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-15

    A new method of plasma electron density measurement using interferometric phases (fractional fringes) of an optical frequency comb interferometer is proposed. Using the characteristics of the optical frequency comb laser, high density measurement can be achieved without fringe counting errors. Simulations show that the short wavelength and wide wavelength range of the laser source and low noise in interferometric phases measurements are effective to reduce ambiguity of measured density.

  3. X-ray and electron scattering intensities of molecules calculated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Garry T.; Tripathi, Awadh N.; Smith, Vedene H.

    1999-05-01

    The elastic and total intensities for x-ray and high-energy electron scattering from the ten-electron hydride series has been calculated from Kohn-Sham orbitals using the BLYP, B3LYP and LSDA functionals, and compared to the previous Hartree-Fock and singles and doubles configuration interaction (SDCI) results of Wang [J. Wang, A. N. Tripathi, and V. H. Smith, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 101, 4842 (1994)] in the same basis. In those cases where density functional theory (DFT) provides a significantly better electron density than Hartree-Fock, the pair density and hence total scattering intensity for x-rays is also better reproduced, especially in the low s region. The asymptotic behavior of the scattering curves from the DFT methods is poorer than Hartree-Fock due to the inability of DFT to reliably predict the density at the nucleus, the electron-electron distribution at zero-electron separation, and the second moment of the electron-electron distribution.

  4. Description of correlated densities for few-electron atoms by simple functional forms

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, I.; Arias de Saavedra, F.

    1999-02-20

    Simple analytical functional forms for the electron density of two- and three-electron atoms which reproduce fairly the correlated (exact) values are presented. The procedure is based on the fitting of an auxiliary f(r) function which has adequate properties for this purpose and can be extended to more complex atoms.

  5. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. A Unifying Probabilistic Bayesian Approach to Derive Electron Density from MRI for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-01-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for 8 patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as ROC's for bone detection (HU>200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p=2×10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p=2×10-6) and 282 without density correction (p=5×10-6). For 90% sensitivity in bone

  7. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  8. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  9. Validation of Ionosonde Electron Density Reconstruction Algorithms with IONOLAB-RAY in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Gokhan; Mosna, Zbysek; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observation is essentially accomplished by specialized radar systems called ionosondes. The time delay between the transmitted and received signals versus frequency is measured by the ionosondes and the received signals are processed to generate ionogram plots, which show the time delay or reflection height of signals with respect to transmitted frequency. The critical frequencies of ionospheric layers and virtual heights, that provide useful information about ionospheric structurecan be extracted from ionograms . Ionograms also indicate the amount of variability or disturbances in the ionosphere. With special inversion algorithms and tomographical methods, electron density profiles can also be estimated from the ionograms. Although structural pictures of ionosphere in the vertical direction can be observed from ionosonde measurements, some errors may arise due to inaccuracies that arise from signal propagation, modeling, data processing and tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Recently IONOLAB group (www.ionolab.org) developed a new algorithm for effective and accurate extraction of ionospheric parameters and reconstruction of electron density profile from ionograms. The electron density reconstruction algorithm applies advanced optimization techniques to calculate parameters of any existing analytical function which defines electron density with respect to height using ionogram measurement data. The process of reconstructing electron density with respect to height is known as the ionogram scaling or true height analysis. IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is a tool to investigate the propagation path and parameters of HF wave in the ionosphere. The algorithm models the wave propagation using ray representation under geometrical optics approximation. In the algorithm , the structural ionospheric characteristics arerepresented as realistically as possible including anisotropicity, inhomogenity and time dependence in 3-D voxel structure. The algorithm is also used

  10. Seasonal and temporal variability of the equatorial ionosphere with radio occultation electron density profiles from CHAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, K.

    2007-12-01

    This work summarizes a portion of the more than two hundred thousand electron density profiles captured by the Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload for Geophysical Research (CHAMP, GFZ) from 2002-2006. The electron density profiles used in this work were processed by the Cosmic Data Analysis and Archival Center (CDAAC, UCAR) and released in July 2007. This recent release includes data not previously distributed by CDAAC, and nearly doubles the number of electron density profiles available through CDAAC. The local time of the electron density profiles varies throughout the solar day due to the geometry of the experiment (one ~400 km altitude near-polar orbiter with a ~90 minute period receives GPS signals until occulted by Earth). For a majority of the profiles, sampling occurs at two local times each day, separated by 12 hours, such that roughly every 120 days, the sampling local time repeats. The progression of local time with day of year for the CHAMP electron density profiles drives the selection of data subsets used in this multi-year study of electron density. The data are divided into local time windows from 06:00-10:00 (four hours before noon) and 22:00-02:00 (four hours near midnight). For the years 2002-2006, this yields twelve 60-day before-noon data subsets, and thirteen 60-day near-midnight data subsets. Each subset consists of roughly two thousand profiles. For each of these 25 data subsets, the electron density profiles are interpolated onto a global map with latitude and longitude, from 150-400 km altitude. The data are summarized both in terms of bulk trends as well as with focus on zonal structure. For example, the seasonal and interannual variability of the zonal mean equatorial electron density are presented, as well as a wave decomposition of the observed equatorial zonal structure at fixed altitudes, such that the possible effects of non-migrating tides on the ionosphere can be considered. The retrieved electron density profiles are sometimes

  11. Effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on the electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas is studied by particle in cell method. Phase space diagrams show that the size of the holes, and consequently, the number of trapped particles strongly depends on the q-parameter and saturation time. Furthermore, the mechanism of the instability and exchange of energy between electron-positron and electric field is explained by the profiles of the energy density. Moreover, it is found that the q-parameter, saturation time, and electron and positron velocities affect the nonlinear evolution of the electron density which leads to the steepening of its structure. The q-nonextensive parameter or degree of nonextensivity is the relation between temperature gradient and potential energy of the system. Therefore, the deviation of q-parameter from unity indicates the degree of inhomogeneity of temperature or deviation from equilibrium. Finally, using the kinetic theory, a generalized q-dispersion relation is presented for electron-positron-ion plasma systems. It is found that the simulation results in the linear regime are in good agreement with the growth rate results obtained by the kinetic theory.

  12. Effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on the electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas is studied by particle in cell method. Phase space diagrams show that the size of the holes, and consequently, the number of trapped particles strongly depends on the q-parameter and saturation time. Furthermore, the mechanism of the instability and exchange of energy between electron-positron and electric field is explained by the profiles of the energy density. Moreover, it is found that the q-parameter, saturation time, and electron and positron velocities affect the nonlinear evolution of the electron density which leads to the steepening of its structure. The q-nonextensive parameter or degree of nonextensivity is the relation between temperature gradient and potential energy of the system. Therefore, the deviation of q-parameter from unity indicates the degree of inhomogeneity of temperature or deviation from equilibrium. Finally, using the kinetic theory, a generalized q-dispersion relation is presented for electron-positron-ion plasma systems. It is found that the simulation results in the linear regime are in good agreement with the growth rate results obtained by the kinetic theory.

  13. Charge Density Waves in the Electron-Hole Liquid in Coupled Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichenko, V. S.; Polishchuk, I. Ya.

    2017-02-01

    A many-component electron-hole plasma is considered in coupled quantum wells. The electrons and the holes are localized in the different wells. It is found in our previous works that the electron-hole liquid is the ground state of the system. In this paper it is shown that, as the separation between the wells increases, static charge density waves arise resulting in charge fluctuations which form a honeycomb lattice.

  14. Dispersion relations of electron density fluctuations in a Hall thruster plasma, observed by collective light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Pisarev, V.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2009-03-15

    Kinetic models and numerical simulations of E-vectorxB-vector plasma discharges predict microfluctuations at the scales of the electron cyclotron drift radius and the ion plasma frequency. With the help of a specially designed collective scattering device, the first experimental observations of small-scale electron density fluctuations inside the plasma volume are obtained, and observed in the expected ranges of spatial and time scales. The anisotropy, dispersion relations, form factor, amplitude, and spatial distribution of these electron density fluctuations are described and compared to theoretical expectations.

  15. Measurements of electron density and energy content in the VX-30 helicon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma, Ella; Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2005-10-01

    We have observed plasma conditions at several locations in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, a 20 kW helicon plasma expanding into a nozzle. - A three frequency interferometer (70, 90, 110 GHz) provided electron densities at these locations. - We made absolutely calibrated spectroscopic measurements of He I and He II lines in the UV, visible, and near IR. - A comparison with a collisional radiative model suggested that the actual electron density distribution function was not a Maxwellian, but rather was significantly underpopulated at higher electron energies. - We will present preliminary results comparing our measurements with a spectral model using a non Maxwellian distribution.

  16. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  17. Rocket measurements of ion and electron densities in the D-region during sunrise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, A.; Kane, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Results from two rockets launched near sunrise at White Sands, N. Mex., when positive ion and electron densities were measured in the D-region for solar zenith angles of 91 and 79 deg. The measurements cover the height range 80 to 110 km and complement previous vlf observations and rocket measurements of electron density. It is shown that the majority of negative ions in this height range are detached near to after ground sunrise. On the basis of these measurements it is possible to discuss electron affinity of negative ions and ion production functions during twilight.

  18. Electron Temperature and Density Measurements by the Unicity of Particle Confinement Time on the TCABR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, M.; Nascimento, I. C.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E. K.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Daltrini, A. M.

    2006-12-04

    The electron temperature Te and density ne at inner border side of plasma on TCABR tokamak are determined using the unicity of particle confinement time {tau}p. In this method, the signals from hydrogen Balmer series emissions like H alfa, beta and gama are measured with an absolutely intensity calibrated spectrometer during the discharge and the particle confinement time then is evaluated using these three emissions for large range of electron temperature and density, until the unique value of {tau}p is achieved. The results show that during the current plateau, the values of the edge electron density and temperature in high fill density discharge, present much strong variations compared to the low fill pressure because of larger edge turbulence activity.

  19. The calculation of electron density profiles from topside ionograms: Method and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, G. E. K.

    1972-01-01

    A method for converting topside sounder ionograms into topside electron density profiles is discussed. The lamination method used is modified to take into account the variation of electron density and magnetic field within each lamination. Also included is a change of variable to produce a finite integrand of the integral involved, an iteration scheme that permits convergence on an initially unknown density, a second iteration scheme to overcome the problem of an uncertainty in the electron density at the satellite, and a modification to compensate for the changing satellite altitude over the duration of the sounding. Two applications of the technique are discussed: field-aligned traces for computing field-aligned profiles and computer-aided systems for scaling ionograms.

  20. Adsorption of alkenes on acidic zeolites. Theoretical study based on the electron charge density.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Duarte, Darío J R; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2009-12-10

    In the present work, experiments on electron density changes in the adsorption process of alkenes on acidic zeolites, in the framework of atoms in molecules theory (AIM), were carried out. Electron densities were obtained at MP2 and B3LYP levels using a 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. This study explores the energetic and the electron density redistributions associated with O-H...pi interactions. The main purpose of this work is to provide an answer to the following questions: (a) Which and how large are the changes induced on the molecular electron distribution by the formation of adsorbed alkenes? (b) Can a reasonable estimate of the adsorption energy of alkenes on the active site of zeolite be solely calculated from an analysis of the electron densities? We have used topological parameters to determine the strength and nature of the interactions in the active site of the zeolite. All the results derived from the electron density analysis show that the stabilization of the adsorbed alkenes follows the order isobutene > trans-2-butene congruent with 1-butene congruent with propene > ethene, reflecting the order of basicity of C=C bonds, i.e., (C(ter)=C(prim)) > (C(sec)=C(sec)) congruent with (C(prim)=C(sec)) > (C(prim)=C(prim)). In addition, we have found a useful set of topological parameters that are good for estimating the adsorption energy in adsorbed alkenes.

  1. Quantum Electronic Stress: Density-Functional-Theory Formulation and Physical Manifestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Liu, Miao; Wang, Z. F.; Zhu, Junyi; Wu, Dangxin; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Feng

    2012-08-01

    The concept of quantum electronic stress (QES) is introduced and formulated within density functional theory to elucidate extrinsic electronic effects on the stress state of solids and thin films in the absence of lattice strain. A formal expression of QES (σQE) is derived in relation to deformation potential of electronic states (Ξ) and variation of electron density (Δn), σQE=ΞΔn as a quantum analog of classical Hooke’s law. Two distinct QES manifestations are demonstrated quantitatively by density functional theory calculations: (1) in the form of bulk stress induced by charge carriers and (2) in the form of surface stress induced by quantum confinement. Implications of QES in some physical phenomena are discussed to underlie its importance.

  2. Exploring electron pair behaviour in chemical bonds using the extracule density.

    PubMed

    Proud, Adam J; Mackenzie, Dalton E C K; Pearson, Jason K

    2015-08-21

    We explore explicit electron pair behaviour within the chemical bond (and lone pairs) by calculating the probability distribution for the center-of-mass (extracule) of an electron pair described by single localized orbitals. Using Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized orbitals in a series of 61 chemical systems, we demonstrate the utility of the extracule density as an interpretive tool in chemistry. By accessing localized regions of chemical space we simplify the interpretation of the extracule density and afford a quantum mechanical interpretation of "chemically intuitive" features of electronic structure. Specifically, we describe the localized effects on chemical bonds due to changes in electronegativities of bonded neighbours, bond strain, and non-covalent interactions. We show that the extracule density offers unique insight into electronic structure and allows one to readily quantify the effects of changing the chemical environment.

  3. A technique for routinely updating the ITU-R database using radio occultation electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, Claudio; Azpilicueta, Francisco; Nava, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Well credited and widely used ionospheric models, such as the International Reference Ionosphere or NeQuick, describe the variation of the electron density with height by means of a piecewise profile tied to the F2-peak parameters: the electron density,, and the height, . Accurate values of these parameters are crucial for retrieving reliable electron density estimations from those models. When direct measurements of these parameters are not available, the models compute the parameters using the so-called ITU-R database, which was established in the early 1960s. This paper presents a technique aimed at routinely updating the ITU-R database using radio occultation electron density profiles derived from GPS measurements gathered from low Earth orbit satellites. Before being used, these radio occultation profiles are validated by fitting to them an electron density model. A re-weighted Least Squares algorithm is used for down-weighting unreliable measurements (occasionally, entire profiles) and to retrieve and values—together with their error estimates—from the profiles. These values are used to monthly update the database, which consists of two sets of ITU-R-like coefficients that could easily be implemented in the IRI or NeQuick models. The technique was tested with radio occultation electron density profiles that are delivered to the community by the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 mission team. Tests were performed for solstices and equinoxes seasons in high and low-solar activity conditions. The global mean error of the resulting maps—estimated by the Least Squares technique—is between and elec/m for the F2-peak electron density (which is equivalent to 7 % of the value of the estimated parameter) and from 2.0 to 5.6 km for the height (2 %).

  4. Diurnal and seasonal Variability of D-Region Electron Densities at 69°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Werner; Rapp, Markus; Latteck, Ralph; Friedrich, Martin

    Electron densities of the lower ionosphere are estimated with the Saura MF Doppler radar since summer 2004. The radar is located near country-regioncountry-regionAndenes, countryregionNorway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) and operates at 3.17 MHz with a peak power of 116 kW. The narrow beam transmitting/receiving antenna consists of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles arranged as a Mills Cross resulting in a beam width of about 7° . Antenna and transceiver system provide high flexibility in beam forming as well as the capability forming beams with left and right circular polarization at alternate pulses. The experiment utilizes partial reflections of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-90 km to estimate electron number densities from differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements. Height profiles are obtained between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes and a height resolution of 1 km. The electron density profiles independently derived from DAE and DPE measurements are in remarkable good agreement. Electron number densities are given if the results of the DAE and DPE experiments are in agreement within a factor of two. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes and the response of D-region electron densities to solar activity storms and geomagnetic disturbances. The radar results are compared with previous rocket-borne radio wave propagation measurements at Andenes as well as with recent co-located simultaneous insitu observations using radio wave propagation experiments (differential absorption and Faraday rotation) which showed good agreement between the two techniques. In addition, monthly mean electron densities obtained with the MF radar are compared the recent dedicated auroral-zone, empirical model IMAZ.

  5. Attosecond pumping of nonstationary electronic states of LiH: Charge shake-up and electron density distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2011-01-15

    Electronic reorganization during and after excitation by an intense ultrashort pulse is computed for LiH in a many-electron multireference time-dependent approach at a fixed nuclear geometry. The electronic dipole moment is used to probe the temporal response of the charge density. Above a field-strength threshold, there is an extensive Stark shifting and Rabi broadening of levels with corresponding distortion of the charge distribution whose response at strong fields is neither adiabatic nor diabatic. A nonresonant IR pulse is more effective in inducing charge shake-up during the pulse.

  6. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  7. Unequal density effect on static structure factor of coupled electron layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, L. K.; Nayak, Mukesh G.

    2014-04-01

    In order to understand the ordered phase, if any, in a real coupled electron layers (CEL), there is a need to take into account the effect of unequal layer density. Such phase is confirmed by a strong peak in a static structure factor. With the aid of quantum/dynamical version of Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjölander (so-called qSTLS) approximation, we have calculated the intra- and interlayer static structure factors, Sll(q) and S12(q), over a wide range of density parameter rsl and interlayer spacing d. In our present study, the sharp peak in S22(q) has been found at critical density with sufficiently lower interlayer spacing. Further, to find the resultant effect of unequal density on intra- and interlayer static structure factors, we have compared our results with that of the recent CEL system with equal layer density and isolated single electron layer.

  8. Photochemical response of the nighttime mesosphere to electric field heating—Onset of electron density enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotovsky, D. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    Onsets of electron density enhancements in the upper nighttime mesosphere produced by electric field heating of electrons are examined using a photochemical model that accounts for 29 dynamic species via a set of 156 reactions. Physical mechanisms are identified which result in electron density enhancements that continuously increase for up to several seconds after electric field heating, establishing the conditions under which early VLF scattering is either "fast" (<20 ms) or slower (>20 ms, including "slow," ≥500 ms). During heating, O- ions are produced by heterolysis, e- + O2 → e- + O- + O+, and dissociative attachment, e-+ O2 → O- + O. Following heating, a significant proportion of O- ions associatively detach with molecular oxygen, O- + O2 → O3 + e-, and atomic oxygen, O- + O → O2 + e-. If enough O- ions are produced during heating such that O- detachment exceeds electron loss (predominantly attachment, e- + O3 → O2- + O, and/or electron-ion recombination), electron densities will continue to increase after heating has ended. Consequently, the total risetime of electron density enhancements produced by electric field heating is controlled by the duration of the electric field heating and (in some cases) the effects of O- detachment following heating.

  9. Simulation of Ionospheric E-Region Plasma Turbulence with a Massively Parallel Hybrid PIC/Fluid Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Dimant, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Farley-Buneman (FB) and gradient drift (GD) instabilities are plasma instabilities that occur at roughly 100 km in the equatorial E-region ionosphere. They develop when ion-neutral collisions dominate ion motion while electron motion is affected by both electron-neutral collisions and the background magnetic field. GD drift waves grow when the background density gradient and electric field are aligned; FB waves grow when the background electric field causes electrons to E × B drift with a speed slightly larger than the ion acoustic speed. Theory predicts that FB and GD turbulence should develop in the same plasma volume when GD waves create a perturbation electric field that exceeds the threshold value for FB turbulence. However, ionospheric radars, which regularly observe meter-scale irregularities associated with FB turbulence, must infer kilometer-scale GD dynamics rather than observe them directly. Numerical simulations have been unable to simultaneously resolve GD and FB structure. We present results from a parallelized hybrid simulation that uses a particle-in-cell (PIC) method for ions while modeling electrons as an inertialess, quasi-neutral fluid. This approach allows us to reach length scales of hundreds of meters to kilometers with sub-meter resolution, but requires solving a large linear system derived from an elliptic PDE that depends on plasma density, ion flux, and electron parameters. We solve the resultant linear system at each time step via the Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computing (PETSc). We compare results of simulated FB turbulence from this model to results from a thoroughly tested PIC code and describe progress toward the first simultaneous simulations of FB and GD instabilities. This model has immediate applications to radar observations of the E-region ionosphere, as well as potential applications to the F-region ionosphere and the chromosphere of the Sun.

  10. Comparison of measured electron density rise and calculated neutral beam particle deposition in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Budny, R.; McCune, D.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Barnes, C.W. )

    1991-12-01

    The initial rate of rise of the central electron density during {approximately}100 keV deuterium neutral beam injection is found to agree well with calculations of the beam deposition rate. The best agreement is with beam deposition calculations using older tabulations of the atomic cross-sections; the effects of using new tabulations or including multi-step ionization processes appear to approximately cancel. The neutral-beam deposition profile is a strong function of both the magnitude and the shape of the target plasma density. Peaked heating profiles can be achieved at high target densities only from peaked target density profiles. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Electron inelastic mean free path theory and density functional theory resolving discrepancies for low-energy electrons in copper.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2014-02-06

    We develop the many-pole dielectric theory of UV plasmon interactions and electron energy losses, and couple our advances with recent developments of Kohn-Sham density functional theory to address observed discrepancies between high-precision measurements and tabulated data for electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs). Recent publications have demonstrated that a five standard error difference exists between longstanding theoretical calculations and measurements of electron IMFPs for elemental solids at energies below 120 eV, a critical region for analysis of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and related technologies. Our implementation of improved optical loss spectra and a physical treatment of second-order excitation lifetimes resolves this problem in copper for the first time for energies in excess of 80 eV and substantially improves agreement for lower energy electrons.

  12. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  13. First observations of an /F-region turbulent upwelling coincident with severe /E-region plasma and neutral atmosphere perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Collins, Stephen C.; Kelley, Michael C.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Kudeki, Erhan; Franke, Steve; Urbina, Julio; Aponte, Nestor; González, Sixto; Sulzer, Michael P.; Friedman, Jonathan S.

    2002-08-01

    Highly structured electron densities in the /E and /F regions over Puerto Rico during the night of February 20/21, 1999 were accompanied by intense coherent VHF radar backscatter from the /E region and perturbations in neutral sodium in the mesosphere. Simultaneous observations of the event were made with the VHF Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI) located near Isabela, PR, the University of Illinois VHF radar located at Salinas, PR, the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar, and the sodium lidar located at the Arecibo Observatory. On this geomagnetically quiet night, regions of very different electron concentrations moved through the region. The /F-region peak altitudes of the low density regions differed by about 100km from the high-density region altitudes. The /E region also exhibited an unusual enhancement with a vertical extent of about 6km and caused intense VHF backscatter. The echoing /E regions seen by both VHF radars were highly structured with multiple filaments and Doppler shifts exceeding 300m/s (directed north and upward) some of the time. The Arecibo incoherent scatter radar recorded a large eastward component of the velocity (~200m/s) during the early portion of the event, which then switched to strongly westward (peaking over 500m/s and averaging perhaps 400m/s for about half an hour) before returning eastward. The meridional velocity components were also variable. The Arecibo lidar showed an intense sodium layer that maintained a constant altitude until the strongest VHF echoes began. Then the layer fell 2km over a time span of about half an hour and the lidar echoes intensified. Because (1) the timing of the events at the different locations is well correlated with the /F-region drifts as measured with the Arecibo radar, and (2) because the Pedersen conductivity falls precipitiously at the start of the event, we conclude there was strong coupling between the /E and /F regions, perhaps even reaching the mesosphere, during this

  14. Dust charging and density conditions deduced from observations of PMWE modulated by artificial electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havnes, O.; La Hoz, C.; Rietveld, M. T.; Kassa, M.; Baroni, G.; Biebricher, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present an analysis of relatively strong Polar Mesospheric Winter Echoes (PMWE) under artificial electron heating that changes the PMWE intensity. A major purpose is to find reliable estimates of the relaxation time of the heater modified PMWE to their undisturbed state during the heater switch-off phase; the implications regarding charge/discharge mechanisms; and to exploit the diagnostic potential of artificial electron heating. The relaxation time is between 60 to 70 s for the regions with strong PMWE layers and substantial electron heating. This short relaxation time, related to the variation of charges on the nanometer dust which most likely is present in PMWE, rules out ion attachment as the mechanism to bring the dust charges to their equilibrium state. Neutral winds, sweeping the heated electrons out of the radar beam, are unlikely to be the cause of the observed relaxation, since this requires winds of around 100 m s-1. The most probable cause is photo detachment by which negatively charged dust can lose excess electrons by photon absorption with energies less than the dust material's work function. By comparing the observed heating with heating model profiles, the electron density at 65 km height must have been of the order of 3 × 109 m-3. This agrees with PMWE occurring mainly during disturbed conditions with high electron densities. Our results also indicate that in the strongest PMWE layers, electron bite-outs exist consistent with the role of charged dust particles in the mechanism of PMWE and implying larger dust densities.

  15. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  16. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  17. Laser and Pulsed Power Electron Density Imaging Through Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begischev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Salee; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Vescovi, Milenko; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    A Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer was deployed using laser driven and x-pinch x-ray backlighters. The Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer is an ideal electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas with the potential to simultaneously deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single image with source limited resolution. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 10-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu foil targets at the Multi-TeraWatt facility. An areal electron density of 0.050 g/cm2 was obtained at the center of a fluoro-nylon fiber of 300 mm diameter with a source FWHM of 80 µm and resolution of 50 µm. Grating survival and Moiré pattern formation was demonstrated using a Cu x-pinch plasma of FWHM 27 µm, driven by the 350 kA, 350 ns Llampudken pulsed power generator. These results closely match simulations and laboratory results. It was demonstrated that the technique can detect both sharp and smooth density gradients in the range of 2x1023 to 2x1025 cm-3, thus allowing implementation of the electron density technique as a HED plasma diagnostic in both laser and pulsed power experiments U.S. DoE/NNSA and DE-NA0002955.

  18. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  19. Developing an ANN electron density profile model over Cyprus based on ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambous, H.; Papadopoulos, Harris; Mostafa, Md. Golam

    2015-06-01

    The impact of the upper atmosphere on navigation, communication as well as surveillance systems is defined by the state of the ionosphere and in particular by variations in its electron density profile along the signal propagation path. The requirement for the accurate specification of the electron density profile stems from the fact that the electron density at each altitude determines the refractive index for radiowaves that are refracted by or penetrate the ionosphere and therefore affects significantly navigation and communication signals. Consequently satellite systems that are based on trans-ionospheric propagation may be affected by complex variations in the ionospheric structure in space and time leading to degradation of the availability, accuracy and reliability of their services. Therefore the specification of the electron density profile over a geographical region is very important within the context of operation of such systems. Although regional models have been developed for such a purpose by interpolating data coming from different instruments using various techniques, for a limited geographical scope, the single station model approach is the preferable option as it best encapsulates the behaviour of the ionosphere over the station. This paper presents the development of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the electron density profile of the ionosphere over Cyprus based on manually scaled ionograms collected at the Nicosia ionosonde station during the period 2009-2013.

  20. [Research on electron density in DC needle-plate corona discharge at atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Tao-Tao; Wu, Wen-Shuo; Liu, Shu-Min

    2013-11-01

    Using needle-plate discharge device, corona discharge experiment was done in the atmosphere. Through photo of spot size of light-emitting area, the relationship between the voltage and thickness of corona layer was discussed. When the distance between tip and plate is fixed, the thickness of corona layer increases with the increase in voltage; when the voltage is fixed, the thickness of corona layer decreases with the increase in the distance between tip and plate. As spectral intensity of N2 (C3pi(u)) (337.1 nm)reflects high energy electron density, it was measured with emission spectrometry. The results show that high energy electron density is the biggest near the needle tip and the relationship between high energy electron density and voltage is basically linear increasing. Fixing voltage, high energy electron density decreases with the increase in the distance between tip and plate. When the voltage and the distance between tip and plate are fixed, the high energy electron density increases with the decrease in the curvature radius of needle tip. These results are of great importance for the study of plasma parameters of corona discharge.

  1. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Cayton, Thomas E; Denton, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  2. Topological analysis of the electronic charge density in the ethene protonation reaction catalyzed by acidic zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2007-08-16

    In the present work, the distribution of the electronic charge density in the ethene protonation reaction by a zeolite acid site is studied within the framework of the density functional theory and the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. The key electronic effects such as topological distribution of the charge density involved in the reaction are presented and discussed. The results are obtained at B3LYP/6-31G(**) level theory. Attention is focused on topological parameters such as electron density, its Laplacian, kinetic energy density, potential energy density, and electronic energy density at the bond critical points (BCP) in all bonds involved in the interaction zone, in the reactants, pi-complex, transition state, and alkoxy product. In addition, the topological atomic properties are determined on the selected atoms in the course of the reaction (average electron population, N(Omega), atomic net charge, q(Omega), atomic energy, E(Omega), atomic volume, v(Omega), and first moment of the atomic charge distribution, M(Omega)) and their changes are analyzed exhaustively. The topological study clearly shows that the ethene interaction with the acid site of the zeolite cluster, T5-OH, in the ethene adsorbed, is dominated by a strong O-H...pi interaction with some degree of covalence. AIM analysis based on DFT calculation for the transition state (TS) shows that the hydrogen atom from the acid site in the zeolitic fragment is connected to the carbon atom by a covalent bond with some contribution of electrostatic interaction and to the oxygen atom by closed shell interaction with some contribution of covalent character. The C-O bond formed in the alkoxy product can be defined as a weaker shared interaction. Our results show that in the transition state, the dominant interactions are partially electrostatic and partially covalent in nature, in which the covalent contribution increases as the concentration and accumulation of the charge density along the bond path between

  3. Laser Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a hall-effect plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washeleski, Robert L.

    Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) are compact electric propulsion devices with high specific impulse used for a variety of space propulsion applications. HET technology is well developed but the electron properties in the discharge are not completely understood, mainly due to the difficulty involved in performing accurate measurements in the discharge. Measurements of electron temperature and density have been performed using electrostatic probes, but presence of the probes can significantly disrupt thruster operation, and thus alter the electron temperature and density. While fast-probe studies have expanded understanding of HET discharges, a non-invasive method of measuring the electron temperature and density in the plasma is highly desirable. An alternative to electrostatic probes is a non-perturbing laser diagnostic technique that measures Thomson scattering from the plasma. Thomson scattering is the process by which photons are elastically scattered from the free electrons in a plasma. Since the electrons have thermal energy their motion causes a Doppler shift in the scattered photons that is proportional to their velocity. Like electrostatic probes, laser Thomson scattering (LTS) can be used to determine the temperature and density of free electrons in the plasma. Since Thomson scattering measures the electron velocity distribution function directly no assumptions of the plasma conditions are required, allowing accurate measurements in anisotropic and non-Maxwellian plasmas. LTS requires a complicated measurement apparatus, but has the potential to provide accurate, non-perturbing measurements of electron temperature and density in HET discharges. In order to assess the feasibility of LTS diagnostics on HETs non-invasive measurements of electron temperature and density in the near-field plume of a Hall thruster were performed using a custom built laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Laser measurements were processed using a maximum likelihood estimation method

  4. Results of Ionospheric Heating Experiments Involving an Enhancement in Electron Density in the High Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhengwen

    2016-09-01

    Observations are presented of the phenomenon of the enhancement in electron density and temperature that is caused by a powerful pump wave at a frequency near the fifth gyrofrequency. The observations show that the apparent enhancement in electron density extending over a wide altitude range and the enhancement in electron temperature around the reflection altitude occur as a function of pump frequency. Additionally, the plasma line spectra show unusual behavior as a function of pump frequency. In conclusion, the upper hybrid wave resonance excited by the pump wave plays a dominating role and leads to the enhancement in electron temperature at the upper hybrid altitude. The phenomenon of apparent enhancement in electron density does not correspond to the true enhancement in electron density, this may be due to some mechanism that preferentially involves the plasma transport process and leads to the strong backscatter of radar wave along the magnetic line, which remains to be determined. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 40831062)

  5. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Sonnad, K.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; Krasnykh, A.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-10

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  6. Density and localized states' impact on amorphous carbon electron transport mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo-Dávila, S.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Velasco-Medina, J.; Avila, A.

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses the electron transport mechanisms that we obtained as a function of the density of amorphous carbon (a-C) ultra-thin films. We calculated the density of states (total and projected), degree of electronic states' localization, and transmission function using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. We generated 25 sample a-C structures using ab-initio molecular dynamics within the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We identified three transport regimes as a function of the density, varying from semimetallic in low-density samples ( ≤2.4 g/cm3) to thermally activated in high-density ( ≥2.9 g/cm3) tetrahedral a-C. The middle-range densities (2.4 g/cm3 ≤ρ≤ 2.9 g/cm3) are characterized by resonant tunneling and hopping transport. Our findings offer a different perspective from the tight-binding model proposed by Katkov and Bhattacharyya [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 183712 (2013)], and agree with experimental observations in low-dimensional carbon systems [see S. Bhattacharyya, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 21 (2007)]. Identifying transport regimes is crucial to the process of understanding and applying a-C thin film in electronic devices and electrode coating in biosensors.

  7. The Electron Density in Explosive Transition Region Events Observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the intensity ratio of the O iv line at 1401.16 Å to the Si iv line at 1402.77 Å in Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectra. This intensity ratio is important if it can be used to measure high electron densities that cannot be measured using line intensity ratios of two different O iv lines from the multiplet within the IRIS wavelength range. Our discussion is in terms of considerably earlier observations made from the Skylab manned space station and other spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft. The earlier data on the O iv and Si iv ratio and other intersystem line ratios not available to IRIS are complementary to IRIS data. In this paper, we adopt a simple interpretation based on electron density. We adopt a set of assumptions and calculate the electron density as a function of velocity in the Si iv line profiles of two explosive events. At zero velocity the densities are about 2-3 × 1011 cm-3, and near 200 km s-1 outflow speed the densities are about 1012 cm-3. The densities increase with outflow speed up to about 150 km s-1 after which they level off. Because of the difference in the temperature of formation of the two lines and other possible effects such as non-ionization equilibrium, these density measurements do not have the precision that would be available if there were some additional lines near the formation temperature of O iv.

  8. Likelihood-based modification of experimental crystal structure electron density maps

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2005-04-16

    A maximum-likelihood method for improves an electron density map of an experimental crystal structure. A likelihood of a set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is formed for the experimental crystal structure as (1) the likelihood of having obtained an observed set of structure factors {F.sub.h.sup.OBS } if structure factor set {F.sub.h } was correct, and (2) the likelihood that an electron density map resulting from {F.sub.h } is consistent with selected prior knowledge about the experimental crystal structure. The set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is then adjusted to maximize the likelihood of {F.sub.h } for the experimental crystal structure. An improved electron density map is constructed with the maximized structure factors.

  9. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  10. Propagation of terahertz waves in an atmospheric pressure microplasma with Epstein electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jingwen W.; Sun Hongguo; Wang He; Du Yanwei; Xiang Xiaoli

    2011-03-15

    Propagation properties of terahertz (THz) waves in a bounded atmospheric-pressure microplasma (AMP) are analyzed in this study. A modified Epstein profile model is used to simulate the electron density distribution caused by the plasma sheaths. By introducing the dielectric constant of a Drude-Lorentz model and using the method of dividing the plasma into a series of subslabs with uniform electron density, the coefficients of power reflection, transmission, and absorption are derived for a bounded microplasma structure. The effects of size of microplasma, electron density profile, and collision frequency on the propagation of THz waves are analyzed numerically. The results indicate that the propagation of THz waves in AMPs depend greatly on the above three parameters. It is demonstrated that the THz wave can play an important role in AMPs diagnostics; meanwhile, the AMP can be used as a novel potential tool to control THz wave propagation.

  11. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  12. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  13. Density distribution of high energy electrons in pulsed corona discharge of NO+N2 mixture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Younian

    2003-12-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the high-voltage pulsed positive corona discharge in a line-cylinder reactor is used to investigate the high-energy electron density distribution in the discharge gap. The relative overall emission intensity spatial distribution profile of the A2Sigma+ --> X2Pi transition of NO is successfully recorded against a severe electromagnetic pulse interference coming from the corona discharge at one atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation shows that the high-energy electron density in the discharge has a nonlinearly decline in the radial distribution. When varying the discharge voltage, the absolute emission intensity of NO is different but the radial distribution profile is similar. If an oxygen flow was introduced into the discharge reactor, the emission intensity of NO decreases tremendously and, therefore, the high-energy electron density decreases reasonably.

  14. Electron density in the intermediate heights for low latitude stations: observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosert, M.; Radicella, S. M.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Ezquer, R. G.; Jadur, C.

    The electron density (NF1) and height (hF1) of the F1 inflection point measured at three low latitude ionosonde stations were compared with the parameters of the N170 point (electron density at 170 km) and with those predicted by the IRI model. The validity of the empirical equation proposed by Radicella and Mosert to predict the height hF1 was checked. Daytime electron density profiles from Ibadan, Ouagadougou and Tucumán covering different seasonal and solar activity conditions were used in the study. The results indicate that the two points are close together most of the time and that the Radicella-Mosert formula descrbies the data better than the current IRI model.

  15. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  16. Estimation of dislocation density from precession electron diffraction data using the Nye tensor.

    PubMed

    Leff, A C; Weinberger, C R; Taheri, M L

    2015-06-01

    The Nye tensor offers a means to estimate the geometrically necessary dislocation density of a crystalline sample based on measurements of the orientation changes within individual crystal grains. In this paper, the Nye tensor theory is applied to precession electron diffraction automated crystallographic orientation mapping (PED-ACOM) data acquired using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The resulting dislocation density values are mapped in order to visualize the dislocation structures present in a quantitative manner. These density maps are compared with other related methods of approximating local strain dependencies in dislocation-based microstructural transitions from orientation data. The effect of acquisition parameters on density measurements is examined. By decreasing the step size and spot size during data acquisition, an increasing fraction of the dislocation content becomes accessible. Finally, the method described herein is applied to the measurement of dislocation emission during in situ annealing of Cu in TEM in order to demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterizing microstructural dynamics.

  17. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Researcha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. U.; Chung, J.

    2010-10-01

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  18. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  19. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  20. Electron-density descriptors as predictors in quantitative structure--activity/property relationships and drug design.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Arabi, Alya A

    2011-06-01

    The use of electron density-based molecular descriptors in drug research, particularly in quantitative structure--activity relationships/quantitative structure--property relationships studies, is reviewed. The exposition starts by a discussion of molecular similarity and transferability in terms of the underlying electron density, which leads to a qualitative introduction to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The starting point of QTAIM is the topological analysis of the molecular electron-density distributions to extract atomic and bond properties that characterize every atom and bond in the molecule. These atomic and bond properties have considerable potential as bases for the construction of robust quantitative structure--activity/property relationships models as shown by selected examples in this review. QTAIM is applicable to the electron density calculated from quantum-chemical calculations and/or that obtained from ultra-high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments followed by nonspherical refinement. Atomic and bond properties are introduced followed by examples of application of each of these two families of descriptors. The review ends with a study whereby the molecular electrostatic potential, uniquely determined by the density, is used in conjunction with atomic properties to elucidate the reasons for the biological similarity of bioisosteres.

  1. Topological analysis of electron density and the electrostatic properties of isoniazid: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, Gnanasekaran; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2014-04-01

    Isoniazid (isonicotinohydrazide) is an important first-line antitubercular drug that targets the InhA enzyme which synthesizes the critical component of the mycobacterial cell wall. An experimental charge-density analysis of isoniazid has been performed to understand its structural and electronic properties in the solid state. A high-resolution single-crystal X-ray intensity data has been collected at 90 K. An aspherical multipole refinement was carried out to explore the topological and electrostatic properties of the isoniazid molecule. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical charge-density calculations performed using CRYSTAL09 with the B3LYP/6-31G** method. A topological analysis of the electron density reveals that the Laplacian of electron density of the N-N bond is significantly less negative, which indicates that the charges at the b.c.p. (bond-critical point) of the bond are least accumulated, and so the bond is considered to be weak. As expected, a strong negative electrostatic potential region is present in the vicinity of the O1, N1 and N3 atoms, which are the reactive locations of the molecule. The C-H···N, C-H···O and N-H···N types of intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions stabilize the crystal structure. The topological analysis of the electron density on hydrogen bonding shows the strength of intermolecular interactions.

  2. High-energy-density electron beam generation in ultra intense laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxun; Ma, Yanyun; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tongpu; Shao, Fuqiu; Zhuo, Hongbin; Gan, Longfei; Zhang, Guobo; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Jingkang

    2017-01-01

    By using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, we demonstrate a scheme for high-energy-density electron beam generation by irradiating an ultra intense laser pulse onto an aluminum (Al) target. With the laser having a peak intensity of 4 × 1023 W cm‑2, a high quality electron beam with a maximum density of 117nc and a kinetic energy density up to 8.79 × 1018 J m‑3 is generated. The temperature of the electron beam can be 416 MeV, and the beam divergence is only 7.25°. As the laser peak intensity increases (e.g., 1024 W cm‑2), both the beam energy density (3.56 × 1019 J m‑3) and the temperature (545 MeV) are increased, and the beam collimation is well controlled. The maximum density of the electron beam can even reach 180nc. Such beams should have potential applications in the areas of antiparticle generation, laboratory astrophysics, etc. This work is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475260, 11305264, 11622547, 91230205, and 11474360), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2013CBA01504), and the Research Project of NUDT (No. JC14-02-02).

  3. Interpretation of the shape factor at Ootacamund, India. [ionospheric electron density profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Anderson, D. N.; Davies, K.; Rama Rao, P. V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with equatorial ATS-6 measurements of the shape factor, F, interpreted in terms of the shape of the electron density profile along the ray path. The observed rapid increase in F at sunrise is attributed to EUV production of ionization in the E and F regions. The evening decrease is seen to result from an upward drift of the F region at sunset and the evening decay of the E and bottomside F regions. The nighttime peak, or plateau, is caused by gradual decrease of the electron density profile.

  4. A model of F2 peak electron densities in the main trough region of the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halcrow, B. W.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An empirical model of the peak electron densities in the region of the northerly main trough in the ionospheric F region is presented. The model was derived from measurements made by the satellites Alouette I and II and is in the form of a multiplicative modification factor to the CCIR peak electron density model. The model is a computer program which, when provided with the location, universal time, day number, sunspot number, and Kp index, provides the modification factor, the CCIR model prediction of Nm F2, and the new prediction including the effect of the trough. The model is expected to be of considerable use for propagation calculations in the affected region.

  5. Calculation of optical and electronic properties of modeled titanium dioxide films of different densities.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Marcus; Amotchkina, Tatiana; Ehlers, Henrik; Jupé, Marco; Ristau, Detlev

    2014-02-01

    The electronic and optical properties of TiO2 atomic structures representing simulated thin films have been investigated using density functional theory. Suitable model parameters and system sizes have been identified in advance by validation of the results with experimental data. Dependencies of the electronic band gap and the refractive index have been calculated as a function of film density. The results of the performed calculations have been compared to characterized optical properties of titania single layers deposited using different coating techniques. The modeled dependencies are consistent with experimental observations, and absolute magnitudes of simulated values are in agreement with measured optical data.

  6. Determination of global plasmaspheric electron density profile by tomographic approach using omega signals and ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, I.; Kasahara, Y.; Oya, H.

    2001-07-01

    It has been necessary requirements to determine the global electron density distribution in the plasmasphere with time resolutions, of less than a day. We have provided solutions to this requirement using the wave normal directions, delay time of Omega signals and the in situ electron density observed on-board the Japanese satellite Akebono (Sawada et al., Journal of Geophysical Research 98(11) (1993) 267, Kimura et al., Advance Space Research 15(2) (1995) 103, Advance Space Research 18(6) (1996) 279, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 59 (1997) 1569). The present paper is intended to review our earlier studies.

  7. Critical density for Landau damping in a two-electron-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Constantin F.; López, Rodrigo A.; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2015-10-15

    The asymptotic evolution of an initial perturbation in a collisionless two-electron-component plasma with different temperatures is studied numerically. The transition between linear and nonlinear damping regimes is determined by slowly varying the density of the secondary electron-component using high-resolution Vlasov-Poisson simulations. It is shown that, for fixed amplitude perturbations, this transition behaves as a critical phenomenon with time scales and field amplitudes exhibiting power-law dependencies on the threshold density, similar to the critical amplitude behavior in a single-component plasma.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling of electron density in hypersonic rarefied gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jin; Zhang, Yuhuai; Jiang, Jianzheng

    2014-12-09

    The electron density distribution around a vehicle employed in the RAM-C II flight test is calculated with the DSMC method. To resolve the mole fraction of electrons which is several orders lower than those of the primary species in the free stream, an algorithm named as trace species separation (TSS) is utilized. The TSS algorithm solves the primary and trace species separately, which is similar to the DSMC overlay techniques; however it generates new simulated molecules of trace species, such as ions and electrons in each cell, basing on the ionization and recombination rates directly, which differs from the DSMC overlay techniques based on probabilistic models. The electron density distributions computed by TSS agree well with the flight data measured in the RAM-C II test along a decent trajectory at three altitudes 81km, 76km, and 71km.

  9. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors, it is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  10. Effective electron displacements: A tool for time-dependent density functional theory computational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Ciro A. Cortona, Pietro; Adamo, Carlo

    2014-03-14

    We extend our previous definition of the metric Δr for electronic excitations in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory [C. A. Guido, P. Cortona, B. Mennucci, and C. Adamo, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 3118 (2013)], by including a measure of the difference of electronic position variances in passing from occupied to virtual orbitals. This new definition, called Γ, permits applications in those situations where the Δr-index is not helpful: transitions in centrosymmetric systems and Rydberg excitations. The Γ-metric is then extended by using the Natural Transition Orbitals, thus providing an intuitive picture of how locally the electron density changes during the electronic transitions. Furthermore, the Γ values give insight about the functional performances in reproducing different type of transitions, and allow one to define a “confidence radius” for GGA and hybrid functionals.

  11. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Li, D. Z.; Aeschlimann, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  12. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi-Electron Reaction Materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi-electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in-depth understanding of multi-electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi-electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi-electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium- and sodium-ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal-air batteries, and Li-S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi-electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this.

  13. Effects of toroidal rotation on electron heat transport via changes in inertial force and impurity density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, E.; Honda, M.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashi, N.; Urano, H.; Ide, S.

    2017-04-01

    Two types of JT-60U discharges are studied with an emphasis on toroidal rotation: in one discharge, which is characterized by the existence of an internal transport barrier (ITB), electron heat transport in the core region is affected by the toroidal rotation direction, while in the other discharge, which is a conventional H-mode plasma without an ITB, the clear correlation between the toroidal rotation direction and electron heat transport is not observed. In both discharges, the impurity density is also found to vary together with the rotation velocity profile. With a flux-tube gyrokinetic code, we have found that the effects of the changes in the rotation velocity profile and the impurity density on electron heat transport are different between these discharges. Including the effects explains the tendency observed in the experiments. First, regarding the rotation velocity profile, which influences heat transport through the inertial force, the dependence of heat transport on the rotation direction changes, according to the gradient of the rotation velocity. Next, an increase in the impurity density stabilizes the ion temperature gradient mode, but can destabilize the trapped electron mode. Therefore, it is found that the difference in the impact of the impurity density on electron heat transport in these discharges can be attributed to the difference in the dominant instability.

  14. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure.

  15. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: I. Experimental study in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Astakhov, D. I.; Goedheer, W. J.; Lee, C. J.; Ivanov, V. V.; Krivtsum, V. M.; Koshelev, K. N.; Lopaev, D. V.; Bijkerk, F.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmas induced by EUV radiation are unique since they are created without the need of any discharge. Moreover, it is essential to characterize these plasmas to understand and predict their long term impact on highly delicate optics in EUV lithography tools. In this paper we study plasmas induced by 13.5 nm EUV radiation in hydrogen gas. The electron density is measured temporally resolved using a non-invasive technique known as microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The influence of the EUV pulse energy and gas pressure on the temporal evolution of the electron density has been explored over a parameter range relevant for industry. Our experimental results show that the maximum electron density is in the order of 1014 m-3 and depends linearly on the EUV pulse energy. Furthermore, the maximum electron density depends quadratically on the pressure; the linear term is caused by photoionization and the quadratic term by subsequent electron impact ionization. The decay of the plasma is governed by ambipolar diffusion and, hence, becomes slower at elevated pressures. Similarities and differences of the same processes in argon are highlighted in this paper.

  16. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi‐Electron Reaction Materials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi‐electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in‐depth understanding of multi‐electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi‐electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi‐electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium‐ and sodium‐ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal–air batteries, and Li–S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi‐electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this. PMID:27840796

  17. Orbital disproportionation of electronic density is a universal feature of alkali-doped fullerides

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides show a wide range of electronic phases in function of alkali atoms and the degree of doping. Although the presence of strong electron correlations is well established, recent investigations also give evidence for dynamical Jahn–Teller instability in the insulating and the metallic trivalent fullerides. In this work, to reveal the interplay of these interactions in fullerides with even electrons, we address the electronic phase of tetravalent fulleride with accurate many-body calculations within a realistic electronic model including all basic interactions extracted from first principles. We find that the Jahn–Teller instability is always realized in these materials too. In sharp contrast to the correlated metals, tetravalent system displays uncorrelated band-insulating state despite similar interactions present in both fullerides. Our results show that the Jahn–Teller instability and the accompanying orbital disproportionation of electronic density in the degenerate lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band is a universal feature of fullerides. PMID:27713426

  18. Dynamics of electron injection and acceleration driven by laser wakefield in tailored density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Maynard, G.; Audet, T. L.; Cros, B.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of electron acceleration driven by laser wakefield is studied in detail using the particle-in-cell code WARP with the objective to generate high-quality electron bunches with narrow energy spread and small emittance, relevant for the electron injector of a multistage accelerator. Simulation results, using experimentally achievable parameters, show that electron bunches with an energy spread of ˜11 % can be obtained by using an ionization-induced injection mechanism in a mm-scale length plasma. By controlling the focusing of a moderate laser power and tailoring the longitudinal plasma density profile, the electron injection beginning and end positions can be adjusted, while the electron energy can be finely tuned in the last acceleration section.

  19. Electron density characterization of inductively-coupled argon plasmas by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dogeun; Uhm, Han Sup; Jang, Donggyu; Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2016-12-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas (ICP) in the high electron density regime of the order of 1013 cm-3 are generated and their electron density characteristics are investigated by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) method. In this experiment, the plasma was produced by RF (13.56 MHz) with an applied RF power of 300-550 W and the argon gas pressure was in the range of 0.3-1.1 Torr. We generated the THz wave by focusing a femtosecond laser pulse in air with a DC electric field. As a plasma diagnostic tool, the THz-TDS method is found to successfully provide the plasma density information in the high-density regime, where other available plasma diagnostic tools are very limited. In addition, the analytical model based on the ambipolar diffusion equation is compared with experimental observations to explain the behavior of the electron density in the ICP source, where the plasma density is shown to be related to the applied RF power and gas pressure. The analytical result from the model is found to be in good agreement with the THz-TDS result.

  20. Electrode material dependence of two-dimensional electron and vapour density distribution over vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Y.; Matsuoka, S.; Kumada, A.; Ikeda, H.; Hidaka, K.

    2017-03-01

    Electrode material dependence of intense-mode vacuum arc behaviour was systematically investigated by using the Shack-Hartmann method capable of simultaneously visualising two-dimensional electron and metal vapour density distributions from single-shot recordings. The electrode materials studied included Cu, CuCr (Cu75Cr25 wt. %), WC, and AgWC (Ag40WC60 wt. %). A comparison between the Cu and CuCr electrodes showed that the metal vapour densities for the CuCr decreased in an even shorter time scale than for the Cu. In the case of the WC electrodes, the widths of the electron density distributions became narrower as the arc current decreased although the electron densities hardly decreased in the decaying process of the arc current. The density measurements conducted at the late stage of the vacuum arcs demonstrated that the metal vapour densities around the anode were maintained at the highest value for the AgWC among the electrode materials in this study.

  1. Electronic precursor states of the charge density wave in NbSe 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S. D.; Blaha, P.; Claessen, R.; Thorne, R. E.

    2002-03-01

    The electron bands of the Peierls compound NbSe3 are mapped with angle-resolved photoemission. Data of the Fermi level crossings show the nesting condition responsible for the charge density wave along the one-dimensional axis. The instability with periodicity q=0.44 Å-1 induces a remnant backfolding of the electron bands in the nominally metallic state high above the critical temperature.

  2. Empirical models of the electron temperature and density in the nightside venus ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Brace, L H; Theis, R F; Niemann, H B; Mayr, H G; Hoegy, W R; Nagy, A F

    1979-07-06

    Empirical models of the electron temperature and electron density of the late afternoon and nightside Venus ionosphere have been derived from Pioneer Venus measurements acquired between 10 December 1978 and 23 March 1979. The models describe the average ionosphere conditions near 18 degrees N latitude between 150 and 700 kilometers altitude for solar zenith angles of 80 degrees to 180 degrees . The average index of solar flux was 200. A major feature of the density model is the factor of 10 decrease beyond 90 degrees followed by a very gradual decrease between 120 degrees and 180 degrees . The density at 150 degrees is about five times greater than observed by Venera 9 and 10 at solar minimum (solar flux approximately 80), a difference that is probably related to the effects of increased solar activity on the processes that maintain the nightside ionosphere. The nightside electron density profile from the model (above 150 kilometers) can be reproduced theoretically either by transport of 0(+) ions from the dayside or by precipitation of low-energy electrons. The ion transport process would require a horizontal flow velocity of about 300 meters per second, a value that is consistent with other Pioneer Venus observations. Although currently available energetic electron data do not yet permit the role of precipitation to be evaluated quantitatively, this process is clearly involved to some extent in the formation of the nightside ionosphere. Perhaps the most surprising feature of the temperature model is that the electron temperature remains high throughout the nightside ionosphere. These high nocturnal temperatures and the existence of a well-defined nightside ionopause suggest that energetic processes occur across the top of the entire nightside ionosphere, maintaining elevated temperatures. A heat flux of 2 x 10(10) electron volts per square centimeter per second, introduced at the ionopause, is consistent with the average electron temperature profile on the

  3. Squeezed states of electrons and transitions of the density of states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung Joo; Um, Chung IN

    1993-01-01

    Electron systems which have low dimensional properties have been constructed by squeezing the motion in zero, one, or two-directions. An isolated quantum dot is modeled by a potential box with delta-profiled, penetrable potential walls embedded in a large outer box with infinitely high potential walls which represent the world function with respect to vacuum. We show the smooth crossover of the density of states from the three-dimensional to the quasi-zero dimensional electron gas.

  4. Differential spectra and phase space densities of trapped electrons at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilwain, C. E.; Fillius, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Using Pioneer 10 data, differential spectra and phase-space densities have been constructed for trapped electrons at Jupiter. These quantities should assist in calculating synchrotron radiation from these particles and in evaluating the diffusion mechanisms that accelerate the particles. Absorption by the moons Io and Europa is evident, and injection by Io is demonstrated by a density peak in phase space, which demands a local source. There is also a rapid decrease in density between the moons, which could call for either a local loss mechanism or nonlocal losses fed by diffusion.

  5. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  6. Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Statistical studies of electron density around lunar wake boundary derived from WFC observation onboard KAGUYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Y.; Kanatani, K.; Goto, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Omura, Y.; Kumamoto, A.; Ono, T.; Nishino, M. N.; Saito, Y.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2011-12-01

    The waveform capture (WFC) [1,2] onboard KAGUYA measured two components of electric wave signals detected by the two orthogonal 30 m tip-to-tip antennas from 100Hz to 1MHz during the mission period of KAGUYA from November, 2007 to June 2009. By taking advantage of a moon orbiter, the WFC was expected to measure plasma waves related to solar wind-moon interaction, mini-magnetospheres caused by magnetic anomaly on the lunar surface, and radio emissions to be observed from the moon. Because the moon is basically non-magnetized, the solar wind particles directly hit the lunar surface and a plasma cavity called the "lunar wake" is created behind the moon. We investigated electron density profile around the terminator of the moon from the local plasma frequency obtained by WFC. Because our measurement is a direct method measuring the local plasma frequency, we expect absolute density can be derived. KAGUYA experienced encounters with the lunar wake every 2 hours at an altitude of ~100km in the nominal mission, we first analyzed electron density statistically when KAGUYA was located in the solar wind comparing with the data from WIND. Using these observation data, we constructed an electron density model around the lunar wake boundary region. We also report several interesting feature in the profile such as asymmetric structure depending on the direction of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). KAGUYA was descended to the 50 km altitude and was descended again down to 10-30km in lower altitude (perilune). Electron density in the lower altitude region is also studied using the data obtained in the extended mission. We found electron density slightly increases in the lower altitude region. [1] Y. Kasahara et al., Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 341-351, 2008. [2] T. Ono et al., Space Science Review, doi:10.1007/s11214-010-9673-8, 2010.

  8. Electron and negative ion densities in a CW and pulsed 100 MHz capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, Nishant; Ellingboe, Bert; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Makoto, Sekine; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges operating at a very high frequency, 30 -300 MHz, are becoming very popular now a days due to enhanced plasma processing rates and lower damage to the substrate. This is mainly achieved due to higher plasma densities and lower electron temperature produced at higher driving frequencies. Moreover, pulsing of the discharge system is known to deliver charging-free plasma processes which is highly desirable for high-aspect-ratio plasma etching. In this study, we present electron and negative ion densities in a CW and pulsed 100 MHz CCP discharge produced in O2 and Ar/O2/C4F8 gas mixture. Electron density is determined by the Hairpin probe and negative ion density is determined by the pulse laser photo-detachment combined with Hairpin probe. Photo-detachment is performed at 532, 355 and 266 nm laser wavelengths in order to selectively photo-detach different negative ions present in the discharge. Experimental results are presented for several power (100-500 W), pressure (1-10 Pa) conditions and for several duty ratios (25 - 75%) for 1 KHz pulse repetition frequency. In CW O2 plasma, we observed a similar trend in electron and negative ion density vs power, whereas, in Ar/O2/C4F8 gas mixture an opposite trend is observed in electron and negative ion density. This publication has emanated from research conducted with the financial support of Science Foundation Ireland under the International Strategic Cooperation Award Grant Number SFI/13/ISCA/2846.

  9. Daytime longitudinal structures of electron density and temperature in the topside ionosphere observed by the Hinotori and DEMETER satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Y.; Lin, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Kamogawa, M.; Watanabe, S.; Parrot, M.

    2011-05-01

    Daytime longitudinal structures of the electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) in the topside ionosphere observed by Hinotori and DEMETER are examined under various conditions of solar flux, local time, and seasons. Results from both satellites show a similar longitudinal Ne structure in the morning from July to October, although the value of Ne observed by Hinotori is higher than that of DEMETER owing to higher solar flux. This result implies that the longitudinal structure of Ne may appear in any solar cycle. Further, a negative correlation between Ne and Te in the longitudinal structures appears in the morning when Ne is low, while a positive correlation appears around the magnetic equator when Ne is sufficiently enhanced during noontime in the high solar flux. A spectrum analysis performed on the DEMETER data reveals that wave numbers 1-2 for Ne and Te are dominant and nondominant. The observed wave numbers 3-4 for Ne are dominant during November-May and June-October, while they are dominant for Te during October-June and July-September. Both Ne and Te show the largest power of wave number 3 in December and wave number 4 in September. Further, observed annual variations of wave numbers 3-4 for Ne and Te also differ from wave numbers 3-4 generated by waves in the lower thermosphere. It can be interpreted as discrepancies between the longitudinal distributions of Ne and Te caused by difference in the condition of zonal winds driving E region dynamo and meridional winds modulating the ionospheric plasma structures.

  10. Simulation of Electron Cloud Density Distributions in RHIC Dipoles at Injection and Transition and Estimates for Scrubbing Times

    SciTech Connect

    He,P.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2009-01-02

    In this report we summarize electron-cloud simulations for the RHIC dipole regions at injection and transition to estimate if scrubbing over practical time scales at injection would reduce the electron cloud density at transition to significantly lower values. The lower electron cloud density at transition will allow for an increase in the ion intensity.

  11. Density functional study of the electronic structure of NaNiO_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskine, Hakime; Satpathy, S.

    2003-03-01

    It is well known that the two compounds LiNiO2 and NaNiO_2, in spite of being isovalent and structurally similar, exhibit different magnetic and electronic properties. While NaNiO2 is antiferromagnetic exhibiting ferrodistortive orbital ordering, LiNiO2 has no long-range order. We study the electronic structure of these compounds from density functional calculations using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method, focusing in particular, on the effect of the Jahn-Teller distortion of the NiO6 octahedron on the electronic and magnetic structure.

  12. The effect of a longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow-out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of a longitudinal density gradient, (ii) avoiding the use of a co-moving simulation box, (iii) inclusion of ion motion, and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of 10-fold increasing density over 10 cm long lithium vapour plasma results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared with the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4×1010 V m-1), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from an initial 20.4 GeV), with energy transfer efficiencies from the leading to trailing bunch of 75%. In the uniform density case, a -2.5×1010 V m-1 wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with energy transfer efficiencies of 65%. It is also established that injecting the electron bunches into a negative density gradient of 10-fold decreasing density over 10 cm long plasma results in spatially more spread and two and a half smaller electric fields (-1.0×1010 V m-1), leading to a weaker acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 21.4 GeV, with energy transfer efficiencies of 45%. Taking ion motions into consideration shows that in the plasma wake ion number density can increase over a few times the background value. It is also shown that transverse electromagnetic fields in a plasma wake are of the same order as the longitudinal (electrostatic) ones.

  13. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  14. Wormholes in chemical space connecting torus knot and torus link pi-electron density topologies.

    PubMed

    Rzepa, Henry S

    2009-03-07

    Möbius aromaticities can be considered as deriving from cyclic delocalized pi-electron densities rho(r)(pi) which have the topological form of either a two-component torus link or a single-component torus knot. These two topological forms are distinguished by their (non-zero) linking number L(k), which describes how many times the two components of a torus link cross each other or the single component of a torus knot crosses with itself. The special case of Hückel or benzenoid aromaticity is associated with a pi-electron density that takes the form of a two-component torus link for which the linking number is zero. A class of molecule has been identified which here is termed a Janus aromatic, and which bears the characteristics of both a two-component torus link and a single-component torus knot in the topology of the pi-electron density. This is achieved by the formation of one (or more) wormholes or throats in the pi-electron density connecting the two torus forms, which can impart a Janus-like dual personality to the aromaticity of the system. The impact of such wormholes on the overall pi-delocalized aromaticity of such molecules is approximately estimated using a NICS(rcp) index, and subdivides into two types; those where the forms of aromaticity associated with a torus link and a torus knot cooperate and those where they oppose.

  15. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Abbema, Joanne K.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R.

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning.

  16. High-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junhai; Jin, Shuanggen

    2017-03-01

    GPS radio occultation can estimate ionospheric electron density and total electron content (TEC) with high spatial resolution, e.g., China's recent Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation. However, high-order ionospheric delays are normally ignored. In this paper, the high-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from the Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation data are estimated and investigated using the NeQuick2 ionosphere model and the IGRF12 (International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 12th generation) geomagnetic model. Results show that the high-order ionospheric delays have large effects on electron density estimation with up to 800 el cm-3, which should be corrected in high-precision ionospheric density estimation and applications. The second-order ionospheric effects are more significant, particularly at 250-300 km, while third-order ionospheric effects are much smaller. Furthermore, the high-order ionospheric effects are related to the location, the local time, the radio occultation azimuth and the solar activity. The large high-order ionospheric effects are found in the low-latitude area and in the daytime as well as during strong solar activities. The second-order ionospheric effects have a maximum positive value when the radio occultation azimuth is around 0-20°, and a maximum negative value when the radio occultation azimuth is around -180 to -160°. Moreover, the geomagnetic storm also affects the high-order ionospheric delay, which should be carefully corrected.

  17. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal exchange-correlation density functionals are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). The ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response of the uniform electron gas. WDA is constructed so that it is exact for one-electron systems, and was shown to yield good results for solids, too. While the WDA has correct one-electron behavior, it is important to access the accuracy of the method in the opposite limit of the nearly homogeneous electron gas. To do so, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of WDA. We compare our results with Monte-Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local field correction, and identify the weak points of the conventional WDA in this limit. The WDA can be modified to improve the response function in the short wavelength regime. The exchange-correlation local field correction includes a term derived from the correlation part of the kinetic energy, which does not decay at qarrow ∞. This can be reproduced by adding a delta-function part to the WDA weight function. The resulting approximation is good in both limits, and may be useful for practical density functional calculations. (More at this URL.)

  18. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT.

    PubMed

    van Abbema, Joanne K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J W; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R

    2015-05-07

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning.

  19. F region electron density profile inversion from backscatter ionogram based on international reference ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng; Zhou, Chen; Zhang, Yuannong; Yang, Guobin; Jiang, Chunhua; Sun, Hengqing; Cui, Xiao

    2015-07-01

    Ionospheric backscatter sounding transmits HF (3-30 MHz) radio wave obliquely into ionosphere and receives echoes backscattered from remote ground. Due to the focusing effect, the echoes form leading edge on the swept frequency backscatter ionogram (BSI). This kind of backscatter ionogram contains plentiful ionospheric information, such as electron density, radio wave propagation modes and maximum usage frequency (MUF). By inversion algorithm, the backscatter ionogram can provide two-dimensional electron density profile (EDP) down range. In this paper, we propose an ionospheric F2 region EDP inversion algorithm. By utilizing the F2 bottomside electron density profile represented by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model and ray tracing techniques, this approach inverts the leading edge of the backscatter ionogram to two dimensional F region EDP. Results of validation experiments demonstrate that the inverted ionospheric EDPs show good agreement with the results of vertical ionosonde and provide reliable information of ionosphere. Thus the proposed inversion algorithm provide an effective and accurate method for achieving large scale and remote ionospheric electron density structure.

  20. Partial-reflection studies of D-region winter variability. [electron density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denny, B. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    D-region electron densities were measured from December, 1972, to July, 1973, at Urbana, Illinois (latitude 40.2N) using the partial-reflection technique. During the winter, electron densities at altitudes of 72, 76.5, and 81 km show cyclical changes with a period of about 5 days that are highly correlated between these altitudes, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the winter anomaly in D-region ionization applies throughout this height region. From January 13 to February 3, a pronounced wave-like variation occurred in the partial-reflection measurements, apparently associated with a major stratospheric warming that developed in that period. During the same time period, a traveling periodic variation is observed in the 10-mb height; it is highly correlated with the partial-reflection measurements. Electron density enhancements occur approximately at the same time as increases in the 10-mb height. Comparison of AL and A3 absorption measurements with electron density measurements below 82 km indicates that the winter anomaly in D-region ionization is divided into two types. Type 1, above about 82 km, extends horizontally for about 200 km while type 2, below about 82 km, extends for a horizontal scale of at least 1000 km.

  1. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Hao, Huilian; Wang, Linlin

    2016-12-01

    Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k0) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k0 values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k0 valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  2. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Ke; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Peng; Xu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation. PMID:26346510

  3. Performance of a local electron density trigger to select extensive air showers at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, T.; Madani, J.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Time coincident voltage pulses in the two closely space (1.6m) plastic scintillators were recorded. Most of the recorded events are expeted to be due to electrons in cosmic ray showers whose core fall at some distance from the detectors. This result is confirmed from a measurement of the frequency distribution of the recorded density ratios of the two scintillators.

  4. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  5. Control of neural stem cell adhesion and density by an electronic polymer surface switch.

    PubMed

    Saltó, Carmen; Saindon, Emilien; Bolin, Maria; Kanciurzewska, Anna; Fahlman, Mats; Jager, Edwin W H; Tengvall, Pentti; Arenas, Ernest; Berggren, Magnus

    2008-12-16

    Adhesion is an essential parameter for stem cells. It regulates the overall cell density along the carrying surface, which further dictates the differentiation scheme of stem cells toward a more matured and specified population as well as tissue. Electronic control of the seeding density of neural stem cells (c17.2) is here reported. Thin electrode films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT):Tosylate were manufactured along the floor of cell growth dishes. As the oxidation state of the conjugated polymer electrodes was controlled, the seeding density could be varied by a factor of 2. Along the oxidized PEDOT:Tosylate-electrodes, a relatively lower density of, and less tightly bonded, human serum albumin (HSA) was observed as compared to reduced electrodes. We found that this favors adhesion of the specific stem cells studied. Surface analysis experiments, such as photoelectron spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements, were carried out to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the electronic control of the seeding density of the c17.2 neural stem cells. Further, our findings may provide an opening for electronic control of stem cell differentiation.

  6. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Kasten, C P; Irby, J H; Murray, R; White, A E; Pace, D C

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with k(R) < 20.3 cm(-1) and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  7. Electronic and magnetic properties of spiral spin-density-wave states in transition-metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer, M.; Ruiz-Díaz, P.; Pastor, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of one-dimensional (1D) 3 d transition-metal nanowires are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The relative stability of collinear and noncollinear (NC) ground-state magnetic orders in V, Mn, and Fe monoatomic chains is quantified by computing the frozen-magnon dispersion relation Δ E (q ⃗) as a function of the spin-density-wave vector q ⃗. The dependence on the local environment of the atoms is analyzed by varying systematically the lattice parameter a of the chains. Electron correlation effects are explored by comparing local spin-density and generalized-gradient approximations to the exchange and correlation functional. Results are given for Δ E (q ⃗) , the local magnetic moments μ⃗i at atom i , the magnetization-vector density m ⃗(r ⃗) , and the local electronic density of states ρi σ(ɛ ) . The frozen-magnon dispersion relations are analyzed from a local perspective. Effective exchange interactions Ji j between the local magnetic moments μ⃗i and μ⃗j are derived by fitting the ab initio Δ E (q ⃗) to a classical 1D Heisenberg model. The dominant competing interactions Ji j at the origin of the NC magnetic order are identified. The interplay between the various Ji j is revealed as a function of a in the framework of the corresponding magnetic phase diagrams.

  8. Plasma devices to guide and collimate a high density of MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Chen, Z. L.; Kumar, G. R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Toyama, Y.; Cowan, T. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Izawa, Y.; Key, M. H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kondo, K.; Matsuoka, T.; Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Norreys, P. A.; Norimatsu, T.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B.; Tampo, M.; Tanaka, K. A.; Yabuuchi, T.

    2004-12-01

    The development of ultra-intense lasers has facilitated new studies in laboratory astrophysics and high-density nuclear science, including laser fusion. Such research relies on the efficient generation of enormous numbers of high-energy charged particles. For example, laser-matter interactions at petawatt (1015W) power levels can create pulses of MeV electrons with current densities as large as 1012Acm-2. However, the divergence of these particle beams usually reduces the current density to a few times 106Acm-2 at distances of the order of centimetres from the source. The invention of devices that can direct such intense, pulsed energetic beams will revolutionize their applications. Here we report high-conductivity devices consisting of transient plasmas that increase the energy density of MeV electrons generated in laser-matter interactions by more than one order of magnitude. A plasma fibre created on a hollow-cone target guides and collimates electrons in a manner akin to the control of light by an optical fibre and collimator. Such plasma devices hold promise for applications using high energy-density particles and should trigger growth in charged particle optics.

  9. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  10. Bonded radii and the contraction of the electron density of the oxygen atom by bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerald V; Ross, Nancy L; Cox, David F; Rosso, Kevin M; Iversen, Bo B; Spackman, Mark A

    2013-02-21

    The bonded radii for more than 700 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 oxide crystals, extracted from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are averaged and compared with the ionic radii for first, second, and third row atoms. At odds with the assumption of a "fixed" ionic radius of 1.40 Å for the oxide anion, the bonded radius for the anion, r(b)(O), decreases systematically from 1.40 to 0.65 Å as the electron density distribution of the atom is progressively polarized and contracted by its bonded interactions. The radii for the more electropositive metal atoms agree with the ionic radii when the electron density distribution of the anion is largely unpolarized by its bonded interactions. However, those for the more electronegative metal atoms are progressively larger than the ionic radii as the electron density distribution of the anion is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors with decreasing bond length. The progressive decrease of r(b)(O) indicates that the compilation of sets of ionic radii, based on a fixed radius for the oxide anion, is problematic and impacts the accuracy of the ionic radii for the metal atoms. The assumption of a "fixed" radius for the anion, made in the derivation of sets of radii, not only results in unrealistic negative ionic radii for the more electronegative atoms but also in ionic radii that are as much as 0.5 Å smaller than the bonded radii, particularly for the more electronegative M atoms. The lack of agreement between the ionic and the bonded radii for the more shared bonded interactions is ascribed to the progressive increase in the polarization and contraction of the electron density of the oxide anion by the bonded interactions with a concomitant decrease in the radius of the anion, a factor that was largely neglected in the compilation of the ionic radii for fluoride, oxide, sulfide, and nitride crystals. The close agreement of the bonded radii and procrystal bonded

  11. The Peierls instability and charge density wave in one-dimensional electronic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouget, Jean-Paul

    2016-03-01

    We review salient structural and electronic features associated with the concomitant Peierls-charge density wave (CDW) instabilities observed in most one-dimensional (1D) inorganic and organic electronic conductors. First of all, the genesis of these concepts is placed in an historical perspective. We then present basic experimental facts supporting the general description of these 1D electron-phonon coupled systems developed in the 1970s. In this framework we shall consider in particular the role of 1D fluctuations on both lattice and electronic degrees of freedom, and of the inter-chain Coulomb coupling between CDWs in stabilizing in 3D the Peierls transition at finite temperature. We also clarify, in relation with experimental findings, the various conditions of adiabaticity of the electron-phonon coupling. Finally we illustrate by recent structural measurements the pioneering work of Jacques Friedel on CDW elasticity and plasticity and CDW pinning to defects through the appearance of Friedel oscillations.

  12. Ab initio downfolding for electron-phonon-coupled systems: Constrained density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-12-01

    We formulate an ab initio downfolding scheme for electron-phonon-coupled systems. In this scheme, we calculate partially renormalized phonon frequencies and electron-phonon coupling, which include the screening effects of high-energy electrons, to construct a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of low-energy electron and phonon degrees of freedom. We show that our scheme can be implemented by slightly modifying the density functional-perturbation theory (DFPT), which is one of the standard methods for calculating phonon properties from first principles. Our scheme, which we call the constrained DFPT, can be applied to various phonon-related problems, such as superconductivity, electron and thermal transport, thermoelectricity, piezoelectricity, dielectricity, and multiferroicity. We believe that the constrained DFPT provides a firm basis for the understanding of the role of phonons in strongly correlated materials. Here, we apply the scheme to fullerene superconductors and discuss how the realistic low-energy Hamiltonian is constructed.

  13. All-electron density functional theory calculations of the zero-pressure properties of plutonium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan C.; Ray, Asok K.

    2000-07-01

    The fluorite structure light-actinide dioxides, uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide, are both known to be prototypical Mott-Hubbard insulators, with band gaps produced by strong Coulomb correlation effects that are not adequately accounted for in traditional density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Indeed, DFT electronic structure calculations for these two actinide dioxides have been shown to incorrectly predict metallic behavior. The highly-correlated electron effects exhibited by the actinide dioxides, combined with the large relativistic effects (including spin-orbit coupling) expected for any actinide compound, provide an extreme challenge for electronic structure theorists. For this reason, few fully-self-consistent DFT calculations have been carried out for the actinide dioxides, in general, and only one for plutonium dioxide. In that calculation, the troublesome 5f electrons were treated as core electrons, and spin-orbit coupling was ignored.

  14. Relative electron density distribution in a low nd helium dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Biswa N.; Scofield, James D.

    2016-09-01

    The axial and radial variations of the relative electron density distributions have been measured in an obstructed helium dc discharge by a laser collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) from 4 3D to 2 3P state at 447 nm. For this 1.75 Torr, 6.5 mm gap, 1.6 mA helium obstructed gas discharge, the on-axis LCIF intensity is mostly determined by the neutral atom collision. On the basis of this information, we have plotted the LCIF data to obtain a normalized electron density variation in the inter-electrode volume by plotting the ratio, I/-Io n -a x i s Io n -a x i s , where I is the radial variation of the LCIF intensity and Ion-axis is the on-axis LCIF intensity. The normalized LCIF data show an annular current density distribution in this obstructed discharge with the current peaking near the radial boundary of the electrodes.

  15. Natural molecular fragments, functional groups, and holographic constraints on electron densities.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Paul G

    2012-06-28

    One of the tools of the shape analysis of molecular electron densities, the Density Threshold Progression Approach used in Shape Group studies can also serve as a criterion for the selection of "natural" molecular fragments, relevant to functional group comparisons, reactivity studies, as well as to the study of levels of relative "autonomy" of various molecular regions. The relevance of these approaches to the fragment-based studies of large molecules, such as biopolymers and nanostructures is emphasized, and the constraints represented by the holographic electron density theorem to this and alternative recent fragment approaches are discussed. The analogies with potential energy hypersurface analysis using the Energy Threshold Progression Approach and connections to level set methods are discussed, and the common features of these seemingly distant problems are described.

  16. Real time two-dimensional spatial distribution measurement method of electron temperature and plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Cheol; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Gun Ho; Chung, Chin Wook

    2009-10-01

    Real time two-dimensional spatial distribution measurement method of electron temperature and plasma density was developed. It is based on a floating probe method [1] because the floating probe has high time resolution. Two-dimensional array of sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board (PCB) and a high speed multiplexer circuit were used for real time distribution measurement. The method was tested at various powers and pressures, spatial distributions of the electron temperature and the plasma density could be obtained. And in the measurement results, asymmetric plasma density distributions caused by pumping port effect could be observed. This method can measure spatial distribution of plasma parameters on the wafer in real time without plasma perturbation, therefore it will be expected to improve the uniformity of processing plasmas such as etching and deposition. [4pt] [1] M. H. Lee, S. H. Jang, C. W. Chung, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 033305 (2007).

  17. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions.

    PubMed

    Lobayan, Rosana M; Bochicchio, Roberto C

    2014-05-07

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH5(+)), ethonium (C2H7(+)), and protonated alkanes n - C4H11(+) isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  18. Accurate Electron Densities at Nuclei Using Small Ramp-Gaussian Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    McKemmish, Laura K; Gilbert, Andrew T B

    2015-08-11

    Electron densities at nuclei are difficult to calculate accurately with all-Gaussian basis sets because they lack an electron-nuclear cusp. The newly developed mixed ramp-Gaussian basis sets, such as R-31G, possess electron-nuclear cusps due to the presence of ramp functions in the basis. The R-31G basis set is a general-purpose mixed ramp-Gaussian basis set modeled on the 6-31G basis set. The prediction of electron densities at nuclei using R-31G basis sets for Li-F outperforms Dunning, Pople, and Jensen general purpose all-Gaussian basis sets of triple-ζ quality or lower and the cc-pVQZ basis set. It is of similar quality to the specialized pcJ-0 basis set which was developed with partial decontraction of core functions and extra high exponent s-Gaussians to predict electron density at the nucleus. These results show significant advantages in the properties of mixed ramp-Gaussian basis sets compared to all-Gaussian basis sets.

  19. Bayesian modeling of JET Li-BES for edge electron density profiles using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, Jakob; Brix, Mathias; Ghim, Young-Chul; JET Contributors Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A Bayesian model for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system has been developed to infer edge electron density profiles. The 26 spatial channels measure emission profiles with ~15 ms temporal resolution and ~1 cm spatial resolution. The lithium I (2p-2s) line radiation in an emission spectrum is calculated using a multi-state model, which expresses collisions between the neutral lithium beam atoms and the plasma particles as a set of differential equations. The emission spectrum is described in the model including photon and electronic noise, spectral line shapes, interference filter curves, and relative calibrations. This spectral modeling gets rid of the need of separate background measurements for calculating the intensity of the line radiation. Gaussian processes are applied to model both emission spectrum and edge electron density profile, and the electron temperature to calculate all the rate coefficients is obtained from the JET high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system. The posterior distributions of the edge electron density profile are explored via the numerical technique and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplings. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., Proceedings of the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

  20. Electronic Zero-Point Oscillations in the Strong-Interaction Limit of Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Vignale, Giovanni; Seidl, Michael

    2009-04-14

    The exchange-correlation energy in Kohn-Sham density functional theory can be expressed exactly in terms of the change in the expectation of the electron-electron repulsion operator when, in the many-electron Hamiltonian, this same operator is multiplied by a real parameter λ varying between 0 (Kohn-Sham system) and 1 (physical system). In this process, usually called adiabatic connection, the one-electron density is kept fixed by a suitable local one-body potential. The strong-interaction limit of density functional theory, defined as the limit λ→∞, turns out to be like the opposite noninteracting Kohn-Sham limit (λ→0) mathematically simpler than the physical (λ = 1) case and can be used to build an approximate interpolation formula between λ→0 and λ→∞ for the exchange-correlation energy. Here we extend the systematic treatment of the λ→∞ limit [Phys. Rev. A 2007, 75, 042511] to the next leading term, describing zero-point oscillations of strictly correlated electrons, with numerical examples for small spherical atoms. We also propose an improved approximate functional for the zero-point term and a revised interpolation formula for the exchange-correlation energy satisfying more exact constraints.

  1. Nonadiabatic electron dynamics in time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Tokatly, I. V.

    2006-06-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) treats dynamical exchange and correlation (xc) via a single-particle potential, Vxc(r,t) , defined as a nonlocal functional of the density n(r',t') . The popular adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA) for Vxc(r,t) uses only densities at the same space-time point (r,t) . To go beyond the ALDA, two local approximations have been proposed based on quantum hydrodynamics and elasticity theory: (a) using the current as the basic variable (C-TDDFT) [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4847 (1997)], (b) working in a comoving Lagrangian reference frame (L-TDDFT) [I. V. Tokatly, Phys. Rev. B 71, 165105 (2005)]. In this paper we illustrate, compare, and analyze both nonadiabatic theories for simple time-dependent model densities in the linear and nonlinear regime, for a broad range of time and frequency scales. C- and L-TDDFT are identical in certain limits, but, in general, exhibit qualitative and quantitative differences in their respective treatment of elastic and dissipative electron dynamics. In situations where the electronic density rapidly undergoes large deformations, it is found that nonadiabatic effects can become significant, causing the ALDA to break down.

  2. Density matrix calculations of gaseous and adsorbate dynamics in electronically excited molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micha, David A.

    This contribution deals with two approaches for localized phenomena in excited many-atom systems. The first approach develops a quantum quasi-classical treatment for the density operator, including all atoms. It is based on a partial Wigner representation and is illustrated with applications to photodissociation of NaI, and to light emission of excited Li interacting with a He cluster. This second application describes the direct dynamics with a time-dependent electronic density matrix, expanded in a basis set of atomic functions. It shows that such an approach can deal with electronically excited many-atom systems involving tens of quantum states and hundreds of classical variables. The second approach makes use of the reduced density operator description for a system in a medium. This allows for dissipative dynamics, which can be instantaneous or delayed. An application is presented for femtosecond photodesorption using a Markovian dissipation and construction of the density operator from density amplitudes, for CO/Cu(001). A second application of a reduced density operator has been made to vibrational relaxation of adsorbates, solving integrodifferential equations to compare delayed, instantaneous, and Markovian dissipation. It is concluded that delayed dissipation is needed at short times and that a Markovian treatment is suitable for the interpretation of cross-sectional measurements that involve long-term dynamics.

  3. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  4. Dense Helical Electron Bunch Generation in Near-Critical Density Plasmas with Ultrarelativistic Laser Intensities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ronghao; Liu, Bin; Lu, Haiyang; Zhou, Meilin; Lin, Chen; Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Chia-erh; He, Xiantu; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-10-27

    The mechanism for emergence of helical electron bunch(HEB) from an ultrarelativistic circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in near-critical density(NCD) plasma is investigated. Self-consistent three-dimensional(3D) Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations are performed to model all aspects of the laser plasma interaction including laser pulse evolution, electron and ion motions. At a laser intensity of 10(22) W/cm(2), the accelerated electrons have a broadband spectrum ranging from 300 MeV to 1.3 GeV, with the charge of 22 nano-Coulombs(nC) within a solid-angle of 0.14 Sr. Based on the simulation results, a phase-space dynamics model is developed to explain the helical density structure and the broadband energy spectrum.

  5. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gasses consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor.

  6. Density functional calculation of the structural and electronic properties of germanium quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Gopir, G.

    2015-04-24

    We apply first principles density functional computational methods to study the structures, densities of states (DOS), and higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) – lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps of selected free-standing Ge semiconductor quantum dots up to 1.8nm. Our calculations are performed using numerical atomic orbital approach where linear combination of atomic orbital was applied. The surfaces of the quantum dots was passivized by hydrogen atoms. We find that surface passivation does affect the electronic properties associated with the changes of surface state, electron localization, and the energy gaps of germanium nanocrystals as well as the confinement of electrons inside the quantum dots (QDs). Our study shows that the energy gaps of germanium quantum dots decreases with the increasing dot diameter. The size-dependent variations of the computed HOMO-LUMO gaps in our quantum dots model were found to be consistent with the effects of quantum confinement reported in others theoretical and experimental calculation.

  7. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnad, Kiran G.; Hammond, Kenneth C.; Schwartz, Robert M.; Veitzer, Seth A.

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  8. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  9. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2014-10-07

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  10. Density functional calculation of the structural and electronic properties of germanium quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, M. M.; Gopir, G.

    2015-04-01

    We apply first principles density functional computational methods to study the structures, densities of states (DOS), and higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) - lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps of selected free-standing Ge semiconductor quantum dots up to 1.8nm. Our calculations are performed using numerical atomic orbital approach where linear combination of atomic orbital was applied. The surfaces of the quantum dots was passivized by hydrogen atoms. We find that surface passivation does affect the electronic properties associated with the changes of surface state, electron localization, and the energy gaps of germanium nanocrystals as well as the confinement of electrons inside the quantum dots (QDs). Our study shows that the energy gaps of germanium quantum dots decreases with the increasing dot diameter. The size-dependent variations of the computed HOMO-LUMO gaps in our quantum dots model were found to be consistent with the effects of quantum confinement reported in others theoretical and experimental calculation.

  11. Controlling Electron-Phonon Interactions in Graphene at Ultrahigh Carrier Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri K.; Kim, Philip

    2010-12-01

    We report on the temperature dependent electron transport in graphene at different carrier densities n. Employing an electrolytic gate, we demonstrate that n can be adjusted up to 4×1014cm-2 for both electrons and holes. The measured sample resistivity ρ increases linearly with temperature T in the high temperature limit, indicating that a quasiclassical phonon distribution is responsible for the electron scattering. As T decreases, the resistivity decreases more rapidly following ρ(T)˜T4. This low temperature behavior can be described by a Bloch-Grüneisen model taking into account the quantum distribution of the two-dimensional acoustic phonons in graphene. We map out the density dependence of the characteristic temperature ΘBG defining the crossover between the two distinct regimes, and show that, for all n, ρ(T) scales as a universal function of the normalized temperature T/ΘBG.

  12. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  13. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  14. Dayside electron density structures organised by the Martian crustal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieval, C.; Wild, J. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Andrews, D. J.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express is able to detect remotely the Martian topside electron densities down to the main ionospheric peak. In the ionospheric mode it transmits a sequence of pulses in the frequency range 0.1 to 5.5 MHz and measures the delay of reception of the reflected signals returned by the ionospheric plasma layers below the spacecraft. Previous studies using MARSIS have investigated localized electron density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere, located in areas of typically near-vertical or oblique orientation of the Martian crustal magnetic fields. These crustal fields are remnants of the now extinct global Martian dipole magnetic field, with the strongest fields in the Southern hemisphere reaching up to |B| > 200 nT at altitudes of 400 km. These density structures are often detected as apparent upwellings above the surrounding ideally horizontally stratified ionosphere. Previous studies searched the density structures at a fixed sounding frequency of 1.9 MHz (equivalent to a plasma density of 4.47·104 cm-3), which is a typical frequency at which they are detected. In addition, these studies did not account for the signal dispersion due to the propagation through the ionosphere, which causes larger time delays for receiving the radar echoes, and therefore an underestimation of the altitude of these structures. In the present work we propose to use a statistical dataset of such density structures detected on the dayside of Mars by MARSIS in areas of oblique crustal fields, to determine the interval of densities for which the structures are found to make apparent upwellings. Then we use the corresponding electron density profiles corrected for signal dispersion, to determine the real altitudes of the density structures, their vertical extent and their plasma scale heights compared to the surrounding ionosphere. These new informations give critical hints for uncovering their origins

  15. Measurement of electron density transients in pulsed RF discharges using a frequency boxcar hairpin probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Coumou, David; Shannon, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of 10 microseconds has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and rectified to produce a DC signal read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating reflected signal dips. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. A dc sheath correction is applied for the grounded probe, producing low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements. The measurements are made in both inductively and capacitively coupled systems, the latter driven by multiple frequencies where a subset of these frequencies are pulsed. Measurements are compared to previous published results, time resolved OES, and in-line measurement of plasma impedance. This work is supported by the NSF DOE partnership on plasma science, the NSF GOALI program, and MKS Instruments.

  16. Density-functional theory of interacting electrons in inhomogeneous quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedinpour, Saeed H.; Polini, Marco; Xianlong, Gao; Tosi, Mario P.

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidence of electron localization in cleaved edge overgrowth quantum wires and by the recent interest in the development of density-functional schemes for inhomogeneous Luttinger and Luther-Emery liquids, we present a novel density-functional study of a few interacting electrons confined by power-law external potentials into a short portion of a thin quantum wire. The theory employs the quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) homogeneous electron liquid as the reference system and transfers the appropriate Q1D ground-state correlations to the confined inhomogeneous system through a suitable local-density approximation (LDA) to the exchange and correlation energy functional. The LDA describes accurately ``liquid-like'' phases at weak coupling but fails in describing the emergence of ``Wigner molecules'' at strong coupling. A local spin-density approximation allowing for the formation of antiferromagnetic quasi-order with increasing coupling strength is proposed as a first step to overcome this problem.

  17. Evidence for density-gradient-driven trapped-electron modes in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Terry, Paul; Williams, Zach; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli

    2015-11-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved-confinement MST RFP plasmas exhibit features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when magnetic transport is reduced. In standard RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from current-driven tearing modes. Using inductive control, these tearing modes are reduced, improving confinement. The improved confinement is associated with substantial increases in the density and temperature gradients, and we present evidence for the onset of drift wave instability. Density fluctuations are measured with a multi-chord, laser-based interferometer. These fluctuations have wavenumbers kϕ *ρs <0.14, frequencies characteristic of drift waves (>50 kHz), and are clearly distinct from residual global tearing modes. Their amplitudes increase with the local density gradient, and require a critical density gradient. Gyrokinetic analysis provides supporting evidence of microinstability in these plasmas, in which the density-gradient-driven TEM is most unstable. The experimental threshold gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. Work supported by DOE.

  18. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2008-10-15

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  19. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine.

    PubMed

    Brombin, M; Boboc, A; Zabeo, L; Murari, A

    2008-10-01

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  20. Development of a Falling Sphere Technique for E-region Wind Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, B. K.; Fish, C. S.; Larsen, M. F.; Swenson, C.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we outline the development of a new falling sphere technique sensor for measuring the lower E-region neutral winds and density, which are critical for many of the electrodynamics and plasma physics studies that are carried out as part of the NASA suborbital rocket program. Currently, chemical releases are the primary technique for measuring winds in the lower E-region. Chemical release wind measurements provide detailed wind profiles with good accuracy and have a long flight history. However, they have a number of operational drawbacks, including the need for clear skies over a broad area for camera observations, limited viewing windows (e.g., only at nighttime in the case of trimethyl aluminum), and the need to follow strict handling procedures. Recent advances in low-cost commercial technology have made the falling sphere technique an attractive option to chemical release for E-region measurements. Falling sphere instruments (typically inflatable devices) have been used extensively to make wind measurements in the D-region. Similar measurements in the lower E-region require higher sensitivity accelerometers and a more careful design of the sphere (e.g., solid sphere structure for hypersonic speeds). This presentation demonstrates the design and laboratory testing and calibration of a next-generation solid falling sphere instrument for E-region measurements. Ultimately, the development of this new falling sphere instrument will enable the deployment of multiple falling spheres from one rocket for 3D volume determination of neutral wind measurements.

  1. Laser-induced plasma electron number density: Stark broadening method versus the Saha-Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnab, Sarkar; Manjeet, Singh

    2017-02-01

    We report spectroscopic studies on plasma electron number density of laser-induced plasma produced by ns-Nd:YAG laser light pulses on an aluminum sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of different laser energy and the effect of different laser wavelengths were compared. The experimentally observed line profiles of neutral aluminum have been used to extract the excitation temperature using the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density has been determined from the Stark broadened as well as using the Saha-Boltzmann equation (SBE). Each approach was also carried out by using the Al emission line and Mg emission lines. It was observed that the SBE method generated a little higher electron number density value than the Stark broadening method, but within the experimental uncertainty range. Comparisons of N e determined by the two methods show the presence of a linear relation which is independent of laser energy or laser wavelength. These results show the applicability of the SBE method for N e determination, especially when the system does not have any pure emission lines whose electron impact factor is known. Also use of Mg lines gives superior results than Al lines.

  2. Validation of ISS Floating Potential Measurement Unit Electron Densities and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.; Bui, Them; Wright, Kenneth, Jr.; Koontz, Steven L.; Schneider, T.; Vaughn, J.; Craven, P.

    2007-01-01

    Validation of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) electron density and temperature measurements is an important step in the process of evaluating International Space Station spacecraft charging issues .including vehicle arcing and hazards to crew during extravehicular activities. The highest potentials observed on Space Station are due to the combined VxB effects on a large spacecraft and the collection of ionospheric electron and ion currents by the 160 V US solar array modules. Ionospheric electron environments are needed for input to the ISS spacecraft charging models used to predict the severity and frequency of occurrence of ISS charging hazards. Validation of these charging models requires comparing their predictions with measured FPMU values. Of course, the FPMU measurements themselves must also be validated independently for use in manned flight safety work. This presentation compares electron density and temperatures derived from the FPMU Langmuir probes and Plasma Impedance Probe against the independent density and temperature measurements from ultraviolet imagers, ground based incoherent scatter radar, and ionosonde sites.

  3. Two color interferometric electron density measurement in an axially blown arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, Patrick; Carstensen, Jan; Galletti, Bernardo; Doiron, Charles; Sokolov, Alexey; Salzmann, René; Simon, Sandor; Jabs, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    High voltage circuit breakers protect the power grid by interrupting the current in case of a short circuit. To do so an arc is ignited between two contacts as they separate; transonic gas flow is used to cool and ultimately extinguish the arc at a current-zero crossing of the alternating current. A detailed understanding of the arc interruption process is needed to improve circuit breaker design. The conductivity of the partially ionized gas remaining after the current-zero crossing, a key parameter in determining whether the arc will be interrupted or not, is a function of the electron density. The electron density, in turn, is a function of the detailed dynamics of the arc cooling process, which does not necessarily occur under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. In this work, we measure the spatially resolved line-integrated index of refraction in a near-current-zero arc stabilized in an axial flow of synthetic air with two nanosecond pulsed lasers at wavelengths of 532 nm and 671 nm. Generating a stable, cylindrically symmetric arc enables us to determine the three-dimensional index of refraction distribution using Abel inversion. Due to the wavelength dependence of the component of the index of refraction related to the free electrons, the information at two different wavelengths can be used to determine the electron density. This information allows us to determine how important it is to take into account non-equilibrium effects for accurate modeling of the physics of decaying arcs.

  4. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  5. Electronic Properties of Bimetallic Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs): Tailoring Density of Electronic States Through MOF Modularity.

    PubMed

    Dolgopolova, Ekaterina A; Brandt, Amy J; Ejegbavwo, Otega; Duke, Audrey S; Maddumapatabandi, Thathsara D; Galhenage, Randima P; Larson, Bryon W; Reid, Obadiah; Ammal, Salai Cheettu; Heyden, Andreas; Chandrashekhar, Mvs; Stavila, Vitalie; Chen, Donna A; Shustova, Natalia B

    2017-03-18

    Development of porous well-defined hybrid materials (e.g., metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)) will add a new dimension to a wide number of applications ranging from supercapacitors and electrodes to "smart" membranes and thermoelectrics. From this perspective, understanding and tailoring electronic properties of MOFs is a key fundamental challenge that could unlock the full potential of these materials. In this work, we focused on the fundamental insights responsible for the electronic properties of three distinct classes of bimetallic systems, Mx-yM'y-MOFs, MxM'y-MOFs, and Mx(ligand-M'y)-MOFs, in which the second metal (M') incorporation occurs through: (i) metal (M) replacement in the framework nodes (type I), (ii) metal node extension (type II), and (iii) metal coordination to the organic ligand (type III), respectively. We employed microwave conductivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spec-troscopy, pressed-pellet conductivity, and theoretical modeling to shed light on the key factors responsible for the tunability of MOF electronic structures. Experimental pre-screening of MOFs was performed based on changes in the density of electronic states near the Fermi edge, which was used as a starting point for further selection of suitable MOFs. As a result, we demonstrated that tailoring of MOF electronic properties could be performed as a function of metal node engineering, framework topology, and/or presence of unsaturated metal sites while preserving framework porosity and structural integrity. These studies unveil the possible pathways for transforming the electronic properties of MOFs from insulating to semiconducting, as well as provide a blueprint for the development of hybrid porous materials with desirable electronic structures.

  6. Real time 3-D electron density reconstruction over Europe by using TaD profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutiev, I.; Marinov, P.; Belehaki, A.

    2016-07-01

    The TaD (Topside Sounder Model (TSM)-assisted Digisonde) profiler, developed on the basis of the Topside Sounder Model (TSM), provides vertical electron density profiles (EDP) over Digisondes from the bottomside ionosphere up to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) orbit heights. TaD EDP uses the Digisonde bottomside profile and extends it above the F2 layer peak, representing O+ distribution by α-Chapman formula and H+ distribution by a single exponent. Topside scale height HT and transition height hT are taken from TSM, while the plasmasphere scale height Hp is defined as a function of HT. All profile parameters are adjusted to the current conditions comparing the profile integral with the GNSS vertical total electron content (TEC) retrieved from the European Reference Frame (EUREF) maps. To expand to three dimensions (3-D), European maps of foF2 and hmF2 are produced, based on Digisonde data, with spatial resolution 1°×1° in latitude and longitude, and TaD profiles are calculated at each grid node. Electron density (ED) at any point of the 3-D space is obtained by linear interpolation of TaD parameters between neighbor nodes. Samples of two dimensional (2-D) electron density distribution (EDD) at different cross sections of the 3-D space between 200 km and 1150 km over the mapping area are presented, along with distributions of the electron density along various raypaths of GNSS signals. The modeled 3-D EDD is compared with vertical (vTEC) and slant (sTEC) TEC parameters calculated from individual GNSS receivers. The model error (relative deviation of model from the data), based on 6780 data values, is 10% for sTEC and 6% for vTEC.

  7. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  8. DAMQT: A package for the analysis of electron density in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Rafael; Rico, Jaime Fernández; Ramírez, Guillermo; Ema, Ignacio; Zorrilla, David

    2009-09-01

    DAMQT is a package for the analysis of the electron density in molecules and the fast computation of the density, density deformations, electrostatic potential and field, and Hellmann-Feynman forces. The method is based on the partition of the electron density into atomic fragments by means of a least deformation criterion. Each atomic fragment of the density is expanded in regular spherical harmonics times radial factors, which are piecewise represented in terms of analytical functions. This representation is used for the fast evaluation of the electrostatic potential and field generated by the electron density and nuclei, as well as for the computation of the Hellmann-Feynman forces on the nuclei. An analysis of the atomic and molecular deformations of the density can be also carried out, yielding a picture that connects with several concepts of the empirical structural chemistry. Program summaryProgram title: DAMQT1.0 Catalogue identifier: AEDL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 278 356 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 065 317 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 and C++ Computer: Any Operating system: Linux, Windows (Xp, Vista) RAM: 190 Mbytes Classification: 16.1 External routines: Trolltech's Qt (4.3 or higher) ( http://www.qtsoftware.com/products), OpenGL (1.1 or higher) ( http://www.opengl.org/), GLUT 3.7 ( http://www.opengl.org/resources/libraries/glut/). Nature of problem: Analysis of the molecular electron density and density deformations, including fast evaluation of electrostatic potential, electric field and Hellmann-Feynman forces on nuclei. Solution method: The method of Deformed Atoms in Molecules, reported elsewhere [1], is used for partitioning the molecular electron density

  9. Unequal density effect on static structure factor of coupled electron layers

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, L. K. Nayak, Mukesh G.

    2014-04-24

    In order to understand the ordered phase, if any, in a real coupled electron layers (CEL), there is a need to take into account the effect of unequal layer density. Such phase is confirmed by a strong peak in a static structure factor. With the aid of quantum/dynamical version of Singwi, Tosi, Land and Sjölander (so-called qSTLS) approximation, we have calculated the intra- and interlayer static structure factors, S{sub ll}(q) and S{sub 12}(q), over a wide range of density parameter r{sub sl} and interlayer spacing d. In our present study, the sharp peak in S{sub 22}(q) has been found at critical density with sufficiently lower interlayer spacing. Further, to find the resultant effect of unequal density on intra- and interlayer static structure factors, we have compared our results with that of the recent CEL system with equal layer density and isolated single electron layer.

  10. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Electron Density Diagnostic for the Edge Plasma based on Stark Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Abdullah; Martin, Elijah; Shannon, Steve; Isler, Ralph; Caughman, John

    2016-10-01

    Passive spectroscopic measurements of Stark broadening have been reliably used to determine electron density for decades. However, a low-density limit ( 1014 cm-3) exists due to Doppler and instrument broadening of the spectral line profile. A synthetic electron density diagnostic capable of high temporal (ms) and spatial (mm) resolution is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The diagnostic is based on measuring the Stark broadened, Doppler-free, spectral line profile of a Balmar series transition by using an active laser based technique. The diagnostic approach outlined here greatly reduces both of these broadening contributions using Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS), allowing access to lower density regimes. The measured profile is then fit to a fully quantum mechanical model including the appropriate electric and magnetic field operators. The modeling and experimental results for this active spectroscopic technique are presented for a magnetized (<=5 T), low-density (1011-1013 cm-3) plasma. Details of applying DFSS to the plasma edge are also discussed.

  11. Estimates of the Electron Density Profile on LTX Using FMCW Reflectometry and mm-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Holoman, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Labrie, D.; Schmitt, J. C.; Majeski, R.

    2014-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer has been installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. This diagnostic consists of two channels using bistatic antennas with a combined frequency coverage of 13.5 -33 GHz, which corresponds to electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 (in O-mode). Initial measurements will utilize O-mode polarization, which will require modeling of the plasma edge. Reflections from the center stack (delayometry above the peak cutoff frequency), as well as line density measurements from a 296 GHz interferometer (single-chord, radial midplane), will provide constraints for the profile reconstruction/estimate. Typical chord-averaged line densities on LTX range from 2 -6 ×1012 cm-3, which correspond to peak densities of 0 . 6 - 1 . 8 ×1013 cm-3 assuming a parabolic shape. If available, EFIT/LRDFIT results will provide additional constraints, as well as the possibility of utilizing data from measurements with X-mode or dual-mode (simultaneous O- and X-mode) polarization. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm−2 and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm−2, respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics. PMID:24786366

  13. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)

  14. Self-consistent implementation of ensemble density functional theory method for multiple strongly correlated electron pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Liu, Fang; Kim, Kwang S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-12-01

    The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method is based on an ensemble representation of the density and is capable of correctly describing the non-dynamic electron correlation stemming from (near-)degeneracy of several electronic configurations. The existing REKS methodology describes systems with two electrons in two fractionally occupied orbitals. In this work, the REKS methodology is extended to treat systems with four fractionally occupied orbitals accommodating four electrons and self-consistent implementation of the REKS(4,4) method with simultaneous optimization of the orbitals and their fractional occupation numbers is reported. The new method is applied to a number of molecular systems where simultaneous dissociation of several chemical bonds takes place, as well as to the singlet ground states of organic tetraradicals 2,4-didehydrometaxylylene and 1,4,6,9-spiro[4.4]nonatetrayl.

  15. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of the dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. Our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order. PMID:26804717

  16. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin; Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  17. Energies and densities of electrons confined in elliptical and ellipsoidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a droplet of electrons confined within an external harmonic potential well of elliptical or ellipsoidal shape, a geometry commonly encountered in work with semiconductor quantum dots and other nanoscale or mesoscale structures. For droplet sizes exceeding the effective Bohr radius, the dominant contribution to average system parameters in the Thomas-Fermi approximation comes from the potential energy terms, which allows us to derive expressions describing the electron droplet’s shape and dimensions, its density, total and capacitive energy, and chemical potential. The analytical results are in very good agreement with experimental data and numerical calculations, and make it possible to follow the dependence of the properties of the system on its parameters (the total number of electrons, the axial ratios and curvatures of the confinement potential, and the dielectric constant of the material). An interesting feature is that the eccentricity of the electron droplet is not the same as that of its confining potential well.

  18. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z. -X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-25

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of the dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. In conclusion, our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order.

  19. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  20. Vanishing quasiparticle density in a hybrid Al/Cu/Al single-electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saira, O.-P.; Kemppinen, A.; Maisi, V. F.; Pekola, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The achievable fidelity of many nanoelectronic devices based on superconducting aluminum is limited by either the density of residual nonequilibrium quasiparticles nqp or the density of quasiparticle states in the gap, characterized by Dynes parameter γ. We infer upper bounds nqp<0.033μm-3 and γ<1.6×10-7 from transport measurements performed on Al/Cu/Al single-electron transistors, improving previous results by an order of magnitude. Owing to efficient microwave shielding and quasiparticle relaxation, a typical number of quasiparticles in the superconducting leads is zero.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    The first principles calculations have been carried out to investigate the structural, electronic band structure density of states along with the projected density of states for poly(vinyl alcohol). Our structural calculation suggests that the poly(vinyl alcohol) exhibits monoclinic structure. The calculated structural lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental values. The band structure calculations reveal that the direct and indirect band gaps are 5.55 eV and 5.363 eV respectively in accordance with experimental values.

  2. The variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Nicholas C.

    In this thesis we develop the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems. Extended systems are represented in two ways: i) lattice models describing the dominant valence electronic structure with periodic boundaries to account for their extended nature and ii) a crystalline-orbital basis built from atomic orbitals using the generalization of molecular orbital theory to polymers. The first part of this thesis (Ch. 3--4) examines the performance of the variational 2-RDM method on lattice systems with tunable electron correlation. The first of these systems is the classic Hubbard model with linear and ladder lattice topologies. Because electron correlation functions, such as charge- and spin-ordering, are linear functions of the 2-RDM, the difference in electronic structure between one- and quasi-one-dimensional systems is accurately characterized. The second model contains only two-body interactions and is unique among typical spin models in that it does not have a mean-field reference wave function. The ground state wave functions from all Hamiltonians in the model have the same 1-electron reduced density matrix; consequently, one-electron theories are largely inapplicable. The superconducting eta-pairing ground states make the model a unique tool for demonstrating the necessary N-representability in highly correlated environments. The second part of this thesis (Ch. 5--6) develops a formalism for modeling materials by solving the full Schrodinger equation. Crystalline-orbital Hartree-Fock provides a set of orbitals and integral tensors for the variational 2-RDM method. We demonstrate that time-reversal symmetry, which is implicitly included in position space electronic structure calculations, must be explicitly included as an N-representability constraint on the 2-RDM when using a momentum space basis. The necessity of these equality constraints is demonstrated by the accurate recovery of the binding energy of two polymers and the

  3. Local ionospheric electron density reconstruction from simultaneous ground-based GNSS and ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankov, S. M.; Warnant, R.; Stegen, K.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the LIEDR (Local Ionospheric Electron Density Reconstruction) system is to acquire and process data from simultaneous ground-based GNSS TEC and digital ionosonde measurements, and subsequently to deduce the vertical electron density distribution in the local ionosphere. LIEDR is primarily designed to operate in real time for service applications, and, if sufficient data from solar and geomagnetic observations are available, to provide short-term forecast as well. For research applications and further development of the system, a post-processing mode of operation is also envisaged. In essence, the reconstruction procedure consists in the following. The high-precision ionosonde measurements are used for directly obtaining the bottom part of the electron density profile. The ionospheric profiler for the lower side (i.e. below the density peak height, hmF2) is based on the Epstein layer functions using the known values of the critical frequencies, foF2 and foE, and the propagation factor, M3000F2. The corresponding bottom-side part of the total electron content is calculated from this profile and is then subtracted from the GPS TEC value in order to obtain the unknown portion of the TEC in the upper side (i.e. above the hmF2). Ionosonde data, together with the simultaneously-measured TEC and empirically obtained O+/H+ ion transition level values, are all required for the determination of the topside electron density scale height. The topside electron density is considered as a sum of the constituent oxygen and hydrogen ion densities with unknown vertical scale heights. The latter are calculated by solving a system of transcendental equations that arise from the incorporation of a suitable ionospheric profiler (Chapman, Epstein, or Exponential) into formulae describing ionospheric conditions (plasma quasi-neutrality, ion transition level). Once the topside scale heights are determined, the construction of the vertical electron density distribution in the

  4. Molecular structural formulas as one-electron density and hamiltonian operators: the VIF method extended.

    PubMed

    Alia, Joseph D

    2007-03-29

    The valency interaction formula (VIF) method is given a broader and more general interpretation in which these simple molecular structural formulas implicitly include all overlaps between valence atomic orbitals even for interactions not drawn in the VIF picture. This applies for VIF pictures as one-electron Hamiltonian operators as well as VIF pictures as one-electron density operators that constitute a new implementation of the VIF method simpler in its application and more accurate in its results than previous approaches. A procedure for estimating elements of the effective charge density-bond order matrix, Pmunu, from electron configurations in atoms is presented, and it is shown how these lead to loop and line constants in the VIF picture. From these structural formulas, one finds the number of singly, doubly, and unoccupied molecular orbitals, as well as the number of molecular orbitals with energy lower, equal, and higher than -1/2Eh, the negative of the hydrogen atom's ionization energy. The VIF results for water are in qualitative agreement with MP2/6311++G3df3pd, MO energy levels where the simple VIF for water presented in the earlier literature does not agree with computed energy levels. The method presented here gives the simplest accurate VIF pictures for hydrocarbons. It is shown how VIF can be used to predict thermal barriers to chemical reactions. Insertion of singlet carbene into H2 is given as an example. VIF pictures as one-electron density operators describe the ground-state multiplicities of B2, N2, and O2 molecules and as one-electron Hamiltonian operators give the correct electronegativity trend across period two. Previous implementations of VIF do not indicate singly occupied molecular orbitals directly from the pictorial VIF rules for these examples. The direct comparison between structural formulas that represent electron density and those that represent energy is supported by comparison of a simple electronegativity scale, chiD=N/n2, with

  5. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  6. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  7. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  8. Density Functional Study of the Transport and Electronic Properties of Waved Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouri, Mahmoud; Vasiliev, Igor

    2015-03-01

    First principles ab initio calculations are employed to study the electronic and transport properties of waved graphene nanoribbons. Our calculations are performed using the SIESTA and TRANSIESTA density functional electronic structure codes. We find that the band gaps of graphene nanoribbons with symmetrical edges change very slightly with the increasing compression, whereas the band gaps of nanoribbons with asymmetrical edges change significantly. The computed IV-characteristics of the waved graphene nanoribbons with different compression ratios reveal the effect of compression on the transport properties of graphene nanoribbons. Supported by NMSU GREG Award and by NSF CHE-1112388.

  9. Measurement of electron temperature and density in an argon microdischarge by laser Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Khandelwal, Rahul; Wang, Qiang; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2008-06-01

    Laser Thomson scattering in a novel, backscattered configuration was employed to measure the electron temperature (Te) and electron density (ne) in argon dc microdischarges, with an interelectrode gap of 600μm. Measurements were performed at the center of the gap that corresponds to the positive column. For 50mA microdischarge current and over the pressure range of 300-700Torr, the plasma parameters were found to be Te=0.9±0.3eV and ne=(6±3)×1013cm-3, in reasonable agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model.

  10. Communication: Reduced density matrices in molecular systems: Grand-canonical electron states

    SciTech Connect

    Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Miranda-Quintana, Ramón A.; Rial, Diego

    2013-11-21

    Grand-canonical like descriptions of many electron atomic and molecular open systems which are characterized by a non-integer number of electrons are presented. Their associated reduced density matrices (RDMs) are obtained by introducing the contracting mapping for this type of distributions. It is shown that there is loss of information when connecting RDMs of different order by partial contractions. The energy convexity property of these systems simplifies the description. Consequently, this formulation opens the possibility to a new look for chemical descriptors such as chemical potential and reactivity among others. Examples are presented to discuss the theoretical aspects of this work.

  11. Density-functional calculations of transport properties in the nondegenerate limit and the role of electron-electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjarlais, Michael P.; Scullard, Christian R.; Benedict, Lorin X.; Whitley, Heather D.; Redmer, Ronald

    2017-03-01

    We compute electrical and thermal conductivities of hydrogen plasmas in the nondegenerate regime using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and an application of the Kubo-Greenwood response formula, and demonstrate that for thermal conductivity, the mean-field treatment of the electron-electron (e-e) interaction therein is insufficient to reproduce the weak-coupling limit obtained by plasma kinetic theories. An explicit e-e scattering correction to the DFT is posited by appealing to Matthiessen's Rule and the results of our computations of conductivities with the quantum Lenard-Balescu (QLB) equation. Further motivation of our correction is provided by an argument arising from the Zubarev quantum kinetic theory approach. Significant emphasis is placed on our efforts to produce properly converged results for plasma transport using Kohn-Sham DFT, so that an accurate assessment of the importance and efficacy of our e-e scattering corrections to the thermal conductivity can be made.

  12. Conceptual density functional theory for electron transfer and transport in mesoscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Paulo R; Miranda, David A

    2017-02-22

    Molecular and supramolecular systems are essentially mesoscopic in character. The electron self-exchange, in the case of energy fluctuations, or electron transfer/transport, in the case of the presence of an externally driven electrochemical potential, between mesoscopic sites is energetically driven in such a manner where the electrochemical capacitance (C[small mu, Greek, macron]) is fundamental. Thus, the electron transfer/transport through channels connecting two distinct energetic (ΔE[small mu, Greek, macron]) and spatially separated mesoscopic sites is capacitively modulated. Remarkably, the relationship between the quantum conductance (G) and the standard electrochemical rate constant (kr), which is indispensable to understanding the physical and chemical characteristics governing electron exchange in molecular scale systems, was revealed to be related to C[small mu, Greek, macron], that is, C[small mu, Greek, macron] = G/kr. Accordingly, C[small mu, Greek, macron] is the proportional missing term that controls the electron transfer/transport in mesoscopic systems in a wide-range, and equally it can be understood from first principles density functional quantum mechanical approaches. Indeed the differences in energy between states is calculated (or experimentally accessed) throughout the electrochemical capacitance as ΔE[small mu, Greek, macron] = β/C[small mu, Greek, macron], and thus constitutes the driving force for G and/or kr, where β is only a proportional constant that includes the square of the unit electron charge times the square of the number of electron particles interchanged.

  13. Existence of a virtual cathode close to a strongly electron emissive wall in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tierno, S. P. Donoso, J. M.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L.

    2016-01-15

    The interaction between an electron emissive wall, electrically biased in a plasma, is revisited through a simple fluid model. We search for realistic conditions of the existence of a non-monotonic plasma potential profile with a virtual cathode as it is observed in several experiments. We mainly focus our attention on thermionic emission related to the operation of emissive probes for plasma diagnostics, although most conclusions also apply to other electron emission processes. An extended Bohm criterion is derived involving the ratio between the two different electron densities at the potential minimum and at the background plasma. The model allows a phase-diagram analysis, which confirms the existence of the non-monotonic potential profiles with a virtual cathode. This analysis shows that the formation of the potential well critically depends on the emitted electron current and on the velocity at the sheath edge of cold ions flowing from the bulk plasma. As a consequence, a threshold value of the governing parameter is required, in accordance to the physical nature of the electron emission process. The latter is a threshold wall temperature in the case of thermionic electrons. Experimental evidence supports our numerical calculations of this threshold temperature. Besides this, the potential well becomes deeper with increasing electron emission, retaining a fraction of the released current which limits the extent of the bulk plasma perturbation. This noninvasive property would explain the reliable measurements of plasma potential by using the floating potential method of emissive probes operating in the so-called strong emission regime.

  14. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2001-01-01

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  15. van der Waals forces in density functional theory: Perturbational long-range electron-interaction corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Angyan, Janos G.; Gerber, Iann C.; Savin, Andreas; Toulouse, Julien

    2005-07-15

    Long-range exchange and correlation effects, responsible for the failure of currently used approximate density functionals in describing van der Waals forces, are taken into account explicitly after a separation of the electron-electron interaction in the Hamiltonian into short- and long-range components. We propose a 'range-separated hybrid' functional based on a local density approximation for the short-range exchange-correlation energy, combined with a long-range exact exchange energy. Long-range correlation effects are added by a second-order perturbational treatment. The resulting scheme is general and is particularly well adapted to describe van der Waals complexes, such as rare gas dimers.

  16. Nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density and high performance for glass surface cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Masahiro; Matsudaira, Yuto; Hori, Masaru; Inui, Hirotoshi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Naofumi; Ito, Masafumi

    2008-02-25

    We produced a nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma by applying an alternative current between two electrodes. The gas temperature and electron density were evaluated using optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that the plasma had gas temperatures from 1800 to 2150 K and ultrahigh electron densities in the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. A remarkably high oxygen radical concentration of 1.6x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} was obtained at a 1% O{sub 2}/Ar gas flow rate of 15 slm (standard liters per minute). Contact angles below 10 deg. were obtained in the process of glass cleaning with a plasma exposure time of 23 ms.

  17. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: Combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Niccolò R. C. Greco, Andrea; Haynes, Peter D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Molteni, Carla

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  18. Propagation of terahertz electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma with inhomogeneous electron density and collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, LinJing; Guo, LiXin; Li, JiangTing

    2017-02-01

    This study theoretically analyzes the propagation properties of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma that is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Three parabolic profiles are adopted to describe the inhomogeneity of these two parameters in the plasma slab. Numerical calculation results show that when a magnetic field is applied, an absorption valley appears near the middle of the absorption peak. The characteristics of the absorption spectra are affected by two factors: (1) the parameters in the plasma's first layer, which is the border between the air and the plasma and (2) the gradient of the parameters across the entire plasma. Specifically, a more substantial difference between the inhomogeneous plasma and the uniform plasma corresponds to a greater difference between the two absorption spectra. In addition, electron density, plasma thickness, and collision frequency also play important roles in the propagation.

  19. Electron-cyclotron wave scattering by edge density fluctuations in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Tsironis, Christos; Peeters, Arthur G.; Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Vlahos, Loukas; Strintzi, Dafni

    2009-11-15

    The effect of edge turbulence on the electron-cyclotron wave propagation in ITER is investigated with emphasis on wave scattering, beam broadening, and its influence on localized heating and current drive. A wave used for electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) must cross the edge of the plasma, where density fluctuations can be large enough to bring on wave scattering. The scattering angle due to the density fluctuations is small, but the beam propagates over a distance of several meters up to the resonance layer and even small angle scattering leads to a deviation of several centimeters at the deposition location. Since the localization of ECCD is crucial for the control of neoclassical tearing modes, this issue is of great importance to the ITER design. The wave scattering process is described on the basis of a Fokker-Planck equation, where the diffusion coefficient is calculated analytically as well as computed numerically using a ray tracing code.

  20. Density functional Studies of structural, electronic and vibrational properties of palladium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kansara, Shivam; Singh, Deobrat; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, structural properties, electronic properties, phonon dispersion curve and Raman spectra at different pressure of the tetragonal palladium oxide (PdO) using density functional theory are discussed. The electronic band structure and density of states (DOS) show the poor metallic behavior of the system but through the hybrid potential calculation show 0.71 eV band gap. The phonon dispersion curve and Raman spectra confirm the stability of the structure while Raman peaks are slightly shifted toward higher frequency due to the applied pressure. Phonon calculations indicate that the PdO structure is stable up to 10 GPa and slightly unstable at 15 GPa pressure. There is no change of the crystallinity with applied pressure which is observed from the intensities of Raman active mode. Palladium oxides are mainly used as a catalysts for catalytic hydrogenation in organic synthesis.

  1. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Niccolò R C; Greco, Andrea; Hine, Nicholas D M; Molteni, Carla; Haynes, Peter D

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  2. Diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe for measuring absolute electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2014-08-15

    A generalized diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe is presented with a full analytical solution. In previous studies on the microwave cut-off measurement of weakly ionized plasmas, the cut-off frequency ω{sub c} of a given electron density is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency ω{sub p} and is predicted using electromagnetic simulation or electric circuit model analysis. However, for specific plasma conditions such as highly collisional plasma and a very narrow probe tip gap, it has been found that ω{sub c} and ω{sub p} are not equal. To resolve this problem, a generalized diagnostics principle is proposed by analytically solving the microwave cut-off condition Re[ε{sub r,eff}(ω = ω{sub c})] = 0. In addition, characteristics of the microwave cut-off condition are theoretically tested for correct measurement of the absolute electron density.

  3. Density functional perturbational orbital theory of spin polarization in electronic systems. I. Formalism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Kyun

    2006-10-21

    A perturbational approach is presented for the general analysis of spin-polarization effect on electronic structures and energies within spin-density functional formalism. Explicit expressions for the changes in Kohn-Sham [Phys. Rev. 140, 1133 (1965)] orbital energies and coefficients as well as for the change in total electronic energy are derived upon using the local spin density and self-interaction-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. The application of the method for atoms provides analytical expressions for the exchange splitting energy and spin-polarization energy. The atomic exchange parameters are obtained from the expressions for the elements with Z=1-92 and they match well with Stoner exchange parameters for 3d metal elements.

  4. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  5. Computational analysis of thermal-motion effects on the topological properties of the electron density.

    PubMed

    Michael, J Robert; Koritsanszky, Tibor

    2015-03-01

    The distributions of bond topological properties (BTPs) of the electron density upon thermal vibrations of the nuclei are computationally examined to estimate different statistical figures, especially uncertainties, of these properties. The statistical analysis is based on a large ensemble of BTPs of the electron densities for thermally perturbed nuclear geometries of the formamide molecule. Each bond critical point (BCP) is found to follow a normal distribution whose covariance correlates with the displacement amplitudes of the nuclei involved in the bond. The BTPs are found to be markedly affected not only by normal modes of the significant bond-stretching component but also by modes that involve mainly hydrogen-atom displacements. Their probability distribution function can be decently described by Gumbel-type functions of positive (negative) skewness for the bonds formed by non-hydrogen (hydrogen) atoms.

  6. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Quevedo, H. J. McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  7. Electronic and structural properties of superionic Cu2Se from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Råsander, Mikael; Bergqvist, Lars; Delin, Anna

    2013-03-01

    The superionic high temperature phase of Cu2Se has been found to yield high thermoelectric efficiency due to an interesting combination of low thermal conductivity and a rather high power factor. The low thermal conductivity has been found to be due to the quasi-liquid behaviour of the superionic Cu atoms (Liu et al., Nature Materials, 11, 422-425 (2012)). Here we will present results obtained using density functional theory calculations of the electronic and structural properties of the superionic Cu2Se phase. We will especially address how the inclusion of non-local exchange by the use of hybrid density functionals as well as how localization of the Cu 3d-states affect the electronic structure of Cu2Se. This work was financed through the EU project NexTec, VR (the Swedish Research Council) and SSF (Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research)

  8. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  9. TEMPy: a Python library for assessment of three-dimensional electron microscopy density fits

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Vasishtan, Daven; Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Sahota, Harpal; Topf, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is currently one of the most promising techniques used to study macromolecular assemblies. Rigid and flexible fitting of atomic models into density maps is often essential to gain further insights into the assemblies they represent. Currently, tools that facilitate the assessment of fitted atomic models and maps are needed. TEMPy (template and electron microscopy comparison using Python) is a toolkit designed for this purpose. The library includes a set of methods to assess density fits in intermediate-to-low resolution maps, both globally and locally. It also provides procedures for single-fit assessment, ensemble generation of fits, clustering, and multiple and consensus scoring, as well as plots and output files for visualization purposes to help the user in analysing rigid and flexible fits. The modular nature of TEMPy helps the integration of scoring and assessment of fits into large pipelines, making it a tool suitable for both novice and expert structural biologists. PMID:26306092

  10. Fast magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2010-10-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to study magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas without a guide magnetic field. Impulsive reconnection rates become of the order of unity when the background density is much smaller than 10% of the density in the initial current layer. It is demonstrated that the outflow speed is less than the upstream Alfven speed, and that the time derivative of the density must be taken into account in the definition of the reconnection rate. The reconnection electric fields in the low-density regime become much larger than the ones in the high-density regime, and it is possible to accelerate the particles to high energies more efficiently. The inertial term in the generalized Ohm's law is the most dominant term that supports a large reconnection electric field. An effective collisionless resistivity is produced and tracks the extension of the diffusion region in the late stage of the reconnection dynamics, and significant broadening of the diffusion region is observed. Because of the broadening of the diffusion region, no secondary islands, which have been considered to play a role to limit the diffusion region, are generated during the extension of the diffusion region in the outflow direction.

  11. Boundary location of Mars nightside ionospheric plasma in term of the electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morooka, Michiko W.; Andersson, Laila; Ergun, Bob; Fowler, Christopher; Woodson, Adam; Weber, Tristan; Delory, Greg; Andrews, David; Edberg, Niklas; Eriksson, Anders; Michell, David; Connerney, Jack; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Halekas, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Photo-ionized Mars atmosphere is forming an ionosphere and shielding the solar wind with creating barriers of bow shock. Inside the bow shock ionospheric plasma interact with solar wind plasma and result different boundaries. A question is how far the ionospheric plasma can stand off the solar wind.On the dayside, in-situ data set from Mars magnetosphere missions often observed the sharp gradient of the thermal plasma flux and ion composition change as well as the drop off of the magnetic fluctuation simultaneously as a outer boundary of the ionospheric plasma and an obstacle to the solar wind. Several models have constructed the shape of the boundary based on the statistical observations [e.g., Trotignon et al., 2006; Edberg et al., 2008].On the nightside, plasma instrument onboard Phobos 2 observed the particles and magnetic field characteristics similar to the dayside. However, the number of data is still too few to understand the general location of boundaries. We will present the characteristics of the nightside magnetospheric boundary region in term of the electron density. MAVEN Langmuir probe measurement (LPW) can estimate the electron density using the spacecraft environment. As MAVEN pass from the bow shock and sheath region into the magnetosphere the electron density often show a sharp gradient (the density jumps two orders of magnitudes in a few seconds). Comparing this to the data from particle instrument, the sharp electron density gradient was often associated with the transition of the characteristic energy of ions.Several hundreds of boundaries crossing by MAVEN allow us to investigate the statistical view of the boundary. We searched for a large electron density gradient as an indicator of the plasma boundary to identify the location of the ionospheric/solar wind plasma boundary. The results show that the many of the nightside boundaries locates close to the tail region of Mars forming elliptical shape of boundary. We will provide the empirical

  12. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    PubMed

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  13. Plasmaspheric electron densities: the importance in modelling radiation belts and in SSA operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, János; Jorgensen, Anders; Koronczay, Dávid; Ferencz, Csaba; Hamar, Dániel; Steinbach, Péter; Clilverd, Mark; Rodger, Craig; Juhász, Lilla; Sannikov, Dmitry; Cherneva, Nina

    2016-04-01

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet, Lichtenberger et al., J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet detects millions of whistlers in a year. The network operates since early 2002 with automatic whistler detector capability and it has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu, Lichtenberger et al., Space Weather Space Clim. 3 2013, A23 DOI: 10.1051/swsc/2013045.) Eu FP7-Space project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model (Lichtenberger, J. J. Geophys. Res., 114, 2009, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799), that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups. The network operates in quasi real-time mode since mid-2014, fifteen stations provide equatorial electron densities that are used as inputs for a data assimilative plasmasphere model but they can also be used directly in space weather research and models. We have started to process the archive data collected by AWDANet stations since 2002 and in this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time and off-line runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods. The equatorial electron densities obtained by whistler inversion are fed into the assimilative model of the plasmasphere providing a global view of the region for processed the periods

  14. Superconductivity, cohesive energy density, and electron-atom ratio in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Lawson, D. D.; Hrubes, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that superconductivity above 8 K occurs in alloys and metallic compounds within relatively narrow regions of cohesive energy density with a sharp peak which includes Nb3Ge, SiV3, Nb3Ga, and NbN. When cross-correlated with the electron-atom ratio, high-temperature superconductivity can be observed in only a few regions. This suggests a search for superconductors with high-transition temperatures and critical fields within these regions.

  15. Rocket observations of electron-density irregularities in the equatorial ionosphere below 200 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaus, D. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    Nike Apache rockets carring instrumentation to measure electron density and its fine structure in the equatorial ionosphere were launched from Chilca, Peru in May and June 1975. The fine structure experiment and the data reduction system are described. Results obtained from this system are presented and compared with those obtained by VHF radar and from other rocket studies. A description of the equatorial ionosphere and its features is also presented.

  16. Asymptotic expansions of the electron momentum densities of the atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium

    SciTech Connect

    Thakkar, A.J.; Wonfor, A.L.; Pedersen, W.A.

    1987-07-15

    The first three coefficients in each of the small p Maclaurin and large p asymptotic expansions of the spherically averaged electron momentum densities of the ground states of the 103 neutral atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium, 73 atomic cations and 41 atomic anions are calculated from nonrelativistic self-consistent-field wave functions. These coefficients should be useful in the analysis of experimental Compton profiles. An analysis of the periodic behavior of these coefficients is given.

  17. Correlated magnetic impurities in a superconductor: electron density profiles and robustness of superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, P D; Dugaev, V K; Vieira, V R; Araújo, M A N

    2010-01-20

    The insertion of magnetic impurities in a conventional superconductor leads to various effects. In this work we show that the electron density is affected by the spins (considered as classical) both locally and globally. The charge accumulation is solved self-consistently. This affects the transport properties along magnetic domain walls. Also, we show that superconductivity is more robust if the spin locations are not random but correlated.

  18. On the Non-Intrusive Determination of Electron Density in the Sheath of a Spherical Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-20

    PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT On the Non-intrusive Determination of Electron Density in the Sheath of a Spherical Probe David N...07-9033 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UL 15 David Walker (202) 767-2248 Plasma...approximations where the ion flow velocity is well known from the Bohm condition. When plasmas become highly collisional, the analysis is further

  19. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  20. Nanosecond Enhancements of the Atmospheric Electron Density by Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, C.; Camporeale, E.; Ebert, U.; Buitink, S.; Scholten, O.; Trinh, G. T. N.; Witteveen, J.

    2015-12-01

    As is well known a sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent sub-nanosecond enhancements of the atmospheric electron density. Predicting these electron density enhancements accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. For this study we use the initial energy, inclination and altitude of first interaction, which will influence the evolution of the shower significantly. To this end, we use the stochastic collocation method, [2] to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015)[2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317[3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  1. Density Determination and Metallographic Surface Preparation of Electron Beam Melted Ti6Al4V

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-02

    polishing with silicon carbide (SiC) papers and colloidal silica suspension to produce samples with varying surface topographies. Surfaces were...polished to 60 grit SiC, 120 grit SiC, 400 grit SiC, and colloidal silica finishes were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compared...polishing with 60 grit SiC paper to polishing with colloidal silica suspension. Conclusions: One factor contributing to an average lower density of EBM

  2. Contemporary X-ray electron-density studies using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has many compelling advantages over conventional radiation sources in the measurement of accurate Bragg diffraction data. The variable photon energy and much higher flux may help to minimize critical systematic effects such as absorption, extinction and anomalous scattering. Based on a survey of selected published results from the last decade, the benefits of using synchrotron radiation in the determination of X-ray electron densities are discussed, and possible future directions of this field are examined. PMID:25295169

  3. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using three-color interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-15

    A new method for determining the plasma electron density using the fractional fringes on three-color interferometer is proposed. Integrated phase shift on each interferometer is derived without using the temporal history of the fractional fringes. The dependence on the fringe resolution and the electrical noise are simulated on the wavelengths of CO{sub 2} laser. Short-time integrations of the fractional fringes enhance the reliability of this method.

  4. Model simulations of ion and electron density profiles in ionospheric E and F regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chu, Y. H.

    2017-02-01

    We develop a time-dependent theoretical numerical model to simulate the density profiles of the ions (i.e., O+(2P), O+(2D), N2+, O+(4S), N+, O2+, and NO+) and free electrons in E and F regions. In this model, the ion photoionization production rates, the photoelectron ionization production effect, and the chemical reactions between the ionized species and the neutral compositions are considered, and the plasma transport processes are not included. The simulation results show that the mean electron density ratios of the model simulations to the AE-C satellite measurements for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (SDO-EVE), EUV flux model for Aeronomic Calculations, and Hinteregger-Fukui-Gilson solar irradiance models are, respectively, 0.97, 0.79, and 0.71 in a height range 140-400 km and 0.79, 0.75, and 0.64 in a height range 90-150 km. A comparison shows that the electron densities simulated by the model developed in this study are much more consistent with the in situ measurements made by the AE-C satellite than those predicted by the International Reference Ionosphere model and simulated by the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. The model simulations with SDO-EVE solar irradiance input indicate that the photoelectron impact production process contributes about 20%-30% of the total atomic ion densities throughout the height range 130-400 km around noon. However, the photoelectron production effect on the molecular ion densities is very minor (less than about 7%) above 275 km. Below 250 km, its effect increases with the decrease of height for O2+ and N2+, from about 4% and 10% at 250 km to 13% and 27% at 150 km, respectively.

  5. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  6. Tracing the Fingerprint of Chemical Bonds within the Electron Densities of Hydrocarbons: A Comparative Analysis of the Optimized and the Promolecule Densities.

    PubMed

    Keyvani, Zahra Alimohammadi; Shahbazian, Shant; Zahedi, Mansour

    2016-10-18

    The equivalence of the molecular graphs emerging from the comparative analysis of the optimized and the promolecule electron densities in two hundred and twenty five unsubstituted hydrocarbons was recently demonstrated [Keyvani et al. Chem. Eur. J. 2016, 22, 5003]. Thus, the molecular graph of an optimized molecular electron density is not shaped by the formation of the C-H and C-C bonds. In the present study, to trace the fingerprint of the C-H and C-C bonds in the electron densities of the same set of hydrocarbons, the amount of electron density and its Laplacian at the (3, -1) critical points associated with these bonds are derived from both optimized and promolecule densities, and compared in a newly proposed comparative analysis. The analysis not only conforms to the qualitative picture of the electron density build up between two atoms upon formation of a bond in between, but also quantifies the resulting accumulation of the electron density at the (3, -1) critical points. The comparative analysis also reveals a unified mode of density accumulation in the case of 2318 studied C-H bonds, but various modes of density accumulation are observed in the case of 1509 studied C-C bonds and they are classified into four groups. The four emerging groups do not always conform to the traditional classification based on the bond orders. Furthermore, four C-C bonds described as exotic bonds in previous studies, for example the inverted C-C bond in 1,1,1-propellane, are naturally distinguished from the analysis.

  7. Electronic viscosity in a quantum well: A test for the local-density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Vignale, Giovanni

    2007-07-01

    In the local-density approximation (LDA) for electronic time-dependent current-density-functional theory, many-body effects are described in terms of the viscoelastic constants of the homogeneous three-dimensional electron gas. In this paper, we critically examine the applicability of the three-dimensional LDA to the calculation of the viscous damping of one-dimensional collective oscillations of angular frequency ω in a quasi-two-dimensional quantum well. We calculate the effective viscosity ζ(ω) from perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction and compare it with the commonly used three-dimensional LDA viscosity Y(ω) . Significant differences are found. At low frequency, Y(ω) is dominated by a shear term, which is absent in ζ(ω) . At high frequency, ζ(ω) and Y(ω) exhibit different power-law behaviors ( ω-3 and ω-5/2 , respectively), reflecting different spectral densities of electron-hole excitations in two and three dimensions. These findings demonstrate the need for better approximations for the exchange-correlation stress tensor in specific systems where the use of the three-dimensional functionals may lead to unphysical results.

  8. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    PubMed

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  9. Protein structural ensembles are revealed by redefining X-ray electron density noise

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P. Therese; Holton, James M.; Fraser, James S.; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To increase the power of X-ray crystallography to determine not only the structures but also the motions of biomolecules, we developed methods to address two classic crystallographic problems: putting electron density maps on the absolute scale of e−/Å3 and calculating the noise at every point in the map. We find that noise varies with position and is often six to eight times lower than thresholds currently used in model building. Analyzing the rescaled electron density maps from 485 representative proteins revealed unmodeled conformations above the estimated noise for 45% of side chains and a previously hidden, low-occupancy inhibitor of HIV capsid protein. Comparing the electron density maps in the free and nucleotide-bound structures of three human protein kinases suggested that substrate binding perturbs distinct intrinsic allosteric networks that link the active site to surfaces that recognize regulatory proteins. These results illustrate general approaches to identify and analyze alternative conformations, low-occupancy small molecules, solvent distributions, communication pathways, and protein motions. PMID:24363322

  10. Electronic structures and optical properties of TiO2: Improved density-functional-theory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Sai; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2012-05-01

    TiO2 has been recently used to realize high-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. In fact, it has been widely used for a long time as white pigment and sunscreen because of its whiteness, high refractive index, and excellent optical properties. However, its electronic structures and the related properties have not been satisfactorily understood. Here, we use Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) exchange potential (plus a local density approximation correlation potential) within the density functional theory to investigate electronic structures and optical properties of rutile and anatase TiO2. Our comparative calculations show that the energy gaps obtained from mBJ method agree better with the experimental results than that obtained from local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA), in contrast with substantially overestimated values from many-body perturbation (GW) calculations. As for optical dielectric functions (both real and imaginary parts), refractive index, and extinction coefficients as functions of photon energy, our mBJ calculated results are in excellent agreement with the experimental curves. Our further analysis reveals that these excellent improvements are achieved because mBJ potential describes accurately the energy levels of Ti 3d states. These results should be helpful to understand the high temperature ferromagnetism in doped TiO2. This approach can be used as a standard to understand electronic structures and the related properties of such materials as TiO2.

  11. Recovery of Mars Ionospheric Electron Density Profiles Acquired by the Mariner 9 Radio Occultation Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreri, N. R.; Withers, P.; Weiner, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Mariner 9 radio occultation experiment acquired 118 profiles of dayside ionospheric electron density from 1971-2. Relative to the MGS dataset, which contains the only electron density profiles for Mars that are readily available to the public today, the Mariner 9 dataset has some unique characteristics. Profiles extend to 300-400 km, thereby probing the topside ionosphere better than the MGS profiles that typically terminate around 200 km. Profiles were acquired during the waning phase of a tremendous dust storm, when the ionospheric peak was 20-30 km higher than normal. Profiles are distributed globally, whereas MGS profiles are poleward of 60 degrees north latitude, and sample solar zenith angles as low as 47 degrees, whereas MGS was limited to 71 degrees and higher. We have digitized the Mariner 9 electron density profiles from their microfilm archive. Here we report on archiving plans for these profiles. Since there have been many scientific discoveries at Mars since the last studies of these Mariner 9 data, we also present a preliminary report on scientific analysis of these profiles.

  12. Microwave techniques for electron density measurements in low pressure RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltukhin, Viktor; Gafarov, Ildar; Shemakhin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Results of the experimental studying of RF plasma jet at low pressure in the range of 10 - 300 Pa is presented. The electron density distribution both in inductive and in capacitive coupled RF discharges was measured at 1.76 MHz and 13.56 MHz consequently. We used three independent microwave diagnostic techniques such as free space (the ``two-frequency'' and ``on the cut-off signal'') and a resonator. It is found that the electron density in the RF plasma jets is by 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the decaying plasma jet, and by 1-2 orders of magnitude less than in the RF plasma torch. Thus the RF plasma jet is similar to the additional discharge between the electrodes or the coil and the vacuum chamber walls. As a consequence, the formation of the positive charge sheath near the specimen placed in plasma stream is observed. It is found that the maximum of ionization degree as well as more uniform electron density distribution across the stream is observed in the range of the gas flow rate Gg = 0 . 06 - 0 . 12 g/s and the discharge power Pd = 0 . 5 - 2 . 5 kW. The work was funded by RFBR, according to the research projects No. 16-31-60081 mol_a_dk.

  13. Validity of power functionals for a homogeneous electron gas in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaja, A.; Eich, F. G.; Baldsiefen, T.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-03-01

    Physically valid and numerically efficient approximations for the exchange and correlation energy are critical for reduced-density-matrix-functional theory to become a widely used method in electronic structure calculations. Here we examine the physical limits of power functionals of the form f (n ,n') =(nn')α for the scaling function in the exchange-correlation energy. To this end we obtain numerically the minimizing momentum distributions for the three- and two-dimensional homogeneous electron gas, respectively. In particular, we examine the limiting values for the power α to yield physically sound solutions that satisfy the Lieb-Oxford lower bound for the exchange-correlation energy and exclude pinned states with the condition n (k )<1 for all wave vectors k . The results refine the constraints previously obtained from trial momentum distributions. We also compute the values for α that yield the exact correlation energy and its kinetic part for both the three- and two-dimensional electron gas. In both systems, narrow regimes of validity and accuracy are found at α ≳0.6 and at rs≳10 for the density parameter, corresponding to relatively low densities.

  14. [Investigation on the electron density of a micro-plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-chen; Zhao, Na; Liu, Wei-yuan; Liu, Zhi-qiang

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a micro-hollow cathode discharge setup was used to generate micro-plasma jet in flowing mixture of Ar and N2 at atmospheric pressure. The characteristics of the micro-plasma jet were investigated by means of optical method and electrical one. It has been found that breakdown occurs in the gas between the two electrodes when the input power of electric source is increased to a certain value. Plasma appears along the gas flow direction when the mixed gas flows from the aperture of the micro-hollow cathode, and the length of plasma reaches 4 mm. The discharge current is quasi-continuous, and the duration of discharge pulse is about 0.1 micros. Electron density was studied by using Einstein equation and Stark broadening of spectral lines from the emission spectrum respectively. It was found that the results of electron density calculated by the two methods are consistent with the order of 10(15) x cm(-3). It was also found that the electron density is almost independent of power. A qualitative explanation to the phenomenon is given based on the gas discharge theory.

  15. Topological analysis of aromatic halogen/hydrogen bonds by electron charge density and electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; de las Vallejos, Margarita M; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the intermolecular distribution of the electronic charge density in the aromatic hydrogen/halogen bonds is studied within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) analysis. The study is carried out in nine complexes formed between benzene and simple lineal molecules, where hydrogen, fluorine and chlorine atoms act as bridge atoms. All the results are obtained at MP2 level theory using cc-pVTZ basis set. Attention is focused on topological features observed at the intermolecular region such as bond, ring and cage critical points of the electron density, as well as the bond path, the gradient of the density maps, molecular graphs and interatomic surfaces. The strength of the interaction increases in the following order: F[Symbol: see text]pi < Cl[Symbol: see text]pi < H[Symbol: see text]pi. Our results show that the fluorine atom has the capability to interact with the pi-cloud to form an aromatic halogen bond, as long as the donor group is highly electron withdrawing. The Laplacian topology allows us to state that the halogen atoms can act as nucleophiles as well as electrophiles, showing clearly their dual character.

  16. Nonlocal density functionals and the linear response of the homogeneous electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, I. I.; Singh, D. J.

    1998-03-01

    The known and usable truly nonlocal functionals for exchange-correlation energy of the inhomogeneous electron gas are the ADA (average density approximation) and the WDA (weighted density approximation). ADA, by design, yields the correct linear response function of the uniform electron gas. The WDA is constructed so that it is exact in the opposite limit of one-electron systems, and it was conjectured that the WDA is also accurate in the uniform gas limit. To test this conjecture, we derive an expression for the linear response of the uniform gas in the WDA, and calculate it for several flavors of the WDA. We then compare the results with the Monte Carlo data on the exchange-correlation local-field correction, and identify the weak points of conventional WDA in the homogeneous limit. We suggest how the WDA can be modified to improve the response function. The resulting approximation is a good one in both opposite limits. Future testing should show whether it will also be better than conventional WDA and ADA for practical nonlocal density-functional calculations.

  17. Density-matrix formalism for the photoion-electron entanglement in atomic photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2006-09-15

    The density-matrix theory, based on Dirac's relativistic equation, is applied for studying the entanglement between the photoelectron and residual ion in the course of the photoionization of atoms and ions. In particular, emphasis is placed on deriving the final-state density matrix of the overall system 'photoion+electron', including interelectronic effects and the higher multipoles of the radiation field. This final-state density matrix enables one immediately to analyze the change of entanglement as a function of the energy, angle and the polarization of the incoming light. Detailed computations have been carried out for the 5s photoionization of neutral strontium, leading to a photoion in a 5s {sup 2}S J{sub f}=1/2 level. It is found that the photoion-electron entanglement decreases significantly near the ionization threshold and that, in general, it depends on both the photon energy and angle. The possibility to extract photoion-electron pairs with a well-defined degree of entanglement may have far-reaching consequences for quantum information and elsewhere.

  18. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, III, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-16

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solvemore » the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Lastly, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.« less

  19. Electron density measurements in very electronegative plasmas using different diagnostic techniques: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Lafleur, Trevor; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Very electronegative plasmas (known as ``ion-ion'' plasmas) are used in different applications including material processing, space propulsion and thermonuclear fusion. Diagnostics of ion-ion plasmas can be performed using different probe techniques, including Langmuir and hairpin probes, RF, microwave and optical diagnostics. However, in certain applications (for example, in the electronegative thruster PEGASES), the electron density is too low (<1012m-3) to be reliably measured by these standard techniques. This is further complicated by the presence of strong, non-homogeneous, magnetic fields in the plasma ( 200 G) and the relatively small plasma size (few cm). In this work we compare results achieved with a Langmuir probe, and with an independent measurement of the electron density using a matched dipole probe. Measurements are performed in an SF6 plasma with an electronegativity in the range between a few hundred to a few thousand. We show here that though the model itself can correctly describe the plasma-probe interactions, there is a critical value of plasma electronegativity above which the electron density measured with a Langmuir probe can give only an upper limit estimation.

  20. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  1. Electronic structures of rocksalt, litharge, and herzenbergite SnO by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Aron; Watson, Graeme W.

    2004-12-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on SnO in the litharge, herzenbergite, and rocksalt crystal structures. An asymmetric electron distribution was found around the Sn atoms in litharge and herzenbergite SnO which could be ascribed to a Sn5s2 sterically active “lone pair.” Analysis of the electronic structure shows that the states responsible for the asymmetric Sn electron distribution are due to the coupling of unfilled Sn(5p) with the antibonding combination arising from interaction of Sn(5s) and O(2p) . The coupling of Sn(5p) was found to be active in both the formation of the asymmetric density and the stabilization of the litharge and herzenbergite phases. Due to the symmetry of the interaction the coupling of Sn(5p) with the antibonding states can only take place on distorted Sn sites, explaining the absence of an asymmetry in the rocksalt structure. In contrast to the classical view that the Sn(II) “lone pair” forms directly through hybridization of Sn5s and 5p , our calculations confirm for the first time, through COOP analysis, that it is only through the interaction of the oxygen 2p states that formation of the asymmetric density is achieved.

  2. Hydride vapor phase GaN films with reduced density of residual electrons and deep traps

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Yugova, T. G.; Cox, H.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Usikov, A. S.

    2014-05-14

    Electrical properties and deep electron and hole traps spectra are compared for undoped n-GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) in the regular process (standard HVPE samples) and in HVPE process optimized for decreasing the concentration of residual donor impurities (improved HVPE samples). It is shown that the residual donor density can be reduced by optimization from ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to (2–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. The density of deep hole traps and deep electron traps decreases with decreased donor density, so that the concentration of deep hole traps in the improved samples is reduced to ∼5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} versus 2.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} in the standard samples, with a similar decrease in the electron traps concentration.

  3. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-01

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Finally, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  4. Unbiased reduced density matrices and electronic properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Overy, Catherine; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Booth, George H.; Cleland, Deidre; Alavi, Ali

    2014-12-28

    Properties that are necessarily formulated within pure (symmetric) expectation values are difficult to calculate for projector quantum Monte Carlo approaches, but are critical in order to compute many of the important observable properties of electronic systems. Here, we investigate an approach for the sampling of unbiased reduced density matrices within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo dynamic, which requires only small computational overheads. This is achieved via an independent replica population of walkers in the dynamic, sampled alongside the original population. The resulting reduced density matrices are free from systematic error (beyond those present via constraints on the dynamic itself) and can be used to compute a variety of expectation values and properties, with rapid convergence to an exact limit. A quasi-variational energy estimate derived from these density matrices is proposed as an accurate alternative to the projected estimator for multiconfigurational wavefunctions, while its variational property could potentially lend itself to accurate extrapolation approaches in larger systems.

  5. A high density two-dimensional electron gas in an oxide heterostructure on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, E. N.; Kornblum, L.; Kumah, D. P.; Zou, K.; Walker, F. J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Ngai, J. H.; Ahn, C. H.

    2014-11-01

    We present the growth and characterization of layered heterostructures comprised of LaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} epitaxially grown on Si (001). Magnetotransport measurements show that the sheet carrier densities of the heterostructures scale with the number of LaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces, consistent with the presence of an interfacial 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at each interface. Sheet carrier densities of 8.9 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} per interface are observed. Integration of such high density oxide 2DEGs on silicon provides a bridge between the exceptional properties and functionalities of oxide 2DEGs and microelectronic technologies.

  6. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-08

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  7. A study of density measurements in hypersonic helium tunnels using an electron beam fluorescence technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honaker, W. C.; Hunter, W. W., Jr.; Woods, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the feasibility of using electron-beam fluorescence to measure the free-stream static density of gaseous helium flow over a wide range of conditions. These experiments were conducted in the Langley hypersonic helium tunnel facility and its 3-inch prototype. Measurements were made for a range of stagnation pressures and temperatures and produced free-stream number densities of 1.53 x 10 to the 23rd to 1.25 x 10 to the 24th molecules/cu m and static temperatures from 2 K to 80 K. The results showed the collision quenching cross section to be 4.4 x 10 to the -15th sq cm at 1 K and to have a weak temperature dependence of T to the 1/6. With knowledge of these two values, the free-stream number density can be measured quite accurately.

  8. Unbiased reduced density matrices and electronic properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Overy, Catherine; Booth, George H; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Cleland, Deidre; Alavi, Ali

    2014-12-28

    Properties that are necessarily formulated within pure (symmetric) expectation values are difficult to calculate for projector quantum Monte Carlo approaches, but are critical in order to compute many of the important observable properties of electronic systems. Here, we investigate an approach for the sampling of unbiased reduced density matrices within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo dynamic, which requires only small computational overheads. This is achieved via an independent replica population of walkers in the dynamic, sampled alongside the original population. The resulting reduced density matrices are free from systematic error (beyond those present via constraints on the dynamic itself) and can be used to compute a variety of expectation values and properties, with rapid convergence to an exact limit. A quasi-variational energy estimate derived from these density matrices is proposed as an accurate alternative to the projected estimator for multiconfigurational wavefunctions, while its variational property could potentially lend itself to accurate extrapolation approaches in larger systems.

  9. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2-215 solar radii and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances of about 20 solar radii the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrum is well modeled by a single power law in the frequency range 0.0001-0.05 Hz. The flattening of the density spectrum within 20 solar radii is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind.

  10. Structural, Electronic and Dynamical Properties of Curium Monopnictides: Density Functional Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roondhe, Basant; Upadhyay, Deepak; Som, Narayan; Pillai, Sharad B.; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-01-01

    The structural, electronic, dynamical and thermodynamical properties of CmX (X = N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) compounds are studied using first principles calculations within density functional theory. The Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof spin polarized generalized gradient approximation and Perdew-Wang (PW) spin polarized local density approximation as the exchange correlational functionals are used in these calculations. There is a good agreement between the present and previously reported data. The calculated electronic density of states suggests that the curium monopnictides are metallic in nature, which is consistent with earlier studies. The significant values of magnetic moment suggest their magnetic nature. The phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states are also calculated, which depict the dynamical stability of these compounds. There is a significant separation between the optical and acoustical phonon branches. The temperature dependence of the thermodynamical functions are also calculated and discussed. Internal energy and vibrational contribution to the Helmholtz free energy increases and decreases, respectively, with temperature. The entropy increases with temperature. The specific heat at constant volume and Debye temperature obey Debye theory. The temperature variation of the considered thermodynamical functions is in line with those of other crystalline solids.

  11. Magnesium: Comparison of density functional theory calculations with electron and x-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, J.; Madsen, G. K. H.; Larsen, F. K.; Jiang, B.; Marthinsen, K.; Holmestad, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accurate experimental structure factors for Mg have been measured and compared with density functional theory (DFT) to test some commonly used functionals and self-interaction correction (SIC) schemes. Low order structure factors, free of extinction and on absolute scale, were measured accurately by quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction. In addition, a complete set of structure factors up to sin θ/λ=1.6 Å-1 was measured by x-ray diffraction at 10 K. The DFT calculations were performed using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. It was found that the agreement with experiment increases when going from the local density approximation (LDA) to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhofer and further to the GGA of Engel and Vosko. Applying the SIC of Perdew and Zunger to the core states for LDA does not improve the agreement with theory, while applying the SIC of Lundin and Eriksson results in a significantly improved agreement. This implies that the main source of error in the LDA functional comes from the description of the core densities. Using the functional which agrees best with experiment, a non-nuclear maximum is established in the calculated electron density of beryllium but not of magnesium.

  12. Structural, Electronic and Dynamical Properties of Curium Monopnictides: Density Functional Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roondhe, Basant; Upadhyay, Deepak; Som, Narayan; Pillai, Sharad B.; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-03-01

    The structural, electronic, dynamical and thermodynamical properties of CmX (X = N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) compounds are studied using first principles calculations within density functional theory. The Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof spin polarized generalized gradient approximation and Perdew-Wang (PW) spin polarized local density approximation as the exchange correlational functionals are used in these calculations. There is a good agreement between the present and previously reported data. The calculated electronic density of states suggests that the curium monopnictides are metallic in nature, which is consistent with earlier studies. The significant values of magnetic moment suggest their magnetic nature. The phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states are also calculated, which depict the dynamical stability of these compounds. There is a significant separation between the optical and acoustical phonon branches. The temperature dependence of the thermodynamical functions are also calculated and discussed. Internal energy and vibrational contribution to the Helmholtz free energy increases and decreases, respectively, with temperature. The entropy increases with temperature. The specific heat at constant volume and Debye temperature obey Debye theory. The temperature variation of the considered thermodynamical functions is in line with those of other crystalline solids.

  13. Distributions and averages of electron density parameters: Explaining the effects of gradient corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the electron densities n(r) of atoms, molecules, solids, and surfaces. The distributions of values of the Seitz radius rs=(3/4πn)1/3 and the reduced density gradient s=|∇n|/(2(3π2)1/3n4/3) in an electron density indicate which ranges of these variables are significant for physical processes. We also define energy-weighted averages of these variables, and , from which local spin density (LSD) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation energies may be estimated. The changes in these averages upon rearrangement of the nuclei (atomization of molecules or solids, stretching of bond lengths or lattice parameters, change of crystal structure, etc.) are used to explain why GGA corrects LSD in the way it does. A thermodynamic-like inequality (essentially d/>d/2) determines whether the gradient corrections drive a process forward. We use this analysis to explain why gradient corrections usually stretch bonds (but not for example H-H bonds), reduce atomization and surface energies, and raise energy barriers to formation at transition states.

  14. Plasma Wave and Electron Density Structure Observed in the Cusp with a Dual-Rocket Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S.; Cairns, I.

    2008-12-01

    The Twin Rockets to Investigate Cusp Electrodynamics (TRICE) were launched on December 10, 2007, from Andoya Research Range in Andenes, Norway, into the active cusp. Both payloads traveled north over Svalbard, with one payload reaching an apogee of ~1100 km, and the other reaching ~600 km. The payloads were separated by 100-400 km during the main portion of the flight. Both payloads included waveform receivers with 5 MHz bandwidth. These recorded several distinct types of auroral waves including whistler mode waves below ~1000 kHz and Langmuir-upper hybrid waves at 300-3000 kHz for several hundred km. Both payloads concurrently encountered a distinct period of Langmuir turbulence. Clearly defined wave cutoffs provide measurements of electron density and reveal significant density structure with density enhancements having amplitudes up to 100 percent and scale sizes from meters to tens of kilometers. Analysis of the inferred density profiles using windowed Fourier Transforms or Lomb-Scargle periodograms generates dynamic spectra of the density, which provide estimates of the spectral composition of the density irregularities for time intervals sufficiently short that the stationarity of the spectra can be investigated. The large-scale structures through which the two payloads propagated were measured by both the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars as well as by all-sky cameras operated at Longyearbyen and Ny-Alesund on Svalbard. Using this data when available, comparison of the density irregularity waveforms and spectra from the two flights is studied in relation to spatial and altitude variations of the turbulence. This examination of wave and density structures and the large scale formations with which they are associated will add to the understanding of the large scale electrodynamics of the cusp region.

  15. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_s<0.14, and propagate in the electron drift direction. Their spectral emergence coincides with a sharp decrease in fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  16. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Habenicht, Bradley F; Tani, Noriyuki P; Provorse, Makenzie R; Isborn, Christine M

    2014-11-14

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S0 state and the doubly-excited S2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation.

  17. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  18. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm(-1). The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  19. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  20. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L.; Gill, Peter M. W. Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids — the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) — and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  1. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres.

    PubMed

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L; Gill, Peter M W; Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids - the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) - and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  2. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-01-17

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 10(20) neutrons cm(-)(2) The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 10(22) m(-3)) and dislocation density (7.8 × 10(13) m m(-)(3)) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments.

  3. Generation of Superponderomotive Electrons in Multipicosecond Interactions of Kilojoule Laser Beams with Solid-Density Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Sorokovikova, A; Arefiev, A V; McGuffey, C; Qiao, B; Robinson, A P L; Wei, M S; McLean, H S; Beg, F N

    2016-04-15

    The interaction of a multipicosecond, kilojoule laser pulse with a surface of a solid target has been shown to produce electrons with energies far beyond the free-electron ponderomotive limit m_{e}c^{2}a_{0}^{2}/2. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that an increase in the pulse duration from 1 to 10 ps leads to the formation of a low-density shelf (about 10% of the critical density). The shelf extends over 100  μm toward the vacuum side, with a nonstationary potential barrier forming in that area. Electrons reflected from the barrier gain superponderomotive energy from the potential. Some electrons experience an even greater energy gain due to ponderomotive acceleration when their "dephasing rate" R=γ-p_{x}/m_{e}c drops well below unity, thus increasing acceleration by a factor of 1/R. Both 1D and 2D simulations indicate that these mechanisms are responsible for the generation of extensive thermal distributions with T_{e}>10  MeV and a high-energy cutoff of hundreds of MeV.

  4. On the interaction of energetic electrons with a tearing mode in density-sweeping tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erzhong; Lin, S.; Shen, B.; Hu, L.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed study on the interaction between energetic electrons and the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode (m, n are respectively the poloidal and toroidal mode number) which was investigated in a deliberate experiment via actively controlling the bulk electron density (Li et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 042001). Energetic electrons were generated by the residual loop voltage in the ohmically heated plasma where periodic bursts of magnetic perturbations were frequently observed. The frequency evolution of the mode is similar to the well-known fishbone (m/n = 1/1) or the ‘off-axis’ fishbone in high-beta plasma (Heidbrink et al 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 085028), but demonstrates the characteristic of a tearing mode. In particular, it can increase the average intensity of H-alpha radiation as the mode grows, which is distinctive from the following oscillatory phase. The dynamics of the mode are strongly influenced by the increasing background electron density, suggesting a collisionality dependence. This qualitatively agrees with the prediction of a drift kinetic theory.

  5. Measurement of solar wind electron density and temperature in the shocked region of Venus and the density and temperature of photoelectrons within the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, William C.; Jones, Douglas E.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Knadler, Charles E.

    2016-08-01

    Presented herein are measurements of the solar wind electron number density and temperature near and within the bow shock of Venus. The measurements were made by the Pioneer Venus mission Orbiter Retarding Potential Analyzer operating in its suprathermal electron mode. The measurements are essentially point measurements. The spacecraft travels approximately 0.8 km during the 0.1 s time interval required to record a single I-V curve. The dual measurement of a density and temperature is obtained from one sweep by least squares fitting a mathematical Maxwellian expression to the I-V curve. The distance between successive measurements is approximately 100 km. In many orbits, when the spacecraft is crossing or traveling within the bow shock, the derived densities and temperatures (high density, high temperature (HDHT)) are large, densities of the order of 100 cm-3 and temperatures of the order of several hundred eV. We interpret these HDHT measurements as measurements in regions where the large, directed kinetic energy of the solar wind ions is being degraded into randomized, more thermal-like energy distributions of the electrons and ions through wave-particle interactions. The HDHT values define the electron energy distribution in the limited energy interval 0 to 50 eV. We assume that the underlying electron flux distributions are flat topped like those measured in the Earth's bow shock. We also report densities and temperatures of EUV produced photoelectron energy distributions measured within the ionosphere.

  6. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  7. Electronic-structure calculations of praseodymium metal by means of modified density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Trygg, J.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O. |

    1997-09-01

    Electronic-structure calculations of elemental praseodymium are presented. Several approximations are used to describe the Pr f electrons. It is found that the low-pressure, trivalent phase is well described using either the self-interaction corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) with spin and orbital polarization (OP). In the SIC-LSD approach the Pr f electrons are treated explicitly as localized with a localization energy given by the self-interaction of the f orbital. In the GGA+OP scheme the f-electron localization is described by the onset of spin and orbital polarization, the energetics of which is described by spin-moment formation energy and a term proportional to the total orbital moment, L{sub z}{sup 2}. The high-pressure phase is well described with the f electrons treated as band electrons, in either the LSD or the GGA approximations, of which the latter describes more accurately the experimental equation of state. The calculated pressure of the transition from localized to delocalized behavior is 280 kbar in the SIC-LSD approximation and 156 kbar in the GGA+OP approach, both comparing favorably with the experimentally observed transition pressure of 210 kbar. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Counterintuitive electron localisation from density-functional theory with polarisable solvent models

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Stephen G.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-11-14

    Exploration of the solvated electron phenomena using density-functional theory (DFT) generally results in prediction of a localised electron within an induced solvent cavity. However, it is well known that DFT favours highly delocalised charges, rendering the localisation of a solvated electron unexpected. We explore the origins of this counterintuitive behaviour using a model Kevan-structure system. When a polarisable-continuum solvent model is included, it forces electron localisation by introducing a strong energetic bias that favours integer charges. This results in the formation of a large energetic barrier for charge-hopping and can cause the self-consistent field to become trapped in local minima thus converging to stable solutions that are higher in energy than the ground electronic state. Finally, since the bias towards integer charges is caused by the polarisable continuum, these findings will also apply to other classical polarisation corrections, as in combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. The implications for systems beyond the solvated electron, including cationic DNA bases, are discussed.

  9. Lineshape, linewidth and spectral density of parametric x-radiation at low electron energy in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberger, J.; Genz, H.; Morokhovskii, V.V.; Richter, A.; Morokhovskii, V.L.; Nething, U.; Zahn, R.; Sellschop, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Applying an absorber technique, the experimental shape and width of a parametric x-radiation line has been determined. The 9 keV radiation was produced by bombarding a diamond crystal of 55 {mu}m thickness with electrons of 6.8 MeV. The variance of the spectral line distribution was found to depend on the tilt angle of the crystal and to have a magnitude of {sigma}=51 eV. Simulations based on a Monte Carlo method exhibit that the observed variance is mainly influenced by multiple scattering of electrons passing through the crystal ({approx}43 eV) and the finite detector opening ({approx}18 eV), leaving for the intrinsic linewidth a value of the order of 1 eV. The spectral density of the line was found to be J{approx}10{sup {minus}7} photons/(electron{times}sr{times}eV). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Structural and electronic properties of small silver-sulfur clusters: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Fang; Li, Yang; Li, Ying; Tan, Jia-Jin; Li, Hui-Li

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of neutral and anionic AgnSm (2≤n+m≤6) clusters. The results show that the ground-state structures of neutral clusters are different from those of anionic clusters. Theoretical electron detachment energies (both vertical and adiabatic) are compared with the experimental measurements to verify the ground states of silver-sulfur clusters obtained in the present study. For both neutral and anionic systems, the highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy gaps exhibit an odd-even oscillation as a function of the cluster size. In addition, the natural population analysis reveals that the charges transfer from Ag atoms to S atoms in AgnSm clusters, and the extra electron of AgnSm- clusters is mainly localized on the 3p subshells of S atoms.

  11. Alkali-metal electron spin density shift induced by a helium nanodroplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-04-01

    Helium (He) nanodroplets provide a cold and virtually unperturbing environment for the study of weakly bound molecules and van der Waals aggregates. High resolution microwave spectroscopy and the detection of electron spin transitions in doped He droplets have recently become possible. Measurements of hyperfine-resolved electron spin resonance in potassium (39K) and rubidium (85Rb) atoms on the surface of He droplets show small line shifts relative to the bare atoms. These shifts were recorded for all 2I + 1 components (I is the nuclear spin) of a transition at high accuracy for He droplets ranging in size from 1000 to 15,000 He atoms. Evaluation of the spectra yields the influence of the He environment on the electron spin density at the alkali-metal nucleus. A semi-empirical model is presented that shows good qualitative agreement with the measured droplet size dependent increase of Fermi contact interaction at the nuclei of dopant K and Rb.

  12. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  13. Development and Miniaturization of RF based probes for Electron Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    To make a diagnostics on plasmas for materials processing plasmas accompanying with deposition of non-conducting films in etching and/or CVD processes, curling probe (CP) with a spiral slot antenna has been recently developed as a compact diagnostic tool which enables the local electron density measurement. The electron density is obtained from a shift of the probe resonance frequency in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). A conventional CP has a diameter larger than 15 mm typically, because a slot length of the CP is as long as several tens millimeters for its resonance frequency less than several GHz. Further miniaturization of the CP was required to expand applicable range to various plasma sources like a narrow-gap parallel plate discharge. We tried miniaturization of the CP down to less than 3 mm in the probe diameter by fabricating narrow spiral slot antenna, and experimentally and numerically the miniaturized probe was investigated how much influence the slot width has on probe resonance characteristics and electron density measurements. In the case of the conventional CP made of stainless steel, 0.3-mm-wide normal slot antenna, the resonance spectra was clearly observed regardless of antenna materials of copper or stainless steel (SS). However, when the slot width was reduced down to 0.03 mm, the slot resonance was strongly dependent on the antenna materials. Namely the resonance peak was almost vanished for the SS antenna, whereas clearly appeared for the copper antenna. In general, the narrower the slot is, the higher attenuation factor the slot has for electromagnetic wave propagating along the slot. In such an attenuated transmission line of the narrow slot, high electric conductivity of the antenna seems preferable for the slot resonance. Furthermore, the miniaturized CP with the copper antenna was also introduced into low pressure (< 1Pa) Ar plasma. The resonance frequency was confirmed to changes sensitively with electron

  14. Electron density and temperature in the solar corona from multifrequency radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Chambe, G.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The 2D images obtained through rotational aperture synthesis with the Nançay Radioheliograph are suitable for quantitative exploitation. First results are presented. Aims: We study the variations of the quiet corona in brightness and size during an 8-year period and derive electron density and temperature in the corona. Methods: Images at 6 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz for 183 quiet days between 2004 and 2011 were used. Measurements of the brightness temperature Tb beyond the limb allowed coronal density models to be derived in both EW and NS radial directions, with a weak dependence on the electron temperature. The total ranges in the heliocentric distance r are 1.15-1.60 R⊙ (EW) and 1.0-1.4 R⊙ (NS). The agreement between results from different frequencies, in the ranges of r where there is overlapping shows the robustness of the method. The electron temperature, in turn, can be derived from the comparison of the observed mean spectra on the disk with those predicted through transfer calculations from the density models derived from limb observations. Results: The widths of the brightness profiles that were averaged yearly have minima at cycle minimum (2008-2009). These minima are more pronounced for EW profiles than for NS ones. The derived yearly-averaged density models along equatorial and polar diameters are consistent with isothermal and hydrostatic models. They are characterized by their density value n0 extrapolated down to the base of the corona and their scale-height temperature TH. Changes in n0 and TH with solar cycle are given for equatorial and polar regions. The kinetic temperature Te of electrons in the corona (~0.62 MK) is found to be significantly less than TH (~1.5 MK). This implies an ion temperature Ti ~ 2.2 MK. Conclusions: The yearly-averaged variations of these models are less than the dispersion between models derived from other techniques, such as white light and EUV observations, partly because these two techniques

  15. Nonlinear Upshift of Trapped Electron Mode Critical Density Gradient: Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. R.

    2012-10-01

    A new nonlinear critical density gradient for pure trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence increases strongly with collisionality, saturating at several times the linear threshold. The nonlinear TEM threshold appears to limit the density gradient in new experiments subjecting Alcator C-Mod internal transport barriers to modulated radio-frequency heating. Gyrokinetic simulations show the nonlinear upshift of the TEM critical density gradient is associated with long-lived zonal flow dominated states [1]. This introduces a strong temperature dependence that allows external RF heating to control TEM turbulent transport. During pulsed on-axis heating of ITB discharges, core electron temperature modulations of 50% were produced. Bursts of line-integrated density fluctuations, observed on phase contrast imaging, closely follow modulations of core electron temperature inside the ITB foot. Multiple edge fluctuation measurements show the edge response to modulated heating is out of phase with the core response. A new limit cycle stability diagram shows the density gradient appears to be clamped during on-axis heating by the nonlinear TEM critical density gradient, rather than by the much lower linear threshold. Fluctuation wavelength spectra will be quantitatively compared with nonlinear TRINITY/GS2 gyrokinetic transport simulations, using an improved synthetic diagnostic. In related work, we are implementing the first gyrokinetic exact linearized Fokker Planck collision operator [2]. Initial results show short wavelength TEMs are fully stabilized by finite-gyroradius collisional effects for realistic collisionalities. The nonlinear TEM threshold and its collisionality dependence may impact predictions of density peaking based on quasilinear theory, which excludes zonal flows.[4pt] In collaboration with M. Churchill, A. Dominguez, C. L. Fiore, Y. Podpaly, M. L. Reinke, J. Rice, J. L. Terry, N. Tsujii, M. A. Barnes, I. Bespamyatnov, R. Granetz, M. Greenwald, A. Hubbard, J. W

  16. Insights into the crystal chemistry of Earth materials rendered by electron density distributions: Pauling's rules revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2014-05-20

    Pauling's first two rules are examined in terms of the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms for a relatively large number of oxide and silicate crystals and siloxane molecules. The distribution of the electron density shows that the radius of the oxygen atom is not fixed, but that it actually decreases systematically from ~1.40 Å to ~ 0.65 Å as the polarizing power and the electronegativity of the bonded metal atoms increase and the distribution of the O atom is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors by the impact of the bonded interactions. The contractions result in an aspherical oxygen atom that displays as many different bonded “radii” as it has bonded interactions. The bonded radii for the metal atoms match the Shannon and Prewitt ionic radii for the more electropositive atoms like potassium and sodium, but they are systematically larger for the more electronegative atoms like aluminum, silicon and phosphorous. Pauling's first rule is based on the assumption that the radius of the oxide anion is fixed and that the radii of the cations are such that radius sum of the spherical oxide anion and a cation necessarily equals the separation between the cation-anion bonded pair with the coordination number of the cation being determined by the ratio of the radii of the cation and anion. In the case of the bonded radii, the sum of the bonded radii for the metal atoms and the oxide anion necessarily equals the bond lengths by virtue of the way that the bonded radii were determined in the partitioning of the electron density along the bond path into metal and O atom parts. But, the radius ratio for the O and M atoms is an unsatisfactory rule for determining the coordination number of the metal atom inasmuch as a bonded O atom is not, in general, spherical, and its size varies substantially along its bonded directions. But by counting the number of bond paths that radiate from a bonded atom, the coordination

  17. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Helle, M.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ˜1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called "bucket jumping" where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  18. ConfMatch: automating electron-density map interpretation by matching conformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, C E

    2000-12-01

    Building a protein model from the initial three-dimensional electron-density distribution (density map) is an important task in X-ray crystallography. This problem is computationally challenging because proteins are extremely flexible. The algorithm ConfMatch is a global real-space fitting procedure in torsion-angle space. It solves this 'map-interpretation' problem by matching a detailed conformation of the molecule to the density map (conformational matching). This 'best-match' structure is defined as one which maximizes the sum of the density at atom positions. ConfMatch is a practical systematic algorithm based on a branch-and-bound search. The most important idea of ConfMatch is an efficient method for computing accurate bounds. ConfMatch relaxes the conformational matching problem, a problem which can only be solved in exponential time, into one which can be solved in polynomial time. The solution to the relaxed problem is a guaranteed upper bound for the conformational matching problem. In most empirical cases, these bounds are accurate enough to prune the search space dramatically, enabling ConfMatch to solve structures with more than 100 free dihedral angles. Experiments have shown that ConfMatch may be able to automate the interpretation of density maps of small proteins.

  19. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Chunxiu

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  20. The 10 sheath-accelerated electrons and ions. [atmospheric models of plasma sheaths and ionospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A model is presented that suggests that plasma sheaths form between the ionospheric plasma moving with Io and the ambient plasma corotating with Jupiter. Potentials across these sheaths could be as high as 580 kV which is the motional emf across Io's ionosphere. Electrons and ions can be accelerated across these sheaths. The sheaths may exist at the top of the Io ionosphere with characteristic thicknesses of 1/4 kilometers. The model is consistent with the Pioneer observations of 0.15 MeV electrons at the inner edge of Io's L-shell and the enhanced number density of low-energy protons at the outer edge. Ion sputtering of the Io surface is discussed and may explain the presence of atomic hydrogen and sodium in the vicinity of Io. Also these accelerated particles may be important to the formation of the Io ionosphere. High electron flux which may lead to decametric radio emissions, Jovian atmospheric heating and optical and X-ray emissions is also discussed.

  1. Exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePrince, A. Eugene; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The parametric variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method is applied to computing electronic correlation energies of medium-to-large molecular systems by exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the framework of the cluster-in-molecule (CIM) approximation [S. Li et al., J. Comput. Chem. 23, 238 (2002); J. Chem. Phys. 125, 074109 (2006)]. The 2-RDMs of individual molecular fragments within a molecule are determined, and selected portions of these 2-RDMs are recombined to yield an accurate approximation to the correlation energy of the entire molecule. In addition to extending CIM to the parametric 2-RDM method, we (i) suggest a more systematic selection of atomic-orbital domains than that presented in previous CIM studies and (ii) generalize the CIM method for open-shell quantum systems. The resulting method is tested with a series of polyacetylene molecules, water clusters, and diazobenzene derivatives in minimal and nonminimal basis sets. Calculations show that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with system size. We also compute hydrogen-abstraction energies for a series of hydroxyurea derivatives. Abstraction of hydrogen from hydroxyurea is thought to be a key step in its treatment of sickle cell anemia; the design of hydroxyurea derivatives that oxidize more rapidly is one approach to devising more effective treatments.

  2. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: Two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lobayan, Rosana M.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2014-05-07

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH{sub 5}{sup +}), ethonium (C{sub 2}H{sub 7}{sup +}), and protonated alkanes n−C{sub 4}H{sub 11}{sup +} isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  3. Predicting stored grain insect population densities using an electronic probe trap.

    PubMed

    Flinn, P W; Opit, G P; Throne, J E

    2009-08-01

    Manual sampling of insects in stored grain is a laborious and time-consuming process. Automation of grain sampling should help to increase the adoption of stored grain integrated pest management. A new commercial electronic grain probe trap (OPI Insector) has recently been marketed. We field tested OPI Insector electronic grain probes in two bins, each containing 32.6 tonnes of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., over a 2-yr period. We developed new statistical models to convert Insector catch into insects per kilogram. We compared grain sample estimates of insect density (insects per kilogram of wheat) taken near each Insector to the model-predicted insect density by using Insector counts. An existing expert system, Stored Grain Advisor Pro, was modified to automatically read the Insector database and use the appropriate model to estimate Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens), Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) density from trap catch counts. Management decisions using Insector trap-catch estimates for insect density were similar to those made using grain sample estimates of insect density for most sampling dates. However, because of the similarity in size of R. dominica and T. castaneum, the software was unable to differentiate counts between these two species. In the central and southern portions of the United States, where both species frequently occur, it may be necessary to determine the proportion of each species present in the grain by manual inspection of trap catch. The combination of SGA Pro with the OPI Insector system should prove to be a useful tool for automatic monitoring of insect pests in stored grain.

  4. Matched dipole probe for magnetized low electron density laboratory plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a diagnostic method for magnetized and unmagnetized laboratory plasma is proposed, based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole. The range of the measured electron densities is limited to low density plasmas (10{sup 12}–10{sup 15 }m{sup −3}), where other diagnostic methods have strong limitations on the magnetic field strength and topology, plasma dimensions, and boundary conditions. The method is designed for use in both large- and small-dimension plasma (<10 cm) without or with strong non-homogeneous magnetic field, which can be undefined within the probe size. The design of a matched dipole probe allows to suppress the sheath resonance effects and to reach high sensitivity at relatively small probe dimensions. Validation experiments are conducted in both magnetized (B ∼ 170 G) and unmagnetized (B = 0) low density (7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}) low pressure (1 mTorr) 10 cm scale plasmas. The experimentally measured data show very good agreement with an analytical theory both for a non-magnetized and a magnetized case. The electron density measured by the matched dipole and Langmuir probes in the range of 7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3} show less than 30% difference. An experimentally measured tolerance/uncertainty of the dipole probe method is estimated to ±1% for plasma densities above 2 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}. A spatial resolution is estimated from the experiments to be about 3d, where d is the dipole diameter. The diagnostic method is also validated by comparing the measured plasma impedance curves with results of analytical modelling.

  5. Detection of F-region electron density irregularities using incoherent-scatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudivada, Krishna Prasad

    Incoherent-scatter radar data from Poker Flat, Alaska has been used to determine size distributions of electron density structures in the evening time sector of the auroral zone. At high latitudes ionospheric plasma typically moves east-west with speeds of several hundred meters per second. Density irregularities that rapidly move through the radar beam are therefore observed as time-varying power fluctuations. The new phased array radar used for this study has been operated with several antenna directions with successive pulses transmitted in each direction. It is therefore possible to observe plasma Doppler velocities in multiple directions and determine the vector direction of the plasma motion. This near-simultaneous observation of the plasma velocity in conjunction with the electron density height profile data enable a new technique to determine the scale sizes of electron density fluctuations that move horizontally through the radar beam. The study focuses on the collision-less F-region ionosphere where the plasma drift is approximately constant with altitude. The experimental technique limits the range of scale sizes that may be studied to relatively large-scale sizes (i.e. greater than few tens of km). Results show that during magnetically disturbed conditions (Kp ≥ 4) when westward plasma velocities are relatively high (500-1000 m/s) the scale sizes of irregularities (often called plasma blobs) are in the range of 100-300 km and predominantly originate from the polar cap and are transported over long distances (˜1000 km) due to the long chemical recombination times (30-90 minutes). Some irregularities are caused by local auroral particle precipitation and have been identified with associated electron temperature enhancements. For cases of low magnetic activity (Kp ≤ 1), when the radar is located in a region of low plasma velocities (100-500 m/s) well south of the auroral oval (essentially a mid-latitude type ionosphere), the density distribution is

  6. Extracting the density profile of an electronic wave function in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Erin E.; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2011-11-01

    We use a model of a one-dimensional nanowire quantum dot to demonstrate the feasibility of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) imaging technique that can extract both the energy of an electron state and the amplitude of its wave function using a single instrument. This imaging technique can probe electrons that are buried beneath the surface of a low-dimensional semiconductor structure and provide valuable information for the design of quantum devices. A conducting SPM tip, acting as a movable gate, measures the energy of an electron state using Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. When the tip is close to the nanowire dot, it dents the wave function Ψ(x) of the quantum state, changing the electron's energy by an amount proportional to |Ψ(x)|2. By recording the change in energy as the SPM tip is moved along the length of the dot, the density profile of the electronic wave function can be found along the length of the quantum dot.

  7. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-09-01

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  8. Scalable sub-micron patterning of organic materials toward high density soft electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung -Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong -Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun -Hi; Noh, Yong -Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong -Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. As a result, the successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  9. Scalable sub-micron patterning of organic materials toward high density soft electronics

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung -Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; ...

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. Inmore » this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. As a result, the successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.« less

  10. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Yun Jaung, Jae; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kyu Park, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics. PMID:26411932

  11. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  12. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Jaung, Jae Yun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  13. Measuring atomic oxygen densities and electron properties in an Inductively Coupled Plasma for thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, David; Gibson, Andrew; Booth, Jean-Paul; Wagenaars, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Plasma Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PE-PLD) is an advanced way of depositing thin films of oxide materials by using a laser to ablate a target, and passing the resulting plasma plume through a background Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP), instead of a background gas as is done in traditional PLD. The main advantage of PE-PLD is the control of film stoichiometry via the direct control of the reactive oxygen species in the ICP instead of relying on a neutral gas background. The aim is to deposit zinc oxide films from a zinc metal target and an oxygen ICP. In this work, we characterise the range of compositions of the reactive oxygen species achievable in ICPs; in particular the atomic oxygen density. The density of atomic oxygen has been determined within two ICPs of two different geometries over a range of plasma powers and pressures with the use of Energy Resolved Actinometry (ERA). ERA is a robust diagnostic technique with determines both the dissociation degree and average electron energy by comparing the excitation ratios of two oxygen and one argon transition. Alongside this the electron densities have been determined with the use of a hairpin probe. This work received financial support from the EPSRC, and York-Paris CIRC.

  14. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  15. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  16. Large-amplitude electron density and Hα fluctuations in the sustained spheromak physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.; Wurden, G. A.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Woodruff, S.

    2002-06-01

    New types of toroidally rotating fluctuations (toroidal mode numbers n = 1 and n = 2) of line-integrated electron density and Hα emission, with frequencies ranging from 10 to 100 kHz, are observed in the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX). The rotating directions of these fluctuations are the same as the direction determined by E×B, while the E and B directions are determined by the gun voltage and gun magnetic flux polarities, respectively. These results take advantage of one distinctive signature of spheromaks, i.e. it is possible to observe toroidal MHD activity during decay and sustainment at any toroidal angle. A theoretical constraint on line-integrated measurement is proposed and is found to be consistent with experimental observations. Fluctuation analysis in the time and frequency domains indicates that the observed density and Hα fluctuations correlate with magnetic modes. Observation of Hα fluctuations correlating with magnetic fluctuations indicates that, at least in some cases, MHD n = 1 modes are due to the so-called `dough-hook' current paths that connect the coaxial gun to the flux conserver, rather than internal kink instabilities. These results also show that electron density and Hα emission diagnostics complement other tools for spheromak mode study.

  17. Effect of rare earth substitution in the density of electronic states of LnOFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Saravia Ortíz de Montellano, A.; Mustre de León, J.; Saini, N. L.; Bianconi, A.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of the Fe K-edge x-ray absorption near edge (XANES) spectra of LnOFeAs (Ln being a lanthanide) high Tc superconductors exhibit significant changes in the pre-edge peak region upon rare earth substitution. Ab initio XANES calculations, based on the local structure centered at the Fe site obtained by crystallographic investigations, reproduce the observed changes in the spectra, indicating variations of the Fe d-local unoccupied electronic states. The calculated Fe